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The News and Observer from Raleigh, North Carolina • 2

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Raleigh, North Carolina
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2
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THE NEWS AND OBSERVER, RALEIGH, N. C. Saturdey Morning, December 28, 1963 Lakonia's Crewmen Defended MADRID, Spain (AP) The captain and first mate of the cruise liner Lakonia have defended their conduct aboard the blazing ship and insisted that no one, am panicked. most prond of the behavior of my crew. Thanks to their efforts the number of victims was relatively, small as compared with the importance of the disaster," Capt.

Mathios Zarbis told newsmen between planes here Friday. Figures on, survivors still were not completely sorted out. The Greek Line's latest were 886 rescued, 91 known dead and 64 missing. This 5 totaled 1,041, slightly higher than previously reported because some relatives of the crew and staff of the Greek Line were found to have been on the cruise ship she burned and was abandoned some 200 miles north of Madeira on Monday. Ninety-nine Lakonia survivors -52 passengers and 47 crewmen at Lisbon in the Portuguese liner Funchal.

Buses took them to hotels for an overnight stay before they fly to London and Athens. fanoitt To Start Inquiry. line was not legally bound to make them. Atkins said passengers would be compensated for other losses such as clothing. He said the line would cooperate with any British inquiry if the Greek government does not object.

Concerning the pattern of actick taken aboard the Lakonia after the fire broke out, Atkins declared: "I think the lowering of the boats and the decision to abandon ship came six to seven hours too early. At that time the crew was still busily engaged trying to put the fire people who were not trained for the job were handling the lifeboats." DAL Manchester, England, Greek steward Andrew Vasiliades, 26, said, "The only mistake was that nothing was said over the ship's loudspeaker system. Everybody had to rely on rumors." The steward said the Lakonia had just come from repairs and had a new crew. "We were not given enough time to settle down because we had been at a In Piraeus, Greece, a marine official said Nestor Phokas, head of Central Harbor Police had been appointa preliminary investigation of the Lakonia disaster. At the end of the preliminary inquiry, the official said, Phofindings will be forwarded to the Ministry of Justice for a decision on whether the Commission of Maritime Accidents should take further action.

R. J. Atkins, passenger director of the Ormos Shipping London agent for the Greek Line, promised all passengers action would get refunds although the bases, sea for only four days." NOW YOU CAN RENT-A-CAR Cheaper Than You Have Ever Believed( As Low As $399 A Day Hour 12 Plus Pennies Per Mile ECONO-CAR OF 307 RALEIGH, Phone 833-5536 SOME POLITICS WERE DISCUSSED -Mayor Robert F. Wagner of New York and former President Harry S. Truman flash smiles during their interview with newsmen Friday at the PP Hotel Carlyle in New York.

Wagner paid a courtesy call on the former Chief Executive, who is in New York for a holiday visit. Both conceded after the meeting that they discussed politics. LBJ Defends Economy Program a And Jabs Sharply at Goldwater JOHNSON CITY, Tex. President Johnson claimed sweeping support Friday for his action in closing 33 military bases, and jabbed sharply at Sen. Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz.

The President held another of of his folksy, impromptu news conferences under the oak trees on his LBJ Hickory smoke from a barbecue, wafted over the scene, and when the news conference was over Johnson is galloped a horse. The President talked with newsmen on of his first other government, dress conference, with anChancellor Ludwig Erhard of West Germany. He said that most important part" of the exWest relations will be "the change of views. Johnson, who said, he may be ready to talk about his own political intentions before long, was asked for comment on Goldwater's protest that the President played politics at Christmas with the foreign aid bill and dictated to Congress to do. Goldwater is a potential, nominee Johnson.

for president Johnson said the Senate leaders had asked him whether it made any difference what day foreign aid was taken up and he told them it was a matter for the Senate to determine. "And I'm sure," Johnson added, "if Sen. Goldwater had been around he would have known that." Goldwater is recovering in Phoenix, from a minor foot operation. Dressed in a gentleman rancher's finery, from tan boots through trousers, shirt and jacket in matching a mauve, President reeled off dozen announcements. Then he jumped on a dark brown Tennessee walking horse for a jaunt around his 400-acre ranch.

Johnson made these announcements: 1. Mail reaction to the ad- Now Your Church Can Have A Beautiful DIG Hammond Organ! Why Your Church Should Choose a Hammond Organ: Thousands of Beautiful Church Tones Rich Percussion Tones Qualities with Hammond's "Living" Cathedral Tone Reverberation Control Low Up-Keep and Maintenance Costs--Not effected by extreme temperature and humidity changes No Tuning Expense Over 45,000 Church Installations Send For Free Booklet, "How To Raise the Organ Fund for Your Church" Free Surveys Giadly Given By Experienced Technicians For 24 years we have been a Hammond Franchised Dealer now servIng the following counties: Beaufort, Brunswick, Bladen, Caswell, Carteret, Columbus, Cumberiand, Chatham, Craven. Duplin, Durham, Edgecombe, Franklin, Granville, Greene, Hallfax, Harnett, Hoke, Hyde, Johnston, jones, Lee, Lenoir, Moore, Martin. Nash, Northampton, New Hanover, Orange, Onslow, Pender, Pamlico, Pitt, Person, Sampson, Vance, Wake; Wayne, Warren, Wilson STEPHENSON MUSIC COMPANY "Serving Eastern Carolina For 55 Cameron Village, Raleigh Philippines Plays Role Of Mediator WASHINGTON (AP) The United States publicly accepted Friday a Philippine offer to help heal the breach between America and tiny Cambodia. In announcing acceptance of the mediation offer of Philippine Diosdado Macapagal, State Department press officer United States had not bowed to Richard do I.

Phillips said the demands by Cambodia's Prince Norodom Sihanouk for an apology from the States. Washington officials said it would be possible for both sides to use the good services of the Philippine intermediary without bowing to conditions set by the other. Phillips said the Philippine offer was "for assistance in trying to iron out differences between the Cambodian and the U.S. governments," and, "'We appreciate Philippines' offer and have indicated to the Philippines government enriendly acceptance of their assistance." U.S. authorities were hopeful that the new effort would reverse the deterioration between Cambodia and the United States which has reached the verge of a diplomatic break.

Alleging that U.S. aid officials were helping his enemies, Sihanouk ordered an end to U.S. aid to Cambodia and suggested that U.S. diplomats leave too. The United States denied Sihanouk's charges and inquired about Cambodian broadcasts allegedly slurring the late President John F.

Kennedy. The worse Washington-Phnom Penh relations become, the greater the fear here that Communist influence will reach into Cambodia which borders U.S. friends, South Viet Nam and Thailand. Sihanouk is generally regarded by Washington officials as neutral, rather than preferring coming independ- under the sway of nearby Red China. GOP Continued from Page One.

and some national committee members were asked two ques- 1. On the basis of present conditions, in light of the death of President Kennedy, whom do you consider the strongest candidate for the Republican nomination? 2. Whom do you think the party will nominate? Rockefeller declined to comment on. the poll and the others mentioned were not immediately reachable. Despite the general belief that Johnson, a Texan, will run better than Kennedy would have in the South and Midwest, Goldwater's major strength continued from those areas.

All who replied from Alabama and Mississippi were solidly behind the Arizona senator. But Goldwater lost strength in Texas, South Carolina, and in the border state of Oklahoma. His prospects also declined in New Hampshire, where the March 10 presidential primary is expected to provide the first test at the polls of popularity among the nomination aspirants. In an Associated Press poll in October, 22 of 32 GOP national committee members thought the Arizona senator was the strongest candidate who could be chosen by their party and 17 thought he could win the nomination. The newest poll showed 14 of 26 thought him the strongest candidate but only seven believed he would get the nomination.

Rockefeller got only one vote as the strongest candidate, none as the likely nominee. Lodge and Nixon got three votes each as the strongest candidate and two each as the likely nominee. There are many predictions in the national poll replies that some dark horse might win the prize. Scranton's name was most frequently mentioned in this connection. There was substantial indicathat a great many Republican leaders remained uncertain about the developing political situation.

Some of them said they were confused and a number said it was too early to say who their nominee would be. World News Precedent Broken at Berlin BERLIN (AP) The West Berlin city government broke precedent Friday and directly contacted the Communist regime of East Germany over the Christmas killing of a refugee on the Red Wall. The action took Western Allied officials by surprise. It seemed to introduce a new element into the complicated East relationship over Berlin. Hitherto, the Western Allies have firmly held to the contention that they alone must deal with the East over incidents in Berlin.

Then, they approach only the Soviets, contending they are the occupiers of East Germany. No Western power recognizes the Communist regime of East Germany. DOME Continued from Page One TOWNSEND Newman A. (Nat) Townsend campaign manager for gubernatorial candidate L. Richardson Preyer, have a health problem that could affect his efforts in the forthcoming primary fight.

Reports on Capitol Square recent Friday visit had hospital disit that Townsend's closed ulcer troubles. He entered Rex Hospital here on Dec. 15 and was discharged five days later. One of his aides de- at the Preyer headquarters scribed the illness at the time as "a bed cold and maybe flu." Townsend said after his discharge that his doctor had urged him to stay away from work and rest up until after the first of the year. COMMENT Townsend declined Friday to discuss the Capitol Square report.

"I can't comment on that right now, he said. He said he would be able to talk about it "within the next day or Townsend, 50, is a quiet-spoken tax lawyer who was little known in political circles until Preyer tapped him as his chief lieutenant in the gubernatorial race. Townsend is a partner in the Raleigh law firm of Poyner, Geraghty, Hartsfield Townsend. WEDDING Gov. Sanford has passed up a trip he was expected to make to Florida to see the University of North Carolina football team play the Air Force Academy in the Gator Bowl.

The Governor will stay in Raleigh to attend the wedding of one of his secretaries. The secretary, Joyce Lathan of Monroe, will marry Wilson Woodhouse of Currituck County at 5 p.m. today at Trinity Methodist Church here. Gov. and Mrs.

Sanford will give a reception for the couple at the Executive Mansion immediately following the wedding ceremony. The Governor had been expected to visit a political supporter, Walker Martin of home Raleigh, in Florida. Martin's They were to at vacation attend the Gator Bowl game today together. LATER? The Governor's office said he still may visit Martin in Florida next week, but the trip hasn't been decided on with certainty. His press secretary, noted Graham that the Jones, wedding carefully was planned well in advance of the Gator Bowl bid won by UNC.

Both Miss Lathan and Woodhouse worked for Sanford during his successful two-primary fight and election to the Governor's office. MARKER-It was only 12 years ago when a bronze marker imbedded in granite, topped with a flagpole, was dedicated during a ceremony at the new administration building of the State Ports Authority in Wilmington. Unveiling of the marker took place before a group including Gov. Kerr Scott. Beside Scott's, other names on the marker included board member E.

G. Anderson and the secretary-treasurer of the authority, Terry Sanford. Sanford as Governor later reappointed Anderson. The occasion marked the tangible beginning of the Ports Authority, which had been conin 1945 and implemented in 1949 with construction of certain key buildings. Friday it was learned that the marker will be removed to make way for the new warehouse, being built on the site of the old administration building.

QUALITY, The State Department of Higher Education will release information next week showing in detail how the quality of students accepted by Data From U.S. WEATHER BUREAU 30 20 50 0103 50 Rain Showers FORECAST Snow Flurries For Daytime Saturday Figures Shew High Temperatures Expected Isolated Precipitation Net Indicated- Consult Local forecast WEATHER FORECAST Rain is ex- come an adviser to Mann, with the rank of ambassador. 4. President Adolfo Lopez Mateos of Mexico has accepted Johnson's invitation to join him in Los Angeles on Feb. 21 to receive honorary degrees from the University of California at Los Angeles.

Then they will fly to Palm Springs, for conferences the next day. 5. Federal civilian employment was cut more than 1,000 in November and dropped nearly 3,500 below the figure for a year earlier, mainly by not filling jobs that became vacant. The President said 400,000 employes would have been added during the year had federal jobs increased at the same pace as the population. 6.

At Johnson's direction, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara has named a board of Pentagon officials to step up the search for more military activities that should be reduced or eliminated. Under the pending appropriation military assistance to $1 billion, or one-third of the total. AID Continued from Page One. played during debate this year.

From Johnson down they are convinced that new methods of handling the aid program must be found. Some believe that a commitment to a lower cost level may be desirable. Final decisions are up to Johnson. The committee is under instruction to report to the President by Jan. 15.

One recommendation which seems certain to be made is that the military assistance program should be split off from the did package and put entirely within the control of the Defense Department. One practical result of this would be that initial aid proposals would go directly from the Defense Department to congressional 1 committees dealing with military affairs, rather than those dealing with foreign tions; this is a change strongly backed by Chairman J. W. Fulbright, of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Johnson also is reported to favor it.

pected over northwest Pacific area Saturday. Snow and snow flurries will occur over northern plains and over northeastern section of nation. Colder weath- But an official of the West Berlin city government moved ahead of the Western powers by delivering an oral complaint about the shooting to an East German official. The West Berlin move came after Ernst Lemmer, a former West German Cabinet minister, accused the city government of trying to play down the shooting. He aimed his remarks at Mayor Willy Brandt, a Socialist.

Lemmer is a Christian Democrat. An American protest to the Soviet ambassador in East Berlin came later. The danger in the West Berlin move was that it could be exploited by the Reds to support their contention that the Germans on both sides of the wall should ignore the Western Allies and settle their affairs by direct contact. the State's colleges and universities has greatly date" improved. The release for the material was pushed ahead when it was found that certain statistics from various sources did not coincide as expected.

Dr. William C. Archie, higher education director, said the department is proud of the be higher instandards which seem to dicated by the findings. turned WRITER news writer to make a special report to the people on the problem of widespread -poverty in North Carolina. The report is in five parts and will begin in Sunday morning newspapers and continue through Thursday morning issues.

The Governor's office got out advance copies of the five articles late Friday. He reportedly spent much of the Christmas holidays working on them. Several longtime observers of Tar Heel remember government were stumped to when a Governor offered a series of newspaper, the articles record to and put before his the people. Sanford apparently is the first. -Gov.

Sanford has EXPANSION The Raleigh headquarters of gubernatorial candidate Richardson Preyer will be split and expanded next Thursday when part of the staff now in Suite 4B of the Carolina Hotel moves into five rooms on the fifth floor. The new suite will include a sizable reception room, a room for two, secretaries, offices for campaign manager Nat Townsend and women's campaign manager Mrs. C. Gordon Maddrey, and a small secretary's office and reception room next to Townsend. The present fourth floor suite will continue to serve as an operations center for Phil Carlton, who handles Preyer's scheduling; Eli Evans, who writes speeches; a press aide who will be named in a few days and two offices for secretaries.

A double room down the hall also will be retained for printing and mailing personnel. a pay boost for some 25,000 Tar Heels now earning the 75-centan-hour State minimum wage. On that day, the new 85-cent minimum becomes effective. Labor Commissioner Frank Crane said Friday, that in instances where duplicate coverage exists, the higher federal standard of $1.25 an hour should be paid. He has noted that violators are liable for retroactive wages and may be fined.

Crane pointed out that a substantial number of employes engaged in large retail, service or construction work of an interstate nature are covered by a federal minimum of $1 an hour. Immediate family workers are not covered under the amended law, which was first enacted by the 1959 General Assembly. WAGE- -January 1 will bring Remains Silent PARIS AP)-Former Col. toine Argoud continued a resolute silence Friday at his treason trial, but a battery of fense attorneys argued that Argoud's arrest was illegal and that the trial should be halted. SHOOTING Continued from Page One.

ministration's decision to shut down or curtail 33 defense installations in order to save $106 million is running 5 to 1 in favor. 2. John A. McCone, director of the Central Intelligence Agency, who had breakfast with Johnson on Friday morning, was directed to seek an pointment with former President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

He is to tell Eisenhower about steps the Johnson administration has taken to slap ceilings on federal jobs, outline economic prospects for 1964, preview the new budget, and report on what U.S. intelligence is finding throughout the world. 3. Teodoro Moscoso is being nudged out of his post as coordinator of the Alliance for Progress a move indicated when Johnson decided to give Thomas- C. Mann over-all responsibility for Latin-American policy.

Moscoso now will be- DAVIS Continued from Page One. chairman of the Southeast District of the Public Relations Society America. Weather RALEIGH WEATHER DATA. Sunrise 7:24 a.m. Sunset 5:09 p.m.

Friday's Year high 58. Year ago 50. Friday's ago 38. Absolute high 73 year 1904. Absolute low 12 year 1948.

Average 47. Normal 41. PRECIPITATION. Normal this month 3.29. Greatest 7.78 in 1907.

Least this month 5.9 in 1955. Past 24 hours (5 a.m. to 5 p.m.) 0. cess for month .23. Deficiency for year 6.70.

HOURLY TEMPERATURES. a.m. 37 p.m. a.m. 42 p.m.

10 a.m. 44 p.m. a.m. p.m. 12 noon 55 5 p.m.

50 INFORMATION FOR CITIES. Asheville High Low Preci 43 36 Charlotte 62 37 Cherry Point 62 38 Elizabeth City 57 43 Greensboro 52 Hatteras 58 Wilmington Raleigh-Durham 58 By The Associated Press Weather Bureau report of temperatures (high, last 12 hours; low, last 18 hours) and rainfall (last 24 hours) ending p.m., for selected areas: STATION Pr STATION Pr Albany 9 5.11 Louisville 43 32 Albu'que 52 24 Memphis 43 26 Amarillo 57 23 Miami 70 54 Atlanta 52 38 Minn-StP .01 Bir'ham 47 33 Orleans 66 51 Bismark New York 30 26 Boston 29 17 .07 Norfolk 56 35 Buffalo 19 17 Omaha 21 13 Cha'ston 65 45 Okla City 52 36 Chicago 28 20 Tr Phila 34 25 Cincin't1 39 31 Phoenix 67 34 Clevel'd 29 26 .03 Pittsburg 36 33 .04 Columb's 34 28 Port'd Me 15 Denver 48 23 Richm'd 56 34 Detroit 30 23 .07 St. Louis 38 27 Duluth -1 .07 San Ant. 65 El Paso 61 24 San Fran 59 Ft. Worth 59 33 Savannah 66 Galves'n 61 47 Seattle 48 Jack'ville 71 48 Spokane .20 Kan City 33 27 Tampa Knoxville 38 32 Wash'ton Angeles 71 49 MARINE FORECAST.

Mostly northerly winds 15 to 20 knots today. Partly cloudy and colder. NORTH CAROLINA TIDE TABLE. DECEMBER 20, 1963. (Eastern Standard Time) Oregon Inlet.

Highs Lows 5:05 a.m. 11:47 a.m. 5:27 p.m. 11:49 p.m. Beaufort.

6:01 a.m. 6:23 p.m. 12:35 p.m. Southport. 5:43 a.m.

6:08 p.m. 12:22 p.m. School in Zebulon, Davis also attended Wake Forest College. He formerly worked with the State Employment Security Commission and the State Local Government Retirement System. At one he was news director of Station WRAL in Raleigh, and is former manager of the Morehead City Chamber of Commerce.

His earlier experience also included about 25 years in the weekly newspaper publishing field and as a writer-photographer for the Raleigh Times. He is a Navy veteran, and investigation to determine of the Martin girl's story was true. The mayor, members of the City Council, the police chief and three State Highway Patrol officers met for more than an hour late Friday with three local members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in an effort to ease racial tension. City Manager B. B.

Britt said he could not understand why the Negroes were demonstrating, because some 38 Lee County restaurants had agreed last July to serve all persons regardiess of race. But an NAACP spokesman, Robert Blow of Durham, said many of the restaurants stuck by their open door policy only about 30 days and then refused to serve Negroes. Blow said demonstrations here would continue. Sanford's first anti-segregation protest came a week ago Friday, when about 60 Negroes staged a silent march through the downtown area. No arrests were made then.

The first arrests were made Thursday when Negroes entered several restaurants and refused to leave. Mass Meeting. The Martin girl said the demonstrators had a mass meeting at Blandonia United Presbyterian Church and marched twoby-two to the restaurants. She said her group entered the Matthews Restaurant and was told they would not be served. "We sat in the booths and started singing," she said, "and Mr.

Matthews said he was going to get his shotgun. We got up to leave and nearly at the door when I was hit." Highway patrolmen in the area were put on a standby alert Friday afternoon and a special meeting of the Council was set for 10:30 Saturday morning to deal with the situation. D. N. Whitaker, M.

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