Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California on March 28, 1964 · Page 10
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Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California · Page 10

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Redlands, California
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Saturday, March 28, 1964
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Page 10
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Page 10 REDLANDS, CALIFORNIA MARCH 28, 1964 Soviet is dealing with the 'devir Nikita Khrushchev once defended the infamous Hitler-Stalin pact of 1940 by saying the Russians would have signed an agreement with the devTl himself if it would have prevented or postponed war. The Russians are still finding themselves forced to deal with a sort of devil — in this case, the capitalist world. They may not believe tliat money and its uses are here to stay, but until that glorious day of the classless and wantless society dawTis, they, like the rest of us, need cash (or credit) to get along in the world as it is. So, finding that Westerners are fascinated by a shiny, yellowish metal called gold, of which Mother Russia holds vast stoi-es beneath her copious bosom, they are selling it for old-fashioned cash on the European market. The Russians are estimated to have sold from $450 to $550 million worth of gold last year to the West — more than double the amount they ti-aded in 1962. One effect has been to depress the going price of gold to its lowest level in months. As if this were not enough, the Russians have been reduced to the disgusting capitalistic practice of borrowing money and, like good businessmen, trying to get the best long- range credit terms they can wangle. This bourgeois Russian behavior is generally attributed to lagging e.xport earnings and the need to pay for the huge amounts of wheat they are importing. ^Vhat impact all this could have in the long i-un, not only on the world's monetary structure but on the ideological wall the Russians have built to protect themselves against West- em influences, is something better left for exf)erts in various fields to ponder. Westemei-s might keep in mind, however, that the Russians may not be the only ones dealing with the de\iL Safe to drink the water? Can a resen'oir be used for fishing and boating without danger to the health of people who -will drink \rater that has been drawn from it and treated? The Metropolitan Water District is headed toward a contradiction of answers. MWD has always kept its huge Lake Mathews near Riverside closed. Attempts of sportsmen to force it open for recreation have never succeeded. This water goes into the line that ser\-es various Orange County Cities and to another aqueduct that serves many users in Los Angeles County. At this time MWD has sold $750,000 worth of raw Colorado 'River Water to the state for the filling Lake Elsinore. This is a sheer recreation program since there is no domestic or irrigation use of Elsinore. However, I^IWD has a contract with the State for large annual purchases of water derived from the Sierra Nevada — the so-called Feather River project The state will bring this water down the San Joaquin river, over the Tehachapi mountains to a reservoir at the northern edge of the San Fernando valley. William Wame, State Director of Water Resources, announced yesterday that property is now being acquired for this artificial lake having a surface of about four square miles. Planned facilities, he said, include fishing, boating, camping, picnicking and hiking. Some 2,000,000 %Tsits a year are anticipated from the public. According to prevailing MWD doctrine — which keeps Lake Mathews closed — the Cas- tiac resen-oir water would not be safe for human consumption, even after purification. But this is a reservoir MWD is going to be getting water from. The irony of John Glenn Pitiful though the plight of John Glenn may be, his case is tlie perfect squelch for those who see danger in what other men choose to do—ski, scuba dive, fly. As everj'one knows, Glenn became a national hero by climbing into a Mercuiy capsule, blasting off into space, orbiting the earth, and returning safely. When he quit astronauting and turned to politics, he had the misfortune to slip in his bathtub February 25 and is still hospitalized, frustrating his desire to campaign for senator in Ohio. Danger is where you find it. In your search, never overestimate the ha2ards of air or space, nor underestimate your own bathtub. The Newsreel New electronic devices will enable snoopers to know everything we think and say. Looking back over things she has thought and said recently, Tilly doesn't see how it will do than much good. The new White House Press Secretary has just taken off 30 pounds. There is no room for overweight officers in the war on poverty. An airline offers cut-rate trips to Europe for D-Day veterans. And this time, we assume; they don't have to parachute in. ^Vhat's happened to American manhood? Now men not only admit that they help with the housework but aren't even ashamed to say they wxfuld accept the vice-presidency. With a Grain Of Salt By Frank and Bill Meere The silver dollar is now becoming elusive — as you have read in the news — but no more so than the bonds of the Redlands Unified School Districts. The voters vote them, but they never see them. The trustees offer them for sale, but they never see them. The county treasurer gets them printed, but he can't tell you who has them today. The elusiveness of school bonds has bugged us for so many years that last January we tried to buy one, acting upon the Baok of America advertisement in the Facts of January 7. We found that you have to be quick because the market snaps them up. Others beat us to the bonds. To write the biography of a Bedlands bond we turned to Manager Robert h. Miller of the State Street branch of Bank of America and he in turn solicited the considerable aid of A. E. Stone, Jr., assistant vice president at Los Angeles headquarters of the bank. Another valuable source was our fellow townsman, County Treasurer Ray Williams. The voters put the ball in motion last October 22 when they authorized the trustees to issue $6,500,000 in bonds over a period of years. Needing to build the Mariposa school, to add 21 class rooms to four schools, and to buy land for two entirely new plants, the trustees put an initial offering of $2,000,000 bonds up for bid. Moody's Investor's Service and Standard and Poors rated the bonds AA. This means that Redlands enjoys the second highest rank which these rating services give to political subdivisions throughout the country. ^Vhen the County Supervisors —who act for the school board in these matters — opened the bids. Treasurer Williams look them to his office, ran the data through his calculator, and declared the winner to be a sj-n- dicate of six investment firms under the leadership of Bank of America, managing underwriter. The interest cost to Redlands will average 3.1 per cent, from the retirement of the first bonds in 1966 to the last in 1985. During the three hours following the bond sale at 11 a.m. on December 30 the members of the sindicate contacted their customers for orders. The orders were recorded; bonds were allocated. After that bonds were sold on a first-come, first served basis. Judging by our personal experience, the Redlands securities were no drug ;Dn the market. Mr. Williams then ordered the Jeffries Banknote company in Los Angeles to print the bonds, including on them the opinion of the legal firm of 0"- Melvcny and Myers that the securities arc without legal flaw. To save Nancy Smith, chairman of the Board of Supervisors, and County Clerk Dennis WardcU, the trouble of signing each bond, Mr. Williams had Jeffries print their signatures, as well as the county seal. However, he went to Los Angeles and signed his own name to the 2,000 bonds, using the repeater pen that affixes 20 signatures simultaneously. On January 28 the Bank headquarters in Los Angeles sent two men to the Jeffries company where they checked the bonds and paid to Treasurer Williams $2,000,000 plus about $2,000 accumulated interest. Bank of America retained about $900,000 of these bonds for its own investment program. Mr. Stone esUmates that private investors bought about $750,000 of the tax exempt securities and about $350,000 went to insUtu- fional investori (banks and in- Bring on the eggs, folks ASSIGNMENT; West Firsf residenf takes up housekeeping in Foster Cify Teletips TELEVISION TOP SIfOW: — 9:30, Chan. 7. Hollywood Palace. George Bums is host. Performers are singer Sergio Franchi, comedy team of Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks; the LennoD Sisters, singer Patti Page, juggler Rudy Cardenas, magician Mac Ronay. 7:30 — Chan. 4. The Lieutenant. "Operation: Actress." Lf. Rice is amazed when a Hollywood actress announces she is getting married — to him. 8:30 — Chan. 4. Joey Bishop. TV viewers send Joey two dozen dogs and the Barnes household audiUons children for prospective owners. 11:15 — Chan. 2. First run of 1959 movie, in color, "The Miracle." Stars Carroll Baker, Roger Moore, Walter Slezak, Katina Pa.xinou, Vittorio Gassman. Adaptation of Slax Reinhardt's stage play about a young postulant who leaves her Spanish village convent to seek worldly adventure. One Minute Pulpit Who alone has immortality and dwells unapproachable light, whom no man has ever seen or can see. To him be honor and eternal dominion. Amen. — I Timothy 6:16. •The wages and heroes of history are receding from us, and history contracts the record of their deeds into a narrower and narrower page. But time has no power over the came and deeds and words of Jesus Christ. — William Channing. surance companies, for c.v amplc). You might suppose that -tfr. Williams would know who the ultimate purchasers were and could say how many Redland- crs invested in the local district. He can't, though, because they are coupon bonds, payable to bearer, and can pass from hand to hand just like cash. Nor do the owners appear at his office, thereby identifying themselves. Invariably they cash theu: bonds at the bank where they do business. So our investigation ends where it started. If you want to know a man who owns a Redlands school bond, buy one yourself. That wiU identify at least one bondholder to you. SATURDAY EVENING 5:00— 2—Movie 5—Movie 7-Wide World of Sports 5:3(}_ii—illovie 6:00— 4—News and Sports (c) 9-AbboU & CosteUo 13—Rocky & His Friends 6:30— 4—News Conference (C) 5—Jimmie Rodgers 7—Nation at War 9—Our Miss Brooks 13—Bourbon St. Beat 6:45- 2-News 7:00- 2-Sea Hunt 4—Great Conversations 5—Jack Barry 7—Have Guu —WiU Travel 3—Jfovie 11—Miss Teen Pageant 7:30— 2—Jackie Gleason 4—Lieutenant 7—Hootenanny 13—Deadline 8:00— 5—Leave it to Beaver 11—WresUing 13—Movie 8:30— 2—Defenders 4—Joey Bishop (c) 5—Movie 7—Lawrence Welk 9—Movie 9:00— 4—Movie (C) 9:30— 2—PhU savers 7—Hollywood Palace 10:00— 2—Gunsmoke 5—Dan Smoot 11—News, sports. Features 13—Movie 10:15— 5—Manion Forum 10:30— 5—Movie 7—Movie 11—Naked City 10:35— 9-Movie 11:00- 2—Movie 11—Movie 11:15— 2—Movie 4—News 11:45— 4—Movie 9—NCAA Swimmmg 4:00— 2—One of a Kind 4—World of Golf (C) 5-Movie (C) 7—Press Conference 13—Robin Hood 4:30— 7—Science All-Stars 3—Impressions—Art (C) 13—Movie SUNDAY DAYTIME 9:00_ 2—Light of Faith 4—Easter Music (C) 5—AdvenUst Hour 7—Movie 9—Movie 11—Movie 13—Variedades 9:30— 2—Learning '64 SUNDAY EVENING 5:00—2—Alumni Fun 4—Easter Music (C) 7—Winter Olympic Highlights 9—Movie 11—Movie 5:30— 2—Amateur Hour 4—G-E CoUege Bowl (c) 6:00— 2-^Twentieth Century 4—Meet Uie Press (C) 5-Polka Parade 7—Movie 13—Rocky & His Friends 6:30— 2—Mister Ed 4—Biography 9—Maverick 11—Movie 13-Rod Rocket 7:00— 2—Marineland Carnival 4—BiU Dana 5—Movie 13—Movie 7:30- 4-Disney's World (C) 7—Saga of Western Man 9—Movie 8:00- 2-Ed SulUvan 8:30- 4—Grindl 7—Arrest and Trial 11—American Communism 13—Vagabond (C) 9:00— 3-Judy Garland 4—Bonanza (c) 13—Operation Success 9:30- 5-It is Written 11—Boston Symphony 13—Dan Smoot 9:45—13—Capitol Reporter 10:00— 2—Candid Camera 4—Breakthrough 5—Freedom University 7—Movie 3—Bus Stop 13—Ann Sothem 10:30— 2-What's My Line? 5—Business Opportunities 11—News, Sports, Comment 13-News 4-Christopher Program U:00- 2~News 10:00— 2—Discovering Art 4—News, Sports <C) 4—This is the Life 5—Open End 5—For Kids Only 9—Movie 13—Panorama tatino 11—Opinion in the 10:30— 2—Movie Capital 4—Frontiers of Faith 13—Movie 9—Udies of the Press H:15— 2—Movie 13-FaiU> for Today 11:30— 4-Movic By Neil Morgan *'lkimifsa1oiigh!eb,haHoesh»hanfoniertoit as m'awesom nspoaabilHf?"* 11:00— 4—Way of the Cross (C) 7—Easter Service 9—Easter Service U—Wonderama 13—Church in the Rome 11:30— 2—Sum & Substance 5—Home Buyers Guide 12:00— 2—Capitol Hill 4—Journey of a Life- Time (C) 7—ChaUenge Golf (C) 9—Movie 11—Top Star Bowling 13—Oral Roberts 12:25— 2—News 12:30— 2—Face the Nation 4—Passover Special (C) 5—Baseball Buff 13—Social Security in Action 12:45— S-rBaseball Warmup 13—Film Feature 1:00— 2—Viewpoint 4—EUiics (C) 5-BasebaU (C) 7—Discovery '64 11—Movie 13—Voice of Calvary 1:30— 2—Los Aijgeles Report 4—Confrontation (C) 7—Issues and Answers 13-Cal's Corral 1:45- SL -Movie 2:00— 2—Insight 4—Tales of the West 7—Directions '64 2:25— 2—News 2:30— 2—Sports Spectacular 4-CoUege Report (C) 3:00— 4-Sunday (C) 7—Cavalcade of Books 11—Movie 3:30- 5-Cheaters 7—Conversations 11—Under Discussion THE ALMANAC Today is Saturday, Blarch 28, the 88Ui day of 1964 with 278 to foUow. The moon is approaching its last quarter. The evening stars are Venus and Jupiter. On this day in history: In 1797, Nathanial Briggs of New Hampshire received a patent for a washing machine. In 1939, Madrid surrendered to the Nationalist forces of Generalissimo Francisco Franco. In 1942, British naval forces raided Nazi-occupied St Nazaire, France, and blew up harbor installatiozis. In 1962, Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Whittaker resigned because of ill health. A thought for the day: Author Rainer Maria Rilke once said: "A good marriage is that in which each appoints the other guardian of his solitude." No Cliar Evidtnc* SAN FR.WCISCO - City planners wresUe with the birth pangs of new California communities, but it all looks easy to Charles Zerbe, 30, a San Francisco fireman. For almost three weeks in March, Zerbe and his family, lived alone in a ghost city of studs and rafters and stacked lumber on an island of sand flats beside San Francisco Bay, beneath the glide pattern of planes approaching International Airport. Zerbe is the first citizen of Foster City, which very likely will do just what its planners claim: Grow to a contained community of 35,000 people within 10 years. Foster City is better planned than most new Califomia cities; it has a system of canals, and it will draw in part on the genius of the architects Edward Stone and Mies van der Rohe. But Foster City is a familiar Califomia story. "I've driven by here for years and never dreamed they could use this land," Zerbe told me as I sat with him and his family in their modernistic white house. It has four bedrooms and two baths and an electric kitchen, the Zerbes' . first. "When I signed up for this house, some of the guys down at the station were ribbing me. They said we'd float away. They said, 'That lot you're buying is fill from the bottom of the bay.' They said they'd give me a lot of corks to keep the house up." But peach trees and camellias are blooming already in the Zerbe patio. Stakes and twine guard a tender new lawn in which fragments of shells appear; a Foster City subdivider planted it to see if grass would grow there without topsoil, and it is growing. Califomians, whose roots are not yet so deep as most, move more often than people of other states from one home to another. Often their reasons for moving are of fragile logic. Califomians are restless people to whom a move means less than to most Today's wagon trains are moving vans, carrying televisions, clock radios and even sports cars. Zerbe and his family are no exception. They left a house near Twin Peaks in San Francisco because a doctor said the city fog was bad for their 8-year-old son's asthma. "I answered ads and went to the home show," Zerbe recalled. "Phyllis, here, and I looked at houses from San Rafael to San Mateo. Then one day. at a fire I saw a friend, another fireman, who knew this place was about to open up." The Zerbes drove the 15 miles south of San Francisco on a rainy day last October before model homes were finished at Foster City, and decided to buy. They were the first family to move in. T. Jack Foster, the Oklahoman who is developing the community, gave the Zerbes a framed certificate of welcome and took movies of their arrival, complete with two televisions and three radios. There were merchandise gifts from merchants, and with that, Phyl- fis Zerbe began to sense the ordeals of life as a fract pioneer. The nearest market is three miles away in Hillsdale. After three weeks, they had not yet discovered the nearest church, but although they were the only persons living in a sprawling jungle of construction, the world seemed aware of the Zerbes. A school bus comes each morning across Bayshore Freeway from Horrall school, in San Mateo, and Bruce and Bill Zerbe so far are the only passengers. Two community newspapers are tossed each day on the new Zerbe lawn, and one news- paperboy told Phyllis Zerbe, "I guess you realize I ride three miles to bring one paper." A rubbish service called and signed up the Zerbes at $1.50 a month for Wednesday trash pickup. A telephone was installed after one day. Two dairy drivers have found them. While a debate rages at higher levels over whether Foster City. will be annexed to S a n Mateo or will incorporate as a city on its own. Fireman Zerbe has come up with a San Mateo telephone number to call in case of fire. Construction men and house shoppers parade past the Zerbes' picture window these days, and the sounds of hammer, saw and concrete mixer fill the day on all sides. The Zerbes chase jackrabbits from their lawn. On Zerbe's days off, while the boys are at school, he • and his wife explore the island on the boys' bikes. The Zerbes are swept up is the excitement of newness. "We knew we'd be the first people living in Foster City," Zerbe said, "but we didn't realize at the time what an honor it was. We're kind of floored. We've studied the plans for Foster City and we're very proud." To commuters speeding aIon( Bayshore Freeway, Foster City stiU is barely noticeable. To many city planners, it is a bold experiment to be watched. To Zerbe, it is a personal experience so si^iificant that he " even associates himself with the name of the sfreet where he lives: Pilgrim. Redlands Yesterdays FIVE YEARS AGO Temperatures — Highest T7, lowest 44. Plans being explored to permit two foreign students to come to Redlands High for a year and a Bedlands student go to a foreign country for a summer, the high school reports. The city's new "Hi-Ranger" aerial platform starts work on schedule of trimming the skirts of Redlands many palm trees. Redlands churches plan fradi- tionai services tomorrow to commemorate Easter and the Resurrection. TEN YEARS AGO Temperatures — Highest 70, lowest 40. Four-way stop sign authorized at Citrus and Orange by the City Council. This will now halt Uie former Uirough-traffic on Orange. Waldo Burroughs reappointed to another three-year term on the county's Fish and Game commission by Supervisor S. Wesley Break. Arthur Gregory Sr., pioneer Redlands civic leader and founder of MOD, dies quietly in his sleep at the age of 86. FIFTEEN YEARS AGO Temperatures — Highest 54, lowest 46. Redlanders dismayed when freak storm actually "rains mud" on cars and homes. School Trustees urge parents to study changes before board acts on new boundaries for all seven elemenary schools. Miss Josephine Reay, new society editor of the Facts, takes a brief look at circus life by riding an elephant from the Clyde Beatty circus when it was here yesterday. SIDE GLANCES By Gfll Fox AlUiough there is Uttie doubt that the American Indians originally came from Asia, there is no clear evidence relating the languages of the Americans to those of Asia or elsewhere in the Ohl World, according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica. "Order a nice, big steak, dear. It'll help put rosaa in your cheeks!"

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