Bennington Banner from Bennington, Vermont on September 17, 1974 · Page 1
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Bennington Banner from Bennington, Vermont · Page 1

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Bennington, Vermont
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Tuesday, September 17, 1974
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Cloudy and cool Variable cloudiness today with high in the SOs. Windy with showers tonight, low in the 40. Clearing, breezy and cool Wednesday with high around 60. Yesterday a high 65, low 35. Today at T a.m. 37. Sunset 7:02 sunrise 6:37. aimer Bennington, Vermont, Tuesday, September 17, 1974 Weekly founded 1841, Daily 1903 15 Cents Benningtowffi Ford defends pardon days a very major decision will be taken on Increasing U.S. food contributions for humanitarian purposes to help foreign countries suffering from drought and poor harvests." On the question of Watergate tapes, whose ownership by Nixon Ford affirmed in a special agreement, the President safd: "I believe thai they have been properly preserved and they will be available under subpoena for any criminal proceeding." The tapes will be kept in Joint custody of Kixon and the General Services Ad - War resisters may find amnesty price too high ministration for five years, after which Nixon will gain sole control. Ford denied reports from congressional leaders and some Republican gubernatorial candidates who saw him at the White House recently that he had a "secret reason" lor pardoning Nixon. "Let me say I had no secret reason, anil I don't recall telling any Republican I had such a reason," he said. He disclosed that in exploring the question of pardoning theformer president he found there was "the very real possibility" that Nixon would be charged with obstructing justice and 10 other possible criminal offenses. Ford conceded his pardon decision "has created more antagonism than I anticipated." But he said he is "absolutely convinced" he was correct. His hiain concern, he said "was to heat the wounds throughout the United States." He said fears about Nixon's health were not the major factor influencing his decision, although he was not "oblivious" to news reports concerning the mental and physical condition of theformer President. McCord would refuse pardon HENNIKER, N,H. (UPI) - Convicted Watergate burglar James McCord says he would not accept u presidential pardon if it were offered because it would only further bankrupt the nation's judicial system. McCord, speaking Monday night at New England College, said he believed the pardon of Richard Nixon was "unwise" and added "it may well be illegal," It was YcCord's letter to U.S. District Judge John Sirica early last year, that helped expose the Watergate coverup that eventually led to Nixon's downfall. McCord told his college audience that he believed President Nixon authorized the break - in into Democratic headquarters before it - occurred. Citing a "series of meetings" in early 1972 With G. Gordon IJddy, McCord said the break - ln was supervised by White House counsel John Dean and then Attorney General John Mitchell, By HELEN THOMAS WASHINGTON (UPI) - President Ford says Richard M. Nixon's acceptance of a pardon "can be construed" as an admission of guilt for Watergate crimes and the Former President has been "shamed and disgraced" by his forced resignation. Vigorously defending the pardon, but admitting surprise at the antagonism it created, Ford said he acted to spare the nation further turmoil and division. He said there was "no understanding, no deel...none whatsoever" between him and Nixon. The President's half hour televised news conference Monday night In the East Room was dominated by questions about the pardon. He insisted that "in this very, very difficult situation, I made the right Decision." Ford, who has been moving almost nonstop since he assumed the presidency Eve weeks ago, today called tui early morning meeting with the GOP steering committee, a cabinet session and another in a scries of meetings with his economic advisers. "Let me say very strongly the United Sates is not going to have a depression," he told his news conference. "The overall economy of the United States Is strong." In foreign affairs, Ford acknowledged that the United States secretly intervened in Chile to assist opposition newspapers and political factions, but he denied the CfA was involved in the coup that overthrew Chilean President Salvalore Allende. He safd the intervention was "In the best interests of Chile and our country," and said other powers dc the same. He would not say whether It was legal under international law. Ford disclosed that "within the next few only to have Hewitt run as an independent in the general election. Hewitt won and, although he went to Montpelier officially as an independent, helostno party support nor seniority. This, too, Colvin believes is wrong. ' 'Anyone who runs under a party label and gets beaten ought to support the candidate nominated by his party in the primary, particularly when he's always before that had the backing of that party," he said today. On the statewide supporters of Gov. See CANDIDATE on back page Saxbc, a prune architect of the plan, said be thought no more than about 2,500 would take advantage of it. tMtlcs generally complained that Ford was asking too much in his "earned reentry" approach, particularly after granting an unconditional pardon to former President Hicliard Nixon eight days earlier, and some maintained that Ford essentially wbs demanding tacit admissions of guilt. One major American war exile group in Toronto, known as Amex Canada, called (or a boycott of Ford's overtures. In Washington , a spokesman for the National Council for Universal and Unconditional Amnesty said of the plan; "It is no help whatsoever." The President's action also found little favoT with veterans organizations and some conservative congressmen, who liave generally opposed any form of ajjmesty. Congressional leaders generally endorsed the plan. To deal with men already convicted, Ford signed an executive order creating a speuial clemency board to conduct a case - by - ense review of appeals. He named Charles E. Goodell, a former New York Republi can sen ator and vocal critic of U.S. policy in Vietnam, to head the nine - member panel. The President summed up his position this way: "Reconciliation among our people does not require that these acts be condoned. Yet, reconciliation calls' for an act of mercy to bind the nation's wounds and to heal the sears of divisiveness." ' LTnrler Ford 's program, eligibility will be See AMNESTY on back page Serenity Late summer is reflected in the still - .vaiera ol a sheltered slate quarry in Paivlet, next to the New Yurk stale line. Election procedures protested by Shaftsbury House candidate WASHINGTON (UPI) - Thousands of Vietnam - era war resisters now have a chance for conditional amnesty but many may find the price too high. President Ford presented the basic terms up to two years of "alternative national service" and re - aid alien of allegiance - in a formal proclamation Monday; and he said less might be required in cases with "mitigating circumstances." But activists at home and abroad, especially in Canada and Sweden, quickly turned thumbs down on the cfrer and predicted limited acceptance by those eligible about 15,500 charged with draft evasion and 12,500 accused of desertion from the armed forces. Even Attorney General William R. Aiken, Stafford approve Ford's amnesty proposal MONTPELIER (UP11 Vermont's two U.S. senators say they approve of President Ford's decision to grant conditional amnesty to deserters and draft evaders. Republican Sen. George Aiken said Ford's action was a step toward "national reconciliation" andsaid he "couldn't think of a better proposal at this time." ' Sen. Robert Stafford, also a Republican, also said lie generally approves of the amnesty plan. He noted tha t tile cour Is are giving amnesty to former draft evaders and that deserters should have to "face what the courts give them." Stafford also said he approves of provisions for draft evaders to work at a low pay scale in order to work their way back into the United Stales Kep. Richard Matlary, Vermont's lone congressman, said the President's amnesty plan represents "a worka ble solution to what is obviously a very emotional problem." nominee for U.S. Congress; Brian Burns, candidate for Lt. Governor and M. .lerorne Diamond, nominee for Attorney General. Also in the crowd, which sp illed over into a tent attached to the side of the popular restaurant, were various party workers and candidates for local and state offices. In brief remarks, former Gov. Hoff said that inflation is the number one problem facing all Americans. Bui he warned thai the Democrats have a special responsibility to sue that not just the "little g uy " is called upon to make tie sacrifices needed to stabilize the economy. "The burden must be shared proportionally by everyone," he added. Gov. Salmon, in his remarks, (hanked all Sec FUND - RAISEIi on back page platforms: Candidate Sanders focuses on power of the Rockfellers State Democrats kick off 'season' with fund - raiser SHAFTSBURy .A new. element has been thrown into the Shaftsbury race for representative in the November election. Pearl Hoyt, who won the Democratic nomination for the post in last Tuesday's primary, has reportedly been gathering signatures on a petition to allow hint a place on the ballot as an independent. Hoyt lllllllllllllllliraif'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIIIIIINMIIISIIIIIIIIIII.IIIII 11 1 On the Inside Ku Klux Mail enters Boston anti - busing controversy Pago 2. Tom Braden notes that in any given situation the maligned CIA does what it is ordered to do by its superiors - Page 4. Godfrey Sperling of The Christian Science Monitor suggests what , this country needs is less adulation accorded its Presidents - Page 5. Work to start soon on "improvements" to N.Y. Route 7 - Page 6. Dailey gets conditional green light fur gravel operation in Manchester Page 6. There's more to apple picking than grabbing an apple Page a. Australian hopes dim as Courageous takes third straight Page 12. John Randolph writes about controlled hunting in Vermont for the Canadian wild goose Page 13. Although "(he Juice" watches from the sidelines, Oakland and Buffalo show why pro football Is still the most exciting of all sports Page It. had also filed in the Republican primary, but was beaten by Edwin A. Colvin. ' Colvin, claiming that Hoyt's entry as an Independent also gives the latter an unfair advantage, said today he is also going to file as an independent .Under Vermont law the totals of an individual candidate running under more than one label are added together to determine the winner. Colvin, in a letter appearing on Page 4 today, says he believes this system Li totally wrong, but will file as an independent in order to protect himself from what he believes is an unfair advantage under the present law. According to Colvin, 100 signatures on a petition are required to get on the ballot as an independent. One factor that may add fo Ihe confusion is the question of who may sign whose petition. According to the Vermont Secretary of State, contacted by local election officials this week, anyone who signed a pre - prbnary petition for a candidate may also sign either candidate's petition as an independent. However, a person who signs an independent petition now for Hoyt may not sign one for Colvin and vice - versa. Signatures to the petitions now being circulated by the two candidates must be witnessed at the signing by either a justice or a notary. The ploy of running as an independent lias been applied previously both stalewide and in local elections. Colvin beat Rep, Merritt Hewitt two years ago for the GOP nomination for Shaftsbury representative, ByTYLERKESCH Talk is the fuel that keeps Bernard Sanders running. And run he does. This is his third statewide race for public office, his seconrl for the U.S. Senate (he ran for governnr in 1972). Talk he docs, too. The Liberty Union party is his vehicle. His issues focus on the disparities between rich and poor, the injustices perpetrated by big profit - in olivate ri eompa n ies with all their big tax loopholes; and the potential that exists in tapping alternative ways of doing things. For Sanders, running for public office in a hopeless race on a third - party ticket offers a chance, an excuse, to talk to people. "You have a reason to knock on doors," he tolri a Liberty Union caucus in Bennington recently. "It's a good way to organize and educate people... talk Ihe Issues... People can't see alternatives. Our job is to open their eyes and give them a vision " Sanders, cares I idle what "image" he conveys and that's part of his image of being a tit r jrnplsr! and unshorn. He's the Republicans do in Ihe development of a statewide land use plan. The Democrats feel the state should provide teehical and financial assistance to regions and towns In order Id create incentives for land use planning. Any land use plan, the platform committee says, should be "sufficiently specific to become the basis for a landuse taxation program." On agricultural matters, the Democratic jxoposal calls for encouragement of the development of new agricultural enterprises, new crops, farmers' markets and food cooperatives. On milk prices, the Democrats favor more equitable prices for dairy farmers, "taking inlo consideration the consumers' pocketbooks and the producers' inflationary cosls." The proposed Democratic platform also supports greater efforts to conserve electrical energy and continued attempts to buy power from Canada. Republicans to concentrate on holding down state spending Democrats propose focusing on closing the tax loopholes WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. - Hundreds of the party faithful crowded into the Captain's Cabin In Wllliamstown last night to kick off the 1974 political season for both county and statewide Democratic candidates. On hand for the gala affair to honor Gov. Thomas P. Salmon and his wife Madge, were the successful primary candidates for state and national offices, former Gov. Philip H. Hoff, as well as County Chairwoman Emma Harwood, who helped organize the fund raising event. Also at the head table and introduced by toastmaslcr, Robert E. Curnmings Jr., himself a candidate for county senator, was Patrick Leahy, winner of Uie primary for U.S. Senate; Francis Cain, Democratic ;imii: The party regulations it finds inappropriate. reposition to a state takeover of Ver - merit's prfvate utility system and support of separation of the planning and regulatory functions of the state public service board are also found In the platform. Agricultural platform planks include; support, of legislation allowing Vermont farmers to be taxed according to the value of their land as productive farmland; diversification of Vermont agriculture with expansion of cooperatives and community - marketing techniques and the establishment of a more equitable way to determine milk prices based on production costs. Erivironmental concerns occupy almost a full page in the six - page pisiform proposal. The GOP Platform Committee supports state assistance to local communities which set up solid waste recycling programs. See REPUBLICANS oil hack page BERNAHD SANDERS on unemployment compensation right now. having worked for the Bread & Law Task Force, as a free - lance writer, tuid as . a carpenter in the Burlington area. But the See SANDERS on back page - .: k J an So - called "right - to - work" legislation - prohibiting closed union shops is opposed, in the Democratic platform proposal and an Increase in the minimum wage In; Vermont is recommended. A special section in the platform on, consumer problems presents 19 different: recommendations, ranging from opposition to passing the costs of wholesale - power along to consumers In their monthly electric bills to congratulating Democratic Gov. Thomas P. Salmon for establishing a telephone "hotline" connecting him with Vermont citizens. The platform committee, in a document released Monday for delegates to the platform convention, acknowledges that the creation of so - called "super agencies.":' that is, executive departments headed by cabinellevel state officials, has been "a' focal point of great controversy."' However, the committee says a "strono. and responsible executive branch" is'. See DEMOCRATS oh back page " ' ' ; ' stockin - trnde taxes as well as a change in the way machinery and equipment are valued in order to preserve the local tax base and assure more equitable assessments. The Republican Platform Committee will seek airport of Act 250, the state's major development control law, But the platform strongly supports local control overland use by opposing any plan "which would, directly or indirectly, centralize all administration over the use and exchange of land in the state government." Kennedy has taken a strong stand in fawr of local land use control and has pledged that If he is elected he will fire Environmental Conservation Secretary Martin L. Johnson. Also recommended is the establishment of a joint legislative cOiTiijdllee on administrative rules. The purpose of such a group would be to monitor all regulations in the executive branch of government and to recommend a legislative veto of any MONTPELIEH (UPI) - Repeal of the 12 per cent surcharge on income laxes will be considered here this Saturday at thestate Republican Platform Convention. Republican gubernatorial candidate Walter L. Kennedy of Chelsea has called Cor repeal of the tax In order to. cut down government spending, The basic emphasis in the proposed GOP platform is on holding down state expenditures. The Republican Platform Committee wants no new taxes, no further increases in the number of executives in state government, and a careful scrutiny of all federal matching grand to insure that they are consistent with the needs of the state government. The proposed Republican state platform, issued Monday to delegates to the cwivenaon, said: "The Itae tea come to reverse Hie trend toward bigger and bigger state government." Economic planks in the platform sup - port a step - by - rtep repeal of inventory and MONTPELIER (UPI) - The proposed platform which the stale Democratic party will review at its platform convention in Barrc Saturday goes inlo considerably more detail than the Republican platform proposal. The Democrats agree with the Republicans that current expenditures should not exceed revenue receipts. However, the Democrats do not favor repeal of Ihe 12 per cent income tax surcharge. "Instead, the Democratic proposal focuses on closing tax loopholes and assessing taxes according to a person's ability to pay. To alleviate unemployment problems, the Democrats favor making greater use of public employment programs such as those becoming available under the federal Comprehensive Employment and Training Act. The Democratic Platform Committee places less emphasis on local control than

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