Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa on July 24, 1974 · Page 11
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July 24, 1974

Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa · Page 11

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Carroll, Iowa
Issue Date:
Wednesday, July 24, 1974
Page:
Page 11
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Legal Notice IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF IOWA IN AND FOR CARROLL COUNTY NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTOR. AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS Probate No. 10765 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Veronica N. Maher Deceased. TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF Veronica N. Maher Deceased: You are hereby notified that on the 23rd day of July, 1974, the last will and testament of Veronica N. Maher deceased bearing date of the 22nd day of April, 1974, was admitted to probate in the above named court and that Joseph White was appointed executor of said estate. Notice Is further given that any action to set aside said will must be brought in the district court of said county within one year from the date of the second publication of this notice, or thereafter be forever barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to said estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned, and creditors having claims against said estate shall file them with the clerk of the above named district court, as provided by law, duly authenticated, for allowance; and unless so filed within six months from the second publication of this notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid) such claim shall thereafter be forever barred. Dated this 23rd day of July, 1974. Joseph White Executor of said Estate Route t Westside, Iowa Ralph M. Crane Attorney for said Executor Carroll, Iowa Alfred J. Klocke Clerk of the District Court Court House, Carroll, Iowa Date of second publication 31st day of July, 1974. July 24,31, 1974 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF IOWA IN AND FOR CARROLL COUNTY NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS Probate No. 10759 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Wilbert W. Kerr Deceased. TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF Wilbert W. Kerr Deceased: You are hereby notified that on the 16th day of July, 1974, the last will and testament of Wilbert W. Kerr deceased bearing date of the 16th day of June, 1970, was admitted to probate in the above named court and that Mary V. Kerr was appointed executor of said estate. Notice is further given that any action to set aside said will must be brought in the district court of said' county within one year from the date of the second publication of this notice, or thereafter be forever; barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to said estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned, and creditors having claims against said estate shall file them with the clerk of the above named district court, as provided by law, duly authenticated, for allowance; and unless so filed within six months from the second publication of this notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid) such claim shall thereafter be forever barred. Dated this 16th day of July, 1974. Mary V. Kerr • ••• Executor of said Estate ••••••• Rt. 1, Box 126 Lohrville, Iowa Taylor, Taylor 8, Feilmeyer Attorneys for said Executor Box 37 Guthrie Center, Iowa 50115 Alfred J. Klocke Clerk of the District Court Court House, Carroll, Iowa Date of second publication 24th day of July, 1974. • July 17, 24, 1974 Soil Survey J Time* Herald, Carroll, la. ^Continued From Page t> Wednesday. July 24, 1 974 « « II Sharp Boosts SIDE OUNCES Profits for by Gill Fox CARNIVAL by Dick Turner Iowa a place to grow Kirk Johnson — will conduct the survey. The three will have an office in the USDA building on Heires Avenue, Carroll, and will work closely with the Soil Conservation Service office here. The scientists will cover the county acre-by-acre, taking samples of at least a four-foot depth. The three will do some on-the-spot testing of soils, but will send most to ISU. They will do field work in the spring and summer months and will plot their findings on aerial photographs in wintertime. The survey will be financed by the federal, state and county governments on an equal basis, with a total cost now estimated at $160,000. The costs could have been borne completely by the state and federal governments, Gesell said, but the survey wouldn't be started for another "20 or 25 years.'' Gesell said the possibility of the survey was talked about eight years ago. The county conference board "got the ball rolling" in July 1970, he added, when they approved spending the money for the survey. Twenty-one Iowa counties have published soil surveys and 26 more have surveys completed but not published, according to Lacy Harmon, soil conservation service soil scientist, as reported in the July 13 Wallace's Farmer magazine. Seventeen counties are in the process of surveying soils and 16 to 20 others will begin within six years, Harmon said. The magazine said that if four counties finish surveys each year, the entire state should be surveyed by 1986. Talking about those who would use the surveys, Gesell said land aprraisers have "any numbe 1 of reasons for wanting soils Jata," including "credit purposes, investment, home or business sites" or for taxation purposes. Numerous Iowa counties are using it in tax assessments and equalization." Engineers could use the soil survey to locate proper sites for the construction of highways, railroads, gas or oil pipelines, dams or buildings, Gesell said. Planning and zoning commissions will be able to use the survey for a guide in the "urbanization of our land," he added. When published, the survey will be available without charge through the extension service. Curds and Whey Little Miss Muffet's "curds and whey" was actually yogurt. Curds is a thick substance and the basis of cheese. It separates from milk under the action of an acid and whey is the watery part of the milk. The dish has long been considered a delicacy in England. Answer to Previous Puzzle • Crops (Continued From Page 1) Awtry said "it can't be answered" when asked how much the corn yield would be diminished if the dry weather continues. "We don't even know how much corn was planted this year," he said, noting the crop report requested by Ray "will give us a better handle on the whole state than what we've had in the past." He said 60 to 65 per cent of the state's corn crop "is historically fed to livestock in Iowa. The rest is for foreign export, or to be remanufactured in some other form, such as breakfast cereals, in other states." "Soybeans in a good share of the state still look good. In some areas the beans are blooming in a very short stage of growth. Overall, they may be affected the same as corn. There's no way to make a forecast." If Iowa and other major corn and soybean states suffer severe crop losses this year, Awtry said, prices "will do the same as with any commodity in short supply. They'll go up." Awtry said ths extent of corn damage in Iowa varies by region. "Apparently the southwest is in a more distressed condition than any other area. They are now approaching the serious stage. You can't go 14 to 16 days of 100- x degree temperatures and no rain without having a stress on \ crops." "In the northwest area they have places in extreme serious condition, but others where — if it rains by next week — they may have a reasonable crop." "In the north-central portion they are in reasonably good shape. Naturally, the heat has affected some yield, but it's certainly not a critical situation. Central Iowa is in reasonably good condition also, but it does need moisture and the situation will be serious in the next ten days if there isn't good precipitation. This is also generally true of the south-central area." "In the northeast quarter and the east-central and southeast regions, many farmers delayed planting last spring. The crop is not as far along as normal, but they have been getting rain and if they can stay away from an early frost their prospects are reasonably good. A good share of this area doesn't have too good a stand of corn and beans because of late planting." Ray's press aide, Dick Gilbert, said "thousands of Oil Companies NEW YORK (AP) Several oil companies say rises in crude oil prices on domestic and foreign markets helped to sharply boost their profits during the second quarter of this year. Standard Oil Co. of Indiana, the nation's sixth largest oil firm, reported on Tuesday that after-tax profits for the three months ended last June 30 were 131 per cent more than the earnings in the same period of 1973. Shell Oil Co., seventh biggest, saidits second-quarter earnings rose 39 per cent. Cities Service Co., 14th in size, reported a 76 per cent gain and Tenneco Inc., a conglomerate with significant oil operations, said its net more than doubled. For the latest quarter, Indiana Standard registered earnings of $280 million on revenues of $2.47 billion. acres of corn across the state, particularly in river bottom lands, are already gone and drought is moving into the hill fields." Gilbert said the information was provided by crop specialists at Iowa State University's extension service. ' 'The governor has also been in contact with ISU agronomists and with Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz's office to determine the procedures for a declaration of disaster," Gilbert said. "The governor's position is that if people in agriculture are entitled to disaster assistance because of too much moisture, it certainly follows that a lack of moisture creates an equally, if not more, severe disaster situation." Gilbert said a disaster declaration for corn and soybean producers offers only limited assistance. "Basically, all that it will do is make farmers eligible for low interest loans that would ' cover crop loss and operating expenses," Gilbert explained. "These are loans, not grants, and have to be paid back at 5 per cent interest over periods ranging from three to seven years." "This just gets them further into debt, so it doesn't solve the immediate problem." "It actually means that, instead of getting paid for his crop, he has to borrow money at low interest for a crop he didn't get. So he's in debt. The loan enables him to hang on, but there's no forgiveness provision and it must be paid back." "An emergency disaster loan is certainly no panacea." "Only the Good Lord knows the year she was born, and He's claiming executive privilege!" THE BORN LOSER "So! You're back again ... but not by popular demand!" by Ait Sonsom BUGS BUNNY by Hcimdohl & Stoffel HEV, SYLVESTER ,YA GOT COMPANY/ I PROTEST VEHEMENTLY/ I DISOBEYED NO TRAFFIC LAWS/ l!M JUST CHECKING TH ^* VEHICLE CODE TO SEE »F THIS THING SHOULD BE ALLOWED ON STREETS AND HIGHWAYS/ PRISCILLA'S POP by Al Vermeer I XJST COULDN'T STAND ANOTHER MA'S WED POTATO SANDWICH! SO I GAVE MY TO A HUNGRY I TWtNK THE S.RC.A. IS LUNCH DOC3-: •Junior Editors'Quiz on CHEESE SHORT RIBS by Frank Hill AFTER I WON IT WENT SACK AND POUND M ERROR IN MV 1%7 TAX RETURN... Vehicles ACROSS 1 Two-wheeled vehicle 5 Taxi 8 Light carriage 12 Above 13 Hurry 14 Docile 15 Music pitch 16 Constellation 17 Athena 18 Goes stealthily 20 Labor organizations 22 Bind 23 Truck weight unit 24 Brown bread- 27 Cover 28 Furniture moving truck 31 Atlantic (ab.) 32 Musical instrument 33 Indonesian of Mindanao 34 WWII agency (iniU 35 Low, sturdy cart 36 Head (slang) 37 Midwestern state (ab.) 38 Auricle 39 Rugged vehicles 41 School subject (ab.) 42 Comparative suffix 43 Kind of bicycle 46 Despot 50 Lily plant 51 Time period 53 Persian poet 54 Ceremony 55 Nothing 56 Ready to harvest 57 Stalk 58 Plaything 59 Bishoprics DOWN 1 Temporary beds 2 English river 3 French name 4 Regales 5 Pursue 6 Atmosphere tara a ataaa araaaranv staianca 7 Make lovely 32 Small piece 8 Discolor 35 Printer's 9 Aura direction 10 Prayer ending 39 Gladness 11 Affirmative votes 19 Soldier's equipment 21 Protuberance 24 Armored vehicle 25 Other (Sp.) 26 Boy's name 27 Falsifier 28 Weather indicator 29 On top of 30 Takes (slang) 40 Mistakes 41 Revoke a legacy 42 European country 43 Covers with pitch 44 Got out of carriage 45 Short letter 47 Girl friend (Fr.) 48 Back of neck 49 Very (Fr.) 52 River (Sp.) JUST BEAT THE COMPUTER AT CHESS. WONDERFUL. 1M4T PROVES MAN IS STILL IN CONTROL. NOT REALLV COM V? ABOUT 400 AND /AJ MAMV FRANK AND ERNEST ... AND NOTIFIED THE IRS/ Howie Schneider 7-2-* by Bob Thaves NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSN.) QUESTION: What is the origin of cheese? •jf. * * ANSWlvR: Cheese, an important food made from the solid parts of milk, has been known from early times. It probably dates back to prehistoric times. There are references to it as far back as 2,000 B.C. It is believed that Asiatic tribes were the first to make cheese from the milk of sheep and goats. These wandering Asiatic bands brought the art of cheesemaking to Hurope. The Ancient Greeks used the milk of mares and goats. Camel milk was the source of Hgyptian cheese. Hurope and Asia favor the milk of goats and sheep, and in the New World, cow's milk is the common base. During the Middle Ages, cheesemaking was carried on by the monns- taries. The peasants were taught different methods of making it, and secret formulas were developed. As nationalism developed in Hurope, every country had its own distinctive types of cheese. The early settlers in the United States brought the methods of cheesemaking from Hurope. Present-day domestic cheeses are usually adaptations of the Old World types. 7-24 (Sharon West house of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, wins a prize for this question. You can win $10 cash plus AP's handsome World Yearbook if your question, mailed on a postcard to Junior Editors in care of this newspaper is t selected for a prize.) MYSELF LIBATION MOVEMENT ALLEY OOP Dove Groue I THINK THE LEAST YOU COULD DO IS <3IVE ME A PARTIAL REFUND OF THE ,,.SO YOU TAKE )T AN; HAUL OUTA HERE /"^ YOU'D BEFORE X LOSE [ SETTER DO MY TEMPER/ NOW WAIT A MINUTE LET ME HANDLE I ALMOST SOT MYSELF KILLED SETTING THAT DANfi KITE FOR YOU, R1KER/

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