Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana on August 11, 1896 · Page 7
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
August 11, 1896

Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana · Page 7

Publication:
Location:
Logansport, Indiana
Issue Date:
Tuesday, August 11, 1896
Page:
Page 7
Cancel
Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page

OCR Text

Mrs, Anna Gage, wife of Ex- Deputy I), S. Marshal, Columbus, Kan., says i I was delivered of TWINS in less than 20 minutes and with scarcely any pain after using -only two bottles of ."MOTHERS' FRIEND" DID HOT SUJTEB AFTBBWABD. nraontbr Expr«i»or Mail, on wcolplofJgn» ( •IToo"per botlU. Book "TO MOTUBB8 1T«0 per botlU. mulled free. BKiDFlEU) BEGILATOB CO., 1TLAM1, di. SOLO BY ALL DRUGGISTS. TIMETABLES. •Dany. Bradford and Co1....n2:|[i»m Philadelphia A N. Y..'12:60am Richmond & CIntl....* 1:00 a ra Ind'pli ft Louisville..'12:45am EfTner & Peorla "SaBam CrSwn Point. * CW..»|:«am Richmond & ClntL.t 6:-»5 a m Sown Point A Chl..t 6:00a ro Montlcello 4 ErTner t SiUO 8 m Bradford A Col......t 7:59am ESner local freight..! 8:30 a m Ind'plB A Louisville..* 2:00pm Richmond and ar.tl..;z : lOpm Bradford and Ccl....* 2:OSp m Phlla & New York....' £:'>5 p m Montlcello & EZnc.-..t 2:20 p m Chicago •l:3Bpm »1* Intermediate...^^ Kokomo A Rich • 2:45 am • 2:45 a m • 2:20 am • 2:30 a m •12:30 am .12:40 am tll:20pm t 7:»pm t 1KB p m t 4:15pm t 2:15pm • 1:30 p m • 1:20 pm • 1:10 pm • i:lii p in t 7:45 a. Tn • 1:55 pm HS:30 r ra •f'J:OOa m WEST BOUND, 05 Loca' FrelKht, accoro dnlll ex Son.. 3 st, J.ouls ilmrtwl dnllj, ojd H04J'.. 1?:!0 p n> .loai p m . »:17 pm .: 3:13pm .lU.l'J a m 2 N, T. 4 Boston II ui d dBllj -old no 42.. 2:41 a m « i'ttut mall (Hilly. •o<lnn4«... ....... ••••• »=« « » 4 Atlantic Lira dally ei Sun 'old no 44.. 4 52 p m 74 local Irt. *ccom. dally *x Bun ......... 12 5u p m EEL RIVER DIVISION. WEST BOUND. No37 arrive EAST BOUND. n m p m •in'tK 1-MIW ................... ........ 10. i& 8 in ytv oo i-jflvr ........ ..... ........ ....... ....... ... m VANDAL! A UN*. PttAIKS No n Lil-V-E LOGANSPORT. IND. KOR THE NORTH. t.ifs n- iM' •• -uri-fii.'.. I'""! " m i > it i ill \ "ii * ill.-... t; - 1 ii ni > 0 £ "•« -tjCl'.'. -V.-u.'.:....:..... I*" P n. Ku i,. ,,. rii Jo,e,,b ou.au, unj) • '« » <n M> 8 exSundttllortont i d«id 8 35 0 ro No 8. bus thrown parlor c»r, ItdiannpollBto South Bend vln COIIKX. No 20 has through sleepers, St Lonls to SIMM DaW- FOB THE 8CUTH No 13 lor TerreHsule daily ex Sun. 7 18 a m No 11 forTerr^ Haute dally ex Bun.... 2:56 p m No 21 dally ex Sunday -""•"'"* "," No 13 Ins ihrouKh pgflor c«r, South Bend to No 21 has thr ogh Sleeper, Mackinaw to St Lonls - . Arrive No 15 <)BlU except Sunday j»*5 p m No 17 Sondaj. only •• »•* P m For.complet* Ume.card. glv»n« all trains ktod1 gtatlOM. aiid tor full Information ai ta rite*, through cari, etc;, .addren, J c*EDaBWOBTH. Ag*nt. '-'..' ' '•• Iioganiport, Ind. Or. B. A. Ford. General Paneenger A««nt, St. Loula, Mo. . jwyT«.UUl> JfUisu . uro<tmlS«oJ6il»T«.Youciin tomof orMnj* prlo0 ntider sami 'tract to pay mllroildfnrwnclbowlomi.inil eoebtrm. It we fan to cure. If you h»re uke j mer- carr. Iodide .potnuh, «nd'itlll b»Te «chM »nd Mini, Maooa» Vatchfl. In mouth. Sore Thro.t, ,f>| m ple*. Copper.Colorcd Spot!, Wieera.on iSfu'll tbli Swonda'y'uEoOD 1'OlSCjf w> co»rmntee to euro. Wo solicit tbo roost obiti Bate care* »nd .olii>l!«fitre.ta«.'iroriu .lor a cavo^ve* ^ni^otouro, ,1'frie dHoa^o^n: 'baflttdthoftkil) oftlionLOItemJnev Cionn. S500.UOO rriiMtul tt-hlnd our ' "-""""" "^liapi^ijltlCA'Gr*, ALL. ** B Trade k Mark I f OR ™ E BtQQD, NERVES, LIVER KIDNEYS. 4 B. B.' B. B. cured ine of Stomach Tremble and Paralysis. I had it since the war. J. T. BALL, Muncie, Ind. 4 B B B B are purely yegetable. Put np In capsules, sixty In a box. Thirty days' treatment In a box. Price »1 per box, or six for $6. Manufactured by M.'C BRAdO, Conn«r(ylll«, Ind. Fo* aale.by alldrnggiits. - —FOB SAL* WT-. -,.•".. F. «sF'K9WNG, Drngglst. S3U th« .d»U«r>h tnlcrob* and yon. eta* CAT** iTlz^ HENDRIX'S WITTY SPEECH. He Milken a Uumoroun Speech on Money to Morocco AlHnnfncturori. Tlie Shoe and Leather Heporter publishes Hie following speech made by Hon. Joseph C. Hendnx at the dinner of the National Morocco Manufacturers' association of the United States at Manhattan Beach early this month: Mr. President and Gentlemen; Iain glnd to see you, "men of small brains and large capital." I.am g-lad always to face successful men in an American industry. You represent a trade which years ago furnished material for .the money instrument. There was leather money once and plenty of it. You have never set wp any cry because of the de- monetization of leather, never asked redress for the "crime" of (he abandonment of the use of leather as money. You do not now ask for its retnonetlzo- tion. Mr. Stein—Nor for free tannage. Mr. HendrLx—No! Therefore, I have great respect for two people, the North American Indian and the morocco manufacturer. Along 1 these sand dunes from Manhattan to Montauk point the. antiquarian can point to great heaps of shells where tho old squaws used to s4t and practice the free coinage of warn- pum, After awhile a smart Yankee invented a turning lathe which transformed the clam shells into money too fast. This led to the demonetization of the Lonff Island clam. (T.a.ugJiter.) The poor Indian has passed oft to the plains and we hear no more of the free coinage of plains. These are simply evolutionary steps. You look back to the beginnings of rour industry and marvel at the changes. The world advances. Civilization refines. Commerce requires ex- net terms ami measures. It insists upon certainty, fix.ity in the standard of values. It must hnve something upon which it can depend. It has found out that it must depend upon some cne ng. That is why it has veered to the single standard. It "as quit stepping from one stnrakml to the other. It makes its election. It votes for gold because of its great value in small compass nntl because of the fixity of that value. So 1t Is t.Lat one great nation niter another, under the command of its best in- •clligonce, has comn to the gold standard. It is because they have found it the cheapest, best and most effective stand- nrcl by which to mensurc all values. What does a standard mean? What is its primnry significance? It comes from nn old Lnt.in word meaning something to torn to. When you are in doubt you go to the standard. I don't f.arc what line of business you are in or what course in life you pursue, a standard governs it somehow or other. You ride a railway on a standard gauge, yon sit at a table of standard heipht, nnd so on through the list. The standard must be the thing it stands for. If you 'lave a standard of weight, it may be of diamonds or precious stones, but it has got, to have weight^tbat is the first hing. If you haven standard of length, it must have longth. And when yon come to the question of the standard of value, whatever it is made of it has got to have value. ' You can talk about the whole question of finance in inn different lights. Put this is tho main point—you must have a standard of value. That standard must, have valiio. Wo. choose for the standard the metnl which fluctuates the Irast In value. That is the whole story of the gold t:tnndard. fGheers.T Our friends out in Chioac-o claim that the gold standard Is a British p.olicy which we are seeldrlc- to enforce in this countrv. Pid you over hear anything nnout British policv in connection with the law of gravitation or.a British policy of good health ngnlrist bnd health- pood clothes against shoddy? There are other countries in the world besides Great Britain. We do not have to look to Great Britain to know what is a good thing. [Great applause.] We are old ough and big enough to know a good thing when.we see.it. Ours is a country that for. CO years has been under the gold standard. You have never known anything else. All you have wns bu:lt upon the gold standard. The greatness nnd development of this country have been attained under that standard. How is the world lining upon this question? China. Japan and Mexico are for free Hilver. Great Britain, Germany, France and the great empires of Europe are for gold. Where do we belong? There is only one answer. Can anyone fancy that our great population, made up of 70,000,000 of ..the best examples of the Anglo-Saxon race, mixed with Irish wit, Scotch cunning, German thrift, is go- Ing 'to step from the high plane where we stand to the lower one beneath ! What stran(?e madness has come into the American people to make it. seem possible that they could do a thing of that kind? [Applause.] . • We can live on a. silver, basis, after we get there. Our great rivers will follow their courses to the sea. God a sun Will kiss the earth. The crop^ w»l spring forth, Children will be.born and :grow up. Enterprises will go forward But are we going to take the leap in the dark and try an experiment fraught with such risk- and,panic?, .A great French economist .once said that when he was 40 he -thought he understood nomething'about finance. When.hewaa .60 he felt he did not know ios muck about it as hfi did at 40, and.at 70.be • began to doubt whether he : knew anything about.it at'oll,.and scarcely dared to" open his mouth, Mr. Gladstone pondered over the question till he eaid thiM •it seemed almost to defy human intellect, but Ben TWmM^from SouthCaro- lina,know* .that rthe goldlraga of :W,aII gtreet and tampiree of Lombard rtreel are "a'gin the fanner," and the way the .former can get." ev-en Sato .cutb>.dollM ''In' tvro. [Applause;!. ,;.;;.'..', .;, „ ', 1 We are living in' a grand and awiuj .timi But the newspapers «Te.-prtnt« every day; and .the'.American«:arBV,no] anleep. Tte-biwln.of.the American peoi ils.is not.du;i.; /honest.! ,.Thiese bere«iM.oop«!..and go.ai \lfcVti^''flow*i.'ap/I,.'.si5a!intiBj«8, '^tlw thickest of : thc' n-lphV.v.-e may not appear to KOP r.n<" *»"•'« '.hnf-'are' BOTH: "13 IT HOT ENOUGH •FOB YOU?" —New York Tribune. But you remember on one historic occai sion, when the sky was all covered with fog, some one asked : "Ob, say, can you see by the dawn's early light the star- ;pangled banner yet waving?" Audit was there!, [Enthusiastic cheers,] MONEY AND CREDITORS. the Memrarc of --Value V»rle», th« Laborer Uet» the Worst of It. Probably no question that has ever been made apolitical issue appeals more strongly- to our selfishness than the money question. The value 'of all the property we possess is expressed in the terms of money, aaid not our property only but our labor. A horse, a cow, a comer lot, a share of stock, a bond or a note are all meas* ured as to their transferable value b,'ri i money. They are worth so much. So of our labor, whether in the professions, the skillful trades lor in more manual employments. We are worth so much on hour or a du.y or a week by tho j services we are able to render, and we , are paid accordingly. . The result is, if j we are not fools, th.lt we want the best , money that circulars in exchange for our services, or our property, and the , less our income the more we want the best. j The contention, therefore/seems un- , answerable that a government or a ' community should establish the high- eatstandord of money whereby to measure those exchanges of labor and property which 'constitute the business of the world. If this is not done and tho measure of value becomes variable, who suffers? The men who have large re- cources behind them or the men who have nothing' but their hands and, brains? Most assuredly the latter. A, well-known banker of this town liae often been heard to say that the money standard did not and could not affect him, for he could make money whether we wo.re on. a gold or silver basis. . So he could, and so can any ca.pi.tuJiBt. It is the man who depends upon his labor that would suffer by a depreciated cur- ; renoy. It is the creditor clncs of the community, therefore, which is most interested in preserving the stability of the; currency and' its high value.' -But of; whom is tihe creditor- class composed?, Manifestly of those to whom something is due from doy to day, from week to: week and from mon.th.to month. These ore the laboring, people, tlie nien.at the desk,' at the. counter, at the forge, at j the bench arid at the plow. The toiler who patiently wields the. shovel and. the'pick when nightfall comesisacrcd-j rtor, and .he is entitled to be, paid. for: his clay's labor in the best money the! country affords. Andsothroug-houtthei whole rouiid'of employment where men, and women receive waged. j 'is it not,' Uien, inexplicable that a, large proportion of those who in the; sweat of their face earn their daily; Dread, laying 1 -by perhaps a trifle from: .week to week toward, a.rainy day, de-i positing it in a savings bank— thut these rfiould be led away by the cry for cheap money? What do 'they want with, cheap money, or "poor man's" money ?, If there is any "difference, why should they not have rich men's money ?— Chicago Times-Herald. . , Sliver P»trlou in 1873. : The advocates , of the cheap, silver ptai>dnrd-preIeDd tlxt.the white metal; is "patriotic." while gold is disloyal. One-half of the argiiment,s for M-cent dollars confiists'of appeals to patriotism : for Votes in favor of the "American; .money"', n.nd ogainat. the. "traitor gold" of England'. , ••••-• . .••;.-• . . ' ' ! . In. .the : htipp..y. days •before., 1.873 the,. bullion" 'value'. of. the. metal .in. a silver. dollar was.' worth' dn.'an'avcrag:e abcut $1.03: D'id tbx> : uobieJ-heuTtcxT, 'patriotic! silver diners 'rush' to pour their products into oar mints, to that the coun- tryiwouldi.ba.ve'.plenty ofemoney.J; Not by a ereoi deal. They were .the, kind of - patriot, who shipped; their,iilv.er off "' ' d. it of •'patriotism" and pretend triut mey wish to get their silver made into dollars in order to benefit the country. Nice kind of patriots they are—men who will send their silver away when it is badly needed nnd try to unload it on the government when it is cheap and plentiful! fco'Fraiice ac'foat ai ti«y conla,«ead. it in order, to , get, • little bigbfer jprioe for : lt' : ''Tb«7 knew ot^tiBi- time' jnetallie money w- ««xse in the Dnited Btatw; but'-' they.vdiffiii't '«!!*»•> ft(r:itlj«4;-.'v They r TO^rtedithe higbti* prio« for .ilver bullion. ai»d. they.therefore wld^in^U* ; .'NboWy bme« them . 'abroad baa gone 1 down; and -they ! tJncle Sun to glve-'tiraa -more 1 for ih/eir bullion tianito 'market value, tbty talk HUv«r Cunptlcn Crlc*. The pla*>orDi adopeted by wing which controlled .the democratic national convention contains abundaot material for stirring campaign mottoes. "Free Silver Inflation," "Debt Eepudiai- tion," "Property Confiscation" and "Commercial Stagnation" are brief and truthful KtatemenU of the aims of the cheap money 'democrats and the certain results which would follow their success in November. Shouting these rheerf ul strains, the silverites can march to the certain defeat which awaits all movements based on sectionalism, greed, appeals to prejudice and hatred of property righls. WHY HE~LEAVES HIS PARTY. An Old-Time Democrat Ctnnot Fellow the SIlTerttm. Mr. Samuel Dlckson, of Philadelphia, a lifelong democrat and an influential citizen, hns resigned as a presidential elector on. the '• .democratic ticket. Am'ong 'other reasons for n.e action, h«. gave tie following: It is merely paltering with tie truth to pretend to acquiesce in the experiment of trying- tw make tlie prodyctof a day's labor in a silver mine worthi two or five times as much a« the product .of. a .day's, labor in .a gold or an iron mine. At thc.,pre(sent time the results: of a .day'si work in oive occvpetion MF wortii Approximately, and . ih tlie long run M much as in any oth«r. To affix an artificial value upoii silver ore is a, dishCTn<?st and' unjust discrimination aga-'inst, every other form of industry, and when it is done by calling it a legal tender it is done at the expense -at every . .class in the community except the money. ' lenders and the money changers.- . '. With' currencies of different vaJne.in circulation, the ihdaey lenders always thrive at, the expense of the people,, and the debtor must suffer more than the wage earner. It was. a. favorite say ing of Lord. Ealnjerston that a high rate of interest, meant" a bod '.security, and; the owner of'inoney 'must charge for 'the risk' if thiEr«i : to a : bhance that when, bo .lends a ; bar "of gold he may be forced .1o take, payment iri. a bar of silver, 'just as the .owner of a horse.will.heBitBte to lesnd ,it. with a. cihanccpf.beJng.giTen'in return 'a Bheep;',6r.'a pig. That, is all there ifl in blmfetallisin OB, a. practical qbeatibn aB'between 'the leader and-'tlie bbrrower,-ana;-«o8tnted;'ltoug1it'tobe -eosy- to.';under«tand ' why;::uotdl it :ia jtf&ted, hjmdredj! of mmion» of .capital are lying .idle- which would. be, at t*« j£rtio6.oi : .'Q».',Bitmto. and.,weet if they were willing to give bocK what they got*. _ ' . ,tt.».>, . Pedplein general look upon all «pec«»» : o*'the ; frog"as' being perfectly -harm- ,je» Shouiai yoii:be traveling .ih-New •Gnmadtti (United; Statesjof. Colombia); ^howe,ver, l yoa would do well to leti a 'Bertain 1 Uttle.tree,eroakei;,seyerely.aJ9ne. : Be BecretiMi 'a 'poison .caj^ly. . «*,,d«»dly W that •of 'toe.ja;ttiVe8nak'e; ' Jtrexudfc* ef«n ; hl»" «kin : in the "snap* of a inilkjr liquid ' and i 'is- n»*d - by' tbe nitlTe*' M ;» poison ifortbelr arrows;; • '•' ' ' . A tingle swallow, according to an ftt>- tb'brlt-y, onn devour 0.000 flies in a day. CASS COUNTY ^Auditor's Annual Report 1896. Auditor's Statement, Showing Receipts ant Disbursements by County Treasurer, for Year Ending May 31,1896. Dr. to Balance In Treasury June 1. 1835 t W'-JJ- 1 -' 2 LC-SH County Funds Overdrawn ..d.TSC.-H To Net Balance in Treasury June. 1, ISSo Collections November Installment 189j: State Revenue....... S.m.X Benevolent InetltutionB State Debt Sinking Fund State School Revenue Endowment Revenue County Revenue *:! 1 ,S«« Township Revenue Tuition Revenue Special School Revenue Dos Revenue "J!-™ Bond Revenue • jMSv 0 ? Gravel Kroad Rcvenu e • ; •. • • .-••.• M-J-M— Collections of Special Assessments Novemebcr, lk.!u: State Revenue -J-'J Benevolent Institutions ';•''! State Debt Sinking Fund,, •••>« State School Revenue «•'! Endowment Revenue '•;" County Revenue '*••:" Township Revenue '•'* Tuition Revenue "• . '.".—.'. Special School Revenue Doe Revenue , Bond Revenue Gravel Road Revenue Road Revenue Additional Road Revenue Delinquent Collections November, 1S95: State Revenue .,',;„ t 80,S5S£ 3.50 H.7S 321.79 State Benevolent Institutions State School Revenue State Debt Sinking Fund Endowment Revenue County Revenue Township Revenue Tuition Revenue Special School Revenue Road Revenue Additional Road Revenue... 213.SO 1.U94.40 388.24 ' 31.30 2,003.35 2W.20 33S.S6 1,403.07 W2.19 252.39 188.24 Gravel Boat] Revenue "*•-* Bond Revenue *'"•*' DOK Revenue • Collections Auril Installment 1S06. S.S53.77- 97.723J!, State Revenue Benevolent Institutions State Debt SInkinK Fund State School Revenue State Educational InstitutI07is Endowment Revenue County Revenue Township Revenue Tuition Revenue Special School Revenue Road ' Revenue Additional Road Revenue DOB Revenue Bridge Revenue Gravel Road Revenue Delinquent Collections April 1S96. State Revenue Benevolent Institutions State Debt Slnkine Fund State School Revenue Endowment -Revenue County Revenue Township Revenue Tuition Revenue Special School Revenue Road Revenue Dog Revenue Gravel Road Revenue Additional Road Revenue Bond Revenue Miscellaneous Collections Show " License. Highways and Bridges 10,171.95 5,127.18 3.07C.67 12,222.50 512.02 36,855.19 5.C22.S1 ' 6,S07.fj8 2<i,3S2.C;i 30,005.13 10,252.90 SSS.50 J0.2U17 2,050.82— 162,539.81 CCS.64 255,19 153.01 S47.27 25 51 1,950'.13 206.03 2M.T2 1,204.61 704.M 307.50 153.02 ]Q6.34 306.03— 7.045.59- 169,585* ,3 M 07500 35840 Poor Farm Revenue 2547!oO Sheriff's Fund ' n«»**** v . _**««*»* Redemptions Chanpe Venue Recorder Fund Ditches Sheets Ditch. 1,029.00 1,397.40 1,155.05 3,112.99 10,100.91 452.SO Hendee Ditch j 664.64 • Kennol Ditch sc',013.43— IOS.C76.18 County Revenue School Fund Collections. , jo.S3S.44 Common Principal i 79* 00 Congressional Principal ii.i!i!".'!!"! 20.43S.20 1.071.78 4,050.00— Cr Common Interest.. ConKreBBlonal Interest — Liquor 'License ....... ...... Total Charges ..................... .............. By Disbursements os follows: M00 County Institute.. ............ ............................ 4 662'.M Repairs to Gravel, Road ............................... Irto5 Hendee Ditch Kennel Ditch Sheets Ditch Interest Remitted Taxes....... .Redemptions Tax Sales Special Judges Change Venue Elections ....... .. Indexing: Records SherllT Fund Recorder Fund .......... . Board of Review Special School Revenue .................. .............. S90677 Road Revenue ........................................... 43'g07!s3 Common School Revenue ................ ............. 245230 Congressional Revenue ................... .............. 9.W6M Township Revenue .................... •. ................. 12 966 SI Tuition Revenue .................... ................... 1750.27 Road Revenue ........................................... -927411 Additional Road Revenue ............... '."'.'.:'."'.;'.'.'. 4iS50.00 3S.196.tt- U7.SO.-C 496,010 JD 4227.21 22436.35 ],«3J.72 1 OM82 1072.39 48500 142240 ' ^\ m .3,300.00 2979.45 i'o22.85 450.00— 4309543 42,703.78 687.50 666.00 32,812.48 1,183.00 29,646.38— 5.673.95 1,185.00 62.25 3,808.79 575.00 JSS.65 Liquor License Revenue Transfer Books .................... Enumeration ...................... State Treasurer. ............ ...... Congressional School Fund ...... Road Receipts PaJd ............. : County Orders Paid; Viz:— Assessors and County Assessor Balllffa .............. • .............. Board of Health... ................ County Auditor .................... County Attorneys..... ............ County Physician............-.--- j.uw.sa County School Superintendent .......... .............. 341496 County Treasurer ........................................ m.SQ County Clerk ............................................. 795.38 County Surveyor ........................................ 1011.10 County Commissioners .................. ............... 4158.60 Circuit Court.......... ............................. ;;"-; 3590.93 Court House and Jail ............................ • ...... 4,071.04 Ditches ........ ..... -. ........ • — .................. Highways and Bridges ........ Insane ...................... • ..... I nquests ......................... JurorsJ ........................... Janitor .. ........ • ................ Litigation ....................... Miscellaneous .................. Orphan's Home .................. Prisoners ........................ Poor ...... ....................... Poor Farm ...................... Printing ........................ Reporter ........................ |pecia" e prosecutlns ' Attorney Benevolent Institutions ....... Probate Judge .................. Broad Ripple Bridge ........... • Loan .'.) ............ •:;•".'"' ..... Balance in Treasury Viz.- HI 504:84 State Revenue:..- ................................... 537217 Benevolent Institutions.. .............................. 3223E5 State Debt Sinking Fund .............................. i' WIO ' state'-Educatidnal Institutions.... .................... j!-^ Township Revenue .................................... 27,326.90 Special School Revenue ................. ................ 717420 '' ' ................ 201,995.62— «4.«99.« 2S.192.28 1.SSI.15 691.60 6.5S9.20 ' 649.92 SS9.53 W0.40 1,589.75 2,440.15 S.S07.S7 3,226.20 : 392.95 f.99.50 . 3,417.GO 90.00 G52.SC 65.00 325.50 16,830:00— 107.401.72 Tultlpn-'-' Ttuvenue Bridge .Revenue Road Revenue Additional .Rood Revenue Common. School Principal Common School Interest..........•• Congressional School Principal... Congressional. School Interest T.lquora-.lcense-Revenue Sheets Ditch, Fund Gravel Road Fund Bond'Revenue County Revenue.. Total : county : Bonds SS1.75 1,557.87 • 10,077.81 2,981.05 34,869.14 2,120.69 97C.15 1.1BO.OO, 6.JS9.88 5,100.43 CHAS; A SMITH>