The Charlotte Observer from Charlotte, North Carolina on August 1, 2008 · K3
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The Charlotte Observer from Charlotte, North Carolina · K3

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Friday, August 1, 2008
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K3
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The Charlotte Observer • charlotteobserver.com/cabarrus Sunday, August 3, 2008 3KNEIGHBORS for about eight years. “Over the years, we’ve seen things that would just make you bawl like a baby,” Fillow said. “We’ve pulled them out of those situations and found them homes.” That will change when Steve Fillow’s job ends in Feb- ruary. His paycheck helps pay the mortgage on the 7.5-acre Har- risburg property where the three have had residences and run an expanded rescue oper- ation since 2003. There are also other monthly expenses, including utilities, dog food bills, and spaying and neutering bills. The rescue arranged 354 adoptions of puppies and dogs of various breeds in 2007, about 10 percent of them adult dogs. So far this year, the rescue has arranged about 130 adop- tions, including about 20 per- cent to 25 percent adult dogs. Phillips also found a home for a pit bull named Gunny who was abandoned after an injury that required amputa- tion of a leg. Phillips and oth- ers say the injury likely oc- curred in a dog-fighting oper- ation. About 36 dogs are awaiting adoption now. The team often invests $100 for a healthy puppy to $400 or more for an adult dog, while adoptions cost $175, Fillow said. Donations have never come close to meeting expenses. “We’re not marketers,” Phil- lips said. “I’m sure there’s much more we could have raised. We’re always in the red by several thousand by the end of the year. That’s basic. It doesn’t incorporate mortgage or utilities.” The organization will con- tinue arranging adoptions as long as possible. Phillips and the Fillows plan to keep any dogs that haven’t been adopt- ed when they go separate ways. “We’re both very sad,” Phil- lips said, frustrated that inde- pendent local rescue opera- tions get less support than na- tional and municipal ones. “I’m happy they get money. (Donors) just don’t know there are private rescues that need money as well.” RESCUE • from 1K DAVID T. FOSTER III – dtfoster@charlotteobserver.com North Mecklenburg Animal Rescue co-owner Terry Fillow with several signs at the front of the facility. After four years, the shelter will close by February. Q. Should (a gardener) cut suckers off his okra plants? I haven’t seen that particular question re- searched, but I would be less inclined to cut suckers from okra than I would be from corn or tomatoes. Suckers (new stems sprout- ing from between the main stem and the leaf) indicate that, at some point, the okra plant thought (at least hor- monally) that it had more than enough energy and nutrition for a single stalk. Okra is worse than many plants about failing to bloom when there is extra nitrogen within the plant. If the suckers don’t siphon off some extra ni- trogen, the plant may not set fruit. In addition, suckers allow the okra to fill in the space when there has been spotty germination. Numerous suck- ers may make the okra slightly more difficult to pick, but that is the major downside. The only time I ever count- ed the number of okra pods on a stalk, I had picked more than 100 from one stalk, which had multiple suckers by Septem- ber. Mine are so late this year that I may not get 10. By the way, I have seen suck- ering sweet corn researched in the commercial field. It is a break-even situation when you have to pay for the labor. Suck- ering tomatoes (removing the suckers) gives you less yield but enough increase in size and earliness to make it worth- while in commercial situa- tions. David Goforth, horticulture and forestry agent with the Cabarrus Center of the N.C. Cooperative Extension Service, teaches the Master Gardener course for Cabarrus County. Don’t bother taking suckers off okra plants McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE PHOTO Suckers allow okra to fill in the space when there has been spotty germination. MASTER GARDENERS Q&A DAVID GOFORTH Made from fresh 100% edible seed. 8609 Concord Mills Blvd. (704) 979-3443 www.wbu.com www.landondunn.com Appointments Available Monday–Friday MINT HILL Hoods Crossroads 704-844-0906 UNIVERSITY AREA 3210 Prosperity Church Rd. 704-688-0505 Brought to You Every Week By Landon A. Dunn LANDON A. DUNN ATTORNEY AT LAW • Real Estate • Wills & Estates • Family Law & Divorce • Corporate & Business Law A MEMBER OF GROUP ATTORNEY NETWORK Interesting Facts China’s Beijing Duck Restaurant can seat 9,000 people at one time. Did you know that for every 10 successful attempts to climb Mount Everest there is one fatality? If you go blind in one eye, you’ll only lose about one-fifth of your vision, but all of your depth perception. Did you know that the Bloodhound is the only animal whose evidence is admissible in an American court? And, here’s another interesting fact… The Secretary of State’s website has the forms to start a business. Why should I hire an Attorney? The website provides the documents the Secretary of State requires, but more documentation is needed for the formation of the Corporation or LLC to be a valid business entity. Experience CHRIST CHURCH Energize Your Life! Sundays at 6:00 p.m. www.christchurchupc.org Hampton Inn @ Concord Mills It’s Awesome August Sale Time at Don’t Miss Our Semi-Annual BLOW-OUT SALE Save Up to 75% OFF! August 1st - 16th Bring a small bag of cat or dog food and Save 20% OFF Your Total Purchase! August 25th-30th Gifts & Garden by Angela Mon. - Fri. 10:00am - 5:30pm & Sat. 10:00am - 4:00pm Phone: 704-788-9076 180 Church Street Concord, NC 28025 www.giftsandgardenbyangela.com Gifts & Garden by Angela Proceeds will benefit the Cabarrus County Humane Society Paying Top Dollar for Your Old, Broken, or Unwanted Gold Jewelry TURN YOUR JEWELRY INTO CASH! 867 Cloverleaf Plaza, Kannapolis, North Carolina 28083 704-782-6622 Hours: M-F 10-6, Sat. 9:30-4 Closed Sunday Watch as we test & weigh your gold!

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