The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on November 25, 1956 · Page 13
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The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 13

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Lincoln, Nebraska
Issue Date:
Sunday, November 25, 1956
Page:
Page 13
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y 25, 1956 _________________ LLNTOLN Slt.VliAV roni.VAL A.Vf) STAK_______.1-B Huskar Defensive Gamble 3Iisses—Oklahoma Romps " By DICK BECKER LINC OLN Slt.VllAV loniNAL AND STAK Foothall l*i( lures |{y Staff Photographers Holi ^ ail Sirkle Corhaiii f ia . íir¡)lane By DICK BECKER Staff Sports Writer NORMAN OkIa.~Shed no tears for the Cornhuskers. They gambled. They lost. And they have no alibis. There was no intention on the part of Pete Elliott or his boys to try for a consolation prize here at the Sooner snake pit. Pete in-stalled a daring defense, on which was to either make or break in a hurry. It didn’t work but everybody concerned felt it*was a gamble well worth taking. We knew we had to stop their speed and breakaway runs if we were to win the game,” Pete said. j We gambled on our defense, using 8 and 9-man line.s. They were just too good a team. They took advantage of our weaknesses and mistakes. We came down here to win, not to try and keep the score down or be satisfied with a creditable showing. It just didn’t work. “All you can say is that Oklahoma has a great football team, one of the really great teams I have ever seen.” Pete also put some tricks into the Husker offense but they w'ere ruined by a hand injury to halfback Frank Nappi early in the third period. The Huskers had spread ends, flankers and the quarterback in motion The latter was installed with the center passing the ball through the quarterbar k’s legs to the left halfback. This made the quarterback eligible as a pass receiver and .set up some single wing passing plays for Nappi. But Frank’s hand was hurt and the Huskers couldn't u.se the new stuff in the second half. Oklahoma was equally tricky, using a man in motion, a spread end, flankers—and even the single wing. All were run with effortless ease and precision. Nappi tackled . . . pass effort fails7 Fumble rolls away . , , but Nebraska recovers. A$ Wilkinson said as he finished shaking hands with Elliott in the center of the field after the game, “We had too many guys who can run fast on our side.” Soiuiers Best Nebraska’s players had no doubts about which was the best team they met this year. Tri-captains Jim Murphy, Lavrne Torczon and Bob Berguin were loud in their praise of the Sooners. They rated the 1956 opposition as Oklahoma first, Ohio State second and Baylor third. The difference? Team speed. ‘‘Baylor had one back who ran away from us.” Murphy said. “Ohio State had a couple of halfbacks. But Oklahoma- their whc'e team just flew past us. "I thought that (Frank) Elwood of Ohio State was a better quarterback than (Jim) Harris. But I think Oklahoma could beat Ohio State or Baylor by at lea.st three touchdowns. “And that (Jerry) Tubbs is terrific defensively. Glass of Baylor and Parker of Ohio State don’t belong on the same team with Tubbs. It’s not so much his hitting, but his quick- ne.ss.” Don t leave out that (Billy) Primer,” Torczon added What a blocker, he hit me once with a forearm and flipped me clear over.” You know we did what we were supposed to, but they were just t^ darned fast. The tackles were supposed to turn their wide stuff in. They would, but that McDonald would cut back m and then cut back out.side again on the next stride and be gone,” Murphy said. who was urgmg the Hu.skers.to keep firing right until the last whistle, could only praise the Sooner speed “We could run with Ohio State,” he said, “but when these guys ^>^*5 more physically, but these guy.s would ju.st brush us and be gone.” fullback, felt Oklahoma’s ability to break the long run or pass was the difference h.u have played, «ééded" t “They were especially tough on third down. We always had them Old Ilf Quit “n »i'kinson had praise for .Nebraska «II ti J well-coached club,” Wilkinson said. "They kept irymi a I the way Our strength was just too much for then, They were beWnd“” “P Elhott concurred in this opinion. "Our team never quit " he said «s^he sat ,n the little training room. ”Our boys were trying on every “I thought Gordie Eiiglert played a real good ball game There game ° «rtainly fine this .Vo I.etd p Pre-game speculation on whether Wilkinson would ease un on his former assistant was soon answered, \Vilkin.son didn’t use his third team until after the Sooners had scored seven times. He rushed his first unit into the game once when Nebraska got to the OU 17 with the score 47-6 But the Huskers asked for no quarter in this Sooner romp and as Brown said, ‘‘We’ll be ba; k.” Wilkinson wasn't happy about having to wallop Pete the way he did, “You never feel good about running up a score like that, from the standpoint of the other team. But you feel good from the standpoint of your own team. So you're torn between two feelings. I guess you could say it kinda leaves you without any feeling at all.” Some of the players had conflicting ideas on playing against Pete. Quarterback Jimmy Harris reported that “I saw Pete in Oklahoma City Friday night and it kinda made me feel funny, knowing I was gonna play against a guy who had coached me and helped me a lot.” End Bob Timberlake said, “You could tell Pete had been coaching 'em. They had the same checks and same blocks as we do. I think it's fun playing against a team that does things just like you do.” Guard Doyle Jennings paid the Huskers a high compliment when he declared, “They were the cleanest bunch we've played all year. They were really wonderful.” Other Sooner player comments: End Don Stiller—“Nebraska was really big. They have a good ball club, about as good as we have played all year. That Brown is really a ball player.” Center Jerry Tubbs—“They were awfully hard to stop at times. They didn’t stop driving after someone would hit them.” Halfback Tommy McDonald—‘‘They have improved as much as any team we’ve played all year. Coach Elliott has great potential up there. They just kept coming at us.'’ McDonald went to the middle of the field with Wilkinson after the game where he was congratulated on his All-American selection by Elliott. Tackle Benton Ladd—“They had as good a line as we’ve played against all year. They hit hard and often and just kept hitting.” Halfback Carl Dodd—“They were the best sports we’ve played against all year. They hit hard but were real clean.” Tackle Ed Gray—“They were rough. Their fullback (Brown) was as good as we have played against all year. He runs low and hard. They were w'cll balanced too. I think Pete has really brought them up and they should be rugged next year. ’ SeuNHS The game wound up the collegiate careers for eight Hu.skers. Tn-Captams Center Bob Berguin, Guard Laverne Torczon and Guard Jim Murphy ended outstanding Nebraska play along with Guard Max Kitzelman, Guard Larry Jones, Tackle Jack Fleming, Halfback Willie Greenlaw and Quarterback Gordon Englert. Sixteen Sooners end their play against Oklahoma A. and M. next Saturday. They are Tackle Ed Gray, Center Jerry Tubbs, Quarterback Jimmy Harris, Fullback Billy Pricer, Halfback Tommy McDonald, Tackle Tom Emerson, End John Bell, Quarterback Jay O’Neal, Fullbai k Bill Brown, End Bob Timberlake, End Delbert Long, Halfback Bob Derrick. Tackle Hugh Ballard, End Bill Harris, Fullback Dale Depue and Guard Henry Broyles, Seven of the OU seniors are on the starting eleven. Mother III The trip to Oklahoma City was homecoming for Husker coach Dee Andros, but it was a sad one. Dee’s mother is critically ill in Oklahoma City. He will stay over to be with her for a few days. tu There’s the ball , , . It looks easy . . . But Sooners break it up. IIere’'s How the Sooners Tried! Sooner sails through air . . . but pass effort fails. wwwifwf «,««»■ 1 ^ K 4 II • • • ^ I I V./I V ti Ws Touchdown No. o for Oklahoma—Pass Play Works Again Sooner (ookt • • McDonald waits • . • He takes the pass . » . And over the goal line.

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