Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California on February 18, 1964 · Page 8
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Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California · Page 8

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Tuesday, February 18, 1964
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8 - Tuesday, Feb. 18, 1964 Redlands Daily Facts Love In a castle — Part II Princess Irene forced to sacrifice her rights (EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is the second of three dispatches reporting on the pitfalls on the path of love for European royalty.) By ROBERT MUSEL United Press International LONDON (UPI) - One lesson even royalty has to learn is that you cannot have your cake and eat it. King Edward VIII of Britain would have liked to make Mrs. Wallis Warfield of Baltimore, his queen. They are now the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, self-exiled since 1936 from the land he ruled. The same implacable forces that insisted on his abdication were on the move again when Princess Margaret, sister of Queen Elizabeth, fell in love with Group Captain Peter Townsend, a royal equerry and a divorced man. After weeks of highly - publicized torment she renounced her love for him in October, 1955, presumably on the ground it would embarrass the throne. She would also have had to give up the privileges of a princess to marry him and this the luxury-loving little lady was not quite prepared to do. In Britain the first rule of the royal marriage game is: abso-.warred on Holland and nation lutely no divorced persons can play. Princess Irene, 24, of Holland must have forgotten these royal precedents when she decided on Feb. 7 to marry Prince Hugo Carlos de Bourbon Parma, 33, one of the two pretenders to the throne of Spain 72 hours after she had assured her mother, Queen Juliana, that the engagement was off. Takes Battle Stations The Dutch government moved to battle stations. Some felt the queen bad been humiliated by the change of mind. Here it was, only three days later and the engagement was on! The cabinet would have been delighted to approve Irene's engagement to an eligible man— meaning, in this case, a Protestant of good family. But Prince Carlos was wrong on practically all counts. He is: Catholic — the Dutch House of Orange if firmly Protestant. A Spaniard — the ancient enmity between the nations is reflected in disapproval of th( Franco regime. A rightist — the Dutch try to be liberal. A descendant of Louis XIV — the French "Sun King" also Joe Cronin may face Senate questioning WASHINGTON (UPI)—American League President Joe Cronin may face Senate questioning today about the baseball loop's running scrap with owner Charles O. Finley on the Kansas City Athletics. Cronin and National League President Warren Giles were scheduled to testify before the Senate antitrust and monopoly subcommittee on legislation to j give all major team sports the For five days the cabinet same favorable antitrust ex al memories are long. Pretender to the Spanish throne — the Dutch demand bylaw that its royalty, even in­ laws, refrain from political activity. THE NEW WILT argued. The Labor Party at tacked the government for "gross clumsiness" in the a: fair. Abhors Publicity Justice Minister Dr. Yvo Scholten said it was trying to avoid "at almost any price further alarms and rumors linking the royal house to common scandal, political strife abroad and dangerous lack of information at home." Behind the hugging and kissing so loudly applauded by the people the bitter struggle went on. Finally Princess Irene capitulated. She agreed to renounce her rights to the throne. She agreed to make her perm- emptions now granted baseball Although Cronin and Giles were prepared to endorse the bill sponsored by Chairman Philip A. Hart, D-Mich., the subcommittee has shown more than a passing interest in Finley's fight with Kansas City officials over a stadium lease and his attempts to move the A's to Louisville, Ky. The subcommittee invited Finley to testify today but Hart said before the hearing he had received no reply or other word from the embattled Kansas City owner. Cronin is laying plans for a league meeting Friday to deal J &iRRaul 7SS»>) anent home elsewhere. Prince wi,h < hc , K ,ansas City impasse Minister Victor Marijnen wcar-j and Finley s threats of legal ily disclosed the settlement that | virtually ended the crisis 'action. The Hart bill was endorsed Did he think the affair had damaged Holland's image abroad? No." he said, "romances are always appreciated." Next: Happily ever after? Beatles bathe at beach, ignore scalper beef MIAMI BEACH (UPI)-Britain's long-haired quartet with the rock 'n roll sound planned to duck out of a posh hotel and hit the beach today. The Beatles didn't make it out of bed until noon or later Monday in recuperating from their second frantic appearance on American national television Sunday. Brian Summcrville, the group's press agent, said the four young men are going to do "nothing but swim, fish and relax," until they head back to New York Friday. The four originally had planned to return to New York Monday and then leave for London today. Meanwhile, controversy still stirred over the Beatles' appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show Sunday night. While hundreds of fans waited outside the hotel where the show was being held, the doors were shut with 200 vacant seats still left in the 5,000-seat audi, torium. "It was inexcusable," said Miami Beach publicity man Hank Meyer. He blamed the mixup at the Deauville on poor planning and ticket distribution. And although tickets were supposed to be free, some scalpers got as much as $30 each for them. IN HOLLYWOOD Allyson Ames — no Ma Hubbard Monday by Commissioner Pete Rozelle of the National Football League, Commissioner Joe Foss of the American Football League and George T. Gareff of Columbus, Ohio, commissioner of the "minor" United Football League. By Erskine Johnson Employment director to aid growers SACRAMENTO (UPI) — A state official Monday pledged full cooperation to the California Council of Growers, which has ended its support of the bracero program and turned to the recruitment of domestic farm labor. Albert B. Tieburg, state Di rector of Employment, made the pledge as a spokesman for the council explained its new plan to the state Board of Agriculture. "The Department of Employment will want to cooperate right down the line," Tieburg said. The council spokesman, John V. Newman, said the council had decided to end its heretofore consistent support of the Mexican farm labor program because of the unemployment situation in this country, and because of the narrow margin by which the Bracero Extension Bill passed Congress last year. The bracero bill extended the program only one year. The program now expires at the end of 1964. HOLLYWOOD — And now for a modernized Hollywood version of "Old Mother Hubbard." The old nursery classic needs a little youthful zipping up, so let's even change the title to "Swinging Mama." First of all, you change Hub bard to Ames — Allyson Ames — with background wolf whistles. Allyson is young, blonde, leggy and strikingly pretty. Then give her a rip-snorting sense of humor, a Texas background and an I.Q. of 162. Move her into an old three story house instead of a shoe. It's on the wrong side of t h e tracks and the place hasn't been painted in 38 years. But Allyson is working up to it. She's painting and wallpapering the interior, doing all the work hersell Now give her four children- three boys, age 8, 7, and 5, and a girl 4. Since Allyson became a divorcee, she's their sole support. But now stop worrying that she doesn't know what to do. Unlike Mrs. Hubbard, Allyson Ames knows exactly what to do. Not that life isn't hectic at times you understand. Or, as Allyson laughs: "I'm the country's best customer for panic buttons." Allyson's goal is movie stardom. She has been told, "You'll never make it with four kids," but she refuses to hide them "I'm not one of those f a t frumps in last year's clothes she argues. "You have to have pride to look like I look." No argument about that. Inch for inch she's a match for any sex kitten you'd like to name. As an actress she's doing even better than some s.k.'s I could name. In just three years Allyson has played bit and featured roles in 42 filmed television shows. Among these were five appearances each on "77 Sunset Strip," Surfside Six" and "Hawaiian Eye." She has had roles in four monies, including the current 'Four for Texas," and the about to-be - released, "The Out- of Towners." While Allyson works, a combination nurse - cook - housekeep- cares for the four children. Court decides on water allocation SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) —The California District Court of Appeals handed down on a decision Monday in the 19 - year dispute over allocation of water from the 101,000 acres of the underground West Coast basin in West Los Angeles. The appellate court affirmed a decision by Los Angeles Superior Judge George Francis in 1961 which enforced an agreements of water allocations worked out by users and the state Division of Water Resources. A sordid childhood of her own is the driving force behind her vow to see all of them well -fed clothed and educated. She has dates (Gardner McKay for one). Sometimes, she says, when she tells a fellow about her brood, "I can see his whole face melt away right in front of me." The improbable world of Allyson Ames in Hollywood matches the world from which she came. "In your nightmares," she says, "you haven't been through tilings I've been through." She was born in the charity ward of a Dallas hospital. As a teen-age rebel she was expelled from school seven times, before marrying at 15. She worked as a cotton picker, car-hop, clerk and behind a theater candy counter before becoming the star high fashion model of a famed Dallas department store. Modeling led to appearances in live television commercials on a Dallas station and the advice: "You oughta be in pictures." Her divorce gave her the children and the family car. Three years ago she packed all the kids into the sedan, locked the doors and drove straight through from Dallas to Hollywood. She hasn't rested since. Stardom is her goal and even her children know it. Their favorite nursery story starts out with Allyson saying. Once upon a time there was a movie star named Allyson Ames and. . ." To place entrance signs only Arlington boys take showman honors at Indio INDIO (UPI) — Alan Ubrun. 16, and Ben Drake, 14, both of Arlington, Monday were named senior and junior championship showmen, respectively, at Riverside County's national Date FestivaL Champion dairy cattle were shown by Edie Halm an of San Jacinto and Leon Den Ouden of Corona, while Kenneth Watje of Arlington, Kristy Henze of Riverside and Ron Vanderford of Mira Loma had champion beef cattle. Tops in the sheep division were Cathie Boren of Riverside, Glenn Brostedt of Colton and Victor Herman of Loma Linda. Bruce Brown of Mira Mar, and Tommy Bryan of Hemet were named 4-H swine winners. Judging of Future Farmers of America dairy and sheep entries will be held Friday. Future Farmer and 4-H animals will go on the block at the junior livestock auction Saturday. MILWAUKEE, Wis. (UPI) — City Atty. John J. Fleming said today he believed he had a solution to Milwaukee's "million- dollar" overnight parking problem. Police have not enforced the city's overnight parking ban since Friday when a judge dismissed five parking tickets. „„„ , . „„,„ „ . . . „„i,„„„ ,... „ eras do to people.. .good and S < L ,l S bad mannerisms when on TV protested there were no sisjs! aIso wi „ bc demonstrated ... spelling out the ordinance. Th Ci pi( thc felIow to has TELEVISION IN REVIEW By RICK DU BROW HOLLYWOOD (UPI) - A dusty 1960 press release in our file bears this headline: "ABC- TV setting up TV coaching schools for candidates through out the nation." The press release was dated June 7 of that last presidential election year, and in a sense the month now can be seen as still being part of the good old days of the new political-electronic era. For it was 11 weeks later than the first Nixon-Kennedy debate proved the potency of television as a weapon that could perhaps alter an election outcome at the highest level. Things haven't been quite the same since. If anyone had had any doubts about the pivotal in fluence of video in politics, the great 1960 debates ended them At ABC-TV Monday, a spokesman said it was currently doubtful that the network and its stations would offer "school ing" again this year, at least not envisioning as wide a scale if at all; and one of the many reasons given was the enormously increased sophistication of politicians concerning television. Whether or not ABC changes jits mind, the fact of sophistication in this area is more widely appreciated than in 1960. At the top-most level, the public is keenly aware that President Johnson has undoubtedly considered carefully the 1960 experience of Richard Nixon as the question of 1964 debates is brought to the fore again and again. Only recently, the matter and influence of debates were re- impressed on the viewing audi ence by ABC-TV's documentary "The Making of the Presi dent, 1960." The two contenders were seen in their first debate. And certain things suddenly seemed magnified even more than before—Nixon's gray suit against the gray background; Kennedy wearing a dark suit and appearing tan. When ABC announced its schooling plan in 1960, it said: "The 'curricula' of the TV coaching schools will include briefing the local candidates on the production of a TV program, with studio and 'remote' procedures, as well as instructing them on what the TV cam city said it would cost SI million to erect the needed 40,000 signs. Fleming proposed to place nothing but brains and honesty. The Channel Swim: CBS-TV confirmed it is planning, for the signs at the city limits on all i fall, a half hour situation com major highways and heavilyjedy with a family that resem- traveled streets. Leniency promised for admitting TOKYO (UPI) — Communist North Korea today promised to deal "leniently" with two U.S. Army helicopter pilots it has held for nine months if the United States admits they violated the Korean truce. The officers captured by the Communists May 17, 1963, are Capt. Ben Weakley Stutts, then 32, of Florence, Ala., and Capt. Charleston W. Voltz, then 26, of Frankfort, Mich. Repeated efforts by United Nations truce officers had failed to obtain their release. Their helicopter landed in Communist territory while on a mission along thc truce line dividing North and South Korea. bles famous movie monsters... The show's gimmick is that the weird Charles Addams-type characters are unaware they look unusual, and think they're just plain folks.. .The princi pals look like Frankenstein's monster, Dracula and the Vampire Lady.. .Fred Gwynne of "Car 54, Where Are You?" is one of the stars.. .The title is "The Ministers".. .And the feeling at the network here is that the series will be either a huge popular smash or a quick bomb.. .CBS has had great success with oddball situation fantasies —"Mr. Ed," "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "My Favorite Martian." Western Regional basketball field about set By United Press International The field for next month's Western Regional basketball championships was about set today—and it's a strong one that could produce the eventual national champion. Oregon State (21 -3) and Seattle (17 -4) were both named as NCAA at large selections Monday along with Rocky Mountain power Utah State (17 -3). Toss in Big Six champion UCLA (21 -0). the West Coast Athletic Conference king, and the Western Conference champ and you have a powerful lineup. USF (15-4) seems likely to win in the WCAC and New Mexico (17-3) is leading the Western Conference. The strength of this field is proven by the latest UPI rankings. UCLA is still number one by a huge margin although its unbeaten string will get a real test this Saturday at Stanford. Oregon State has moved up to sixth place and probably will rate as the favorite in the regionals even over UCLA because it will be playing at home. The Beavers don't lose many at Corvallis. USF has suddenly started to play like the pre-season experts said the Dons could and stands I5th in the latest rankings. New Mexico is 19th ranked nationally and Utah State 20th. Seattle would probably be in there somewhere had the Chiefs not lost three to Oregon State. Seattle Monday night celebrated its invitation to the NCAA regionals with a 100-88 thumping over scrappy Gon zaga. John Tresvant, one of the coast's best scorers, led the winners with 35, while Bill Wilson and Bill Suter had 24 each for the losers, who pulled out to a 32-24 lead before Seattle got going. In other action Monday night, CCAA champion Fresno State- one of the nation's top-ranked college squads—rolled to a 11276 romp over Chapman in a non-conference game. Maurice Talbot scored 23 and grabbed 18 rebounds for the Bulldogs. Other scores: Cal Poly of Pomona 68 San Diego 67. Cal Western 95 Arizona State (Flag staff) 58, Pasadena 55 Sacra mcnto State 52. In games tonight, old West Coast Athletic Conference foes St Mary's and Santa Clara tangle at Richmond, Calif. Both teams are going nowhere this year and the Broncs are so riddled by injuries they are having trouble fielding five men. Portland is at Oregon in Northwest action. Latest unofficial Big Six scoring statistics showed a wide- open scramble with UCLA's brilliant backcourt combination still in one-two position. Gail Goodrich is averaging 19.6 points per game and Walt Hazzard 18.5. Stanford's Tom Dose is third with 17.4, USC's Al Young fourth at 16.0 and Jack Hirsch of the Bruins fifth at 14.7. Each team has played 10 games and has two remaining. . In the West Coast Athletic Conference, Russ Vrankovich of Santa Clara is well ahead with a 22.0 average. Ollie Johnson of USF is second at 18.8, and UOP's Bill Wilson third at 18.7. Thunderbirds need win tonight to clinch title A win tonight and thc Desert Valley League title will go to coach Kent Hayden's Yucaipa High Thunderbird cagers. The T-Binl hoopsters tangle with Palm Springs at 8 p.m. in the Indians gym. Coach Hayden's five has already clinched a share of the crown with their 8-0 record and will be out to wrap it up By ALEX KAHN [year's absence from track anditonight. UPI Sports Writer | field, returned to competition Other DVL clashes will have LONG BEACH. Calif. (UPI >! this winter and gradually has —The growing indoor track and!been improving his marks in First annual Long Beach indoor track event opens field circuit adds another meet to its schedule tonight with thc staging of the first annual Long Beach Games, featuring a cast of world record holders and top performers. Meet coordinator Mai Whitfield, former Olympic Games middle distance champion, has lined up a number of top duels including a high jumping battle between youthful Lew Hoyt and Australia's Tony Sncaz- well, Bob Hayes against a classy field in the 60-yard dash. Dallas Long and Parry O'Brien in the shot and Hayes Jones against Ralph Boston in thc hurdles. Hoyt was a surprise winner at 7 -feet-l in the New York A.C. meet last week in which he defeated John Thomas and Sncaz- well who has yet to perfect his timing indoors. But on springy surface for thc Long Beach games, the Australian hoped to do better than he has thus far on his U.S. tour. The fast plywood track used by San Francisco's Cow Palace was transported to the Long Beach arena for tonight's meet and Whitfield, after testing it personally, said he found it faster than a pine board track. Hayes has tied the 60-yard mark four times this season and hopes he can better the record of 6.0 seconds tonight. The Florida A&M sprint stai feels with the proper competi-j j n Monday's featured Azucar tion and a springy track hcj Purse. St. Tropcz. under a hard may do 5.9. j stretch drive, nosed out Top Dallas Long, after nearly a; Performance. quest of Gary Gubner's indoor record of 64 feet 11-14. Hayes Jones seeks his 54th straight high hurdles victory and with Ralph Boston and Dee Andrews in the race, a speedy mark was anticipated. Boston also is competing in the broad jump. Sneazwell's Australian teammate, Ron Clarke, heads the two-mile field and he demonstrated Saturday in the Golden Gate meet at San Francisco he finally had mastered the boards with an 8:36.9 victory. George Kerr of Jamaica runs in thc 600-yard event against Willie Attcrbury while Jim Dupree and Sig Ohlemann clash in thc l.OOOyard run. Ron Morris. Mel Hcin and Finland's Risto Ankio are featured in the pole vault and Julio Marin the j heads the mile field. second place Banning at home against Coachella and Twentynine Palms at Indio. Junior varsity preliminary games open the twin bills starting at 7 p.m. Forward Dennis Hare seems to be a shoo in for the scoring title after his 43 point performance last Friday night. He has 230 for a hot 28.8 average. Second in the individual point race is a tight battle between Lou Richards of Twentynine Palms and Rich Carr of Banning. Richards moved back into second place last week and has 142 points and a 17.8 average. Carr has 137 and a 17.1. Desert Valley League Varsity Basketball W. Curious Clover probable favorite ARCADIA (UPI) — Curious Clover was the probable favorite today in the featured 525,000- added Santa Barbara handicap, which will produce the feminine champion of the meeting at Santa Anita. PF 519 486 409 444 PA 370 411 4 :J2 5(>1 Yucaipa 8 Banning 6 Palm Springs ... 4 Indio 2 29 Palms 2 6 444 5D1 Coachella 2 6 418 511 Tonight's Schedule Yucaipa at Palm Springs. Coachella at Banning. Twentynine Palms at Indio. DVL TOP 10 SCORERS Player. School FG FT TP Avff. Hare. Yucaipa 89 52 230 23.8 Richards. 29 Palms. 62 7 142 17.8 Carr. Banning _ 12 33 137 17.1 M. Wendt. Indio 43 37 123 15.4 Zamarripa. Coachella _ St 17 119 14.9 Goddard. Indio 43 40 110 13.8 G. Romain, 29 Palms 42 24 108 13.5 Wolfington. Banning 39 23 101 12.8 Price. Coachella 24 40 88 11.0 Wallace. Yucaipa ...33 21 87 10.9 TV GAMES NEW YORK (UPI)—A total of 129 regular season games played by the New York Mets will be televised by WOR-TV. This includes 77 of 81 home games and 32 away games. Sal es jot Clay tells Dundee will outglare Liston h. Now You Know By United Press International More than 11 million cubic yards of concrete were used to build the Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, according to the Portland Cement j Association. NBA Standings Eastern Division W. L. Pet. Boston 45 16 .738 Cincinnati 45 19 .703 Philadelphia 26 34 .433 New York 17 48 .262 Western Division .W. L. Pet. San Francisco St. Louis Los Angeles Baltimore Detroit 36 26 36 27 33 30 27 35 15 43 .581 .571 .524 .443 .250 Monday's Results St. Louis 115 Baltimore 110 Cincinnati 129 San Fran. 113 Tuesday's Games Los Angeles at New York Philadelphia vs Boston at Pittsburgh San Francisco vs. Detroit Lansing, Mich. at By BILL MCCORMICK Newspaper Enterprise Assn. MIAMI BEACH, Fla.—(NEA) — Experts are pretty much in accord that Sonny Liston, the manhandling monster from Pine Bluff, Ark., will retain his heavyweight title against Cassuis Clay, the big lip from Louisville, Ky. They don't agree on who is winning the more interesting fight that is leading up to their 15-round ring encounter at Miami Beach Feb. 25 — the Cold war of nerves between the stolid, sinister champion and Conversational Cassius. Only one expert, one with inside knowledge, has a firm conviction. That is Clay himself. There is never any doubt about anything as far as Cassius is concerned. The Louisville Loudmouth always agrees emphatically with himself. "I got Liston scared to death," he states without equivocation. Whether Loquacious Cassius really believes that, or is just whistling his way past the embalming parlor, will not be known to the public at large, and maybe even to Clay him self, until the gladiators face each other across the ring. Liston, whose evil glower has been known to mow down opponents like a science fiction death ray, may be more than mildly disconcerted if the irrepressible upstart does what he says he will when they meet for instructions just before the battle, mother. 'He glare at me, I glare back Cassias Clay 'Then I stick out my tongue at him." He will, too. He's a manly little fellow. What happens then is anybody's guess. The horrible realization that he has committed heresy may suddenly hit Clay, freezing him like a bird transfixed before a King Cobra. Liston may be so surprised he may forget to hit his saucy opponent, giving Clay a chance to go into a running retreat which will offer a chance of survival. Or, Liston may run amok, which will be a spectacular thing to see. One thing is certain. Liston harder," Clay says. "My glare;has been completely upset by got nuclear fission. It dissolve the way the brash bigmouth him. Ihas converted what started out to be a mutually agreeable "grudge fight" publicity campaign into a private, vicious bate war. "It's the biggest mistake Clay ever made, or will ever live to make," say Listen's handler! with apparently deep concern. "Sonny's so mad he'll try to kill him." All of which bothers Clay not a whit — on the surface. Although one senses a tense nervousness underneath, the blithe spirit goes his merry way, breaking just about every rule of prefight living except the ones against dissipation. Four times in six days. Clay canceled his scheduled training sessions. Thc decision whether to train or not is left entirely up to him and he makes up his mind when he wakes up in the morning. "I know what's best for me by the way I feel," he insists. To the horror of Angelo Dundee, his trainer of record, Clay worked out on the court with a college basketball team on one of the days he played hooky from the gymnasium. Envisioning broken bones, Dundee bit his fingernails to the elbow as he watched his charge maneuver about the slippery floor at full speed. "What difference it make?" Clay reassured Dundee. "I can beat that big bear on one leg, or with one arm, anyway." Cassius Clay is either the most confident fighter since David tackled Goliath, or he's the greatest actor that ever trod the boards. And while he is a big ham, nobody's ever compared him to Edwin Booth or Laurence Olivier.

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