The Wichita Eagle from Wichita, Kansas on May 20, 1884 · Page 2
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The Wichita Eagle from Wichita, Kansas · Page 2

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Wichita, Kansas
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Tuesday, May 20, 1884
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Id pj? &' ' " 3T.. -i,Tr ?'6f ---j i. .-:-- H J "", ' " V jj'&ry , SJ Va .. A -J. feq S- at lip 14 : r?Ksijwtiff. rr A "V. '" "" .4.1 r.TShi ii.wj , --. S' -p" Sait i rBiHiw ak M. M. MURDOCH, Editor. TUESDAY MORNING, MAY 20, 1884. ALTHOUGH AND BUT THAT NOW. Friends, good morning ; one and all, good morning ; here is your Daily Eagil,i;. Although long delayed this greeting is being responded to with that eager promptness and hearty good will which has "made this fair, busy city what it is, and which guarantees a tucccssful future to its first full-fledged daily paper. And, Wichita is going to be a city. Wichita is not only to be the city of this greatest of great valleys, "but possibly, even probably, the city of the State of Kansas. The cities in this State that lead Wichita, to-day, are but few, and the shadow of" each falls upon its neighbor so closely as to hamper the growth and ambitions of all. Wichita, upon the oilier hand, is without, a rival or even the possibility of a rival. But, the time has come when the 'conservation ol a steady development renders it imperative that our business interests should reach out to embrace more than the immediate environments. The character of Wichita's undisputed supremacy as a commercial point must be changed to that of a commercial rcutcrj aud the relation she has heretofore borne to neighborhoods aud adjacent communities must she- now bear to surrounding towns and cities. Wholesaling and manufacturing, to a comprehensive degree, must take the place of a former exclusive retail traffic. No other agency will so aurely contribute to this effort as a dluTy paper going out into the stores, shops and offices of the various surrounding towns and cities, making known our ability and facilities for meeting all demands. Wichita is carrying larger aud finer stoeks of goods to-day than can be found in any city west of St. Louis, if we except Kansas City. These advantages can in no other way be so constantly and effective ly impressed upon the people whose patronage we desire as by and through such a dailj paper as Tjik Eagle will strive to be. That all this is thoroughly understood by the enterprising business men of this city it is hardly necessary to affirm in the face of the columns upon columns of their own declarations found in this paper. The aim ofTnc Daily Eaglk, all of its best thoughts and energies, will be devoted to the cultivation of a community of interests which shall include Wichita first, and, secondly, the eight or nine counties of this lower valley which surround it, aud which composes, we verily bclie c, the fairest and richest domain to be found on God's green earth. If such an aim, backed by such a faith, seconded by the energies of Mich men as are represented in these columns, can make the proudest city in this laud, then, indeed, is the work already more than half accomplished. One word more, and that of a pcr- f-onul nature: It has been our life'h ' ambition to stand at the head of a daily journal. For this, in the early days of this city we severed ties which bound very strongly, left a people who not only sympathized with and sustained us for a long term of years, but who honored us over and again above our deserts, to come to a town in whose future we thought we saw some o.rtlie grand possibilities now being realized. For six j ears past we have had laid away in boxes the necessary extra material for a daily paper, awaiting the auspicious hour when the demand &Iiould warrant the venture. In this we have been seconded by a majority of the members of the Kansas and Missouri Associated Press who held the telegraph franchise for us against all offers and ad schemers. With the majority of these men we have been laboring, in our humble way, for a " quarter of a ccnttir) to make Kansas what she is. And, although our new daily must inevitably trespass upon fields hitherto occupied by them, it is a satisfaction to know that it is dono not only with their lull consent, but that they have persistently refused all others the privilege. Now, filled being the modest grasp of our ambition, filled the hands and head of Tun Daily Eaolk's business manager, filled, we FM SECRETARY OF STATE. wii -p & I 4'C(li -yei&jaSKas.ssB S'JfetjlY? "" il4?i Xs'irtr V'&Z z rk- 5?taW-S)?. ?Z127 S r,is:asi . '"-jwdw r.rHV-i .- lr &J&faii$&n&&, 4e- mrsiii! l Ta - S HV 1 :A- .TXa, iSSfe T, mmmsmjM In making its first appearance before the people of Kansas, the Daily Eagle takes great pride in being able to adorn its iaitial 'number with a good word for E. B. Allen as a candidate for secretary. The importance of this office to the people of the state cannot easily be overestimated. He has the control of the engrossing of all bilU and the custody of all the acts of the legislature, and by the lack of fidelity on his part, the change of a word, or perhaps a letter in a bill, might inflict immeasurable injur upon the people. He is a member of the executive council .which appoints our fiscal agents, our railroad commissioners and official newspaper. He is a member of the board of railroad assessors, which alone is a position of the greatest importance. He has the charge of au incalculable amount of business, affecting directly the welfare of the people. Unquestioned integrity and tried efficiency are the requisites we need in that office. In these respects no man in Kansas holds a higher place than E. B. Allen. He is conservative and he is safe. He is qualified, aud he is reliable, and his claims arc as strong as those of any other man. We earnestly urge him upon the favorable consideration of our fellow Republicans of the state. DRAWII rss&sss k " Sr' 253- THEY'LL COTE ALL THE SAME. "v Mcttiro. CamnbeU at Undertaken to dictate TXr. - of Kansas what they sbaTTtfo: Democrat and the other has beeii in the State four jen.Topta Capital Rev. A. B. Campbell took office as soon as he got to Kansas; he was made chaplain in the penitentiary. It is a soft- place. Your audience caunot ran away. You get a handsome salary, your feed, clothes, boots and shoes," all made by convicts out of goods paid for by the ax-pay era of Kansas. Preacher Campbell waxed fat. He had a soft thing; a sure audience, good pay, no pastoral visit ; no irouoic auout samg souls Preacher Campbell is the fattest man we have ever seen in Kansas. We know all the editors and thousands of farmers ond mechanics, but Kansans are never fat men. They work too hard. The pioneers have had to break the prairies, build their houses on borrowed money, and pay off the mortgages no time" to get fat" When this preacher came litre he had no notion of going on to a farm or of going to work, ou a small salary, like other preachers. He wanted to keep his fat. He selected the biggest stone building in the state for his home, with plenty of servants to wait on him, to feed and clothe him, aud to allow him to get fatter and fatter. When there was a change in the ad ministration and the preacher had to GRANDLY SAID. Charles Rcadc wrote his own epitaph. It is to be engraved upon a plain stone, and reads as follows: Here lie, by the side of his bcl oved friend, the mortal remains of Charles Rcade, dramatist, novelist and journalist. His last words to mankind are on this stone. I hope for a resurrection, not from any power in nature, but from the will 6f the Lord God Omnipotent, who made nature and me. lie created man out of nothing; which nature could not. He cau restore man from the dust, which nature cannot. And I hope for holiness and happiness in a future life, not for anything I have said or dono in this body, but from the merits and meditation of Jesus Christ. He has promised his intercession to all who seek it, aud he will not break his word ; that intercession once granted, cannot be rejected ; for he is God, and his merits arc infinite. 'Him thatcomcth to me, I will in no wise cast out.' 'If any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the Righteous; aud he is the propitiation lor our sins.' " TICKETS TO THE CHICAGO TION. C0NVEN- Nearly two weeks ago we published an article intended to correct misapprehensions concerning the distribution of tickets of admission to the Republican National Convention, and to inform those desiring to attend how tickets may be obtained. But it is evident the matter is still imperfectly understood, and people going to Chicago to attend the Convention may he subject to grave disappointment and unnecessary expense. Wo would, therefore, request Kansas papers generally to publish the facts, which arc as follows: The tickets of admission to the National Convention arc being prepared under the supervision of the sub committee of the National Committee. They will be engraved, with coupons for each probable session of the convention. The tickets will be numbered and allotted to particular seats, as is done in the theatres and opera houses. The owner will retain his ticket, aud as the coupon will be for successive sessions of the convention, this will prevent more than one person obtaining admittance at auy one session on the same ticket. The total seating capacity of the hall will not exceed 9,000. Theie are 820 delegates and 820 alternates, for whom seats will be reserved; 1000 seats have been allotted to the Chicago local committee subscribing the fuuds for defraying the expenses of fitting up the hall, policing, guards, and printing the proceedings; about 600 will be reserved for reporters of daily newspapers making specia' reports; and about 1000 lor distinguished guests, including Senators, Congrcss-mcuState officers, and others. The remaining scats, about 4,700, will be distributed among the delegates fi om the several States, pro rata, so that each delegate will have, in addition to his own ticket, from five to six for distribution among friends. The delegates from each State will, therefore, have the distribution of the tickets, and they arc the persons to whom application should be made. We wish to add,, also, that unless persons who propose attending the Convention have secured, in advance, the promise of a ticket, they had bet ter remain at Home. J. no pressure lor tickets is enormous go, he still had no idea of going to work. So he formed a co-partnership with Martin Van Buren Bennett, a Cherokee county Democrat, and the only man in Ihe United States who, during the war, published a paper called the Copperhead. Bennett did this in Iowa. All the .time that the war lasted this traitor sat in hi3 office and abused the Union soldiers, President Lincoln and the patriotic men and women of his native laud. He did not join the rebel army, where he belonged ; he was just a copperhead snake, hissing, biting, running out his tounge at everything that was loyal anu patriotic "and true. More venomous aud cowardly even than the rattlesnake, which sounds a warning of alarm before it fixes its fanus and sends its poison into the heart of its victim. This was Bennett, the Iowa snake, aud this is his history. He is the coparcener of the preacher. For a year and a half now the fat man and the snake have been travelling through Kansas aud collecting money to support themselves. They camoto Hiawatha aud begged and carried off almost a thousand dollars. Thcv came here during the Methodist conference, when they were sure of an audience. We saw them Van Bennett in frout, spitting and fuming, and the fat preacher in the rear, sweating, wiping the oil off from his face, shaking his fat sides over the snake's wit, laughing, very contented, very happy, aud finally toddling to the front and asking the people to subscribe for Brother Bennett's paper. They collected a great many thousand dollars in Kansas, and the preacher keeps getting fatter and fat ter. No Eskimo, floating in train oil, is fatter or happier than Rev. A.B. Campbell. He has struck it rich and has no idea of floating out of his tank. The coparcener, Van Bennett, is of the same frame of mind. He has plenty of money and has not been so happy since he yelped amT howled over the assassination of Lincoln. The show season has again opened and the Fat Man and the Sn ike gave their first exhibition in the opera house, at Topeka, Saturday, May 3d, giving two performance"", afternoon a.id evening. The rent of the opera house for the occasion was one hundred dollars. If it has been paid at all it has been paid by the temperance people. The showmen pay for nothing. Qampbcll charges for his fat aud Bennett for his venom We need only add that the purpose of the show this vcar, in addition to the passing around of the hat, is to defeat the nomination of John A. Martfu for jrovcrnor. Martin is a Republican, was a union colonel, and has alwavs earned his own living. Hiawatha World. Among the demands -'made bv the Austrian socialist democrats in eae to the effect tluit America stall pet a stop to, emigration from Europe to this conatry. This is aot as carious as it may Beem at first glance. It' is true this conatry lias tong been regarded as the refuge for the" onnressed of En- rope, and hundreds of thousands of the people of that continent have fled to this country to fiud here tho freedom and opportunities denied at home. But the social and political developments of the past few years have put a new aspect upon the emigration question. The revolutionary- leaders - of Europe now want to detain the uiousanils ot young and enterprising men who aro looking toward America for homes, in this they and such absolutists as Bismarck arc agreed, but for contradictory reasons and purposes. Bismarck wants young Germany for his army. The" revolutionists there and elsewhere 'want the young men of the humbler classes as recruits to their movements for the overthrow of monarchical governments. So long, however, as this country presents such an inviting field for immigrate and offers such rewards to intelligence, industry and enterprise, neither the disposition of the princes nor the theories and promises of the revolutionists will keep the young blood of the old world coldly content with the restraints and disabilities of their life there. Leavenworth Times. ZE&OCIK: & "WELLS. UNION MEAT MARKET ! Fresh lake fUb constantly on hand. Family orders a specialty. 1-tf .A., smith:, Oontractor and Builder, SHOP 136 & 138 MAIN St. Itesldruce on Law rence Avenue, near Central Avenue. 1'ost-Offlce Box 003 if Killeen & Stockinger, Practical Plumbers, Steam & Gas Fitters. Gas Fixtures. Steam Healing Ventilating a Specially. Estimates Furnished. S3" Shop on Main -jteet, old Arkansas Valley Hank Building, Wichita, Kansas, l'cst-otlice Box 415. (M For Choice, Fresh GROCERIES! Fair Treatment and llouest Goods, goto CRAVEN & RHODES' Q-IEIEEIN" FR,03STT, South-east Corner Market Street. W. G. IIACKEIt. of Douglas Atenue and 1-tf li. C. JACKSON. CHARLES O'CONOR DEAD. At Nantucket, Tuesday, the great jurist, Chas. O'Conor died. Charles O'Conor was a native of New York City. He was born in the year 1804, the son of an Irishman of culture, a member ot the Catholic HACKER & JACKSON. Wholesale and Itctail Dealers in Colorado and Pennsylvania Anthracite, And all kinds or BITUMINOUS COAL! Also i ! Stone, Lime, Cement, Hair, I Office at Bij; Bed Scales, Xo. 70, Douglas Are., ' South Side, Xear Deot. )-tf ! J. P. ALLEN. measure of the expectations of the good people of Wichita. Again, good morning, those in Kansas who talk of going, do go, not one-third, ot them will be able to procure a ticket, and they will have fln iniirnnv ntul tho nviinnKf fnv rmtli- -.-,.-, . ing, and be subject to a grave disap church, in which faith his distinguish cu sou continued. Ilic tutu re eminent lawyer did not receive a university education. The associations of his life at home, while he was a pupil iu a common school, were, however, favorable to the development of his mental powers. JIc wns admitted to the bar ' when about 20 years of age, rose j-ap-idlyJn his profession, aud was recognized as a lawyer of unusual ability and promise before he was 30. When under 60 years of age he had achieved a national reputation. Of the important cases in which he has taken part, two are pre-eminent namely: the Masou will case, in which he "is considered to have made his greatest argument, and the Forrest divorce suit, in which he appeared for Mrs. Forrest. The statement is made that the great actor on one occasion threat- If only half of j cued personal violence toward thcclo Every Thing Kept in a First-Class Drug Store. JOHN DAVIDSON, . THE Pioneer Lumber rSeniwiCK CoiWTr. ESTABLISHED IN H7 who represented his in this lawsuit, but cyrus Mccormick gone. pointment. The eighteen Kansas delegates will not have to exceed a total of 108 tickets for distribution, or about six for each delegate. Hence we woniu say to an persons in tins iuent advoc:te i wife's iutcrciXs i. was ovcraweil by his cool courage aud dignity. Mr O'Conor lived at JTan-, tucket, in tin enjoyment of an ample income earned by his brilliant success at the bar. He is said to be worth ! about $1,000,000, not a surprisingly j large amount when his long piactice, during the best period of which lie Cyrus II. McCormick, head of the great harvester manufacturing company, aud supposed to be one of the richest men in Chicago, died at his home in Chicago on the 1.8th, iu the 75th year of his age. He had been an im alid for many years. Mr. McCormick was born in 1809. in Uockbridgc county, Virginia. He was a son of Uobert 11. McCormick, a farmer, who invented the original reaper iu 181C, but afterward abandoned it, owing to its imperfections. Deceased brought the invention to successful completion in 1831, when twenty-one years old. For this invention he was elected by the-ireuch institute as a member of the academy i State, if you have not obtained, in ad- j maue irom stu,wu to 7U,uou a year, i vanec, the promise of a ticket, stay at and the appreciation of the real estate i home, and thus avoid expense, loss of in which he invested, arc taken into , , time, and grave disappointment. The account. After beiuga bachelor many ' seatiug capacity of the hall cannot be ' years he married one of his clients, a increased, and" the chances arc that widow lady belonging to the Living-1 there will be in Chicago from all ston family, with whom he lived but parts of tho country, twenty appli- j a short time. Their tastes were as op-' cants for evcrv ticket that can be fur- posite as their religious preferences, i nished. " (6c wa9 a Protestant), ana they scpa- Therc is another fact delegates rated. When, after many years, Mr should bear in mind. The tickets as- O'Conor received the news Riimnri thorn arc intended for distri- wife's death, he is said to ! hiitinn to ritizons of their own State, bitterly. He has no child ! and they should be reserved for that O'Conor was always a favorite among t purpose". Xo matter how near and his brother attorneys. His nature dear mav bo the friends annlyinjr to f was gentle and sympathetic, mid his them, frbm other States, they should quick sensibilities ofion belied refuse all applications made" by per-, cold exterior which he assumed. sons living outside of Kansas. was a democrat in pontics, uunng "We wish the newspapers of the tho presidency of Pierce he acted as State would make public these facts, district attorney for a months. He Their wide circulation mav save man- A Complete Stosk of Pine Lumber, SHINGLES, LATH, DOOKS, SASH,&o. .llways on hand S3- Office and Yard on Market Strttt, txttreen I jtougiat .tvenue ana tirii nirtei. .'JfiT. o HJ ni c J O CD CD 5 OB o a ' rj h ' O 3 2 8 D3 W GO CQ Pi CD CO CD -& CD P- t? - - 1 V" J pW J. F. J.TAFP0RD, PKALEKUT - Guns, Pistols and Ammunition Hunting outfit! rested on reasonable terns, CORXER.FIRST&.MAIX. WICHITA. KANSAS. f LUMBERJDEALERS. YARDS, i Winfleld, J , dW Ga-den Plain, i AVellingt Harper, tr. DEDMANj BROS., Wichita Mett Market, 1-7- 7 DEALERS N All Ms of Mad Salt Meats xi SSi i ' - I Jh.i(sy.i a v.- n .:s.-i i . u.. s. - v i k i.r l ,T-I I ts? 'J t ' 14 'vl 1 at 1 t? "feKzs- K .K a Readers! '"?. Of Of the very bt "qitttty Thursday and Friday. ISRAEL Druggists and r? fi'ih Wednesday. If ocers. F1RS1 BLOCK WEST OF TRrJONT HOUSE. 150 & 3.' Douglas Ave., Vlchita. Iva. tf Exton Elevator Com Mills. Fine Gf onnl ana Bolted C rn Heal. Ground Corn and C its. Corn-Chop and Bran. (4 TlidAily Eagle r Its Promoters and Friends! We With -,', Prosperity and Happiness!- a; .... Orders filled promptly Oflice. Telephone t Exion Coal If DRESSMAKER, Elliotts Bldck: Corner Douglas jnd Lawrence, stairs. Koom'No. t im t up SMITH &HAHN Contractors & Builders. Hard lnc flulsh a npecialut SHOP SOUTH FIDE 4tb AVE. Office PallcU's Lumber lard. i im ROBISDN BROS., t The One-Priie Dry Goods House! 21 Main i., 1 Wichita, Kansas. J. FC. RICHMOND, Wagon and Carriage Maker. DOK3AIX KINOS OK KEl'AIUIN'O. Ught Work n Special t With Klnm ."IColc. Market ftrrul.soiitli of Doii-I'n itu'mie, Wichita, Kaiisiis. tr ORGANS TO RENT "W. :b. im: m .A. 3D Or Aildrr't I "ck IJo K", Kansas. it" Samp I t Donit forget tho si let nijroktojri) 4) 1? Number a.Mri'" iipuit application. X (dUC(JlvS.S( SEDGWICK COUNTY av& Abstracter, Abstracts of title compile, on short notice. Vi1 ( Fire, Life ani Tornaflo Insnrance. Represents scten or the best Ccmpantes va u orld tr persons the expense of a journey to ci of science, and received tltc decoration J Chfwiiro, and tlic grave uisappoint- oCthc cross of the legion of honor. In politics lie was a Democrat, and has been prominent in his party as a , member of the national committee. JIc founded and liberally endowed the theological seminary of the North-west, conducted under the auspices of the Presbyterian church, and also endowed a professorship in the Wash-, iugton aud Union theological colleges ( of Virginia. meut "ot finding, on their arrival there, that they cannot get scats. Champion A SALOON MAN PARD0NE0. The flippant remark made by a prominent Tl.acher man, "that there wSsiQbodr for Martin but old soldiers ana newspapers," does not seem , to be cutirelv in accordance with facts. f the statement ras true, they are j liendsanv candidate may be proud' Thorn is one thins the campaign is far has developed and that is that icw6papcrB and oiu toiaicrsarc pr Timelier. vapuai. CIov. Click yesterday hsucd a pardon to.T. S. Johnston, of Catvker City. Mitchell county, who has been convicted of a violation of the prohibitory law and sentenced to linn and imprisonment. The Governor bacd his action in tho premises on the extenuating facts in the case, the prisoner being singled out aud subjected to a special and different punishment from others tried for the same offense at the same term of court. A petition for Johnston's pardon was presented signed by over four hum.rcd citizens and tax payers of Mitchell county. Governor Glick alo received numerous letters irom cm- was a member of the constitution -r- -r- -r- -r-j - -T K r -y-,- coiivcuuou or 1864. His uomiuation' -"- --- -D-Ev vv jn -for the presidency in 1872 resulted in a few votes being cast for him in several states. These, perhaps, maybe FURMITURE, regarded rather as coitipliiucntafv to the man than as an indorsement of the extreme views entertained by that section of the Democrmic party hich nominated him. Some years "ago he wa reported dead, but tho day the news wa published was able lo sit up and reui his own obitnarv. JEWELRY, Douglas Avenue, - Wichita, Kansas. I Wichih kHRy Jfm f r W W W W W Etc. i o m m r .4 W J 2 l Af 5 I i . pkm r xd si in w I I mmM (j re (J IU &ft .e QIWK. -- KH r i JS 0 J2ZB3m BtAliiJ r?m-. 2 -21 jnvim mmmSLl man : i: . co hh .2::m jprn mnmmm ?S ; , d HH vAllV XHiBHlllL.' 4B s.fZYZT m i-H jiBm, jnmiK MtvKl J rr Ji 7r-lllllv rJLffBKIEG&lRmSm22 .rLrmi i l .m i i u l h mr m Ht, re lo the front with JLXm ELEVATOR. H , KSTAI1U5UKI) 1S71 j mmAJTS, cai?s 7BaiH -J 1- rmm ?K(B; -- ----- r fJBB MJ JLi li-ij flm hmtl l!iir of I CHES ap CLOCKS, COLD CHAINS. VWM SECTACLE8 ETC.! ?K SETRINCS, JB. J. M. ALLEN & CO. IS TO AIJ.K.V .t TWOKKIt.) tj: Wlioieske and Retail ERS H. W KKNOLf. l ,d1 I)lrlo f (LOTH, AND KTAUIC WRI? 2srx o.s-ir-i?:'T-'C aoBxs. oLovjrs, cwlavk. IU tvro dun inrt. A nrli i.l.i to M ItJilU Cmt(ft7. 0(Be lw;i i.f m iniiti)u .ivm, Wlrftlla, Kuu F? rrom,1 elUnt(n 19 Ordnt k$ TtUgrayk hollcwli a 'doran M the Iwitcxt Jicilrxt, Xnhhift and Cliap-t Wn'tk CLOTHING! MANUFACTURE THE CELEBRATED BRANDS: IPERIAL. ... - (Roller Pj ttt t -Rr-rv WHITE ROSE. (Extra YY . U. lYLUJDtJtJ, X. L. C. R. - - (Fa &c iFTiRisnsHrN'Q. V, ibxe: CITIT- GOOI5S Thte lirnU hnTe Wn on thi mrLt Kit. Wt. N'oilb aii'l Socitb fnr tm mr. i won an envll)le rr uitation xshtrrrer Introdar. To trr tlirm 1 to lr with lhm3 .itwayu in the market tor licat at blal,-'t cafh lirif SI-rELLABARGER. IMBODEN & OLIVEI WILLIAM KA88 DIAMONDS, GOLD AND SILVER WAT FINE JEWELRY, COLD CHAINS, Dongliw Avenue, IJctwc-fn Huiytf and WaliMc'd Irnpletneut IIoumI A" S. D. PLLETT, -Mthf in- rs.- NORTHERN AND SlDXBEBN PINE LUMB3R! Otlicc and Yard Vent End of .;t?!i Avenue, Xorth Jihk, N'wr iridg? l-iw It. I)MltUD. Jt , l'riat, J AH UlyiMBAKD. VkwiffI. 14 SETRINCS, Soino Ilepublicaus don't want Arthur because he doen't do enough. A rcat many are againt Blaine tic-cause thry are afraid he would do too much. A compromise ought to be made on Sherman, because the people know that he would do just right. Dayton Journal. It makes all the difference iu the world which Sherman jou mean. If FR00MAN 6l PECKHAM, WnOLXAI.C JLXt PETAIt. OCvlLK.-.S If BRACELETS, ROLLED COLD Staple and Fancy Gro-; ceries, Fruits, &c. Hi;hft CJi-b price paid fur pruluce. Morr AND zens aud business "men of Mitchell j boys will it is 'William TccnillCh the Kansas, pwt oW lor the anr mootj- Him any .Ujr county, without regard to party, a-k- him in the uclghbornood of 50,000 nia-ing for Johnston's pardon. Capital, jjorily over Tildcn. Emporia Sines. 'ioin in the chorus'' and "ive , ? jf "1,t?Kr...,r8u ,,"T'rrt pnanptiy to t PLATED " i d i"I 4iC Ull . soirrn siie dougla .wesue, wlnfltf Thinl Dnor Wrstof Vla. CHAINS. RRCvRflRRRRaRV-HBRl' brwrHbrbrkrhH! imjrm--i'BKm ' BRHDSvRBRRP'VKfHH RBN"tl BNRBRBWKWRilNBf BRlRB2SRaBRJBBr jRKSS2JRZBRlr , 60LO Sl-VER i Kansas Sttte Bank. Paid-up Capital, if - i AND STEEL fSOLID J.I'. AU.KX. J.M. ALLKK, . UF.O. E. SI" ALTON, TDXKOB JAXKS t ANDPUTEO r lUc'lte IMjxmUs, Make (JiAUrttons, act a General llanking itMimeMt, IQBS: JSIISAKD, It. I (SILYIRWAIIE. J No. 88, DongbM Avenue. - - - - Lawrsoce1! Drag Stor. ! COBBBSP f JMCf, l'At03rACrt.,SWimwt..5- JtVAl , KUXCUjXttfXK Jf ATVJ5S4I- !, Uh. ItttA end $ll Era rasmvmz. vau or kmxyrt' jiAT't toiooo l,Jr I aBaKiAY, 1 IHKX. "-W RRRH mm rhhhhhI RrBmt ! rrH n m i s I 1, IS. &L -SL ZSl A ,..-1 . Jti MRRiiiirar-w'"r'r"ani " ai .-rexX'7ie.&i Vf &? i. s Ms&tBtmy, vxsatd lk-tfVS &(?. J... teS&& &H K?j &. f'i

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