The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on October 23, 1965 · Page 13
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The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 13

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Saturday, October 23, 1965
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2 Husker Coaches Achieved Success In Different Ways Soturdav. Otf. 23, IMS The Lüi—hi Iter 1» . . 'I NEVER TALKED TO MOTHERS LIKE BOB DOES/ SAYS BIFF JONES By HAL BROWN Star Sports Editor Two of Nebraska’s most successful coaches achieved their success through different recruiting techniques, one of them noted Friday afternoon. “I never talked to the mothers like Bob (Devancy) doe s,” Biff Jones, coach of Nebraska’s 1941 Rose Bowl team, observed while In Lincoln for a 25- year reunion of that team. “I read where Bob got one fellow (Tony Jeter) from West Virginia because he sang hymns while the boy’s mother played the piano,” Jones chuckled, ‘‘i never did it that way. ‘T always talked with the boy’s father and the father generally left the decision up to the boy. The only player I ever missed getting that I wanted was Tom Brock who went to Notre Dame. “Of course we never went out of the state to recruit.” The 1941 Rose Bowl team consisted entirely of Nebraska boys. Jones will be seeing a Devaney-coached team for the first time today and the two coaches hadn’t met until Friday night w’hen both spoke at the reunion banquet honoring the Rose Bowl players. However, Jones is an avid follower of Husker football from his home in Washington, D.C. Asked to comment on Devaney’s record, Jones replied, “No one has ever done a better job than he is doing.” Devaney was coaching high school football In Michigan when Jones was at Nebraska from 1937 through 1941. “It certainly feels good to have Nebraska on top again,” Jones noted. “Everybody back east assumes 1 know what goes on out here and I try to talk like 1 do.” Between the Jones and Devaney eras, Nebraska had only three winning sea­ sons in the 20 years. Jones’ five-year record was 28 wins. 14 losses and four ties. Devaney is 33-5. Jones rates the 1941 Rose Bowl team and his 1926 Army team as the two best teams he coached, but admits football has changed noticeably since those days. “All the boys are bigger now.” he points out. “Even the high school teams are bigger. They all seem to have feet as big as mine.” Jones tolled off his coaching years as four at Army, three at LSU. two at Oklahoma and five at Nebraska. “As you can see, I couldn’t hold a job an y- where,” he joked. However, he pointed out, “1 was never hanged In effigy, nor was I ever fired. In fact, if the war hadn’t broken out, I might still be around Nebraska somewhere.” Jones was called from Nebraska to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., when World War 11 broke out. He served as athletic director there for six years with Red Blaik the head football coach. He has spent the last five to six years traveling with his wife, “but it doesn’t fall during the football season,” he offered to explain why he hadn’t seen Nebraska play since 1959 when they met Texas in Lincoln. FROSH DUMP K-STATE Casper Still Dominating Sahara Golf Las Vegas, Nev. (^B i 11 Casper Jr. continued to completely dominate the $100,(X)0 Sahara Invitational Golf Tournament Friday, firing his third straight sub-par round, a three-under 68, for a 54-hole total of 2(X). The 34-year-old Casper, who opened the tournament with straight 66s, rallied on the last nine when young Randy Glover began applying the pressure. Casper birdied four of t h e last five holes after Glover, 23, from Florence. S.C., drew within one stroke of the Cali fornian after the 11th hole. STAFF PHOTO BY WEB RAY FIRST TD Wesleyan’s Bill Rohrig dives into end zone with first Plainsman score. Bill Casper Jr ............................ 66-66-68—200 Randy Glover ............................ 70-65-68—203 Bruce Crampton ...................... 70-70-66—206 Bobby Nichols .......................... 68-71-68—207 Tommy Aaron ......................... 70-73-65—208 Billy Maxwell .......................... 71-68-69—208 Dale Dougla.n .......................... 69-67-72—208 Ja<'k Nicklaus ...................... 71-?7-70—208 Billy Martindale ....................... 71-70-68—209 Doug .Sanders .......................... 70-69-70—209 Art Wall Jr.................................. 72-67-70-209 Dudley Wysong ...................... 69-68-72—209 Dow Finsterwald ..................... 70-72-68-210 George Knudson ....................... 73-67-70—210 Rod Fuhseth ............................ 73-72-66—211 Dave Hill ................................... 68-70-73—211 Tony Evans ...................... .69-75-68—212 Fred Marti ................................ 73-70-68-212 Tommy Bolt .............................. 75-68-68-212 Bo Wininger .............................. 71-71-70—212 Bill Bisdorf ........................... 68-73-70-212 Wesleyan Rally Whips Tough Missouri Valley PLAINSMEN WIN 6TH STRAIGHT, 13-7 Huskers' Davis Scores Three STORY AT LEFT NEBRASKA POSTS 38-14 WIN Manhattan, Kan.—Dick Davis, a 195-pound Omahan, scored the first three touchdowns to touch off the Nebraska freshman team’s 38-14 victory over the Kansas State yearlings here Friday. Davis, a master of the dipsydoo, was the game’s leading rusher with 116 yards in 19 carries. The victory was not as easy BIFF JONES . .. former NU coach. f iiiiiiNiiiiiiMiiniiinimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiii Nebraska Wesleyan, its pride attack used by veteran coach stung by an 80-yard touchdown drive and Its perfect season about to be soiled by hard running Missouri Valley, struck on a 68-yard touchdown march midway in the fourth quarter Friday night to Al Geiberger ............................... 73-67-72—212 i o 1‘?-7 victorv Don January .................... 71-69-72-712 ! ^ * VlCluiy. Al Besselink ............................ 72-67-73-212 Miller Barber .......................... 72-73-68-213 Julius Boros .................... 74-71-68—213 Bert Yancpy ...................... 69-73-71—213 Chuck Courtney ....................... 72-73-69—214 Babe Hiskey ............................ 71-72-71-214 Pete Brown .............................. 70-73-71—214 Dan Sikes .................................. 73-69-72-214 Jack Fleck ........................ 72-70-72—214 Ray Floyd ............................ 69-71-74—214 Larry Mowry .......................... 69-71-74—214 Fred Hawkins ......................... 69-77 7 xU74 Duke Matthews ....................... 75-70-70—215 Gay Brewer ............................ 71-73-71—215 Jay Hebert .............................. 74-70-71-215 Jack McGowan ................. 72-72-71—215 Steve Oppermann ................... 73-71-71—215 Don Cherry ............................ 72-71-72—215 Paul Bondeson ........................ 74-68-73—215 Tommy Jacobs ................. 75-67-73—215 Bill Garrett ........................ 73-69-73—215 Kearney Runners Lose Hays, Kan. (J’)—Don Lakin ran the four-mile cross country course in 19.43 to lead Fort Hays State College to a 13-50 victory over Kearney, Neb., College Friday. The Plainsmen’s sixth straight victory, engineered in the semi-darkness of O.N. Magee Stadium before 3,800 Parents’ Night fans, didn’t come easily and if you had to judge ’em by statistics, it didn’t come at all. But the scrappy Plainsmen were able to put together two scoring drives and t h a t’s what counted. Missouri Valley had taken a 7-6 lead on the second play of the fourth quarter when Vincent PetrocceUi crashed in from the two-yard line to climax an 80-yard drive which was so awesome, it had T formation exponents thinking twice about the single wing Buft-Husker lineups Nebraska (5-0) No. Name 84 Tony Jeter (3-0-2) Oolorado No. 73 Jim Brown 67 LaVeme Alters 54 Kelly Petersen 59 Jim Osberg 78 Dennis Carlson 85 Freeman White 10 Fred Duda 20 Ron Kirkland 31 Harry Wilson 45 Frank Solich Average weight: OFFENSIVE STARTERS Wt. Ht. CI. Pos. CI. Ht. Wt. Name 227 6-3 Sr. LE Jr. 6-4 213 Tad Polumbus Sr. LT Sr. 6-0 218 Dick Taylor Jr. LG Jr. 6-0 206 John Beard Jr. C Sr. 5-11 206 Lary Ferraro Jr. RG So. 5-11 229 Kirk Tracy Sr. RT Sr. 6-1 192 F. VanValk’b’g Sr. RE Jr. 5-11 184 George Lewark 40 189 5-10 Sr. QB Jr. 6-1 196 Bemie McCaU 11 213 6-2 Jr. LH So. 6-0 181 Bill Harris 43 196 5-11 Jr. RH So. 6-0 210 John Farter 41 158 5-8 Sr. FB Jr. 6-2 202 Estes Banks 28 Line— Nebraska 228, Colorado 207; Backs- Team 249 6-2 209 6-0 223 6-0 205 6-0 229 6-2 221 6-5 87 74 60 53 65 78 Nebraska 186, Colorado 197; Team— Nebraska 212, Colorado 203. DEFENSIVE STARTERS Wt. Ht. Cl. Pos. Cl. Ht. 227 6-2 So. LE Jr. 6-4 No. Name 88 Jerry Patton 70 Dick Czap 69 Mike Kennedy 52 Jerry Murphy 63 Lynn Senkbeil 77 Walt Barnes 86 Ivan Zimmer 36 Larry Wachholtz 21 Kaye Carstens 30 Marv Mueller 28 Bill Johnson Average weight: 256 6-2 219 5-9 235 6-2 206 6-2 252 6-3 209 6-3 162 5-8 191 6-1 192 6-0 Jr. LT So. 6-1 Sr. LG So. 6-1 Jr. C So. 6-0 Jr. RG Sr. 6-0 Sr. RT So. 6-4 So. RE Jr. 6-2 Jr. QB Jr. 6-0 Jr. LH Jr. 5-9 Wt. Name 225 Sam Harris 225 Vic Hokanson 204 Kerry Mottl 224 Ron Scott 214 Steve Sidwell 245 Frank Bosch 212 Bill Fairband 181 Hate Irwin 191 Robert Lee 189 Larry Fischer 202 Dick Anderson No. 70 61 68 57 71 86 10 22 46 31 Nebraska 183, Colorado 189; TEAM ROSTER Nebraska So. RH So. 6-0 138 5-10 Sr. FB So. 6-2 Line —^Nebraska 223, Colorado 221; Backs— Team— Nebraska 212, Colorado 210. 10 DUDA. b 11 FIERRO, b 12 SIGLER, b 14 WEBER, b 15 CHURCHICH. b 17 NET*M*NN, h 18 WALLS, b 19 UNIS, g 20 KIRKLAND, b 21 CARSTENS. b 22 GREGORY, b 23 ZEMKO. g 25 THORELL. b 28 POG’M'YER. b 28 JOHNSON, b 29 ZIEGLER, b 30 MUELLER, b 31 WILSON, b 33 ALVAREZ.! 34 PAPPAS, g 35 CRTTCHLOW. b 45 SOUCH. b 48 VACTOR. b 47 WEINMAN, b 48 TATMAN. b 49 WORLEY, b 51 UNRATH.C 52 MURPHY, e 53 HILL.C 54 PETERSEN. 0 55 ORUM.C 50 NARISH. t 57 GRELL. g 58 E HANSEN, t 59 OSBERG. g 61 KUDRNA. g 77 BARNES, c 78 CARLSON, t 79 L HANSEN, t 80 L. COLEMAN. • 32 RICHNAFSKY. • 83 SMITH, e 84 JETER.» 85 WHITE. • 86 ZIMMER.« 88 PATTON.« 89 CASEY.« 90 STARTZER. • 91 KIMMEL.« 92 DELANEY.« 94 RUDD, g 10 IRWIN, b 11 McCALL. b 12 ROGERS, b 15 KELLY, b 17 BABBS, b 21 PLANTZ. b 22 LEE. b 25 MORRIS, b 62 R. COLEMAN, i «8 BANKS, b 63 SENKBEIL. fl g p^cV. b 64 McCORD. t 65 GATZIOUS, ■ 66 MEYLAN. g 67 ALLERS, g 36 WACHHOLTZ, b 68 CANARSKY. t 37 MORRISON, b 69 KENNEDY, g 38 HAASCH. b 39 BECK, b 40 BRUNK. b «1 BUCKLER, b 43 KUEHUb 43 JANlK.b «4 WINTEB8.b 70 CZAP. t 71 WILKS, t 72 STTTH.» 73 BROWN, t 30 COOK, e 31 ANDERSON, b 32 MCCARTHY, b 33 MARTIN, e 34 O’DELL, b 35 GRAVES, b 40 LEWARD. b 41 FARLER. b 43 HARRIS, b 44 CORSON, b Colorado 53 FERRARO, c 56 DRUMMOND. C 57 SIDWELL. c 60 BEARD, g 61 MOTTL. g 62 HEATH, g 64 HARBEY. g 65 TRACY, g 66 BORTLES. g 68 SCOTT, g 70 HOKANSON, t 71 BOSCH, t 72 CSIKOS. t 74 TAYLOR, t 76 DONLEY, t 45 GREER, b Volney Ashford’s Vikings. Using two screen passes from sophomore Bob Thomas to Tom Whiteside on critical third down situations fora couple of 12-yard gains and utilizing some hard running by Thomas and PetrocceUi, the Vikings kept the ball for 16 plays in storming to t h e go-ahead touchdown. After Leo Ingolia converted with 14:34 left it didn’t look too good for Wesleyan which had only one first down at that point in the second half. But on its second possession after the touchdown by Missouri Valley Wesleyan got going. Aided by a pass interference penalty which took the ball to midfield, the Plainsmen used two big plays and a handful of crunchers to get it across. BUI Rohrig hit straight ahead for 10 yards to the 40, which was inches shy of a first down. Then quarterback Dave Lebsack, faking beautifully to the fullback on the short yardage situation, rolled to his right and hit Dennis Quick with a 34-yard pass which carried to the six. Four plays later Lebsack finally dived over the center to score. This time Dave Weisbrook converted. Seconds later, Alan Egger Tulane Hits Mississippi State, 17-15 New Orleanis iffi — Bobby Duhon led lowly Tuiane to a 17-15 upset of slumping Mississippi Staite Friday night with the help of a brusing defense that muffled the Maroons’ usuaUy explosive running attack. The left-handed sophomore threw touchdown strikes of 36 and 26 yards and set up what turned out to be the winning field goal in the fourth quar- er with his precision passing. The victory, Tulane’s first in the Southeastern Conference, dimmed the title hopes of Mississippi State, which had whipped Florida in its only other league test. Mis*. State ............................ 0 7 0 8—15 TutoB« .................................... 0 14 0 3—17 BIS—Rhoden 70 punt return (Neil kkdt) Tul—O'Steen 36 pass from Duhon (Pon* pretty much iced the thing when he intercepted a Thomas pass at the 35. Missouri Valley got the ball again with 1:07 to play and moved past midfield, but time ran out. Wesleyan had broken up a nearly complete defensive game with four minutes left in the half when Rohrig capped a 27-yard eight-play drive with a one-yard dive. The Plainsmen got their golden opportunity when a roughness penalty was called on the Vikings on a punt re turn by Rohrig. In this drive, as was the case all evening, the big play was a Lebsack to Quick pass on a slant in pattern which carried from the 14 to the one. Weisbrook’s kick blocked by Tom Baker. Both clubs took shots at field goals, but in all cases they were wide. Valley tried one from the 22 when a drive fizzled at the 12 in the second quarter. And Wesleyan tried once in t h e third and again just before the end of the game when drives stalled at the nine and 14-yard lines. Missouri Valley now has a 3-3 record. was Bliasouri Valley ..................... 0 0 7 0—7 Wesleyan ..................................0 6 0 7—13 Blissouri Valley—PetrocceUi, 2-yard run. PAT—Ingolia. Wesleyan—Rohrig, one-yard run; Leb- sacic. one-yard run. PAT—Weisbrook. Statistics Missouri Vaiiey Wesleyan First dowTis ............................20 Rushing yardage ................. 208 Passing yardage .................... 116 Passes ..................................... 11-23 Passes intercepted by .........0 Punts ............................................6-28 Fumbles lost ............................0 Yards penalized .................... 102 9 84 107 5-11 2 5-40 0 55 as the score might indicate. Kansas State had 7-0 and 14-7 leads before falling behind 21-14 at halftime. Nebraska’s Tom Penney unreeled the longest run of the day, an 85-yard kickoff return and then collaborated with man-mountain quarterback Frank Patrick on a 90-yard play for a touchdown. Dermis Galbraith od Storm Lake, la., kicked five extra points, a field goal of 38 yards and then plunged one yard for the final touchdown. Patrick, the 6-7 quarterback from Derry, Pa., was particularly impressive. He hit 11 of 15 passes for 157 yards. A fumble got Kansas State off on the right foot. The Wildcats scored the second time they had possession by going 32 yards in eight plays with Bill Nossek passing eight yards to Arvyd Petrus for the touchdown. Tom Burns converted. Nebraska tied it moments later by moving 75 yards in 11 plays. Dick Davis got the first of three first-half touchdowns with a four-yard blast. However, the big plays were authored by Patrick who connected on passes of 17 and 14 yards to Bob Moore and Sherwin Jarmon. Dennis Galbraith kicked and knotted it at 7-7. Kansas State needed only six plays to hop back into the lead. Their drive, carrying 64 yards, was climaxed by Greg Mom’s 19-yard run. Nebraska saw one drive thwarted on the four, but capitalized on field position to shoot 35 yards in six plays for the tying touchdown. Davis hammered over from the one. Nebraska moved Into the lead for the first time with the most impressive march of the game. Prodded by Patrick, the Huskers zoomed 99 yards in seven plays. Tom Penney picked up 21 and Davis 36 on the march. Davis went in from the eight to account for the 21-14 halftime lead. Nebraska got off to a fine start in the second half when Penney returned the kickoff 85 yai^s to the 10. How^ever, K-State held twice before Nebraska cashed in on the field position with Galbreath’s 38- yard field goal. That upped the margin to 24-14. The victory, Nebraska’s seventh straight under John Melton was iced with an unusual 90-yard play early in the fourth period. Patrick ran 10 yards and then lateraled to Penney, who covered the remaining distance. Galbraith, a kicking hero, came in to ramrod Ne­ braska’s closing 67-yard, 12- play drive. He rammed over from the one. Kansas State never seriously threatened in the second half. Nebraska ...................... 7 14 3 14—38 Kansas State . . 14 fl 0 9—14 KS—Petrus, 8 pas* from Nossek tBamee kick) N—Davis, 4 run (Galbraith kick) KS— Marn, 19 run (Barnes kick) N—Davis, 1 run (Galbraith kick) N—Davis. 8 run (Galbraith kick) N-FG—Galbraith 20 N Penney. 80 tun after lateral from Patrick (Galbraith kick) N—Galbraith. 1 run (Galbraith kick). Statistics NU First downs ................... 24 Yards rushing ................. 379 Yards passing .................... 157 Passes 11-16 Passes intercepted by ........ 3 Punts . 1-40 Fumbles lost 2 Penalty yardage ..................... 60 KSU 10 .39 140 12-28 I 8-43 0 11 SPORTS MENU 1 93-DAY SEASON Saturday HORSE RACING—Atokkd, South Sioux City. 1:30 p.m. FOOTBALL-Bic Ei^t: Ctrforado at Nebraska. Memtxrial Stadium. 2 p.m.; Missouri at Iowa SUte; Oklahoma at Kansas State; Oklahoma State at Kansas; PFL; Lincoln Omets at Grand Rapids; Des Moines at Omaha; Rock Island at Joliet; State Colleges; Hast ings at Kearney: Wayne at Chadrnn: Doane at Peru; Yankton at Concordia; Midland at Sioux Falls; Northwestern at Dana; Omaha at Eastern New Mexico: McCo<A JC at Northwest. Wyo.: Norfolk JC. at Waldorf. Iowa. Nothing sdwduled. Sportsmen Flock For Pheasants Nothiw Sunday «tieduled. Monday Tul-FOOTBALL—Big Eight Freshmen: sa at Oklahoma. HORSE RACING—Atokad. South Sioux City, 1:30 p.m. By United Press International An estimated 180.0(X) resident and I'.on-resident sportsmen blanketed Nebraska at sunrise this morning in prey of this Corn-Belt State’s prime pheasant crop. The hunting will continue for some time as Nebraska boasts the longest pheasant season in the nation~93 days. —LOSERS SCORE FIRST- Pius Rolls To Easy Win Over Foirbury Pius X spotted Fairbury a first quarter touchdown and then raced to eight of its own (five in the second quarter) to crush the Jeffs, 55-7, at Pius X Stadium Friday night. and Rick scaimper. Shibata’s 55-yard 0 0—7 8 7-J5 Dixon, 3 mn. PAT — Dixna Jim Dixon and Dennis Junker got the Jeffs off to an impressive start by leading a 74- yard, 15-play drive the first time they had the ball to take a quick 7-0 lead with Dixon’s conversion. Soon after he left the game with an injury. Falrtxjry ................................ 7 0 Plog ......................................... 7 35 FaJrtxtry (run). Phis — Rierden (2). 6 run. 18 pam from Glenn; Hu««» ( 2 ), 30 run, 56 run: Whedear, 3 run; Oamell. 34 p«*a from McEoiry; Stephenson. 16 run: Shibata, 53 run. PAT — .McEntry 7 (kicks). Statistics But the Bolts struck back two minutes later for its first touchdown and quickly rolled to a 42-7 half time lead. Subs mopped up for Pius, now’ 5-2 on the season. Fair.Plua First downs ......... 19 Rushing Yardage ........... 367 Passing Yardage ......... 70 Passes ......................... 4-11 Passes int. by ............. 3 Punts ............................ 1-48 Penalty yardage ............. 10 FumMes lost ................. 1 FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD BIG EIGHT FRESHMEN .Nebraska 38. Kansas State 14 Iowa State 14. Missouri 7 Fairbury is now 1-6 for the campaign, taking its soundest defeat. In that spariding second period, the Boite rolled to 106 yards on the ground aiid three for five passing for 60 more yards. Tliey ei^ed up with 367 a foot for the evening. Bruce Hussey did the second half scoring with 30 and 56-yard runs and made some crowd-wooing tackles on kickoffs. Sophomore Bill Rierden also had two touchdowns, going in on a six-yard run and an 13- yard pass from sub quarterback Joe Glenn with ^st one second left in the opening half. The other points in the second quarter went to Dale Darnell’s catch of McEniry’s 34- yard pass, Dana Stephenson on a run from six yards away Uu* kick) Tul—Fitzpatrick 26 pass from Duhon (Pontius kick) Tul—FG P(Mitlus 25 MS—Cook 2 run (Cook run) Attendance 20.0(X). Statistics Miss. State Tulane 77 SAVATINO, t First downs .................1316 78 VAN VALKEN- Rushing yardage ................. 113 110 BURG, t Passing yardage ................. 110 157 80 HARRIS, e Passes ................................11-24 12-28 83 HEYDT. e Passes InterceiHed by..........I 1 86 FAIRBAND. e PtmU ........................................7-39 7-11 87 POLUMBUS. t Funriries lost ......................... Z 2 M LeMASTEBS. «Yards peDaMaed .................. 14» U STATE COLLEGES Midland 34, Sioux Falls 6 Nebraska Westeyan 13. Missouri Valley 7 OTHER COLLEGES Tulane 17. MiseLsi^ State IS LOCAL HIGH SCHOOLS Linooln Southeast 26. Beatrice 13 Pius X 55. Fairbury 7 Unodn Noitheast 21. Grand Mawf 7 STATE mca SCHOOLS Stromeburn 14, St. Edvaard 13 Ralston 21. Auburn 7 Weeidiw Water 12. Plattevlew 0 Nebraska CSty 25. Falls City 13 DeHiler 31. Nelson 0 STAFF PHOTO BY HARALD IHIEIMANIS SLIPS AWAY . . nal Thunderbolt score. Pius’ Bill Hussey slips away from Fairbury tackier for fi- Bameston 34. Alexandria 20 David (Xty Aquinas 21. Hastings SC 6 Columbus 13. Fremont 6 Ckdumbus Sootus 45. Omaha Rummel 14 Valentine 6 . Ainsworth 6 Merriman 7, Cody 7 Exeter 40. Chester 0 MiUard 27, North Bend 0 ArUngton 27. Gretna 14 Fairmont 35. Henderson 0 Lawrence 25. Clay Oenter 7 Albion 34. Schuyler 0 Ashland 19. Hooper 7 Aurora 20, Central C^ity 7 Fremont Bei^n 14, Wa^'erly 7 Nebraska Oily 25. Falls City 13 Ceresoo 54, Utica 13 Bladen 62. Glenvil 6 Cozad 20 , Minden 0 Crestón 35, Oielby 6 Tecumseh 14. Pawnee City 6 Sliver Creek 30, Genoa 0 SukUm 47, Harvard 0 North Platte 33. Omaha Central 8 Waco 38, Beaver Crossing 25 Norfolk 33, Hastings 20 Seward 24, Seward Con<x>rdia 13 Elkhorn 6 . Valley 0 Kearney 27, Scottsbluff 7 Kearney 27. ScottsMuff 7 Km Creek 14. Pleasanton 9 Ovwrton 66 , Sumner 20 H(ridrege 27, Lexington 8 Adams 47. Sterling 26 SuperkM- 13, Wymore 7 Alvo-Eagle 46, Norris IS Milford 7, Friend 6 Syracuse 26, Plattsmouth 14 Rising City 34, Tobias 13 Geneva 26. Wilber 7 Broken Bow 21. Ord 7 Sidney 14, Ogallala 13 Naponee 54. Edison 6 WUcox 40, Amherst 13 Fairmont 35, Henderson 0 Republican City 18, Stamford Loomis 34, Eustis 25 Keneeaw 12. Juniata 6 MUligwi 38, Plymouth 13 Bellevue 14. Omaha Tech 7 Omaha Westskle 42, Onaaha BR 6 Omaha Benson 55, Omaha Burke 0 CouncU Bluffs AL 13, Omaha South 6 Omaha (3athe<k*al 59, Wahoo Neumann 18 Omaha North 34, Oei^ton 0 West Point 20 , Wakefield 12 Blair 18. Wahoo 14 Papillion 19. Onvaha HN 12 Laurel 44. Madison 0 Grand Island NW 45. Howells 14 (>>zad 20 , MliKlen 0 Hartington 39. Ponca 12 Winside 27, Coleridge 0 Newman Grove 19, Battle Cre^ 6 Ocelli 12, Crofutn 0 Stantcm 46. Neligh 13 Kimball 32. Gerii« 6 McC^x* 31. AUiance 0 Owesco 54, Utica 13 Oakland 19, Hooper 7 Elkhorn 6 , Vattey 0 David aty 26. Crete 12 Fort CafDioan 27. Monroe 12 Gordon 63. Chadroo 0 Harrison 20, Mitchdl SunAmror M Rushville 25. Hay Springs 6 Morrill 18, Hemingford 0 Alliance SA 13. Sidney SP 19 Bridgemrt 26. MitcbeM 13 Bayard 32. Mtnatare 0 Potter 26, Harrlfburg 7 Dix 33 . Lodgepoie 6 MelbeU 26. Gutiey 26 Pine Blufls. Wyo. 12 Kearney 12. Hayes (Center 6 14 Lyrban 19. West Kearney 12. Haj Loomis 34. fSnstis 25 Wilcox 40, Amherst 13 Overton 06. Sumner 20 AxteUZI, HUdrelbU The daily bag limit this year is four birds, with 20 allowed in possession. The shooting of hen pheasants will be permitted the final 16 days in western, southwest and northeast areas. One hen a day may be taken from Jan. 8 through Jan. 23. Game technicians have placed the Nebraska pheasant population at between 5 million and 6 million, about average but a little better than last year. An estimated 3 million birds will be mowed down during the long campaign. State Game Commission director Mel 0. Steen said the Nebraska pheasants had a good late nesting season that will add to the already bright prospects. “There are plenty of birds for everyone. There should be a lot of happy, satisfied hunters,” Steen said. More non-resident hunters are expected in Nebraska this season because of reports that pheasant populations are down in neighboring South Dakota and Iowa. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) will televise a special program Monday on Nebraska pheasants for tape r e p 1 a y on its American Sportsman series. Best hunting in Nebraska is expected near gravel and dirt roads off the beaten trail. Those gunners who get I out and work fields and areas jof heavy cover are also expected to harvest limits. Lower watering points are reported to have jungle-like cover which will make it hard, even for the veteran hunter, to maneuver. Dogs will come in handy here. The top hunting regions this year are in northeast, central and southwest Nebraska. The cities of McCook, Hastings, Holdrege, Broken Bow, Norfolk, Fremont and Wayne have been flooded with requests for lodging and quarters. “You can’t touch a room in some northeast cities,” Dick H. Schaffer, Game Commission information chief, said. “Hunters up there say the pheasant crop is the best since 1940 when we had a tremendous crop.” Nebraska’s quail season will open at sunrise next Saturday. Game technicians say the population is the best in six years. “The outlook is terrific. There’s just no other way to describe it,” remarked Schaffer. Southeast counties, which provide from 35 to 40% of the quail harvest, have reported excellent concentrations. Good bobwhite hunting is expected along the Republican and Platte Rivers and their tributaries. Daily bag and possession limits are six and 18, respectively. The season runs through Jan. 2. i

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