Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on November 24, 1972 · Page 1
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Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 1

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Lincoln, Nebraska
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Friday, November 24, 1972
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Page 1
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WraUur IÌRIGIIT National Wealhtr Strvic# Ferocailt for Lincoln Arta Tonight; Cloudy, cool, .30% rain chance Saturday; Cloudy, cool, 40% rain chance Past 24 hours; High .39% Low 24* Next 24 hours; High 4,3% Low 3,3* Full Weather on Page 30 ( hill I r 4 *aMiir 4 \s 4 Sections—3S Pages !0«h Yaar No 282 and Nebraska Slate Journal Lincoln, ^«.el)., Friday, Nov. 21. U)T2 SubKri|9Neii erieaa on t>ago i Market Final lOc' Memb(n% ot .Nebraskaland Trt'asurt' Hunter.^ have fun pursuing Iheir hobby, but find more freaki .h loot than money. Story on Page 17 Secret Rendezvous Fogs Peace Puzzle C O Í ^ Another Meeting Planned Saturday Compiled From News Wires Paris — Presidential adviser Henry Kissinger conferred for about one hour Friday with flanoi's chief peace negotiator. Communist Vietnamese sources said the meeting was not scheduled but that it came at Kissinger’s request. The sources gave no details of the meeting. Karlier, both sides had said no meeting was scheduled Friday. It would have been the first hiatus in this latest round of negotiations, which began Monday in an effort to find an acceptable peace formula. Kissinger and Hanoi's !,e Due Tho will hold another meeting Saturday in Paris, the W'hite House announced Fridav. President Nixon's pres's secrcdary, Ronald Ziegler, said the usual procedure for announcing times for the meetings in advance was not followed for Friday's one*hour Kissinger- Tho ses.sion because they did not want it to fx’ publicized. Kissinger, who has been meeting with Tho daily since Monday, called on French Foreign Minister Maurice Schumann Friday. Ziegler said. The purpose was “to thank the French government for the courtesies it has extended and to give him an update on the talks," Ziegler said. Newsmen who trailed Kissinger said tho meeting with Tho Friday took place in a villa owned by the North Vietnamese delegation and located two blocks from its mission in suburban i'hoisy l.e Roi The newsmen said Ki'.singer slipptxl out of the rear exit of the F.S. emba.ssy residence in Pans, went to the villa and stayed about one hour. Keeping Secret Harder As the negotiators left, a television network correspondent remarked to Kissinger: “It's getting harder and harder to find a place for a secret rendezvous, isn’t it. Dr Kissinger’” Ki.ssinger. he said. rep!ed; “It eertainlv is ’’ Farlicr Friday, a Viet Fong s}K)kesman said the continued support of South Vietman’s President Nguyen Van Thieu by the U.S. is blocking a peace settlement. “We wonder if the United States really wants peace, since it keeps supp<irting Thieu, the Viet Cong s(K»kesman said. “Thieu is opposed to peace. There has Ijeen no change in our demands that Thieu must go," Kissinger and the Hanoi envoys conferrrri Thursday for more than six hours, the most protacted sessmn .so far. South Vietman’s National S(wurity Council met in Saigon with Thieu Friday for the second straight day to discuss the status of the talks, Vietnamese sources said Thieu has also called in a number ot ranking military and government officials for consultations after receiving reports from a trio of diplomats he sent to Paris to observe the current round cf negotiation. Official sources cautioned against speculating what the new round of Saigon meetings mean and said South Vietnam has not modified its opposition to several points of the draft peace agreement now being discussed in Paris. Unhappy over re^wrts he's received from the U.S. in the past, Thieu sent his ambassadors to Washington and lx)ndon and Nguyen I'hu Due, his special adviser on foreign affairs, to monitor the talks and to bt' briefed after each session by Kissinger. The three have then reported back to Thieu, a procedure being followed for the first time in the four-year history of the negotiations. French Comments The French Communist paper L’humamte noted sourly the secret talks are running longer than the "not more than three or four days" estimated as needed by Kissinger in his Oct. 27 news conference. L’hurnanite’s headline called it "Nixon’s Dangerous Game,” saying “he reopens the essential points of the accord." The Communist paper referred to South Vietnamese insistence that the agreement specify the withdrawal of Hanoi’s forces from South Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. Laotion premier Prince Souvanna Phouma in an interview published Friday by the Paris paper i^e Figaro said in Vientiane that extending a Vietnam cea.se-fire to Laos "is going to be discussed in Paris between Mr. Kissinger and .VI. Le Due Tho." Due, who is Kissinger’s counterpart in the Saigon government, reportedly went to Paris to restate Thieu's opposition to sections of the draft agreement. Meanwhile American sources confirmed F'riday that Thieu has asked President Nixon to meet with Due, who is tentatively scheduled to go to Washington from Paris. If the meeting comers off, sources said. Due will present Saigon’s discontent with the draft agreement directly to .Nixon. Other sources said Friday Thieu now wants to meet with Nixon himself. A spokesman for the presidential palace said she could not confirm or deny the report while the U.S. Embassy declined to comment, restating its policy not to discuss matters relating to the negotiatons. Ziegler told reporters that Nixon had "no meeting planned at least at this time" with Thieu. Ziegler declined comment on Saigon reports that the talks had bogged down and refused to say whether Kissinger was encountering unexpected difficulties in finalizing the nine-point cease-fire agreement announced last month. He noted only that Kissinger said when he left for Paris, he was under instructions "to stay a« long as it is useful." Plioiies Canceled lo Protest Rale . . . And A iva y They Go ... Pescara, Italy (UPI) — Pes- chara bar and restaurant owners, irate over inflated telephone bills, said Wednesday they would rather do witlvoui phones than pay the high rates. A spokesman for the owners said the telephone company kept billing them for more calls than they made and refused to correct its error. The spokesman said all bars and restaurants canceled their telephone contracts in protest, test. Wijis Only $4.77 Choose yours from our large selection. House of Wigs, 12th and “N”.—Adv. STAPF COLORPHOTOS BY WEB RAY Although operating out of the wishbone formation, Oklahoma took to the air lines Thursday, completing 10 passes for 186 yards. Oil’s split end John Carroll (10) makes a catch before being stopped by Zaven Yaralian (left). The result was a 17-14 win for the Sooners and an unhappy Boh Devaney who had hoped to make his final home appearance a happy one. liii8ker-SooiM*r on 2.3. Fkiiires on 27 Devaney’s 100 Victories Not Forgotten By DEAN TERRILL The game itself was just another game of the year which happened to be played on Thanksgiving Thursday. But for a record 76,587 fans who jammed Memorial Stadium and for millions who watched on television, the real impact was the passing of an era. Bob Devaney walked off his home field for the last time as coach of the Cornhuskers. It was an incredibly lonely walk. With a 17-14 Oklahoma victory on the scoreboard, he sauntered toward the locker room like anything but "the nation’s winningest football coach.” Moments before, that oft-repeated tribute had set off a farewell chorus of "Auld l^ng Syne” by the N.U. band. Desperation Drive But with 54 seconds on the clock, Devaney hadn’t even had time to tip his Big Red cap. He was much im busy mar.shalling force.s for a final desperation drive. The fans were also intent on that la.st chamt. so what might have been countrywide ovation was rediited to a mere muffled cheer. There had been Continued; Pace 17, Col. I Israeli Troops Clash With Guerrillas Inside Lehaiioii Compiled From News Wires Tel Aviv — The Israeli military command reported a clash with Palestinian guerrillas inside Lebanon Friday, but refused to confirm Lebanese reports of an assault by helicopter-borne commando forces. Military spokesmen said only that an Israeli unit patrolling inside Lebanon clashed with a band of Palestinian guerrillas Thursday night and early Fri day near the cease-fire lin.* where air and tank battles with Syria raged three days ago. iieports from Lebanon and Israeli troops landed i r. helicopters, blew up houses and burned tents at a guerrilla base at Khreibeh on the foothills of Mt. Hermon, and withdrew two hours later. It was the first reported clash inside Lebanon between Israelis and guerrillas since mid-September. Arate newsmen in the region said the Israeli force concentrated its attacK on a guerrilla base. Officials spokesmen in Tel Aviv kept silent on the Lebanese account, but one informed military source denied that any houses had been blown up. Israeli forces in the past have destroyed houses used as guerrilla camps inside Leba-non. "One Israeli soldier was wounded and a number of terrorists were hit,” a spokesman said. In Beirut, the Lebanese army command issued a statement saying that a n Rogers W ants Pearekee|)iiig Force Plans Final Before Cease-fire Sijnned Israeli patrol had infiltrated into an area east of the Hasbani River and clashed with Palestinian guerrillas. "Our forces opened fire aiiii the attacking force pulled out before dawn in a helicopter that flew for this purpose," the Lebanese statement said. The Palestinian news agency WAFA said the attacked base belonged to the Popular Front- General Command, a group that has repudiated an agreement the guerrillas reached with the Lebanese government to suspend operations after a massive Israeli incursion in September. This group, which splintered from the marxist Popular Front for the Liberation oi Palestine, is not represented in the Palestine Liberation Organization, the umbrella body of the 10 major guerrilla organizations. T h e guerrillas reportedly were involved in a skirmish with the Leb.aiese M’m> in the same urea Thursday. One guerrilla was killed and thice others were disarmed and arrested. Image lietterY Darlmcuth, Pmgland (UPli -Ernie .Marshall has changed the name of its new restaurant from Ernie’s Eatery to the Epicurean alter the Dartmouth Muneipal Council said the former was not "in keeping with city’s image.” Hollywood (UPI) — Eight men, all over 60 years old, set off Wednesday to rim the 300 miles, to Las Vegas in the "Life Begins at 60 Super Marathon.” It w'as the third annual running of the marathon, brainchild of Bill Selvin, 62, of Orange, Calif, a teacher and coach, to demonstrate his theory that men can remain fit despite advanced age and even improve their physical condition. xMiller’s Toyville "Pocket Pets”, 1.19 to 3.39. Hand made Austrian stuffed toys.. 4th floor downtown, lower level Catewa''. Miller & Paine.—Adv. Washington i U P I i — Secretary of State William Rogers is hopeful of completing plans for a 5.0u0- member international peacekeeping force in Vietnam before a cease-fire agreement is signed, according to State Dept, sources. Some officials, however, cautioned Thursday that the supervisory troops may not be in place before the fighting actually comes to a halt. The administration’s concern over completion of t h e supervisory force framework was prompted, officials said, by the numerous violations reported in the Middle East when the cease-fire there went into effect two years ago. The violations during the first days were blamed on inadequate supervision. Peimev’.s Open roiiile . . . and Sat. til 9-A '* Rogers, according to officials. believes the supervisory force in Vietnam can be consolidated before the cease-fire comes. But one ot- ficial, asked if the force could actually be in operation simultaneously with the cease­ fire, said, "I would have some reservations about that” Canada, Indonesia, Hungary and Poland, have agreed in principle to participate in the supervisory force. Each nation would supply 1,000 troops and 250 officers to police the cease­ fire. There had been some concern in the cases of Canada and Indonesia that criticism from North Vietnam might cause the countries t o withdraw from the arrangement. Henry Kissinger, President Nixon’s foreign affairs advisor. Ipft the P:>ris | earlier this week to meet with President Suharto of Indonesia in Brussels. Rogers met with Canada’s external affairs minister, .Mitchell Sharp, in New York on Monday. The State Dept, said both countries had "legitimate questions" which had to be answered before they would give their final support. Charles Bray, a State Dept, spokesman, said: ‘ ‘ T h e governments which are considering participating and are looking at the merits and demerits have the right to get a complete set of ground ruies as available.” BE SURE TO READ Blooilhath (Domini*? In Ireland — The militant Ulster Vanguard movement has warned Great Britain it wants independence — or a "bloodbath" might follow The lnsiim : Story Editorial — The central question about 0 St., as The Journal sees it. is not whether to turn it into a mall but whether the pedestrian or King Car will bt‘ supreme in For Men Only! At Richman Gordman’s "Lookin”, 10 to 11 p.m. Friday night. Live models showing the latest in SDortswear and lingerie. Live n..--' 1' • R. Vm ■ A V. the downtown businessdis- 1 i>fi* % trict. ., ........... ^^S^t)E YOl l.L ALSd IhM) .Ann Landers20 Line. News 6,13.17 Sport News . 25-28 Births 24 Living Today 18 Stocks ............ : îo Comics ............. 36 Markets . 24 Television24 Crossword 36 Metro-Area 9,10,23 Theater ....... 29 Daily Record ...24 Movies . 29 Things To Do 29 Deaths ............. 24 National News 2,3.8 Want .\ds . 31-.35 ENtitorial ........... 4 Neb, News 15,17,22 Weather .30 Emergency Nos. 29 Radio 24 Women's News 18-20 Hor<’se<'!)o X 29 ■M Regional 17.21.22 World Nows 3.5.8

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