Oxford Public Ledger from Oxford, North Carolina on October 30, 1915 · Page 2
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Oxford Public Ledger from Oxford, North Carolina · Page 2

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Saturday, October 30, 1915
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PAGE TWO INTERNATIONAL Sunday School Lesson SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31st, 1915 THE BOYvJOASH CROWNED KING Motto Text -"The house of the wicked shall be overthrown; But the tent of the upright shall flourish." (Proverbs 14:11.) Lesson Passage, 2 Kings 11:1-20. Memeory Verses, 11, 12. It never was proposed that a woman should sit upon the throne of David, and surely it could not have been contemplated that a heathen defending the infamous rites of the de-fiers df God should rule over his chosen people. But to this pass had things come in the city of the great King. It all goes back to that ill-digested scheme to seek for areunion of the twelve tribes by a martial connection between the children of reigning monarchs. It is the grandchild of that marriage who now covers Judah with shame. Into what an inert condition have the people of God fallen that such a state of things should be tolerated; for there is no account of any protest when the blood of David runs through the gashes made by heathen assassins. These, horrible conditions continue through six year!: The temple is so neglected that it affords safe sanctuary to child who would be slain if it were imagined such an one as he lived. The worship of God had fallen into decay, and the people were benumbed, their , desolation turning them into little better than dumb cattle, if indeed they had ability to raise their hands to better their conditions. There was more solidity of character, however, in Judah than there' was ni Israel. In the northern kingdom there had been such a succession of base and self-seeking kings that the character of the common people partook of the nature of their rulers. In Judah, however, with its temporary revulsions, the influence of good kings had served to strengthen the character of its people to such an extent that they rallied under wise leadership; this Israel never did. Among these the love of God and enthusiasm for their past history seemed to be practically lost; while in oudah there was a restlessness lest the seat of David and the remnant of his kingdom should become subsidiary to heathen influence. When the opportunity was afforded, the people were ripe for revolution, and the length and breadth of Judah rose up to the defense of its rights. There was preserved to them their love for David with whom had been associated the promise of ultimate blessing, and it was to this that they clung so assiduously. Help was to come out of the sanctuary of which David had. so eloquently sung. It was because the temple was neglected, few going to its solemn feasts, and the altars cold with dead ashes, that within its walls a safe refuge was afforded to the last link that bound these people to David Few knew the secret of the little child who was presumedly supposed to be the son of Jehosheba, if indeed anyone took the trouble to make inquiry. Our help comes from God's altars. This may be an age in which the house of God is slightly esteemed and its aisles echoless or filled occasionally with sparse congregations of worshipers, but when God's grace is to come with power upon us, it is sure to come from the altars upon which men have looked with indifference. The intervening and controlling hand of God must be visible in the admirable procedure of the pious Je-hoiada in whose sight the life of this only descendant of David was precious. The method of presenting him to Israel was' involved in many perils, yet the guiding of the steps of this good man was directed by the Lord who was mindful of his promise that David should never lack one to sit upon Israel's throne. Faith in God implies purpose and activity. We cannot expect that waiting supinely for God to do thinges will result in assured success. It is not distrust in God to lay our plans according to our best judgment, for then faith leaves the issue with God and expects the divine blessing. The gospel requires preaching, which in itself is an insignificant thing, but which God makes his power unto salvation and thus brings about the conversion of human souls. It is equally true with the less important things of life. It must have been a thrilling moment when the 'crisis of Israel's fate hung in the balance. A little lad, but seven years of age, stood arrayed in royal robes on a tribunal in the sight of all beholders, wearing with childish grace the crown" of David. In his hands had been placed the roll of the law of Moses as indicating that he was the rightful successor of those who had led Israel to its highest prosperity. Crown and robes and scepter may "well stand for physical power, but the Wprdvof the living God is above them all. Without that crowns and scepters crumble and - perish as so do the peoples who look no furth er for the emblems of their strength than these. " Jehodia deserves an honorablee place in Jewish history for his clear conception of the right, his remarkable cleverness in planning, and his brave endurance and fearless determination. SUBSCRIBE FOR PUBLIC LEDGER Bullock News Items . (Correspondence of the Public T-edger) Mr. Robert Hester of Chase City was a welcome visitor to Bullock on last Sunday. Mrs. Goodrich Royster left last Saturday for Baltimore where she goes to the bedside of her mother, Mrs. Clifford who is very ill.1 Miss Mattie Lou Sizemore accompanied by Miss Hettie Hunt, who is also teaching at Bullock,; spent the week end at the home of her parents, -Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Sizemore. The literary society of the Bullock school has been reorganized for the year with Charlie Morgan as president; Sallie Norwood, vice president; Fannie Campbell, secretary-treasurer Pearl Royster, supervisor; Miss Hettie Hunt, critic and Virgie Crenshaw, chaplain. The Society had its first meeting on last Friday afternoon. There will be a Halloween Party given at the Bullock High School on October 30th from 7 to 10 o'clock. Everybody is invited. Oysters and fruits will be sold. The funds will go for school improvement. WHEN HER BACK ACHES A Woman Finds All Her Energy and Ambition Slipping Away Oxford women know how the aches and pains that often come when the kidneys fail make life a burden. Backache, hip pains, headaches, dizzy spells, distressing urinary troubles, are frequent indications of weak kidneys and should be checked in time. Doan's Kidney Pills are for the kidneys only. They attack kidney diseases by striking at the cause. Here's proof of 'their merit in an Oxford woman's words: Mrs. J. L. Fuller, 39 Asylum St., Oxford says: "Whenever my back causes me any misery, a few doses of Doan's Kidney Pills have taken them on several occasions and they have always regulated the action of my kidneys and relieved the pains in my back. They are a medicine of merit." Price 50c, at all dealers. Don't simply ask for a kidney remedy get Doan's Kidney Pills the same that Mrs. Fuller had. Foster-Milburn Co., Props., Buffalo, N. Y. ; Honor Roll The following is the honor roll for Currin School: First Grade Harvey Nutt, Pauline Freeman. Second Grade Nathan Cannady. Callie Hobgood. Third Grade Iven Nutt. Fourth Grade Martha Cannady. Fifth Grade -Hurbert Burnett. Sixth Grade Coune Cannady, James Currin. ... Lucy M. Tunstall, teacher. It falls out that Mrs. Norman Gait, who is to become Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, has a fortune of about $250,000 and an annual income of about $ 20, -000. The deceased Mr. Gait left his wife all his property, unconditionally, when he died eight years ago. All the men who would sidestep a pretty widow with an income of $20,000 and no encumbrances, can now criticise Mr. Wilson. Mat. Ziglar, Jr., of Winston-Salem was killed Friday night while possum hunting in the vicinity of :. that city. Ziglar, about 20 years old, was accompanied by two companions. A possum was treed and the tree cut. when it fell it lodged. Ziglar walked under it and at that instant the tree fell and crushed him to death. PUBLIC LEDGER . Good Pay for Good Man (Charlotte Observer.) The commissioners of Iredell county have employed a superintendent whose duty it shall be to look after the upkeep of the roads. His salary was fixed at $150 a month. The Mooresville Enterprise is inclined to be just a little bit critical. "While we have no objections as to who may land the job," says that, paper, "yet it is reasonable to suppose that the county could secure a man for that particular job at $1,000 or $1,200 a year who" would be just as competent and attain just as good results." The Observer is disposed to the view that the commissioners made the salary one of some consequence for the particular purpose of impressing on the superintendent that he has an important duty to perform and that there must be a constant-exercise of alertness and efficiency to earn it. Iredell was the first county in North Carolina to vote a big bond issue for road building and the county' was equipped with a splendid system of good roads. Should the superintendent prove the right sort of a man he will not only be worth his salary to the county, but will save it jnany dollars that formerly went to the repair expense account. Where the upkeep of the pub ic roads is concerned The Observer believes that there is no mistake in the policy of a good salary for a good man. The British board of trade has arranged to make final settlements for all seized American cotton which is not covered by sales contracts. The price to be paid will be the market value at the port of shipment on the date of shipment and contracts of the same dates will be used as a guide in arriving at the price to be paid. A generous slice of our bread with good butter makes a "piece" that every child enjoys. Our bread makes healthy children for it is made from the very finest flour, and not a drop of adultration goes into it. Grown folks as well as children like our bread because it is the best bread baked in this town. A trial will convince you that this is not just a boast. May we have the trial order today? 'PHONE 297L GARRETT'S CASH BAKERY E Dante on Neutrality vj-etie xteviewj Few sentences are as deep engraven in the Italian mind as the famous verses from the third canto of "The Inferno." Every Italian boy learns them by heart. Virgil has led Dante through the gate of hell to where in the starless air, they heard strange tongues, horrible cries, words of pain accents of anger and deep, hoarse noises. Dante, overcome with horror, asks Virgil who these sufferers are. Virgil answers: This wretched state The sorry souls of those endure Who without shame and without hon- or lived. They are commingled with that cai-tic crew Of Angels who neither rebels were Nor true to God, but for themselves. In order not to be less beautiful Heaven drove them out; the deeps of hell receive them -not Lest damned souls should glory over mem - Mercv and Justice disdain tliom Speak not of them, but look and pass. Dante Alighieri's scorn of th remain neutral when right is fighting amongst wrong has become part of tne Italian inheritance. SATURDAY. OCTOBER n. Who Gets The first of the season I published in the paper that I would give $5.00 in gold to the one raising the largest turnip from seed bought from me. Some body will get this $5.00. This proposition will be closed Nov. 1st, If you have a large turnip bring it here and let us weigh it. The winners name will be published soon after the first of Nov. Santa Claus will have his toys at my store this year as usual. We are getting ready for him. d. 6. HALL Coal! Coal! Coal! SPLINT ......... $6.40 Ton . POCAHONTAS . . .$7.40 Ton ANTHRACITE . .$10.00 Ton These prices subject to a discount of 40c per ton if paid by the 10th of the month following delivery. Discounts not allowed to those who owe old accounts. Oxford Ice Co. THE. JJOIHIMSOKf It is the high averages at the Johnson that Talks. Sam Watkims says that Blow as the Tinme 1 6t ROLL m 59 Prices onu Alt Grades Are Let us have Your Next Load and you will Be Among the Satisfied Tobacco Growers s MAM Do You Have Elec. trie Lights in Your Home? If Not We WiU Pay For Having Your House Wired We give you a year in which to pay us. Futher-more, we have secured special reduced prices for your benefit. Call or drop us a card. Carolina Power Light Co. & ss Here is the.AnswerV'in I telrniwbNAL! The Merriam Webster Every day in your talk and reading, at I home, on the street car, in the office, ihoD and school you likely question the mcan. ! wC.il T "w wora a mend asks: VVbat makpj) mnrto it : thelctionofLockaWeorthepronun. i Thi0K?JZJutZ?' Wnat is " i This New Creation answers all kinds of i Questions in Language, History, Biography. ! -- i vvij, iiaucg, Arts ana 400.000 Words. 6000 Illustrations. Cost $400,000. 2700 Pases. The Onlv Hiotmnanrm'tl. the new divided page, char- acterizea as A Stroke of Genius." H India Paper Edition: On thin, opaque, strong, India paper. What a satis- g faction to own the Merriam Webster in a form so light S ana so convenient to use I s unenairthe thickness and! H weight of Regular Edition. H Regular Edition: On strong book paper, s l4Mlbs. Size 12 x $ 5 inches. Writ for specimen pagei. illustrations, etc. Mention this H publication and receive FEEE a eet of pocket S maps. G.&C. I MERRIAM I CO., Springfield, Mass, HuiLiDiniiiiniiiniiiiiiuiuiiiiiiiiiiiuu 'eaa&'ra (j ra ea Kara m..xwa m 'fi'A iirxi hfui unm tut in 1 1 w AT Lyon's Drug Store Make a 25c purchase and receive a- Free Ticket TO Orpheum Theatre MM F. LYOTS "Is the Place." College St. Oarford, N.C The Business Ixcal Column otbe Puc Ledger is read by the people. Will Snrai Sores, zcraa m a used cure Rheumatism, Nm- i. Headacnes, vrauip, VBmises, Cuts Burns, Old i, etc. Annscpuu --7 internally or externally. A DOLIB SPENT IN AD VERT IS I Nfi " LIKE BREAD CAST UPON THE WATER, BETPB

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