The San Bernardino County Sun from San Bernardino, California on October 15, 1972 · Page 44
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The San Bernardino County Sun from San Bernardino, California · Page 44

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San Bernardino, California
Issue Date:
Sunday, October 15, 1972
Page:
Page 44
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Sun., Oct. 15, 1972 THE SUN-TELEGRAM E-3 Check Your Dale Book It's National Business Women's Week By BETTY UJPTON un-Tlgram Club Editor SAN BERNARDINO - National Business Women's Week will be observed today through Oct 22. Business and Professional Women's Clubs in San Bernardino and Orange counties, members of the San Oreo District, will observe the event with other clubs from throughout the nation. Founded in 1919, the national federation is a non-profit, self - governing and membership-supported organization Incorporated for charitable and educational purposes. It is the largest organization In America devoted to the Interests and needs of the working woman. The BPW Foundation offers scholarships, seminars and published material while recognizing the need for women to continue their educations to meet the demands of a growing and changing economic society. Grants for research are awarded as well as career a d v ancement scholarships which enable working women to acquire additional training In qualifying for promotion, obtaining a job or entering a new work field. Promoting legislation affect-ting the equality of women is also a main purpose of the National Federation of BPW Clubs. CD A Day SAN BERNARDINO - To-day has been proclaimed "National Catholic Daughters of America Day" by Mayor William R. Holcomb. A memorial Mass will be held this morning at St. Nicholas Byzantine Catholic Church, 9112 Oleander St., Fontana. A breakfast will follow. Gamma Epsilon SAN BERNARDINO -Gamma Epsilon, preceptor chapter of Beta Sigma Phi, will meet tomorrow evening at the home of Lillian Ramseth. Plans will be made for mid-fall activities including the sale of animal-shaped cutting boards at the next Southern California Council breakfast in the Los Angeles Biltmore Bowl. Mrs. William Hahn will present a cultural program. Xi Eta Delta SAN BERNARDINO - XI Eta Delta Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi will meet tomorrow at the home of Miss Karen Brewer. Mrs. Joseph Cznik wlU discuss "Poise in Beauty." A wine tasting party Is planned for Friday at Colton's Brookside Winery. Tickets are available from members. A Halloween party is also being planned. Card Parly SAN BERNARDINO -Catholic Daughters of America, Court Our Lady of Peace 1306, will hold a scholarship card party at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Knights of Columbus Hall, 1500 W. Highland Ave. The public is invited. Proceeds will go to local school scholarships. f, K , 4' m -,,- ' ' i "'' ' ! jl ' " I tmm 0rwtutis' . v.;;, , - , , , , M. ,. ,- , - , ,,, , Wine Tasting Ball Scheduled Nov. 4 RIVERSIDE - Mrs. Gerald Newcombe is chairman of Casa Ninos Auxiliary's "Festival of the Grapes" ball and wine tasting party to be held Nov. 4. The event will begin with wine tasting at 7 p.m. and dinner and dancing at 8:30 p.m. at Indian Hills Country Club. Assisting Mrs. Newcombe are Mmes. Bill Fisher, decorations; Robert Buster and Robert Franz, Invitations and programs; Dean Pagel and Jerry Rogers, reservations; Robert Frost and Philip Kassel, gifts; Robert Lakes, wine, and J. Russell Bobbitt, publicity. Reservations for the event must be made by Oct. 25 with Mrs. Pagel or Mrs. Rogers. MRS. G. NEWCOMBE . . . ball chairman A Stitch in Time . . . saves lour in this case as San Bernardino Community Hospital's Auxiliary prepares for Its Christmas in November. Handmade gift items will be featured in the sewing booth, headed by Mrs. &un-Ttlgrm phots by Sam Spina William Erdmier, right. Assisting her are, from left, Mmes. Jim Tissue, Eldon Powers and Victoria Adams. The event will be held Nov. 1-3 in the hospital auditorium. Women Voters SAN BERNARDINO - The League of Women Voters will hold its annual membership meeting at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday in Emmerton Elementary School, 1888 Ar-den Ave. There will be analysis of the Coastline Protection, Watson Tax, Legalization of Marijuana, Death Penalty Restoration and Wakefield Anti - busing initiatives appearing on the Nov. 7 ballot. The public is invited to attend the neeting. Zonta Club SAN BERNARDINO Zonta Club of San Rernardino will meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Plantation Restaurant, 1470 E. Highland Ave. Reservations must be made in advance with Mrs. John Bright. Plans for the club's fall luncheon fashion show Saturday will be finalized. The show, to begin at 12:30 p.m. In the National Orange Show Orange Blossom Room, will follow a theme o f "Fashion's Platform 72." Fashions by Harris' will be narrated by Mrs. Aggie Turadian with music provided by The Notables. Proceeds from the show will go to Zonta's service fund which assists community projects. Ticket sales close tomorrow. Muscoy WC SAN BERNARDINO -Muscoy Federated Women's Club will meet at 1 p.m. Wednesday in the Muscoy Grange Hall. Business and a program by Musroy Senior Citizens will follow. The executive board meets Oct. 24. TOPS 717 . SAN BERNARDINO - The Chapter 717 of the TOPS Club will welcome area supervisor Dolores Long Thursday at 9:30 a.m. In Trinity Methodist Church, 224 E. 16th St. Visitors are welcome. . RPE Group SACRAMENTO - Ber-nadyne Brown and Jane Harrington will represent Chapter 33 of Retired Public Employees' Association at a state meeting Nov. 12-13 in Sacramento. New officers of the San Bernardino chapter are Frank Purvis, president; Gail Wilmuth, vice president; and Bernadyne Brown, secretary, treasurer. Directors are Donald Van Luven, Mrs. Ardis Pennoyer, V. E. McBrtde, Mrs. Harrington and C. Roy Williams. Mrs. Lois Shorey Is Junior past president. Colion TOPS COLTON - Colton TOPS Chapter 1427 will hold a Halloween costume party at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 24 in Colton CMc Center. Returning members will be "forgiven" back dues owed. W1CS Day SAN BERNARDINO - In' observance of WICS Day, a; special program will be held at 7:,'!0 p.m. Tuesday at the Home of Neighborly Service, , 839 N. Mt. Vernon Ave. Women in Community Ser?; vro rwrrsn ic the irfpa of a coalition of national women's t organizations: Auxiliary t(j the American G.I. Forum Church Women United, National Council of Jewish Wo- ' men, National Council of" Catholic Women and National Council of Negro Women, (NCNW). The NCNW, which brought At. L 1 i . ine organization 10 dan Bernardino and is sponsoring" the special event, Invites all' interested individuals to attend the meeting. "'' The major project of WICS,, is recruitment and screening, or young women in to zi tortile, .tnh Trims. . ' 1 Want to Win Ma for a Day . . . asks nobo Kelly of KCOP-TV. Sally Baker in real life will be special guest star and costume parade judge at the School of Hope's Hobo Ball Oct. 27 in the UCT Hall, 166 E. 45th St. The couple who wins Hobo Kelly will have the choice of a party for 20 friends of their children or an evening in Hollywood with Hobo Kelly and her husband. Assisting the ball committe are The Lamplighters (Ladies Auxiliary to San Bernardino Area Association for the Retarded) ; Youth for the Retarded Association (high school and college students) ; and staff, parents and employes of the association's Value Village Thrift Stores. Troceeds will go to assisting the mentally retarded. Tickets may be reserved at the school office. i ii-m ii i iH"-"! .riJMhii.g jwinnmi.,,,, n n'iimmt-X&Axmi.mmm in mi Early Detection of Disease Biggest A ide to Cure By LEONARD METZ Sun Telegram Sr.lenci Edllor SAN BERNARDINO - Detect a disease early and you have a much better chance to control or cure it. For example: Childhood diabetes, an inherited ailment, responds much better to treatment if it is discovered before it makes the child ill. With early diagnosis, the young diabetes victim may need only a fourth or a fifth as much insulin as the child whose diabetes affliction Is not discovered until he Is severely ill. And periods of remission (absence of symptoms) may he as much as 24 times as long for the child who receives early treatment. An Asian doctor reports how he saved newborn twin boys from a usually fatal ailment the twin tranfusion syndrome. There are only three cases known tn which twins survived the syndrome, which results in one infant becoming anemic (too little blood) and the other plethoric (too much blood). The exact cause of the syndrome Is now known, according to a report In Modern Medicine. The mother, a 27-year-old Pakistani woman who had borne three other children without complications, was hospitalized when she was 35 weeks pregnant, because her blood showed signs of infection. Labor was induced and she gave birth to identical twin boys, one showing the flush of a plethoric condition, the other pale from anemia. Blood transfers were performed on both Infants, and the anemic one In addition received dextrose injections. Other measures helped keep them alive and gradually thoy improved. At the age of 17 months, both infants seemed to be developing normally, although the one born with anemia was .somewhat smaller than his twin. Pollution will make the earth warm np, the ice caps will melt, the seas will rise and coastal cities will be drowned. True? How about this thought: Pollution will make the world colder and the ice ages will return. Which is true? We know pretty well what would happen if the amount of carbon dioxide tn the air increased. Carbon dioxide lets the rays of the sun come through from space but when the rays hit the earth and bounce back, they cannot penetrate the carbon dioxide layer to get back Into space. More carbon dioxide In the air would retain more heat and would tend to make the world get wanner. We may not be increasing the carbon dioxide content of our air appreciably. Tests indicate that in spile of all the fossil fuels we have been burning, the percentage of carbon dioxide may not be greater today than it was half a century ago. On the other hand, we're throwing lots of dust and solid particles Into the atmosphere and we don't know what effect they may have on our weather. Dust scattered in the atmosphere will absorb both the heat coming from the sun and the radiation coming from earth. If the amount of sun energy bounced back into space is greater than the amount of earth energy bounced back toward the land, the effect will be a cooling one. If the opposite occurs, the earth may warm up. A drop of 314 degrees centigrade could bring on another Ice age. Scientists at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies say the amount of carbon dioxide would have to Increase 10 times to achieve a 2-degree rise I n temperature. More carbon dioxide wouldn't raise the temperature any further because the gas would have reached its "absorption limit," the scientists report. On the other hand, Increasing the amount of dust four times may cause a 3.5-degree drop that could bring on another ice age.

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