Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on April 8, 1968 · Page 3
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 3

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Monday, April 8, 1968
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Star PORTS Competition in Olympics is Tougher Basket ball By PAT THOMPSON Associated Press Sports Writer poned ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - U.S t Olympic basketball Coach Henry Iba of Oklahoma Pro Basketball At A uianee By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NBA Saturday's Results No games scheduled Sunday's Results Eastern Division Finals Philadelphia at Boston, post- to Wednesday night Western Division Finals San Francisco at Los Angeles, State feels foreign competition postj>bned to Wednesday night will be plenty rough and might tall. A 12-mah tf<S, team was named Sunday, banking more on quickness than on size. The Olympic trials ended Saturday night with the NA1A All- Stars whipping a cold-shooting AAU team 64-59 In the tile game. More than 80 players were considered In the three- day tournament In Albuquerque. A 45-man committee picked this team j NAIA—Glynn Saulters, 6-foot- 2, 175 pounds, Northeast Louisiana; Don Dee, 6-7, 205, St. Mary of the Plains, Kan. AAU- Calvin Fowler, 6-1,170, Akron, Ohio, Goodyear; James King, 6-7, Goodyears. Junior College All-Stars- Spencer Haywood, 6-8,230, Trinidad, Colo., Junior College. Armed Forces-Mike Barrett, 6-2, 155, U.S. Navy and former West Virginia Tech collegian; John R. Clawson, 6-4, 200, U.S. Army and Michigan; MikeSilli- man, 6-6, 225, U.S. Army and U.S. Military Academy. NCAA- Ken Spain, 6-9, 225, Houston; Jo Jo White, 6-3, 194, Kansas; Bill Hosket, 6-7, 228, Ohio State, Charlie Scott, 6-4, 180, North Carolina. Alternates-Don Issel, Kentucky, Tom Black, Goodyears, George Carter, U.S. Army; Charles Paulk, Northeastern Oklahoma; Rick Mount, Purdue; and Joe Hamilton, Southwest Christian, Tex, Monday's Games No games scheduled Tuesday's Games No games scheduled NBA Saturday's Result Eastern Division Finals Minnesota 137, Pittsburgh 123, best-of-7 series tied 1-1 Sunday's Results Eastern Dlvvlsion Pittsburgh at Minnesota postponed to Lednesday night Western Division Finals Dallas at New Orleans postponed to Tuesday night at Dallas Monday's Games No games scheduled Tuesday's Game Western Division Finals New Orleans at Dallas, New Orleans leads best-of-7 series 1-0 Delayed Meet Could End on Monday GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) A rarity on the professional golf tour, a 36-hole day, brings the twice-delayed $137,500 Greater Greensboro Open Tournament to a belated conclusion today. Billy Casper, never out of the Iba said the : 12 first-team se- lead since play began last lections will gather at Alamosa, Thursday, held a two-stroke Colo., in early September and margin over Bobby Nichols with four weeks of high-altitude a 36-hole score of 132, one shot training before exhibition over the record for the tourna- ' teams in *New York's Square Garden, Cincinnati and possibly Albuquerque. Hockey Teams Get a Little Respite By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS An unscheduled respite has given six National Hockey League playoff contenders more time to brace themselves for the next collision. Meanwhile, Boston's dazed Bruins, whose first postseason trip in nine years has been on schedule but off course, spent a regular day off trying to put themselves back together again for another shot at the highflying Montreal Canadians. Three first-round games in the expanded Stanley Cup playoffs have been reschduled in the aftermath of the assassination of Dr, Martin Luther King. The second game of the New York Rangers-Chicago Black Hawks series, originally set for Sunday in New York, was moved back to Tuesday night. The Rangers put off the game, which was to have been nationally televised, after Sunday was designated as a day of national mourning for the slain civil rights leader, Third games of the Philadelphia Flyers-St, Louis Blues and Los Angeles Kings-Minnesota North Stars sets were moved back from Monday night. The Kings, who lead Minnesota 2*0 in their best against the North Stars Tuesday night, The Flyers visit St. Louis Wednes. day night to resume a series January for third place at 135. Today's endurance contest was set up when Sunday's scheduled two rounds were postponed because of the national day of mourning for the slain Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King. Play previously was setback a day by the washout of Friday's second round. The double postponement delays the 250- mile trek to Augusta, Ga. and the Masters championship opening Thursday. Cage Coach Realizes His Dream MORGANTOWN, W. Va. (AP) -West Virginia University's Bucky Waters has realized a basketball coach's dreams Waters has recruited a player so large that there's no uniform in stock to fit Mm. The addition of 7-foot, 235- pound Mike Hetz of Garrett, Ind., High School was announced today, "We don't have a uniform to fit him," Waters quipped, "but we're happy to be in a position to have to get one," Hetz racked up a per game average of 28 points and 17 rebounds last season before suffering a broken bone in his leg midway through the year. deadlocked at one victory apiece, The Canadiens, who have trimmed Boston twice on home ice, travel to the Bruins" lair Tuesday night for the third game, Athletic Activity at Standstill By ED SCHUYLER JR« Associated Press Sports Writer Athletic activity continued at a virtual standstill today as the sports community joined the rest of the nation in mourning the death of Dr, Martin Luther Vhe funeral for the slain civil rights leader will be held Tues* day in Atlanta, and few sports events will be held until after the services. Exceptions Included the final two rounds of the Greater Greensboro Open Golf Tournament set for today, an International Hockey League playoff at Muskegon, Mich,, and an American Hockey League playoff at Providence, U,l., tonight. Some horse racing also was on tap, The Greensboro Open already has been postponed twice- Friday because of rain and Sunday in deference to the memory of Dr. King, The Los Angeles Dodgers said they would decide today on whether to postpone their National League baseball opener at home Tuesday night against ' Philadelphia. The Phillies have said they will not play, at the risk of forfeiture and fine. The other 18 major league clubs will open the season ' Wednesday. Three games, Including the presidential opener in Washington, originally were scheduled today. Six had been set for Tuesday. All of the final baseball exhibition games Sunday were canceled with the exception of the Cleveland-Los Angeles game at San Diego, Calif. There was no action Sunday in major league hockey and basketball. The National Hockey League playoffs resume Tuesday night with Chicago at New York, Montreal at Boston and Los Angeles at Minnesota. Philadelphia plays at St. Louis Wednesday night. The American Basketball Association playoffs get under way again Tuesday night with New Orleans at Dallas. Pittsburgh is at Minnesota Wednesday. Postseason play in the National Basketball Association resumes with Philadelphia at Boston and San Francisco at Los Angeles Wednesday night. (ARK) STAR, Prints ft Offset Hockey THE FLAG IS WAVING town Tennis Ready to Take Bids National Hockey League By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Saturday's Results Eastern Division Semifinals Montreal 5, Boston 3, Mon* treal leads best-of-1 series 2*0 Western Division Semifinals Philadelphia 4, St, Louis 3, best-of*"? series tied 1*1 Los Angeles 2, Minnesota 0, Los Angeles leads best-of-7 se* ries 2-0 Sunday's Results Eastern Division Semifinals Chicago at New York, postponed to Tuesday night, New York leads best-of-7 series 1-0 Monday's Games Western Division Semifinals Philadelphia at St. Louis, postponed to Wednesday night Los Angeles at Minnesotapost- poned to Tuesday night Tuesday's Games Eastern Division Semifinals Montreal at Boston Chicago at New York Opening of Baseball Play Is Doubtful By DICK COUCH Associated Press Sports Writer The Philadelphia Phillies were caught in a rundown between Walter O'Malley and Warren Giles today as the Los Angeles Dodgers considered opening the 1968 baseball season all by themselves. Los Angeles owner O'Malley was to decide today whether or not to go ahead with Tuesday night's scheduled home opener against Philadelphia-a gamn the Phillies have refused to play. The Dodgers were left holding the ball Sunday when the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago White Sox pushed back their Tuesday openers one day, joining seven other major league clubs which had postponed opening homa gamss in deference to the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King. Funeral services lor the slain civil rights leader will be held Tuesday In Atlanta. National League President Giles left it up to the Dodgers, as the home club, to decide whether to go through with their game. John Quinn, the Phillies' general manager, said earlier his club would not take the field at Los Angeles Tuesday night, at the risk of a possible forfeit and fine—because of the King funeral that afternoon. The other opening games in DALLAS (AAP>- The U.S. Lawn Tennis Association is ready to receive bids for four each l including the pres- open tournaments, Including the ldentlal flxture at Washington, National Open. SOLUNAR TABUS By RICHARD ALDEN KNIGHT . The schedule of,Solunsr Periods , as printed below , ha< been taken from Richard Aiden Knight's SOLUNAR TABLES Plan your days so (hat you will be fishing in good tei ritor; or hunting in good cover during these times, U you wish to find the best sport that each day has to offer, The Major Periods are shown in boldface type. These begin at the times shown and last for an hour and a half or two hours thereafter. The Mjnor Periods, shown in regular type, are of somewhat shorter duration. Use Central Standard time. Minor MAJOR Minor MAJOR Pate Apr, 8 9 10 U is u it Pay Monday Tuesday Wednesday Ttorafcy Friday Saturday Sunday 3:80 3:30 4:45 5:55 7:15 8:40 7:05 8:00 8:50 9:45 10:40 11:25 3:20 3:50 4:15 4:35 4:55 5:25 5:55 7:30 8:25 9:15 lOrlO 11:05 11:55 12:20 The association, meeting In Dallas over the weekend, agreed to go along with recommendations made earlier this month by the International Lawn Tennis Federation that major tennis nations hold only four open events this year. Professionals will compete against amateurs. Robert Kelleher of Los Angeles, president of the association, and eight other members of a committee will decide where the four meets are to be held. Kelleher said as many as a dozen cities have Indicated Interest in staging either the national open or one of the other tournaments. Texos Relays Produce Some Hopefuls AUSTIN, Tex. (AP) - The Texas Relays, In which Texas led the university division and Southern topped the college class, didn't produce as many outstanding individuals as usgal, But still there were some mighty bright Olympic prospects. A couple of them already had appeared In the Olympic Games — Randy Matson, the Texas A&M giant who holds the world's record in the shot put at 71 feet 5"/2 Inches and was second in the 1964 games at Tokyo, and Billy Mills, former Kansas star who won the 10,000 meters. Matson. who has been resting up from the winter track wars, admitted he wasn't ready to try for a record and that 66 feet would suit him In the Texas Relays. He did better than that, heaving the 16-pound ball 66 feet SVi inches in an exhibition, Mills won a six-mile race in 28:53.3. That delighted him that he could make such good time this early, He seemed ready to go to the Olympics at Mexico City In October. The war of the Roses lasted for 30 years, 1455-85. all were set for Wednesday. President Johnson was expected to miss the Senators' debut against the Minnesota Twins —one of five afternoon openers in the American League. The White Sox entertain Cleveland, Boston's defending champions are at Detroit, the new Oakland Athletics at Baltimore and California at New York in other AL inaugurals. The Chicago Cubs visit Cincinnati and the New York Mets are at San Francisco in National League afternoon games. Pittsburgh Is at Houston and Atlanta at St. Louis under the lights. While O'Malley and Bavasl pondered the possibility of opening the season without an opponent, LA. Manager Walter Alston checked into/an Inglewood, Calif., hospital Sunday for treatment of a kidney stone and the Dodgers whipped Cleveland 5-1 In the lone exhibition finale. All the other exhibition games were canceled in line with the designation of Sunday as a day of mourning for Dr, King. A Dodgers team physician said Alston, beginning his 15th season as dean of major league managers, has a stone In the right kidney, "As soon as It passes we'll let him go," said Dr. Robert Woods. He said doctors might use a tube to remove the stone If It had not passed to* day. Retriever Named Best in Snow CHICAGO (AP) - Ch, Shamrock's Acres Light Brigade, a 3-year-old Labrador retriever, was named best In show Sunday night at the annual International Dog Show, Owned by Mrs. James Gets of Lake Forest, 111,, Light Brigade is the first retriever to win the Chicago event. Former Boxer Dies at 63 WESTFKLD, Mass, (AP) Ruby Bradley, who fought Midget Wolgast for the world flyweight boxing titie in Brook Jimmy Clark, Racing King, Is Killed HOCKENHEIM, Germany (AP) - The auto racing world paid tribute today to Jim Clark, who was killed in a crash Sunday. The 32-year-old Scot, winner of the Indianapolis 500 in 1965 and twice world driving champion, met death in the rain at the Hockenheim Motodrom when his Lotus Ford Cosworth skidded on wet asphalt. His car, speeding along at 174 miles per hour, tore through a fence and hit a tree after turning over several times. Doctors at the nearby Heidelberg Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, said he had been killed instantly from a broken neck and a compound fracture of the skull. A bachelor, Clark won a record 25 Grand Prix races and was the world champion In 1963 and 1965. Three of his Grand Prix victories came In the U.S. Grand Prix at Watkins Glen, N.Y., the last one In 1967. He set a record by winning seven Grand Prix races in a row in 1963. "Jim Clark may well have been the greatest driver of all time," said Wilfred Andrews, chairman of the Royal Automobile Club in London. "Clark was unquestionably the greatest racing driver in the world," said Andy Granatelli In Indianapolis. Granatelli is president of the company which sponsored Clark's Lotus cars in 1966 and 1967 and for whom Clark was to have driven in the Indy 500 this year. Clark's body will be flown to Edinburg, Scotland, where the funeral will be held Wednesday. By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW ORLEANS - Percy Pugh, 143, New Orleans, out- pointed Joe Shaw, 146V 2 , New York, 10. 'pick of the Caddies By TOMMY THOMAS NEA Sports Writer Jim Bryan Is Winner at Phoenix PHOENIX, Ariz. (AP) - Bobby Unser, Albuquerque, N.M., sped through a naming pileup to capture the Jimmy Bryan 150- mile U.S. Auto Club race at Phoenix International Raceway. Unser, driving a turbo- charged, rear-engine Offenhauser, averaged just over 100 miles per hour to win the Sunday race, after setting a one-la- quallfylng record of 124.059 m,p,h. It was Unser's second victory in a row, Unser took the lead from Rog. er McCluskey of Tucson, whose car was one of four put out of action In a flaming crash on the 46th lap in which Johnny Rutherford, Fort Worth, Tex,, was burned. The accident was touched off when Al Unser, the winner's brother, had the engine of his car blow up, throwing oil across the track. Bobby Unser narrowly avoided the resulting pileup. McCluskey, Rutherford and Mario Andretti, Nazareth, Pa., skidded on the slippery surface and crashed Into the upper wall, with the Rutherford and Andretti machines bursting into flames, Rutherford, who suffered burned feet and a burned right hand, was saved from further injury by A. J. Foyt, defending USAC champ who rushed to Rutherford's burning car and AUGUSTA, Ga.—(NEA)— When Arnold Palmer tees off in the Masters, one cf his (op aides in the famous Army will be Charles Reynolds. Jack Nicklaus will look to a guy named Willie Peterson for occasional help. And a fellow named Ernest Nipper will assist Gary Player. Reynolds, Peterson anil Nipper arc three of the top caddies on the PGA tour. Fred Bennett is the caddie master at Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia. He started caddying at the age of 12 and luis been boss at A u gust a for the past 10 years. Bennett is in charge of a select group of 30 caddies at (he club, most of whom have more experience than many of the golfers. Some of the pros have their own touring caddies but Bennett prefers to pick his own men for the Masters. He seldom hears complaints. Once, however, a golfer shot a (Hi in a practice round but didn't like the caddie Fred gave him. The pro selected one of his own choice, shot an 80 the second day and missed the cut. "The only thing the caddies e o m p 1 a i n about," he says, "is sometimes they don't think they get tipped enough. And some of the older guys don't like shagging a lot during practice." Just turn important is a eaddie? "Some players really don't require much," Bennett continues, "hut many times a eaddie's advice is helpful, especially on this course. Besides club selection, (heir knowledge of the contours of the fairways and breaks in the greens is an asset. And a golfer who isn't familiar with this course can have a lot of trouble. On the other hand, an experienced man will not give advice unless asked for it. Sometimes he may not be sure himself what (he right club is, so he keeps quiet. That's the sign of a good caddie." li e n a e 11 says when the c r u c i a 1 putts need (o be dropped, the pressure on the caddies is almost as much as on the players. They use body English and coaxing words as the ball rolls for (he cup. Such loyalties arc not always appreciated by the golfers, however. In last N ear's \ a t i u n a I Master Paid Off for Gay AUGUSTA Ga —(NEA)—Until he went to the Masters Tournament last'year. David Witts didn't have the faintest conception how lucrative it could be to hit a golf ball. Then Gay Brewer Jr., who lias the cherubic face of a miniature Babe' Ruth and the loop-de-loop swing of a weekend hacker won the 1967 Masters. And a revelation came to David Witts He is a Dallas lawyer and Brewer's business manager. He had never even seen a golf tournament until the long green :. of Augusta National. In succession, this is what happened thereafter: • Gay Brewer became the exclusive representative_for the National Association of Insurance Agents on ABC's Golt Galaxy (13 tournaments), with a three-year contract to appear in their television commercials. • He made a record for Decca, a 33'it lp called "How to Give Your Golf Game the Master's Touch." • Rand-McNally and Golf Digest, in collaboration, have published a book, "Gay Brewer Shows You How to Score Better than You Swing." • McGraw-Hill has published "Gay Brewer's Golf Guidebook." • There is now a Gay Brewer Swingmaster Golf Shirt, with a logo, of a little golfer looping his swing, manufactured by Knitco. • Brewer is on the cover of the 1968 edition of Golf Guide, with a merchandising tieup for the guide. • The American Oil Co. has sent out a mailing of 5 million, featuring Gay in the winner's circle, for a new marketing game. There will be 15 million more pictures of Gay himself in the game. •'• • Witts and Brewer have syndicated a radio program called "Tee It Up" in which Gay offers golf tips. ("He has a resonant voice." says the lawyer.) • Brewer has signed a new contract with Dunlop endorsing their golf balls. • His exhibition fees, which were practically nil, have a representative for the vast Kaiser Industries. "All this," admits Witts, "is directly due to his victory in the Masters. It opened up tremendous vistas." Gay did turn down a lucrative offer to be the playing pro for a foreign golf club "because he simply didn't like the course." "You know Mow much of a purist Gay is," says Witts, "about golf." There is a dramatic story behind Brewer's surge to solvency in and after the Masters. For almost a decade, the snub-nosed pro was just another joker on the tour, picking up the scratch after the big boys dike Palmer, Nicklaus, Casper') took the big cut. He lived in an apartment in Dallas, with Carole Lee and their two little girls, Krin and Kelly. Kelly, who's now 3, was born with a leg impediment- the bone wasn't properly set into the hip socket—and needed a series of operations. Her condition aflected Gay's concentration on golf. Surgery before the Masters was a success and brightened Gay's attitude toward the tournament, which he'd lost the previous year in a three- way playoff. Now Gay lives in a big, new borne in Dallas and is big society there. His Masters victory lias made him a hero for every young golfer who tackles the tour and meets initial frustration.. It hasn't exactly hurt him with Witts, who never swung a golf club in his life until he met Brewer. Mark McCormick, the Cleveland lawyer who steere;! Palmer and Nicklaus to fortunes off golf, has said a victory in the Masters is worth a cool million. "1 won't deny it." says Witts. And he'll be here at Augusta National tramping along behind Gay Brewer ,lr when that worthy defends his champion' ship. Which leads us to an irresistible point--every golfer should have his Witts about him. Open, Hives M e 15 e e ran six cuddies in tuo da vs. lyn July 13. 1931, died Saturday, I JUlied tlir " from ttlt< cock l j ". Bradley, 63, lost a 15-rounddeci- Mthertor ' > "'Juries were not sion to the champion, believed seuous. Beale Wins 1 Toledo Race KOS'SBUKG, Ohio (AP) Rollie Beale of Toledo, driving a Chevrolet-ijowered car, won the 30-lajj US'AC .spring car auto race Sunday at the half-mile Eldura Speedway, YOU can own a profitable wholesaling business in the booming automotive parts aftermarket! Huge, rapidly growing market serving replacement jiarts u?eds of service stations, repair shojis, fleets and farms. Your own independent business—not a franchise—but you get all the advantages of executive training, site selection, inventory control, advertising, financial profit planning, warehouse service, group insurance and many inure benefits of nationwide network of NAl'A automotive jwrts distribution system. Minimum capital investment required, but some financing cm be arranged for qualified persons. Write or call: Phone 501-562-3580 National Automotive Parts Assn. NAPA (Little Rock) WAREHOUSE GOOl Forbing Road, Little, Rock, Ark. 72201 L.

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