Sterling Standard from Sterling, Illinois on October 13, 1928 · Page 3
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Sterling Standard from Sterling, Illinois · Page 3

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Sterling, Illinois
Issue Date:
Saturday, October 13, 1928
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Page 3
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i $"? i e JO U 11 Copy M»,ss First Business g Of Sterling <8y Scott Among sterile^ pr*9*T~pd rrmny trfsmw? of oW^n d*r* Is MTU. W« M. BwirTy, wirtciar of GmpisJn M. P. Bnm?y. whn^*> horn? at 2SO Sixth «vprn<» contain. 1 ;, «mong other interf*ine rriir^, n' of remarknh!? t».v*:trif* tnrcush trh'rh ths't ptr the !.?, S r^ns'j'! r>f j-f%«.ff lt£ft in ewfainrd $J?fi! Inhabitant.*, , r j n 404 farms. Pl.lTfl serfs In fivrm. 35,- "Thus Whitesldft whllr*. in rich jr)^ of ton, i n tr-stfr. In timber i in wfi.*er power, mirps!**** any in this section of the thp tvn*, «hown she made durlns whi!® her husbnnr th» Union nrmy. One of the tnpestrien w; in th« IfK-Ri galley of the THinols Academy of Fine Art* exhibit here two yesr* n(fo, »nd attracted much admiring attention. A still finer example of Mrs, Bundy's «rt ... ,.„,. work Is n Isrtte tapestry portrait of Washington, which curators of the national museum in Washington have sought to obtain as n worthy example of that once popular method of artistic expression, but whir! Mrs. Bundy Is loth to part, with * long HA sha lives. Be/rap books kept, by Mrs. Bundy contain a great variety of Interest- Ins records of local'history, and she is one of the possessors of a rsvre old pamphlet, "The sterling Republican's First Annual statement of the Business of Sterling" published In 1057 by William Caffrey and prepared by William S uoodhuc. It is prefaced with a historical sketch of thl.-, community which In the main agrees with the fuller account published in the Bent and Wilson history of Whlteslde county published twenty years Inter The following excerpt from the older account Is Interesting. Off Old Galena Trail. "From 1840 to 1B50 Whlteslde gradually Increased In population and wealth, but before the Air Line branch of the Galena and Chicago Union railroad passed through our county, It wns to a certain extent isolated and did not for several years nil up with farmers with that rapidity which has characterized some of our neighbors. "Those acquainted with the thoroughfares of Illinois n few years back will have no difficulty In accounting for the above fact. Chicago on the east and Galena on the northwest were not only the two principal points of northern Illl-' if not the ty yet until opened two.ye.nr* ago by railroad, !?, took *n inferior' rank among counties In which it HAS no equal (n natural advantages; bu the iron horse h»« crossed Rock rir T and I* now rrmklng half «, dmwt trip«i dally from Ohleisgo throne! Sterling to the Mlwtfcwtppl, and h another year two other route* finished lirmn which we can RO from Sterling to any point of the compn «!<;." Old Whatever rrmy have been the cause of Sterling not growing ... Rockford hsw grown, It was evident!y not. for luck of "boosting," for the old pamphlet gives n glowing Recount of the plans of the Sterling and Port Eyron railroad, to connect the Warsaw and Rockford railroad, 40 miles south of here, and the Kenosha and Rock River railroad, to come down the river from Rockford and connect with the Sterling and Port Byron line. These paper railroads were only two ol dozens of others, which, like paper towns, made maps of northern Illinois In olden dayn look Incomprehensible to those who see them now The two railroad* never came. The Chicago and Bock River railroad, now the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, came to Rock Falls In 1073, and since .then the Peoria branch of the "Chicago and Northwestern has been the only new mil- road built In thta vicinity, in fact, ,s been 20 years or more since any main trunk line railroad has been built In the United States Interurban lines checked railroad building a quarter of a century ago and concrete motor highways con- linue to bar the way of further developing the railroad connections of the country at large. The old booklet gives the follow- ng figures, furnished by Mr. Bates then agent of the Northwestern In Sterling, for the freight business done here during the year ending March I, 1857: From Chicago. $29615.85; to Chicago, $14.828.77; total amount of freight paid by Sterling ?.ri» nttendiTHf the. in churches, hsd 1.300 $0^1 h-nshr-is of wh*M_,, 201,- OS7 bushch of torn, ?fl,654 biishets of vhcRt. 35,4-54 bmhrln of potatoes" hftd M<?0 hor^s, 6,781 rattle, 5.373 sheep. 3,642 hog- and produced 158,817 pounds of butter und chw*». T?w old booklet, claims 38,«!50 Inhabitants for the county In 1855, with cwrre«pondinff Incrwuf* iti other ngiir?^. RccordinR to the («t«ite census of that je«r. First class farms, Improved farms, are quoted BS worth 840 to $75 an acre, farms not. «fl near towns and not ?»<! well improved are valued at 815 to |40 an acre, and "land as good for farming purposes, but not so near towns, unimproved. $5 to $15 an acre." Crops of 1855 were estimated M 530,000 bushels for wheat, 700.000 for corn, 150,000 for potatoes and 300,000 for oats These arcs only a few of the nrnnv curious old facts told bv the pamphlet of 70 years ago. Those pertaining to the city of Sterling must be reserved for another stor'v 21 VIOLATORS!)?" MOTOR LAWS FOUND AMONG ROAD CREWS Motorcycle Officers Robert Card of this city and Hal Roberts of Dixon made a cleanup this week at Steward, Compton nnd Lee Center in Lee county, where a contracting firm Is engaged In hauling gravel onto the roads. Twenty-one persons were found to be violating the state automobile laws and they are to appear at the office of Sheriff Ward Miller at Dixon tomorrow, Sunday morning. Some were driving trucks with but one license plate, some without ilntes at all, others had no chauffeur's license and one was driving with fictitious numbers. In order not to delay the work on the roads ill of the defendants were allowed o wait until Sunday before uppear- ng In court. Sheriff J. w. Kelly of Morrison, was a business visitor in this city on Friday. The Spirit of 76 JR. i YOMI Home Beautiful , T i!™ e l S ,ll at l sf ?? U ? n s f °" d , to "° .° ther - when you arrive at home Drive out. Take a look for yourself. You will greatly l view many HOLLAND BULBS—PLANT NOW artment of b H 1bs „ Peoniea, Poppies, Snowdrops, ™ genume ' arcissus ' Crocus Evergreens, a large assortment. Amoor River Privet, a hardy hedge. lh»j of Shade Trees, Fruit Trees, Flowering Shrubs, Hedge Plants, Climbing and Bush Roses. ' &tock~~€Umated-~~Gwrmteed Highland Park Nurseries Order* giweu '«• f «•• rf ' «. ,, .,' ».,, ?>*7»)-» in »> « . f •- 7' 1 *• ** **f AS THE LF.GION PARADED FN SA convention of the American Legion Ui<-. bv a f!fp and drum corps, is \NTONiO. ..... Strrrt s^nrhrd its ciimnx q around n coniT -, nf F,rm Antonio. Texa In a big parade. Here In thr bnMn^ss district, 5 . -ffpre jammed when the the Hnf 1 of march, headed ,,,,,,^ rlr ,, n ,, ;,,,„,„ er.h/,01 fsrin-;*, fair br^rrte, ^c. rtr In feet fh« r*!wd for th* J!n* In «n g lX^ r t?^ r ri--"r T ' U ' !M ^"'^ fnirn 833iX> to t/.-or> or more TM.rlv. Your corsn«*cUon v/Ith our Omimnv ment. infn pn«H!A T n of grr-nfnr T r<i..--,! very rapid, provMed. rors s,rp ». RCKV! *urf-pr.(l To qualify *nil!c»nt must V>" of eo community; of unauestioniib!" intrg wny. ' Thp men select rd for this respnn^h!" the start wvl q»,!.-klr I'wdi in ,M!} po-ltlons, will Ijc ..uppl^fl with «!-. by Mirect mail ndvrrtlflnsj and fiil'--<.( Write fully in confidf-nce {or jinrtifu send reference-. f»i?-,r-i) '•K. ' i c),»rar***- rttv jn^rt rr. ' ..... " * pr-Mtion. wh drew Mannfartnrcr, r)ppf, jrw, r. O. Rn.x HW A'o more buttons off W HEN the wringer was eaken off the latest EASY Washer, it was because a better method of extracting water from clothes tad been found.. .The new method—which employs centrifugal[force-has these advantages over the old: It takes out more water than wringing does .. . Jt puts no strain on fabrics; does not crack silk or rayon garments. It cannot break buttons, nor injure hooks and fasteners. It does not stretch nor distort woolen garments ; ; ; It leaves clothes evenly damp and free from deep,hajrdcreases.Itmakesdryingmuch quicker. It makes ironing easier .; . Its operation is entirely automatic—and without an exposed part. // is safe! The day of slowly feeding clothes into a wringer- piece by piece —is swiftly passing. With the new EASY Washer, an enclosed compartment replaces the wringer. It takes a whole batch of clotiies at one time «ad whirls out the water in le$$ than two minutes. AJi you do is move a lever. Things like feather pillows or blankets, \vhich will aot go through a wringer, are easily handled. The Vacuum Principle The fame of the EASY Washer was built on the vacuum principle of washing. Like human hands, the EASY'S three vacuum cups N* oier* Urn clotbts move up and down and around — sixty-six times a minute — gently but J>osi- tively cleansing, in an incredibly few moments. No garment is too dirty, no piece too bulky, no fabric too fine towash perfectly in tiie new EASY. How It Saves Time Speed is gained by doing two things at one time. Jbight full-sue sheets, or their equal, are washed in the tub, while eight other sheets are damp-dried in the drying compartment. The clothes ere not rushed and you are not hurried. A special gas heater beneath the wash tub, provides abundan£hotwater.Wheayouarethrou g h,|£tmo V e a little lever, and the new EASY pumps itself empty mtothe drain or sink. No burdensome lifting of water There are EASY Wasbert with wrmg^s, /<*. They are good, efficient machines. Their wrtnjrers are equipped with every known safety device. But the tact remains that wherever there are mechanical wringers, there is *ls& €&a»cef A Week's Washing Free We m ill gladly bring the new EASY to your home. A demonstration does not obligate you. And you on own an EASY on easy terms, with low monthly payments. 3 WASHER AIw supplied with 4-cych gawlma motor for fames without electricity E. WHEELOCK, Rock Falls

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