Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California on March 11, 1964 · Page 8
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March 11, 1964

Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California · Page 8

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Redlands, California
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Wednesday, March 11, 1964
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Page 8
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Redlands Daily Facts Wed., March 11, 1964 - CAN DRIVE CONCLUDES — Redlonds High school students rushed throughout the community after school until 9 p. m. yesterday collecting canned foods for the Family Service Association. And once again the "mighty seniors" emerged victorious in the annuel competition. The junior class come in second and the sophies, third. The high school students collected 26,000 pounds of canned goods this year, 2,000 pounds less than a year ago. Shown here unloading a truck of canned goods at the Family Service association are senior Don Finding - frock, on truck, and junior Terry Gaston. (Facts photo) Egg on Demo fa^es in New Hampshire By Doris Fleeson WASHINGTON — DemocraU are coming out of the New Hampshire primary with egg on their faces. This is apparent even before the returns are counted in the write-in campaign for Robert Kennedy for Vice-President. When that campaign was belatedly enlarged to include an endorsement of President Johnson for President, it only made matters worse. The national party has been forced into a premature ackno- Icdgment that it has a power struggle on its hands which could threaten its success in November. It will read more about it now, and very probably will like it less. It is not a struggle between good guys and bad guys or hard noses and soft noses. It is simply a very human development inherent in the situation since last November 22 when the Kennedys were untimely ripped from the high places they had achieved with such effort and expected to enjoy for a long time. At the time, it was quietely reported that the successor President and John F. Kennedy's brother, the Attorney General, did not like one another and would have a hard time adjusting to the changed situations. It was assumed then, as now, that Johnson would take command strongly and be renominated without question. •The monkey, said the politicians then, is on Robert Kennedy's back and what will he do about it. What has happened in New Hampshire is an attempt to shift the monkey to Johnson's back by forcing him to accept Robert Kennedy on his ticket m all innocence of the President's views is moot. Already incidents and accounts supporting both sides are available. Possibly the write-in was conceived merely as another wreath on President Kennedy's grave. But the timing is right. The memorial mood of the capital and presumably of the country has not passed but is subject, of course, to the erosion of time. Jlood is important in the intensely human trade of poll' tics. Groaned one Democratic Senator of long experience: "If I didn't positively know that Styles Bridges was no longer with us, I'd be sure he arranged that write-in business." The late Senator Bridges managed New Hampshire politics for years with lethal effect on the Democratic opposition in the state. President Johnson and the .Mtomey General have behaved with dignity and circumspection in a situation both understood. The President quickly sent the Attorney General on a diplomatic mission of the type Robert Kennedy had many times made for his brother. Similar marks of confidence were showered on Sargent Shriver, a Kennedy brother-m-Iaw. An inevitable result was discussion (hat Johnson would take Siiriver for] CLAREMONT — Ontario Vice-President to avoid having;'banker Ralph V. Arnold wa« Museum talk on birds Sunday "Birds of Scandanavia" will be the subject of a descriptive program about the many and varied birds to be found in Northern Europe, to be pre sentcd by Jlrs. Josipbine Vaughn of San Bernardino, for the March 19th meeting at the San Bernardino County Museum. During the summer of 1962, Mrs. Vaughn toured Europe, spending most of her time in Scotland and Scandanavia. She had the opportunity to study the intersting birds of northern Eu rope in their native habitat, and take many beautiful slides which will be shown at the meeting on March 19. The pro gram will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Museum auditorium at 18860 Orange street, Blooming ton. Jlrs. Vaughn, a Board mem ber of the San Bernardino Coun< ty JIuseum Association, has been a Biology teacher at both the San Bernardino High School and the Pacific High School. For many years she has been an active member of the Audu bon Society, now holding the office of Publicity Chairman and Editor of the "Western Meadowlark", the monthly newsletter for the Audubon So ciety. She also helps at the Audubon Conservation Education Center in El Monte. Anyone interested in birds is invited to attend this program. Claremont names Arnold to take Robert Kennedy. Few insiders really thought, however, that Shriver would seek a place on the ticket at Robert's expense. President Kennedy did not named a trustee of Claremont .Men's College by unanimous ac lion of its board. Dr. George C. S. Benson, president, announced today. A banker all his professional carry New Hampshire in I960.;life, Mr. Arnold has been asso- But with the death of Senalorieiatcd «''h 'J^e First National \Vhether or not it was done Bridges, Republicans there split into warring factions and in 1962 Democrats elected a Governor and a Senator. They have been confident of carrying the state this fall. British speaker predicts Johnson, Nixon race Britain's Colin Jackson, speaking at the University of Redlands yeasterday, predicted that the 1964 presidential race will be between Johnson and Nbcon. "Jackson, who further prophe sized that either Robert Kennedy or Sergeant Schrivcr would be Johnson's running mate, did not predict the out come of the November election. "The prominent wTiter, lecturer, and BBC commentator appeared at the UR imder the 1964 ASUR Lectureship Pro-am, an annual studcnt-nm series of talks by renowned per sonalities. Opening his Chapel address before the student body, Jackson reflected on Anglo-American events of past months. "It has been an interesting year. We (Britain) sold some busses to Cuba and you (the U.S.) retaliated in a vicious way — you cut off all $11,000 of our aid. But then we sent the Beatles over and they were making $50,000 each perfona- "4nce so we think we came out ahead on the deal," he said.' -Jackson said that one of the principal differences between British and .American elections is that in England they stress issues while in the U.S. personalities are more important "Your country is so large and represents such a diversity of interests that it is suicide for a politician to take a strong stand on any issue," he added. ' St eJ3 >]9ined that in England politicians stand almost entirely on the issues. Lookmg forward to the British elections, Jackson had this to say: "It is very probable that the Labor party will take over in the ne.\t election because the Conservatives have been in power for 12 years and British crs usually like to see the gov emment change hands every so often." Jackson is a graduate of St. Johns College in Oxford. In the past ten years he has visited over 65 countries and traveled over 500,000 miles. The majority of his time on these trips was spent reporting for the BBC, writing, and gathering lecture material Redlands horse in Arabian horse show An Arabian horse owned by Mr. and Mrs. James Smith, 52 Summit drive, Kedlands, will be entered in the Second An nual All-Arabian Horse Show to be held Sunday at the National Orange Show in San Bernardino. The horse will be ridden by Bill Gobie of the Elms Siding School in Riverside. More than 100 of the finest Arabians in California will compete for nearly $1,000 in cash' awards, trophies and ribbons. The National Orange Show opens Thursday, March 12 for a run of 11 days. Bank & Trust Co. of Ontario since 1930. Beginning as a teller, after having served in va rious capacities with the Secur ity First National Bank in Los Angeles, HoUywood, and Inglewood, he became vice president in 1934, executive vice president in 1939, president in 1951, and chairman (in addition to presi dent) in 1961. A native of South Dakota, Mr. .Arnold came to California with his family as a child, and was graduated from Chaffey High School m 1924, and from Pomo na College in 1928. Sign too inviting • NEW MALDEN, England (UPI) — A sign in a shop window here said invitingly: "Leap into view with BBC 2." Tuesday afternoon, something did. Christopher Eccleston on his motorcycle came crashing through the window, but he escaped imhurt. mm DOWNTOWN REDLANDS .ALWAYS FIRST QUALITY ^ FABULOUS ONE-TIME BUY! fresh, new Easter styles at spectacular savings! 3 99 ^ 7 to 14 99 3 fe 6X Terrific one-time-only low price! Luxury fabrics like Dacron® polyester sheers, Pima cotton sheers, Fortreis polyester and cotton broadcloths, and Avril® rayon and cotton poplins! Plus quality extras like nylon mai-quisette underskirts in bouffant styles! Elegant lace 'n embroidery ti-ims! Mounds of pleats . . . delicate- tucks! Come early, and save! SAVE! BOYS' BLAZER SUITS ONLY sizes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 99 CANDY.FILLED BASKETS. DRUMS. MORE! $ TAKE HOME A DOZEN OF THESE 9UALITY SHIRTS! 1 eieh 1 98 Colorful baskets, drums, beach pails brim-ful of delicious Easter c a n d yl Bags of jelly 'n chocolate eggs, lots morel Priced Penney-low! tizts 3 to 8 What a fabulous findl Boys' shirt expertly foi/or- ed in rich cottons come with clip-on bow tie and silver color cuff links. Shop 'n SAVEl He's bound to be the best dressed boy around in Penney's handsome all wool blazer . . . sports 2 lower flap pockets 'n rear center vent! Comes with contrasting rayon aceiafe 'n 420 nylon poplin slacks with belt 'n cuffs! Shop now and SAVE! SHINY FLATS COME CLEAN WITH A CLOTH! SHINY PATENT LEATHER UPPERS! B, C tViU>3 3" OUR PRE. SCHOOLER'S CUSSIC SHOE! Lustrous Pattino® olefinic shoe upper moterial comes clean with damp cloth ... no more messy polishes! Expert fitl Composition solel A to 4, B, C 8V4 to 4 Childcraft® patent lecther uppers • . . expert fittings . . . Sanitized® for healthful wearl This popular sabot style hat composition heel 'n sole. CD, E2h)» ^99 Penney's own Childcraft® for expert fit . . . for the proper support! Leather uppers hove sturdy leather outsolel Sanitized® fool Penney's suits show big style! Quality! Savings! High qualify blend of Orion® Acrylic with added body of wool leads the line-up of Easter valuesl Wrinkle-fighting, shape holding blend, Penney tailored to specifications of suits costing much more! New muted tones and favorite colors have all been included. Just in time for that dressed up Easter lookl i " ~95 sizes 12 to 20 High quality, low price and there's no skimping on fabric fit or selection! Sensible all-season rayon 'n acetate is perfect for Easter and the months to come. One look at the styling, one touch of the fuller hand will tell you each suit is quality through and through! Choose from favorite shades in classic and lively iridescent tones. sizes 6, 8, 10, 12 what an exciting assortment of plaids and checks found in Penne/s Daexon® polyester 'n wool suits! Theyfre bright, boyish . . . perfect for Easter! The handsome solid color royon acetate slacks are fortified with DuPonf 420 nylon for extra rugged wear. At Penney's low price it pays to get 'em more than one/ sizes 4, 5, 6, 7 r m EASTER SPECIAL ON BOYS' DRESS UP SHIRTS! 2-2" sizes £ to 13 Boys' long sleeve combed cotton 'n broadcloth shirts lead the parade for style, V a I u e 1 In buttondown, short point collar styles. DURABLE PENTRED* HEELS 'N SOLES! 5" NON.SCUFF SUPON ... WITH PENTRED* SOLE! B, C, D, E to 3 Smooth leather vppert resist scuffs! And sturdy Penfred* poly vinyl heek 'n soles too! C, D to 3 5" *P«nlr«d lolcs ar* QuorantMd to oirtwtur Mw vppan. Thtfli outgrew Him b«for« th«]f ou>. WMr thtm . . . er a nmr pair fml Smooth leather upper has Pentred* poly-vinyl heel ond sole ... we guaranteed it to wear! *P «fltT«d toles or* guaranteed te eotmor >ha uppen. They'll ovtgraw them before ihey oul- wtor tbem ... or a n«w pair LIKE IT! - CHARGE IT! - STORE MON. &FRi. WEEKDAYS HOURS; TIL 9 P.M. 9:30 to 5:20

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