Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois on July 9, 1963 · Page 1
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Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois · Page 1

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Galesburg, Illinois
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Tuesday, July 9, 1963
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t I •f 'l t h Ifome Paper <sf i -j • i J •1 • i .1: . i i \ Weatlier Stripe "^eHoW Fair Tonight Ifid on ^- i Wednesday, in SOs Maximum 80 to 85 ? -L h P 1 * /I Better Newspaper 160 GALESBURG, ILLINOIS — TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1963 PRICE SEVEN CENTS Hi- - R - ^ H I,'- . r ' . I • ' w! - - * f .-'' ' '/ J ^ 1/A ! W i: r < < 'S ^ ••#s ,> ^' >r A\'i - _ bill KIP MOSCOW (AP) — CommuniSjt Chinese negotiators failed to show up at the Moscow-Peking reconciliation talks today after the Soviet Union fired new charges at Red China and warned of "dangerous consequences." The interruption in the ideological talks between the two ' Communist giants came as Belgian Foreign Minister Paul-Henri Spaak, returning from a meeting with Premier Khrushchev, predicted Soviet relations with the West will im- 556 Persons Die in Auto F Toll Over 4th Unions Indicate 4 Probable Refusal • 1 1 1 WASHINGTON (UPI) i prove, The CHICAGO (AP) count of the nation's traffic accidents during the long independence Day weekend showed 556 persons killed, a record for the four-day holiday. The death toll, reported over a 102-hour period from 6 p. m. Wednesday to midnight Sunday, topped the previous four-day Independence Day high of 509 set in 1961*. The National Safety Coun- In an extraordinary move, The final I President Kennedy today called on the nation's dis- w - chev's peaceful coexistence policy, d , had estimated a death toll 0 f underlined by his meeting with Spaak. The new Soviet party statement denounced speeches at a rally in Peking Sunday in support of flve -Last August during a railroad strike hundreds of idle freight cars stood in the Chicago and North Western 's Proviso yard in Chicago. The possibility of a similar situation exists unless a last- minute agreement prevents a threatened walkout on the nation 's railroads Thursday. UNIFAX Soviet Coipmunist party central committee earlier today Chinese expelled from the Soviet accused the Chinese of deliberate- Union. They had distributed re- ]i ves j n boating accidents. Crackdown on Cuba to Curb Dollar Usage In addition to WASHINGTON (UPI)-A new persons crackdown on financial transac- drowned and 44 others lost their tions with Cuba is expected to 550 to 650. The holiday total compares with an average of 100 traffic fatalities per day during the first five rk r lice Over ly aggravating Soviet-Chinese re lations at a time when the two countries are discussing ideological differences. At the mansion in the Lenin Hills section of Moscow where the talks 1 have been held, Western correspondents noted the usual signs of pre-rrfeeting activity I speakers at the rally tended to prints in the Soviet Union of the Chinese Communist party's long guJ] Humiliated denunciation June 14 of Khrushchev's policies. Unfriendly Moods PAMPLONA, Spain (UPI) Woobson of Austin, Tex., knocked than $30 million in Cuban assets uuwu »J ^ banks> prohibit unlicensed Spaniards when he violated local • ; transfer of dollars to or from was down Monday by two The Soviet statement said custom by riding a Spanish fight- today. create "moods unfriendly to the puting railroads and unions to let Supreme Court Justice Arthur J. Goldberg arbitrate their long dispute over "featherbedding." The railroads indicated they would go along with the proposal, as they have with previous government suggestions for heading off a strike threatened for 12:01 a.m. Thursday. The five unions involved said they would give it "every consideration" but implied they were opposed. The unions have rejected all earlier proposals that arbitration be invoked to settle the long, drawn-out dispute over elimination of what the railroads claim are unneeded jobs. Decide All Issues The President proposed that Goldberg, a former labor secretary and one-time union attorney, be authorized to decide all issues in the complex dispute and make binding recommendations for settlement, according to J.E. Wolfe, chief management negotiator. Goldberg is the newest member of the Supreme Court. He did not participate in a decision several fev... •if make it difficult for Cuba to deal in dollars anywhere in the world, m U.S. officials said today. Jim The new regulations block more r m Ay'<-:AA .a Cuba, and bar unlicensed trans- 44 Not Coming 99 Soviet people, to aggravate the buUs ^ ^ Brahmas in Texas. ing bull—rodeo style. "Actually," Woobson said later, actions with Cuba or Cuban na"I think it's easier to ride these tionals or transactions involving I months ago in which the high 1 11- J -l J .1 T% 1 * M m ^ ft I J . H :U< 4H ^1 4 -Vtrtt- 4-VIA ^ J r - L t By UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL But at 11 a.m., more than an hour after the talks usually begin, there was still no sign of the) China. Chinese. Soviet officials situation in the course of negotiations between the representatives of the Soviet Union and Cuban property. began lice said the Police today patrolled a racial hotspot in New York leaving, and then City where a major incident between, whites and Chinese would not be coming, Negroes was narrowly averted at a teen-age hangout, scene of several violent clashes this week. F i Demonstrations, peaceful biracial meetings and court action — all The Chinese absence aroused more aimed at furthering integration — were scheduled in almost every region of the nation. Four-hundred riot-trained trolmen and rushed Monday night pa- detectives were to the Leaders Call Off March on Gwynn Park BALTIMORE (AP)-Leaders of the integration movement in Maryland called off today a demonstration planned for late afternoon at Gwynn Oak amusement park. Clergymen and leaders of the Congress of Racial Equality decided to postpone the march on the privately owned, segregated park "as an action of good faith." They announced the postponement at a meeting called after the Baltimore County Council had voted unanimously Monday night to establish a human relations council. Spiro T. Agnew, Baltimore County executive, was notified of the postponement. Meeting with the CORE leaders were members of the interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, an organization of Negro clergymen. A Presbyterian minister had been scheduled to lead the march on the amusement park on Baltimore's northwestern outskirts, where some 380 persons were arrested in two previous massive demonstrations. Hospital Gets All Mixed Up; So Does Mother MEDIA, Pa. (AP)—Betty Jo Patterson of Media, a housewife and mother of two, is to enter Lankenau hospital in Philadelphia this weekend for a tonsillectomy. The "hospital sent her instructions suggesting she bring M a pair of pajajnas, a toothbrush, a comb, comic books and your teddy bear." speculation that they were awaiting Peking's reaction to the new Soviet attack. Some observers Bronx diner,' a gathering place for teen-agers, to quell racial rioting. The scene of picketing by integrationists for several days, the diner and the pickets have been under attack by crowds of whites sometimes ranging to more than 1,000. / Arrest Detective A Negro was taken into custody Monday night when he fired a shot in the air after stones allegedly were hurled at his car. He identified himself as the own- thought the Chinese might call an end to the sessions in retaliation. The Soviet blast came shortly after Khrushchev snubbed the Moscow meeting with the Chinese and conferred in Kiev with Spaak on easing cold War tensions. The Chinese militantly oppose Khrush- "The impression is created that a deliberate campaign is being carried on to aggravate seriously the Soviet-Chinese relations, dis- WllCre to Find It | 111 e ^ ect > or ^r bars Cuba from use of the U.S. banking system, for example, in transmitting funds for purposes of sub- 3 SECTIONS 28 PAGES Abingdon Amusement 9 5 tribunal held that the railroads were free to put the controversial new work rules into effect. The White House meeting lasted only a little over 15 minutes. There was no indication whether RESIGNS — Joseph Mitchell, controversial city manager at Newburgh, N.Y., has announced his resignation to take a job with the John Birch Society o the Eastern Seaboard. Mitchell attracted attention due to his crackdown on public welfare clients and later was tried, but found not guilty, of accepting a bribe* UNIFAX Agitators in n Jeer , 4 BushneU 5 version elsewhere in Latin Amer- Classified Ads 14-15 Comics-TV-Radio 12 ica. Kennedy mentioned the possibility of emergency legislation calling for one-shot arbitration of the disregarding the dangerous conse- Editorial 4 An Example quences of this policy." The statement added that despite "such unfriendly actions," the Russians will do everything possible "not to deepen the existing differences" with the Chinese. This clearly indicated that the Russians do not intend to suspend the talks with the Chinese in the Lenin Hills villa overlooking Moscow. Galva 5 Hospital Notes 5 Knoxville 9 Markets 16 Monmouth 8 Obituary 13 Sports 10-11 Weather Z Women in the News 6-7 City of Galesburg property tax valuations 19-28 South China Sea Lands Form Malaysia Federation LONDON (AP)—The way was er of a detective agency, and po- clear toda y for formation of the lice said he had a gun permit. The 400 police were moved onto the scene when a "riot call" was issued and several patrolmen were stoned at' the diner. A biracial meeting was scheduled in Beverly Hills, home of many Hollywood stars, to achieve peaceful integration of the famed community and its surrounding areas. Actors Burt Lancaster and Tony Franciosa were to be among those participating in the meeting to push integration. More demonstrations were expected in Cambridge, Md„ scene of bloody race rioting last month. State troopers with police dogs stood by to control any demonstrations. The nation's racial rundown: Savannah, Ga.; About 500 singing Negroes marched on the city hall and their leaders pledged a "black tornado" of stepped-up racial demonstrations would "hit Savannah as it's never been hit before." New Orleans; Three federal judges were to begin deciding if desegregation of Mobile County, Alabama, public schools should begin in September or be delayed a year. Pine Bluff, Ark.: The school board announced it will desegre- gatp the first and second grades this fall "in the best interests of the Pine Bluff schools." Jackson, Miss.: Byron. De La Beckwith pleaded innocent during his arraignment Monday on a charge of shooting a Mississippi Negro leader from ambush. Omaha, Neb,; A biracial corn- Federation of Malaysia around the South China Sea on Aug. 31, but Brunei and its oil wells are staying out. Britain gave its agreement early today in signing a treaty with the four commonwealth territo­ ries that will form the federation -independent Malaya, the self- governing island colony of Singapore and the Borneo territories of 4 Sarawak and British North Borneo. The West sees Malaysia as a zone against Communist expansion in Southeast Asia. The buffer crescent-shaped federation of 130,818 square miles extends from the square rder of Thailand to within in reach of the Philippines. It includes 10 million persons and is rich in tin and rubber. Singapore boasts one of the busiest ports in Asia and is the site of a huge British military complex. It is aimed as such cases as the arrest of a man in Ecuador last month on charges of being a Cuban agent, who had $25,000 in pute if the two sides did not agree to his 11th hour proposal. Royal Pair r i" r LONDON (AP) After the session, union leaders I i an< * were grim-faced. Both sides were asked to advise Kennedy by 9 a.m. CDT Wednesday—only about 12 hours before the threatened Greek King Queen Frederika for state plagued ar- visifc ay tor a by Communists, anarchists, pacificists and other agitators. -L F n • v. - 9 I. U.S. currency in his possession. str ike-if they would Because any transaction in dol- accept, lars, even through foreign banks, A at some point involves a clearing bro ,^ hoodsf , ^ word from the President serious union spokesman said the would operation with a U.S. bank, offi- ^4^0^ ' But he pointedly cials believe the order also will reminded reporters: "These orga- prevent Cuba from trading in nitons have been traditionally U.S. currency with other coun- 0 ppo S ed to compulsion or to arbi- tries. The regulations could affect Cuban diplomatic operations in La- where I attorney for the AFL-CIO United tration in lieu of a negotiated settlement." Goldberg was a long-time top Steelworkers Union before be- tin American countries, most financial transactions are based on the dollar. For example, coming labor secretary in Ken- the finances of the Cuban Em- nedy's Cabinet. He helped settle bassy in Mexico City always have many sticky labor disputes before been handled through U.S. banks, becoming a Supreme Court The Cuban peso is unconvertible. T NEW HOTEL—Shriners from Atlanta, Ga., undoubtedly recalled Gen. Sherman's famous "March to the Sea" when they renamed Chicago's Sherman House, the Robert E. Lee Hotel. It was approximately 100 years ago that Sherman burned a path across the South, but at the same time burned it into the memory of the Shriners attending the 89th convention of their order. Actually the hotel wasn't named after the Civil War general. Shriners are shown atop the hotel's marquee after they stretched the banner across the front of the canopy, UNIFAX 25,000 CHICAGO (AP) Stage Parade Through Loop some 25,000 strong, rolled through led by the Loop today in one of the piece unit. Shriners, | made up of almost 2,000 Shriners, Medinah Temple's 145- largest non-military parades ever staged in Chicago. In trick autos and fake fire engines, astride motorcycles and horses, and marching, the red-[ ixttee working out desegregation fezzed Nobles of the Ancient Ara- of facilities in the city ran into bic 0rder of ^ Mystic shrine a snag when Mayor James Dworak fired a Negro member for paraded for six hours down Mich- leading a demonstration while the | ^ m Avenue conference was taking place. Included wei'e 50 brass bands, Some 40 temples presented Oriental bands playing musettes, cymbals and other instruments. More than 500 mounted patrols, 1,000 singers in groups of chanters, an estimated 500 clown groups and other floats composed the parade. More than 110,000 Shriners from 167 temples in the United States, Mexico and Canada, and their families and friends, have arrived in Chicago for the Shrine's 89th Imperial Council. Firecrackers exploded in the Loop Monday and streets buzzed with activity as Shriners began their rounds of handshaking and greetings. Motorized rigs of all sorts were unlimbered for the huge parade today and another Thursday. The five-day convention opened Sunday with worship services at Medinah Temple, with some 5,000 Shriners and their families attending. Chicago area commuters were serenaded Monday by one highly polished banjo player, comfortably seated in an open top wagon before a battery of microphones. In other parts of the Loop, impromptu drum and bugle corp sessions blared forth. Throughout the evening and into the night, motorcycles and scooters sped among the parked rigs standing ready for the parade- justice. Wolfe said Kennedy's plan called for Goldberg to announce his decision in the dispute before the Supreme Court opens its fall term. The five unions representing some 200,000 men who work aboard trains have insisted they will strike immediately if the railroads go through with their plan to impose the new work rules. Wolfe said, however, the rules would not be promulgated if both sides accept the suggestion that Goldberg spend the summer arbitrating the issues. The main issue is whether the railroads will be free to replace up to 37,000 firemen on diesel locomotives in freight or yard service. The carriers contend the workers are not needed. Youths Die When Auto Plunges Into Canyon JEROME, Ariz. (AP) — Two youths, one the son of a former Elgin, 111., doctor, were killed when their car plunged to the bottom of a 200-foot-deep canyon. The Arizona Highway Patrol said Peter Phillips, 16, son of Dr. and Mrs. Melvin Phillips, appar* ently was driving when the ve« hide jumped a guard rail on U.S. 80 about one mile west of Jerome. Also killed was Kent Farrell Ohler, 16, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Ohler. Both boys' families reside in Prcscottj Aria, Police beat back an attempted demonstration outside ham Palace. Bucking Met at Victoria Station by Queen Elizabeth n, the royal party drove in state carriages to the palace. Britain's tightest peacetime security the guard kept queen and her visitors from even the demonstrators seeing who tried to mar the welcoming procession. Police beat back youthful pickets as the Greek king and queen entered Buckingham Palace to begin the four-day state visit. "We aren't provoking violence," protested Kenneth Brown, 18, a student. *We just want to picket the palace." The most determined effort to spoil the royal arrival was at the side of the palace. "About 50 of our people wanted to stage a demonstration outside the palace," said Terry Chandler, 23, who described himself as chairman of a Save Greece Now Committee. But the police roughed up and wouldn't let us," he said. The nearest thing to an incident between the visiting royal couplo and demonstrators came in a side street near the station, Woman Screams hush Screaming, "Release my band, release him, M Mrs. Betty Ambatielos, British-born wife of an imprisoned Greek Communist was dragged away by the police. Mrs, Ambatielos, 45, was released after the royal procession passed. The demonstrators were far from giving up. "We aim to follow the king and queen everywhere they go, Every time they appear in public, we'll be there," said a spokesman for Britain's militant Committee of 100, which charges Greece is holding 960 political prisoners and demands their release. Scar 1 urm Blue LONDON (UPD-Mrs. Dorothy Gubbins won 261 pound* ($731) h damages Monday when ahe testified with an auto accident Wi Im a scar on her no*e that turns blue when it nets cold. t 1 1 t -w- kJ

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