The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on October 18, 1925 · Page 11
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The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 11

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Sunday, October 18, 1925
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mmmm. THE LINCOLN SUNDAY STAR— SUNDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1025. THREE NURMI SOUR ON YANK GRAFTERS Marvelous Finn Decided Not to Bend Legs On U. S. ' Tracks This Year. Imposed Upon and Hounded By Army of Gold-Loving Race Promoters. COMMKRCIAL LKAGl’E. Tmra Stand ln«s. 0 w 1 8 < 4 S 4 t S 8 4 . » 3 Hoitert's L>alry ................ 6 3 Indivldfial Artmfe». a . ti . » D. g. TIr* Service.. Varsity Cleaners ... Hardy ........................... iieformatory ............. Magee ................. Union Mre Ins. Pet .888 .«67 .867 .Í1&6 .444 .333 .333 BY FRANK G. MENKE. (Copyright 1925 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.) Paavo Xurml declares It is unlikely that ho will visit America in 1926 for competition purposes. And the reasons, although not stated by Nurmi, are two; il)— American promoters, by tholr greed for gold, preyed upon the sportsmanship of Nurmi and thus forced him to run ot paces, over distances and with such frequency that the marvelous speed ot the greatest distance runner of all time Is perhaps forever dulled. (2)— Ingrates among American promoters and some of the holler- than-thou-hypocrttes, which teem In the alleged “amateur” realms, crushed the earlier affection the great athlete of Finland had for Americans by their cowardly attacks upon him—and by their acts of the sheerest Ingratitude ever known in sportdom. Promotsrs in Free-for-All. Never was the ability of any visiting amateur athlete c.apital- ized In so stupendous a fashion as was that of Nurmi. The athletic l^rlde of Kurope came here planning to run a few races. Not much attention was paid upon his arrival. But when Nurmi packed one arena and another—and countless others—because of his amazing speed and colorful personality, those "amateur” .sport promoters everywhere ln<lulge«i in a wild, free-for-all fight, to get him to run for them. And Nurmi obliged, smilingly, gladly. But as time went on, and those promoters, utterly ruthless In their consideration for Nurmi, totally indifferent as to hl.s needs for rest intervals, demanded of him that he should run almost every night so as to enrich them, the youthful Finn had to choose between two things: Had Little Choice. (1)—Refuse to run oftener than was consistent with safeguarding his health and his running prowess, or 2()—Accede to the frenzied requests and chance not merely the loss of his mighty speed but, perhaps that of his health. Ninety-nine men out of 100 would have thought of themselves— and refused to harken* to the pleas of the promoters. Nurmi, obliging, sweet tempered, genuine sporstman, w.as the 100th. He chose to sacrifice himself rather than <lwappolnt the promoters. Cloak Conceal« Hypocrites. And 80 , la a few t»rief months, Nurmi appeared In about a score <»f cities, ran almost everywhere he WH.S asked to run and, as a result of Nurmi’s drawing powers, those promoters, cloaking thc'msclvcs with the hypocritical mantle of “amateur sportsmanship,” gnth- ered in close to $1,000,000 of which perhaps $:»00^000 was profit. Were they grateful? Ah! Well, some were about as grateful us would be a rattlesnake that a man elected not to kill but to pick up and pet! A few were thankful to Nurmi for all he had done for clean sportsdom her«> -and for them. But the bulk merely used .Nurmi as a BUhorn« .......................... JUsser ................ dip:) ............................................. 9 B»ir ............................................ 6 Kolh ........................................... 6 Jenuinga ................................... 9 A. C. Griswold...................... 3 A. J. UrUwoUl ...................... 8 itohnsteln ............................... 6 boetterltf ................................... 6 Walter ...................................... 9 llelzer ......................................... 6 U. Amos.................................... 9 Kuehl ...................................... 9 Imliiy .......................................... 6 Kelly ........................................... 9 liiiida .......................................... 3 Tobin .......................................... 9 Obbink ....................................... 6 .'?cheldler .............................. / 9 QUliMpie ..................................... 6 v'an dyoc .................................. 8 Huisetl ....................................... 9 Jesperion ................................. S Uranfuud .................................. t Albrecht .................................... 3 Harbaugh .....................'..... 9 McKlbbeu ................................. 9 Uatnblln .................................... » H. Pavison ............................. 9 M. Davison ............................. 6 Becker ....................................... 9 Ket-her ....................................... 6 Miller G. l>avlson Hallock ... Schioeder . Schach .... ilaber .... Pins lUV3 1U81 1886 1047 1044 18ÚU 314 1018 lOi 4 998 1486 988 1484 1482 989 1404 468 1398 936 1368 910 911 1332 882 877 431 1283 1252 825 1240 824 1217 862 784 1163 .169 324 313 600 Ave 182 180 176 178 174 172 171 169 167 166 165 164 163 161 165 184 152 152 182 148 147 146 144 143 139 138 138 137 135 134 131 128 123 108 104 lUO BOOSTER DRAGUE. Team StSMidings. (> IV Amsberry Printing Co. dmlth’.i Bakery ............. Lawlors ............................. Poiitofnce .................... daratosa Alleys .......... rapm»l Auto I.ivery.. Shogo Llthla ................. Ulchmond Candy Individual .%vemge*. G .Sipe .............................................. 6 bange ......................................... 6 irinley ................................... 9 Bishop ........................................ 9 Keck ........................................... 6 Drelth ........................................ 6 9 9 9 9 6 » 3 9 6 9 KIssler .. .Miller .. Perk ___ Amend .. Sbarrar . Culllntore Johnson . Dunman Boss .... Waugh .. Kelly ... Vlerow .. Kobinson I-alrd ... Jennings Loetterls Dalanrt .. Hayden . La Hue Rohrlg .. Workman Dutton ....................................... 9 Bolfstneysr Amspoker . R. Smith . Simmons .. Haney .... Boyles ------ Chrlstensan bsbsork .. McMeen ... N'eal ............ Maser .... Atkins .... Herkel ___ H obbs .... Plank .... Corey .......... 4 .1 6 8 6 8 Plns 1211 lt)59 1888 1883 1020 1023 1523 m 1489 992 1477 493 1470 973 1456 1463 966 485 485 1442 933 938 933 1578 1365 1329 185 437 434 434 1294 430 1285 1247 1250 420 848 1209 828 387 388 768 Pet 1.000 .778 .866 .600 .444 .444 .333 .111 Ave 202 177 178 173 17« 170 169 165 168 163 165 164 164 163 162 TIE RESULT ON NE 1 ] (Continued from Page One.) Stiner fell on the ball and recovered It for the Cornhuskers on the western team’s 22-yard line. Rhodes and Locke accounted for five yards on two plunges and a Stephens-to-Mandery pass netted ten yards and a first dowm. Rhodes ploughed through center for three yards and a subsequent fake smash at center tricked the Washington forwards, as Halfback Mandery skirted the Huskies* right end and sprinted five yards to the Washington goal, scoring a Nebraska touchdow'n. Stephens’ attempted place-klck for the extra point was low and short of the T?“' mark, but Nebraska w'as leading, ill 6 to 0. Huskies Knot th« Score. Washington’s lone .scoring parade punctuated the early moments of the fourth period. A W'elr punt propelled the hall to W’a.shlngton’.s 30-yard line and Quarterback Guttormsen squirmed b.ack ten yards before a Cornhusker tackier dropped him to the turf. A fake end run by W'llson w'us converted into a line plunge by Halfback Patton, ivho reeled off 17 j-ards. Guttormsen accounted for eight yards on a line smash through center and W'ilson then hurled a pa.sa over Mandery, I,eft End Cutting clutching the hall for a gain of 25 yards on the play. Cutting’s succe.ssful performance planted the pigskin on Nebraska’s six-yard line, w'hence It was carried over the goal on three line sn.ashes by W’llson, offensive mainstay cf the W'’a,shIngton hackfleld. Goal Kick Wa« Blockad. The touchdow'n tied the score and the Huskies w'cre in sight of victory, needing only a successful drop-kick for the goal, but a trio of Cornhusker forwards swarmed through the center of the forward wall to block the ball as It came off Outtormsen’a toe and nullify the kick. Subsequent proceedings W'ere featureless, with the single exception of the blocking of a Wilson pass, a Cornhusker forward breaking through the W’’a8hington line to interfere with the pass. The ball bounded high in the air and landed In the clutches of Ed Weir, Nebraska captain, near the middle of the field. W'eir had a clear track to a touchdown, but before he could get under headw'ay a Washington tackier lunged from behind and dumped him to the sw’ard. A successful Nebraska pass, Hecht to Dailey, gained 11 yards and a first down, hut the final pistol shot dropped the curtain on the struggle. Th« Lin«up and Summary. 161 161 161 160 186 156 186 153 162 152 148 148 146 145 145 144 143 143 140 140 140 140 134 134 129 129 12 « AURDN ROMPS VER WILOGATS WATNR, Pfeb., Oct. 17.—Chadron Normal sw'cpt through to a 29 to 7 victory over the W’ayne W’lld- cat.s before a big Homecoming day crowd here this afternoon. The Chadron backfield Eagles outclassed the W’ayne eleven throughout the contest, scoring four touch- nieans to gain a financial end for ' ‘lowns and a field goal. Quarterback McKelvey Nebraska, 6—Pos. Sprague .le.. E. W'eir (c)....lt. W’ash., 6 Cutting ... .Erickson E. Brix ... .Bonainy Wright ..P. W’llson .................Cole Guttormsen themselves. Chorus of Shrill Crio«. Some folks stepped up finally and emitted shrill cries that Nurmi ■was not an amateur. Out In the middle west a gentleman became fearfully upset becau.se someone— in Nurmi’s behalf—had made some trick demand on the expense thing, I’nder amateur rules, a contestant’s expenses are paid from his home city to the point of contest headed the Chadron attack, playing a heady game. Wayne scored in the last quarter. Hennlck’s brilliant running bringing the ball to the Chadron 30-yard line. Here he heaved a long Jorward pass to Reed, the Wayne end falling across the line for a touchdown. Each team made eight first downs, but long runs by Christian and McKelvey and the toe of the latter gave Chadron the eilge. In the closing minutes of - -and return. It seems—according to that fellow-—that wen request • ‘'hristlan returned Hennick’s was made to have Nurmi run at a ; pnnt through a broken field to a certain meet that the answer was: jion^bdown. The lineup: *'\’es, he'll coiupete. if his expenses W’ayne contest and then B.VCK to FIN- J.AND." The request was WITIIIN Garwood the . ........... ......... ...I »»/UI r..-, lit* VI I , going right buck to Finland— but ' ----- I’OH. — (’hafiron .]«>___ ... Christian ..It... ............ Spray ..............Dewitt . r ... ............ Smith t-R----- .......... Weller . rt___ ........... Trapp . r«*. .. .......... Carroll .qb... .. McKelvey Ih ___ .... . (SKirvln rh.. . ... Kummer . fb ... Buckingham Posplsll ..............!g.. Hutchison .... c.. Scholz ................rg. Stiner ................rt., J, Weir.................re. Brown ................qb. Rhodes ..............Ih.................G. W’ilson A. Mandery... rh........................Patton Galley ................fb Tesreau (c) Substitutions: Nebraska—Locke for Dailey, J.eigh for J. W’eir, Stephens for Brown, Ralsh for I*ospislI, Heeht for Rhodes, Presnell for Locke, W’irkman for Stephens, J, W’eir for Leigh, Shaner for Sprague. Washington—Schuh for Cole, Douglas for Schuh, Sherman for Guttormsen, Guttormsen for Patton, Beckett for Guttormsen, E. Brix for W’rlglit, H. Brlx for Erickson, Erickson for H. Brlx. Touchdown—A Mandery, W’llson. Score by periods; Nebraska ................,..o 0 6 0—6 W’ashlngton ...................o 0 U 6—6 Officials: Referee—Birch, Earlham college. I’mplre—Morris, Seattle. Field judge—(7ochrane, Kalamazoo college. Headllnesman —Reilly, Georgetown university. ZUPPKEiS eleven ROWS TÜ IOWA (f’ontlnued from I’age One.) Suddenly Frothed Up. The gentleman in question be- | came all frothed up about it. He conceived the Idea Hint maybe .Nurmi was, in his later days here, when lie found that promoters wer« making a fortune out of him, Tnak- iug a similar d«-maiul frutii all promoters. These drmamL, if paid would, of course, net N’urnil a little extra »ash. for if he collected from each promoter money for a return trip to Finland, he would make the... . »llfference between what he col- h .'. ih ” Eutsch, 2, Place-kiekr lected from all of them minus the • expense« involved in one return trip. PurpI* Bow« to Maroon. The "return trip to Finland” Hem CIHCAGtt, Oct 17.—Two drop- dldii’t amount to moro than $3t»o kicks by Little Bob Curley of the or ItflO at the most. But this pr- , .M!u*oon.s in the third quarter gave moter, or athletic director, who Chicago a f> to 0 victory over figured on making about $10,000 .Northw i stern on Stagg field today, profit out of Nurmi, let loose shiUl [At that the Purple got away easy, cries that echoed in silly falsetto for the closing gun found a drive - throughout the land by McCarty half the length of the Pounding of Anvil Choru«. ; i.all away from the goal line and a He gained nothing lur himself touchdown. - except the thumping serenade of ______ r V Moocnuroutoau W’ashlng- 4S yards, yards to failed and UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA TOUCHDOWN PASS V«. SYRACUSE. In the Intersectlonal games that have been played, the far west has had decidedly the better of It. So It was when Sy-racuse met the University of Southern California last^season on the coast. In this game, which I’. S. C. won In a decisive manner, one of the early touchdowns scored was the result of this forward pas.s. The open passing game is w’ell developed on the Pacific slope and this pass, well executed, would at times fool most any team. The formation for attack was a normal one, w'lth the line balanced and the backs distributed as shown in the diagram. The left end, No, 5, ran on a diagonal to the left, to draw the W'ing bark on that side away from his po.sltton. .The left tackle blocked his guard to the right. The left guard left the llne'and ran to the right to act as protector for the i»asser. Usually he would take out the defensive left tackle. The other linemen held tightly, closing to thè right. The right end. No. 6, ran straight Into the deep center territory to decoy the defensive left wing back from following the receiver. No. 2. The No. 1 hack, by running quickly to the flank, drew the elose-up defensive back on his side away from his position. No. 2 made his 'w-ay through the line, ju.st inside the defensive tackle and cut to the left, taking the hall on the run. No. 3 acted with the left guard as a protector for the passer. No. 4 received the ball from the center, ran to the right and rear, stopped and whirled «the ball to the speeding No. 2, w ho caught it and continued on for a score. I.lke all back diagonal passes there is always grave danger of a ruinous Interception by a fast running defensive back. The danger in this type of pass is offset by the great effect it has if completed. All teams fear It. It takes a .skilful and strong player to be able to do the w'ork of No. 2 In this play. If he can manage to worm his w’ay through the defensive line and arrive in time to take the pass, he often reaches his catching position before being detected. In case he falls to make his way, there are several alternate receivers to whom the ball may »aslly be thrown. (Copyright. 1926, Sol Metzger.) FIRST QUARTER. E, Weir kicked off 55 yards and I'atton of Washington returned 23 yards to the Washington 38-yard line. Wilson failed to gain around the Nebraska right end and Got- torsen punted 62 yards. Brown returning 5 yards to the Nebraska 15-yard line. Rhodes plunged for *w,> yards but lost his gain on an cn.i n-n. Ed. U’eir punted 26 yards out of bouud.s and the Huskies had the hall on Nebraska’s 41-j-ard lln-'. E. 'I'esreau plunged four yard.s and I’atton added (our more on a split buck. 'I'esreau fumbled and Hmlth i lost a yarth Guttormsen punted across the Nebraska goal. Kick Called Back. The Cornhuskers scrimmaged from their 20-yard line, Itliodes made a yard and A. Mandery failed to gain. Dailey made r yard on a fake punt. Weir’s kick went 35 .vards and tiottormsen returned five yards to the Nebraska 48-yard line 'I'he play, liowcvcr, w-as called bai'k and Nebraska was given the hall on its 30-yurd line. Hhoiles plunged for 5 vards through the right side of the Wash- Ingtoti line. Washington j’ecovored a Neliraska fumble on tho Nelira.s- ka 32 yard line, Wilson rnuUa a yard on a drive outside tlio Ne- liraska left tackle. A forvard pass by the Huskies failed to gain and on a double pas.s beliind the line of scrimmage, 'resreau failed to gain. Try for Goal Fail«. Guttormsen’s dropklck wa.s short and Nebraska recovered on its 12 yard line. Nebraska fumblej on the second play and Ed. Weir recovered on the Nebia.'«k-i .’»-yard line. Weir punted 24 yarda out oi bounds. tluttormsen fumlded on the first play, Fosplsll rvcoverlng for Ne­ braska on the Cornhu.sker’s 26- yard line. Rhodes drove Inrough for seven yards. Dailey made 1(1 yards and a first down on a run around the Washington right *nd, Cornhusker« Penalized. Dailey lost eight yards on a wide end run. Rhodes rammed th© line for tw'o yards and Dailey ran the fight end for six yards from punt formation lineman w'as penalized for hacking and Washington given the ball on Its 48-yard line. Wilson and I’atton made six yards and a pass, Wilson to E. Te.sreau netted 12 yards. It was Washington’s ball on the Nebraska 31-yard line. Posplsll dropped on Tesrcau’s fumble on the Nebraska 29-yard line. Rhodes hit center for 2 yards. ’Fhe quarter ended wltli Nebraska in possession of the ball on its 32-yard line. SECOND QUARTER. Herman Brlx went in for Erickson at left tai'klo in the Washington line. Ixfcke replaced Dailey in the Nebraska backfield. Ix)cke made three yards and E. Weir punted 48 yards, Gottormscn returning seven yards to tlie Washington 32-yard line. Leigfi w’ent In the Nebraska line for J, Weir. On the third play Hutchison blocked Gottormsen’s punt and recovered the ball on the Washington 19-yard line. Stephens went In the Nebraska hackfleld for Brow'n. After Ix)cke had failed to gain in two plays, Stephens passed to i^prague from an 18-yard gain. The ball W'as on the Washington 6-yard line. Nebraska Pa«« Fail«. Locke made a yard through center and failed to gain on the next play. Rhodes added two more through center. A forward pass, Stephens to A. .Mandery, was incomplete In the end zone for a i touchback. \ On the third play Gottormscn i punted 30 yards, Nebraska making no return. It was Nebraska’s ball on its 43-yard line. A pass by Stephens was Intercepted by Gottormscn and It was Washington’s ball on Its 43-yard line. Gottormscn fumbled and Wilson recovered for no gain. 'fesreau made six yards on tw'o plunges. Slejihens returned Gutturinscn's punt 2 yards to th«* Nebraska 22- yartl line. tiottormsen ieiurn«*d Weir’s 4.1-yanl punt seven yards to the Wushiiigfon 47-yard line. P««« Gain« 17 Yard«. After two line plunge.s made «cant yardage, Wilson passe«! to Tesreau for 17 yards. Wilson drove over the Nebraska left guard and cut back fur an 19-yard gain. The ball was on th«* Nebraska J5-yard Itn«*. Wilson and Tesreau plunged the westerners scrlTnmaged from their 20-yard line. Wilson made 12 yards from punt formation. Time was up for the third quarter with Washington In possession of the I>all on its 35-yard line, fourth down and seven yards to go. . ^ Score- Nebra.ska, 6; Washington, FOURTH QUARTER. Shaner went in the Nebraska line for Sprague. On an exchange of punts, Washington got the ball on Its 40-yard line. Hutchison W'as injured and Wos- toupal replaced him at center. On a fake end run, I’atton plunged for 17 yards. Gottorpisen plunged for eight more. A forward pass, Wilson to Cutting, was good for 25 yards. Washington had the ball on tlie Nebra.ska six ynr«l line. Wilson made three yards through center. Wilson added another yard and on the next play carried the ball across for a touchdown. Goal Kick Blocked. Guttormsen’s dropklck for the extra point wa.s blocked by the Nebraska linemen. Score—Nebraska, 6; ton, 6. Weir kicked off Patton returning 12 Washington passe.s Stephen.s returned Gottormsen’s punt to the Nebraska 38-yard line. Halsh w'ent in for I’ospisll in the Nebraska line. Nebraska fumbled but Stephen* recovered for a gain of four yards. Dailey went In the Nebraska backfield for A. Mandery. Rhode.s failed to gain at center, but a forward pass, Stephens to Dailey, gained five yards,. Stephens made it a first down and Nebraska had the ball in midfield. Dailey 6o«« Eight Yar«*«. Rhodes lost a yard on an attempt at the left side of the Washington line. Dailey ran the Huskies’ right end for eight yards. I’resnell w’ent in for Locke and Douglas went in the Washington lino for Schuh. Hhode.s plunged for two yards. Stephens made It a first dow'n on a drive through center. Sherman W'cnt in the Washington backfield for Patton. Nebra.*«ka failed to make yardage and Washington took the ball on downs on It.s 39-vard line. W«ir Grab« Wilson Pa««. Gn the second play Wllsop gained twelve yards and Tesreau added six more. Wickham -substituted for Stephens In the Nebraska backfield. Hecht went In for Rhod«*s. Beckett replaced Guttormsen In the Husy backfield. Tesreau plunged for two yardJ and Wickham broke up a forw'ard pas.s l)y Wilson. Captain Ed Weir of Nebraska Intercepted Wilson’s pass and the ball was on the Nebraska 46-yard line. A pass, Hecht to Dailey, was good for 1 yards. Anotherl pass, Hecht to Dailey, lost two yanls and time W'as up with Nebr.aska in pos- sesl.son of the ball on Washington’s 45-yard line. Score—Nebraska 6: 6 . Foxy Glen’s Stanford Uni. Team Trims Southern California. Wabash Crushed By Gopher Team MINNEAPOLIS. Minn., Oct. 17.— (U, P.)—Minne.sota showed new strength today against a heavy W.'ibash lin«\ Marching down the fl**ld for consistent gains, the Gopher .squad smashed. ov*r a score of 32 to 6 against the Hoosler w'arrlors. I.OS ANGELES. Cal., Oct. 17.— ( 17 . i>.)—Crafty Glen Warner’s mighty Cardinals fought to victory over the powerful University of Southern California team In a sensational gridiron struggle here this afternoon, winning by a score of 13 to 9. It was Stanford's first victory over Southern California. A capacity crowd of 80.000 saw the Trojan's humbled for the first time by their traditional rivals from the north, The husky northerners completely outfought and outguessed the Trojan warrlor.s during the first half of the contest. Southern Cal- Ifornla’s vaunted aerial attack failed to function under Stanford’s defensive strategy and Coach Howard Jones sent in substitute after substitute In vain. -The. BULL’SEYE “Editor ond ÇênormlJànnmqër WIU.ROOERJ ' Bears Have Tight 8qu««z«. BERKELEY. Cal.. Oct. 17.—(U. P.) — California’s Golden Bears e.s- caped another Inglorious grldl#*)n defeat by a narrow' margin here this afterngpn, when they defeated little St. Mary’s by a score of 6 to 0, the winning touchdown coming in the last quarter. Only by adesperate rally In the final period, after Slip Madlgan’s sturdy Saints had hehi the Bears scoreless through three quarters, did Andy Smith’s men cross the line. The battle was waged all the harder In the face of a defeat last W'eek by the Olympic club eleven. 1 J LLEGESCORES (Continued From I’age One.) for a first dow'n, carrying the ball to the Nebraska 4-yard line. Wilson failed to gain through center. Wifson plunged for three yards and time was up for the end of the second quarter w'ith Washington in possession of the ball on the Nebraska one-yard line. Score—Nebraska, 0; Washington, «. THIRD QUARTER. liTOW'n went back In the Ne­ bra.ska backfield, replacing Stephens. Gottorrnsen kicked off 50 yards to Locke, the North Platte sp^ed merchant returning the ball down the sidelines for 46 yards. It was Nebraska’s ball on the Wa.sh- ington 44-yard line. Uhotles plunged for three yards but fumbled, Hutchison recovering on the Washington 43-yard line. Locke lost three yards and, after a forward pass by A. Mandery wa.s incomplete, Weir punted 45 yards across the Washington goal line. Lock« Go«« Nine Yard«. Washington scrimmaged from Its 20-yard line. Schuh went In the Wushihgton line for Cole. Falling to gain, Gottorrnsen punted, Nebraska putting the ball Inplay on its 34-yard line. Locke drove outside th«* Washington left tackle and cut back for a nine yard gain. Brown wriggled through center for three yards and a first down, (,’ook replaced Wright in the Washington line. Nebraska failed to make yardage and Weir punted out of bounds on the Washington 23-yard line. Washingt«in fumbled on the first pUty and Stiner recovered on the . Washlgton 22-yard line. Locke SlOl X <’1T), Ta.. Oct. 17. plunged for four yards and Rhodes j having been outi>Iay**d for ilrove through for another. Ste. ' l»hens r«*placed Brown in the Nebraska Imi'kflehl. Mandery Cro«««« Goal. Rhodes phinged for thre«* yards. On a fake plunge at center by Rhodes, A. .Mae<lery ran around the Washington right end for a touchdown. S-t«*phens misse«! the extra point. Score Nebra.ska, 6; Washington. 0. Erickson replaced H. Brix In the Washington line. Gottorjusen kicked off 52 yards to Hhod« s w'ho ’ r«'turned 19 yards to the Nebraska i SSS 27-yard line. J. Weir W’«*nt bark ^ SS In th«* Nebiaska line for Leigh. ; ¡¡j; Lock« Run« th« End. | ss Loi ke sw«*pt arouml the Wash- i SS2 Ington right « nd for 11 yard.s. Ste- ' phens wriggU'd through «enter f.ir ' ss four yanls. L»>«ke made ii yar«l ov«r Washington’s left tackle and — a forwar«! pass, l^ocke to A. Man-l^S dery, gained six yanl.s ami a first , down. Nebraska lia<l the ball in ^ midfield. i — 1 'ailing to gain. Weir punted ' —; across the Washington goal and SS At Buffalo—Cani«u«, 3; Quantico. Marin««, 0. At Collegeville — Ur«inius, 19; Juanita, 6. At Baltimore—John«-Hopkin«, 7; Richmond, 0, At Waahington — Carnegie T«ch, 14; Waahington & Jefferaon, 0. At New York—New York U., 41; New York colleg«, 0. At Medford—Norwich, 13; Tuft«, 0 . At Troy—St. Lawrence, 21; Ren- •elaer Poly. 18. j At Williametown—William«, 0; Washington. i St. Stephen«. 0. 27; — SOUTH, button Irounces At Birmingham — Alabama, Clay Center Hi i At Rockhill—Davideon, 13; Prea- By 28-0 Score | io; B«yior. 3 . -------------------------- I At Houeton—Rice, 13; Arkane««, Another '‘Bull” Durham advertisement by Will Rogers, Ziegfeld Follies and screen star, and leading American humorist. More coming. Watch for them. SI’TTON, Neb.. Oct. 17.—Sutton high trounced (.’lay (’enter in football here yesterday ,28 to 0. Uoacli Glcfc'i Frary’s Sutton grldsters negotiated seventeen first «low'n.s and scored four touchdowns, t'aptain Robert Oates booting ' each «'Xtru point. The Sutton eleven showed miieh improvement over last w'cek’s «le- feat at Crete and reeled off big gains around the Clay Center ends. Hallfbock Carl Oates .•md Fullback Joyce Jolwiston playe«l’ excellent gatnes, each making a touchdown In addition, to presenting a goo«l def**nKe against Clay Center’s aerial attack. Sutton’s Line, from end to end, held w'cll on the defense and tore upon large holes on the offense. Clay Center put up a game fight but couhl not hold the fierce plunging of the Sutton backs. Next week Sutton plays at Friend. The spirit among the rival high schools was high and receipts show a crowd of three to four hundred witnessed the game. At Dall««— Texa« U., 33; Auburn, 23; At Atlanta — Georgia T«ch, Florida) 7. At Johnaon City—Car«on-N«w- man, 10; Milligan college, 6. At Columbia — South Caroline froeh, 13; Clemaon froah, 6. At New Orleana — Tulane, 25; Missisaippi Aggie«, 3. At Fort Worth—Texaa. 26; Simmona, 16. At Lexington—Washington and Lee, 25; Kentucky, 0. At Augutta — Georgia, 21; Furman, 0. At Na«hvilla — Vanderbilt, 34; Tennessee, 7. At Richmond—Virginia, 18; Virginia M. I.. 10. At Columbua-St. Benning, Oglethorpe, 7. At Charleston—Citadel, 26; New- berry.O. At. Houaton — Rice,. IS;. Arkansas, 9. Creighton Wins In Last Period Spurt ON THE COAST At Lot Angalet — Stanford, 13; Southarn California, 9. At Pullman—Idaho, 7; Waahing­ ton Stat«, 6. At Berkeley—California. 6, St. minutes, Creight«>n’s bnckfleld, Fltz- Marya, 0 , ^ gihhoii, Keane. Tracey am! Bollogio Butta — Montana U., 14; Gon- t!«:il«‘ashed u bewlldt rlng aerial at- | 1^* * ta<‘k and rnd run«, which crunhcd | At Bozeman— -Montana State, 30* the .Mornlng.slde t«am here this aft- i St. Charle», 0. Aft**r fifty ernooii. The ttnal score was 20 to 6. Mornlngside outplayed th** h«;av- ler Creighton team for fhr«‘e quarters, scoring H touchdown In the s«*cond quarter, and «'ompletely stopping the Omaha rixnners. At Corvallis—Oregon Aggie«, 8; Whitman, 0. At Portland—Or«gon U., 13; Pacific, 0 . At Pasadena — California Tech, ,21; Pomona, 14. I Kerens Style | I and Quality | “BOOLÄ** s in the I Merchant Tailored I meatia i in anvil chorus. To such things was N’utml trrateil by «‘ertuln .\rnericans in return for his gulluntry and his bravery in running «»n ami «m at Ohio Conquers Columbia. COLUMBC.H, «».. «Jet. 17. Playing without the services of «’apt. Gt*orge p«*a«e. who sustained a times when th** effort was but shipped slioubler in the Wesleyan agony for him and the ultimate ] game a «'«•<• k ago, «'olunibta was reward w'us to lake from him the heuten. 9 to 0, by Ohio State here whirlwind flight that was in hla '“day. aupeih legs. Elmer Marek, Ohio Stste’.s much. Us it anv wonder that he has ' ^ ♦‘«’»Ide.l sophomore barkfleld star, about decided not to return to '»P expeetati«>n« by re- America? pea(e«lly gaining ground. He did ; not «llrcetly account for Ohio Sitate’s ¡/»Ira R/kafo Joints, but his punting, passing and 1/I tf|JfLlviva ledtua I running were largely Instrumentat Harvard Hi Team HARVARD, Nell, «)ct. 17 A 21 ynrit dropkirk in the seeotid «juart er gave Exeter high a 3-9 vh’torv over Harvard. Exeter has not be*-n def«?ated this season. Mindan Defeata Ravenna MINDEN. Neb. dct 17 .Mlnde«i handed Ravenna its first defeat of the season y«**terdaj% «’oarh Charle* l.eBar’s athletes winning a 14 to 7 victory. Sutton Wina Game rUTTd-N, N«b., det. 17 Hutton won a 28 to ii vt< tory «»v« r Clay Center In football here yesterday. 77 /Home of the Malted Milk Where They Alt Meet For ¡YAFFLES AND OYSTER STKiYS SALEM’S 19 tli and O HI. B-4589 B-r-r-r! An overcoat feels good these snappy evenings—especially if it has just been cleaned by us, we also reline and remodel all garments, shorten coats, etc. City Cleaners KMl.5 “0” Phone B2.S01 Better Dressed OUR MARK IN YOUR CLOTHES GUARANTEES THE UTMOST IN VALUE —THE FINEST IN QUALITY—THE smartest in STYLE— C The distinctively conser%’- ative appearance of the successful man is invariably the re.sult of the* Merchant Tailor’s efforts. Cl “Appearing well groomed is a matter of choosing a good tailor—there is no other way.” CYour desire to be well dressed — without extra cost—may be realized by placing an order with this institution. A lot of our big writers arc paid so much a word for their writings. Now when you arc paid so much a word you have to make one idea cover a terrible lot of words. Now just suppose that I was one of the big Authors and was paid by the word. I would dig me up a lot of adjectives and cvcrj’thing I would describe I |vould go way around. I wouldn’t tell y ou what it was right off the reel. I would describe the weather and the sunset, and the crackling, roaring, blazing, brilliant fire, as all of them sit around. Some of them sit around in different places; some of them sit around in the same place; some even go so far as to stand. Yet they arc all enjoying the pleasure, the delight, the fragrance, the complete .satisfaction, the unalloyed happiness, the restfiil- ness that only can come when you arc smoking “BULL” DURHAM. P, S. Now you «ee that it what you call w'riting by the word. I haven’t said a thing but that “BuIP’ Durham is the world’s best tobacco, all of which I could have said in seven words, if I had not been getting paid by the word. P. P. S. There is going to be another piece in this paper aoon. Look for IL Our **Super Five" What a Boot! Elliott Bros Lloffd F, Elliott IJ.NTOLN’S LEADING TAIfOKS 1219 P Street. B uilt to complement the wide, straight hanging trousers of the young men and the men who .stay young. Priced to compliment their keen judgment of value! Swagger wide swinging lines. The popular French toe. Burly black or tan Scotch grain leather. Storm-proof welted inner .sole. Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^^^^^^^^^ B ull D urham Guaranteed by iHceeeeAATSe 111 Fifth Awwnue, New York City 5323485353482323234823532353534853485348234853534823534848 0100012348535353482323234800535353484848485353485348484848 0002025348535353482348485353235353535348484823482353485348482353484853 5348234848485353482353484848532353235353534853485390485323484848482301 23235348234823902323535353532348235348534823535348234848 0053485348535323234848235353535353020223235323532353232353

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