Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on April 2, 1968 · Page 9
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 9

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Hope, Arkansas
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Tuesday, April 2, 1968
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Page 9
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W\ STAR, Pff««i fir Offset Tuesday, April 2,1968 Is Downtown Value Day In Hope MnksGOPs May Capture More Seats LitTLB ROCK (Af) - &>v. Wiftthfbp Kbdkefeiter said Monday M believed that the Re- tfublfckn party had a chance to capture an additional 20 to 30 seats in the Arkansas Mouse this November, Rockefeller said the voting reeertis of legislators who hold Seats, the GOP believes most vulnerable were being analyzed by the party. the governor also said he saw no reason why Republicans should file for office any sooner than necessary. Me said if he were running for a legislative office he would "wait as close to the filing deadline as possible." Rockefeller said he had heard six or more persons mentioned as possible candidates for the five constitutional offices not held by Republicans. Rockefeller said he planned to call his second special session of the legislature this year about May 13. He said he hoped a tax increase Would not be necessary but that he did be- lieVe a tax increase was inevitable. The governor said he would meet with departments heads Friday to discuss the state's financial problems. He said he would be .in a better position to assess the state's financial situation after the meeting. Rockefeller had planned to release the State Police report of its investigation of the unearthing of three human skeletons at Cummins Prison Farm Monday. He postponed releasing the report, however, because his legal adviser, G. Thomas Eisele, was called out of the city. Rockefeller said he hoped to release a condensed version of the report before the end of the week. Enforcing Mixed Drink Law Tough By PETE YOUNG Associated Press Writer LITTLE ROCK (AP)-Harrel Hughes, director of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board, said Monday he would stand behind his pledge to enforce mixed drink laws, but indicated that enforcement would be a long, slow process. Hughes refused to discuss in detail what ABC agents have been doing since Hughes led them on a raid of the Top of the Rock Club March 23. "We are going to enforce every law put on the book," Hughes said. "We are going to do whatever it takes to stop the sale of mixed drinks in Arkansas." But when asked what that action constituted, Hughes pointed out, "There are only 15 (ABC) agents scattered throughout the state." "We are depending on local officials to enforce the laws," he said. Hughes said he mailed letters to officers earlier asking them to cooperate In enforcing liquor laws, Hughes said the ABC board wanted to "give the local authorities an opportunity to enforce the law themselves." He said he would act when the local officials didn't but he would not set a deadline for local action. Asked about published reports THE r FAMILY^ LAWYER. "Kill the Umpire!" Fof verbal pyrotechnics, few events cart equal a hard-fought game of baseball. As a rule the soiitid and fury signify nothing serious. fiiit nt times, matters do get out of hand. Suppose, for example, that the fun who yells "Kill the umpire!" really takes a swing at him. What are the legal consequences? For one thing, the umpire may hold the fan liable for the damage he inflicts. The law draws a sharp line between violent words and violent deeds. But there may be further complications. Take this case: An umpire, slugged by an irate fan, decided that the real villain was the home team's peppery manager. Suing the manager for damages, the umpire argued in court: "He kept heckling me all through the game. He knew perfectly well that he was getting the local fans all worked up against me. Therefore, he was responsible for my injury." But the court refused to pin legal liability on the manager. The judge said it would be unfair to blame a manager for the antics of "every emotionally unstable person who might arrive at the game spoiling for a fight." Furthermore, merely by taking on such a job in the first place, an umpire assumes a certain amount of risk. In one case a college student, volunteering to umpire in a practice game, took up a position close behind the netting of the batting cage. A fast foul ball thudded into the netting and struck the student in the eye. In due course he sued the school for damages, complaining that there was 'too much slack in the netting. But the court ruled that this was a risk he himself had assumed by standing in such a vulnerable spot. Still, umpires do have the consolation of wielding vast power within the game itself. According to Section 9.02 of the Official Baseball Rules, the umpire's call, on almost every question, is the final word on the subject. With no appeal from his decisions, the umpire has the kind of authority that a judge on the bench might well envy. One umpire displayed a keen sense of baseball law when he said: 'They ain't strikes, they ain't balls, they ain't nothin' 'till I call 'eml" An American Bar Association public service feature by Will Bernard. that the sale of mixed drinks had returned to Hot Springs within 48 hours after ABC agents and State Police raided three private clubs, three weeks ago, Hughes said he was "watching the situation." "We're trying to watch the situation and we'll take what steps necessary to stop it," he said. "We'll give the local authorities a chance to correct the situation first." Hughes was asked how much time expires between receiving a report of the illegal sale of mixed drinks and action by the ABC, THINKS CONG (From Page 1) it in the first place was a stupendous blunder and now he proposes to retreat and maybe surrender," McGIellan said. Rep, David Pryor, D-Ark., said he would support the bombing halt. Pryor said, however, that if Hanoi "does not react within a certain period — 1 don't know what period—1 think the bombing will be resumed." Rep. John Paul Hammerschmidt, R-Ark., said he felt Johnson's position on the bombing was "reasonable and we should try it." Rep. E. C. "Took" Gainings, D-Arfc., said Johnson's proposals would put North Vietnam on the defensive and said he felt they were good ideas. Rep. Wilbur D. Mills, D-Ark., said his House Ways and Means Committee would want to see more cuts in government expenditures before making a decision on Johnson's proposed 10 per cent surtax. The surtax increase has been bottled up in Mills' committee. Mills said he was particularly impressed by Johnson's statement that he expected, and would accept, a cut in his budget by Congress. "This is clearly a step toward the kind of compromise we have all been talking about," Mills said. "I thought the President made a splendid speech and delivered it better than any other speech of his I have heard." Mills said he was "shocked and surprised at Johnson's withdrawal from the presidential race. McClellan said Johnson's withdrawal was not a shocking surprise by any means but that he had not expected it. Pryor said he was "flabbergasted" at Johnson's announcement. Gainings said he thought Johnson's withdrawal would aid party stabilization. Fulbright said Johnson's announcement would make the nomination very interesting. "This will provide a re-assessment, an open discussion of where we are going and what our policy is," said Fulbright. OFFICIALS THINK (From Page 1) freed from bombing by the President's order is a rail line extending south westward out of Red China into Hanoi. The line carries a substantial amount of small arms from China. This rail line has to be hit regularly to disrupt its use. In addition, the military would have liked to continue striking industrial plants and military complexes located in the same northeast quadrant. How much the enemy benefits from the cessation— assuming Hanoi doesn't move immediately toward negotiations- will obviously depend on how long the bombing, halt lasts, officers said. Defense officials who declined to be identified told newsmen there is no time limit on the bombing cessation. But these officials also pointed out the United States is two months away from the best flying weather over North Vietnam—throwing open the possibility American planes might resume full operations this summer if Hanoi takes no reciprocal act of de-escalation. Defense officials declined to state exactly what area may be bombed under the President's guidelines, MONUMENTAL inuw wlsibr in KJMWZ. Poland, are tb« work of t'ratow art stu uJU tu lpi< th*>»v siw» kings urt-u't likely to fade until Overture for Pence We/corned LONDON (AP) — President Johnson's new overture for peace in Vietnam was welcomed across Europe and by some of America's Asian allies today. But diplomatic authorities in London expect Hanoi to reject it because of the President's companion announcement that he is not a candidate for re-election. These informants said Johnson's decision not to run again may tempt the Vietnamese Communists—with Red Chinese encouragement—to battle on in hopes of the election of a "peace candidate" who might give them better terms. But the emergence of a "win the war" candidate with a strong chance of being elected probably would convince Hanoi it should negotiate now, these sources said. There was no immediate comment on the President's speech from the foreign quarters whose reaction mattered most—North Vietnam, the Viet Cong and the Soviet Union. Moscow Radio briefly reported Johnson's decision to curtail the air attacks on North Vietnam but made no mention of his decision not to seek re-election. The British government welcomed the bombing cutback, which it said "should offer a further opportunity of achieving a just and honorable peace." The government said it was "examining urgently how best (it) can respond to President Johnson's invitation to exert (its) influence to end the conflict." Presumably the British will renew their pressure for another Geneva conference on Viet- nam. Britain and the Soviet Un ion were cochairmen of the 1954 conference which ended the French war in Vietnam, but so far the Russians have refused to join in calling another such parley. A spokesman for Prime Minister Harold Wilson refused to comment on the President's decision to withdraw from the electoral campaign. But some British officials expressed the fear that the U.S. government would become a lame duck administration that might bring inter-allied decision-making to a halt until January. In Paris, two interpretations were put on the President's political move: that he was bowing to mounting pressure in the United States against his policies, and that he hoped to present the Democratic convention with a peace agreement which would result in the "grateful" convention drafting him for another term. Japanese officials, whose government reluctantly supported the U.S. bombing of North Vietnam, welcomes the de-escalation move. The officials speculated that Johnson made his announcement after receiving some positive \vord that it would get favorable reaction from Hanoi. Among America's Asian allies, officials in Thailand were shaken and perturbed by Johnson's political exit. Premier Thanom Kittikachorn said he felt that if Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was elected, the United States would abandon Asia. Another supporter of American policy in Vietnam, Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman of Malaysia, said he hoped tlia the decision to cut back the bombing did not mean the Americans were giving up "the fight to preserve democracy against communism." BARBS You perhaps read about the 104-year-old bachelor who attributed his longevity to nonsmoking, nondrinking and the early-to-bed routine. This is living? * * * In certain circles, an old- fashioned girl is one ivho rides a motorcycle sidesaddle. * * * Our moochy neighbor, who runs out of potables whenever i company arrives, must have invented the no-return bottle. * * * Restaurant near here, has a "home cooking" sign in the ivindow, and we wish the cook could hurry back. (Newspaper Enterprise Assn.) £^ In TABLEWARE FOR EASTER 8 PLATES Your Choice 35< i --^ tyjr 4 •*T .. •/.• > • 8 CUPS *•* 9 ';•/. Tl 20 NAPKINS 54x96-lnch Tablecloth Novelty Candles . 15c Don't simply sot the table—Set the V^ ^ J rnoocl! Festive tableware oe.iles ,i k^^ij/ gala atmosphere to enliven your party. Cuts clown clean up lime, too! ' Cute, .Colorful, Cuddy PLUSH BUNNIES 2.98 V- Delightfully squeezable! •: Adored by teens and tots. "'•• - •'•••'• _ 2'£3 " 1-Pound Bag JELLY BIRD EGGS • Many Delicious Fruit Flavors! A must in Easter baskets . . kid dies love them as extui trtats! Buy n big bag now <ind sav; Reg. 33c BARGAINS FOR BOYS BRA OH JC L t-V BEANS ISo- Wide Selection of... EASTER BASKETS i and up - Ready-Made to Save You Time and Money! Delicious, fresh candies and popular toys to brighten their faces on Easter morning. Just the right amount of candy—no costly leftovers. Come in today—get first choice. A COMPLETE EASTER OUTFIT INCLUDES THESE FASHIONS! v < No-Iron DRESS SHIRTS Never wrinkles . . . stays Ireih .ill day. 100% Polyester tricot. M,r acolene" limsh. 14',-'-17. White Reg. 2.77 244 Boys Crew Socks Ail occasion nb kmu frjr drc'.,., school or cdsual we-ir Choi e ol dark co!ors in si^es / f'.ni M Reg 48t PASTEL PADDED BRAS Lightly cushioned for t i soft, natu r;il look. White pini*. blu'j or yellow. Si/es 32 40, ABC. J99 LONG-LEG GIRDLES Controls your figure White, Pink, Blue and Yellow Reg 4.99 "NYLON HALF SLIPS For a smooth, sleok line under to- ddy'i revLMlmg l.istnons. Smart embroidered r'^tail. S M t. J99 LUXURIOUS ACOTATE THICOT WOMEN'S PANTIES i'(rit /Ourv'lf to |he (me lit .n-,:l ll'l." o( smooth S.lt-n Inr |l'f. (in- .• , JU il |.il, lor ':<jttOn 'j 7 REG. 49c 2 Panti Hose Just right under today's Short Skirts. 727 Nylons Cantrece for a fine fit J.OO * 80 New Styles /or Easter WOMEN'S HANDBAGS Bright colors to complement your new Spring wardrobe. Coinu in— hnd the uiir- you've looked lor. CLIP THESE COUPONS ...AND SAVE! Confidential ENVHQPES Cljirol s Loving Care HAIR COLORING J.05 With This Coupon oir.*_- ol fn With This Coupon Mild ',«e<;t tjste I •vhole f.muiy will l-r to prevent mtfthru "/'/> • With This Coupon fj«!..?'-•).)I;•>: 'i' • SNACK BAR SPiCIAl . Ham Sandwich ON HUN OH TOAST ONLY 29 ROOt Beer MKG.iGc size SPECIAL 70* Free Parking All Day Wednesday Downtown Hope! !

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