The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on October 16, 1966 · Page 29
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The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 29

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Lincoln, Nebraska
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Sunday, October 16, 1966
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Page 29
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Mizzou Lateral Sinks Cowboys Statistics Flr*t downs Rushing yardage Passing yardage Pass e« Passes intercepted by Punts Fumbles lost Yards penalized MIT IS 250 30 S-10 0 5-35.8 I 30 OSlT 11 101 24 3-8 1 7-38.1 0 30 Columbia, Mo. (M — Gary Kombrink and Ray Thorpe put together a 49-yard dash early in the last half to give Missouri a hard-fought 7-0 victory over Oklahoma State in a Big Eight Conference football game Saturday. Defensive play by both teams dominated the g a m e. Except for the scoring play, neither team penetrated the other’s 20-yard line. The victory gave Missouri a 2-0 Big Eight mark and 4-1 over-all record. Oklahoma S t a t e’s conference slate dropped to 1-1 and the Cowboys now have a 1-3 season record. The game was played in 46 degree weather before a capacity crowd of 54,000 at Memorial Stadium. The only score came when quarterback Kombrink, run- I May Be Wrong mimimi t IP' » miiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniHiiimiiiiiiiiimnuMiiiiiiiiii Jtßk By Curt Mosher Unless soccer style kickers are like blue suede shoes and barefooted hooters are like whooping cranes we may be seeing, in Larry Wachholtz, the last of a vanishing breed. There has been, within the past couple of weeks particularly and in the last few years generally, a rash of stories concerning soccer style kickers and those who choose to air out their shoes while they kick the football. It is very possible that when we tell our grandchildren of watching a place kicker approach the ball from the rear with shoes on we will be describing something so unusual they might make a television series out of it. The latest major development was at Ames where Iowa State has now topped its bomb act with a scantily clad and frail young man who possesses some fantastic feet. Saginaw Slippers The pro leagues are even in the act and it undoubtedly will spread with each success story. It isn’t new really. Nebraska coach Bob Devaney notes that he had a Swedish soccer kicker when he was at Wyoming. He has even had a couple of guys give it a casual try here at Nebraska. It would be expected that Devaney would be an authority on the subject. When he was in junior high in Saginaw, Mich., they didn’t play football. Soccer was the game for that age, football coming when they got into high school. “I’m afraid I wasn’t much of a kicker,” Bob says. “None of us were. We put on those foundry shoes and got after it. We didn’t worry about the ball much.” (Foundry shoes are steel toed affairs, which presumably would smart if you got kicked with them and would be inappropriate for dancing in.) It’* F-O-O-T-ball Perhaps one of the reasons for the emphasis on kicking, whether it be soccer or barefoot or drop kickers or even plain old-fashioned ones like Wachholtz is the emphasis on three-pointers. Last weekend there was a record number, as near as the NCAA service bureau could tell the most in the 30 years such things have been listed. Oklahoma and Wyoming each hit four field goals, and if the number wasn’t enough, then consider the distance. OU’s Mike Vachon kicked them 20. 31, 41 and 43. But Wyoming’s Jerry DePoyster, who played his high •chool football at Bellevue, had three which went 54, 52 and 54. And OMo State’s Gary Cairns kicked one 5a, which equalled the longest one by a major collegian in the last quarter of a century. In 1939 Fred Powers of Denver kicked one 56. The modern record is 59 set in the small college division when Jan Stenerud of Montana State kicked 59 against Montana last season. Need a Passport This past week the Detroit Lions made arrangements with the government to put Gary Ypremian, a 22-year-old Cypriot, on their roster. He is a left-footed soccer-style kicker. Michigan State’s Duffy Daugherty has had tremendous luck with Hawaiian kickers, although Daugherty says most of them have been of the old fashioned variety. The time seems to he rapidly approaching coaches will need a passport to recruit kickers. Oklahoma Batters KU, 3 ning to the left, was hit by several tacklers and lateraled to Thorpe at the Oklahoma State 45. The 179-pound halfback then dashed down the sidelines for the score. The play covered 49 yards. The touchdown came with 3:53 gone in the third quarter. Bill Bates kicked the extra point. Missouri’s scoring play capped a drive that covered 80 yards in ten plays. The Tigers, taking the second half kickoff, had moved to t h e Oklahoma State 49 in nine plays. The Tigers kept the drive alive by gambling on fourth down with a yard to go at their 41. Kombrink bowled up the middle for the first down to keep the drive alive. In the first half, the deepest penetration by either team came late in the second quarter when Missouri drove to Oklahoma State’s 21. That drive ended as Terry Bacigalupo of the Cowboys pounced on a fumble by Missouri’s Dan Sharp. Oklahoma State mounted a 44-yard drive that sputtered on the Tiger 26 in the first quarter when Craig Kessler’s field goal attempt from the 32 was short. Missouri’s Bates tried two field goals, but both were wide to the right. His first was a 44-yard kick in the second period, the other a boot from the 42-yard line in the fourth quarter. Kombrink carried 26 times for 94 yards to lead ground gainers for both teams. He threw nine passes and completed three for 30 yards. Charlie Brown, Tiger 187- pound halfback, rushed for 89 yards in 23 attempts. For Oklahoma State, Tommy Boone picked up 37 yards in 12 rushes while fullback Larry Gosney gathered 34 yards in ten tries. Ronnie Johnson, the Cowboy’s quarterback, hit three of eight passes for 24 yards. Despite winds that gusted up to 20 miles per hour, Bates punted five times for a 36 yard average for Missouri, while Johnson booted seven times for Oklahoma State with a 38 yard average. “I’m pleased with the victory,” said Missouri coach Dan Devine “But I’d liked to have seen the offense generate a little more in the first half — and the defense to stop them more often on their third down plays.” ‘‘It was a very soundly played game,” added Phil Cutchin, the Oklahoma State coach. “I think we’ll have a good team in a couple of weeks.” Cutchin said he felt the Cowboys’ defense played better then last week but added. “I wasn’t satisfied. They did let Missouri score.” Statistics Fir*! downs Rushing varriaR* Passing yardage Passes Passes intercepted by Punts Fumbles lost Yards penalized Okla. Kan. 20 143 146 12-17 0 8-42 1 20 10 134 38 412 1 3-39 2 25 Lincoln Sunday Journal and Star Oct. 16. 1966 Oklahoma Stale Missouri MU - Thorpe 49 brink 'Rates kick» Attendance 54,000. 000 0—0 0 0 7 0-7 lateral from Korn- £tttnie& Lawrence, Kan. (fl) — Clever Bob Warmack directed Oklahoma on early 80 and 70 yard touchdown drives, then the defense made the big plays for the unbeaten Soon- ers in a crunching 35-0 victory over Kansas Saturday. Oklahoma takes a 4-0 record into its showdown with unbeaten Notre Dame next week at Norman, while Kansas slipped to 0-2. Warmaik, a skinny but talented quarterback, expertly used the talent of split end Ben Hart, a fast 206 pound­ er, and wingback Eddie Hinton, another homerun threat. The Sooners scored two of the first three times they had the ball for a 14-0 bulge. Eugene Ross, Oklahoma’s monster man or roving linebacker, broke open the game by blocking a punt midway in the third quarter. Quarterback Bob Stephenson beat a horde of teammates to the ball in the end zone for the TD, making it 21 - 0 . Jim Burgar, Oklahoma No. Two quartertiack, directed the last two Sooner touchdowns, the last coming after a Kansas fumble. John Titsworth, a tall, lean 212-pound tackle, and Bobby Robinson, a quick little senior end, made Oklahoma’s other big defensive plays. Kansas had a fourth down at the Oklahoma three-yard line after a 78-yard second period drive when quarterback Bob Skahan lateralled to halfback Don Shanklin who flipped a short screen pass to Skahan. Titsworth prevented a touchdown getting Skahan from behind. A short time later Kansas caught a pass at the Oklahoma 29 but Robinson h i t Skahan from the blind side forcing a fumble and Titsworth recovered. “I consider the blocked punt the turning point of the game,” said Oklahoma coach Jim Mackenzie. “It wasn’t easy until then. This squad really fooled me. I didn’t feel we were ready to play. First their plane was late and then at the hotel we ran into a convention of Future Farmers and our players were running around visiting and talking.” Nose guard Granville Liggins said “we had a real hard time containing the Kansas backs. Don Shanklin is very quick and can really cut — he’s the fastest and best player we have faced all year.” Kansas coach Jack Mitchell said Liggins “is a great football player-^he dealt us a lot of misery. “They just outquicked us,” Mitchell said. “They were hitting our backs before they got to the hole. To stop their quarterback (Bob Warmack) you have to leave yourself vulnerable somewhere else.” Colorado quarterback Dan Kelly, making the most of his first starting role, runs for 10 yards and the first of three touchdowns in a 41-21 win over Iowa State. Don Graves (85) and Dennis Esselmann (81) are too late to stop the bootleg. Kelley ran 29 times for 156 yards and passed for 86 more. Colorado Romps, 41-21 First Down* Rushing yardage ......... Passing yardage ........... Passes Passes intercepted by. Punts . ................. Fumbles lost Statistics Colorado 27 349 .. 84 8-16 0-9 4-29 2 Yards penalized .........................70 Iowa St. 17 132 197 11-25 0-0 3-32 1 43 By TOM HENDERSON Ames, Iowa — When Eddie Crowder was a quarterback at Oklahoma he was known as the magician. He still has his act intact, although it was not his old dexterity he used Saturday to keep things alive. Instead it was the oldest trick in the vaudeville guide. He pulled a rabbit out of his hat. The rabbit he pulled out was Dan Kelly, a heretofore unused quarterback who stands 5-10, weighs 173 pounds "and is currently averaging three touchdowns every game he starts. Iowa State to set the stage for what shapes up as one of many showdown battles due in the Big Eight this year. The Buffs, now 2-1 in the conference, entertain unbeaten Nebraska Saturday. Kelly was a surprise choice at quarterback, replacing veteran Bernie McCall. A shrewd choice it was, too. Kelly raced for 156 yards That’s how many he scored on the ground and passed for here while leading the Buf- 88 more and both coaches faloes to a 41-21 victory over i agreed he was the difference Clock Runs Out as Iv-State Bids for Second Touchdown 7 7 14 7-35 0 00 0—0 9, pass from warmack when his And just think of Wachholtz trying to explain to grandchildren that he really did set records as a kicker. Grandchild: Okay, grandad, now show us again how you used to kick. This record book says you kicked 12 field goals. a t Larry: The other man held the ball for me and I kicked it like this. Grandchild: When did you take your shoes off? Larry: I didn’t. Grandchild: Nobody kicks with their shoes on except the soccer kickers. That’s it. You’ve just forgotten. Think, grandad, did y>u kick from the side or directly behind the ball? Larry: Behind it. Grandchild; I’m just glad they don’t make them like they used to. __ ____________ Big C rowti Sees Army Triumph yard quarterback sneaks in carving out a 14-9 football victory over fumble-plagued Rutgers Saturday before the largest crowd in Rutgers Stadium history. Army .......... 7 9 7 0-14 Rutger* ............................ — 0 3 • 0— 9 Army—Mndell I run lindell kick Rut -FG Dulifl 29 Army—O’Toole 1 run Lindell kick Rut—Baker 35 peas from Eekert kick failed Attend» nr* 30,000. New' Brunswick, N.J. Ufí — Army ended touchdown drives of 30 and 51 yards with one- TRAP SHOOT Everybody Welcome 1 P.M. Sunday, Oct. 16 Poultry and Bacon Shoot Shell* for solo SALT VALLEY GUN CLUB Bat wean 1418 on« 37»*» It. • Milts North of "O" It. Monday Entries POST TIME 1:3® P.M. Flr*t race. pur*e *800. 3 and 4-year old*, maidens, 6 furlongs. Aire It* Prwta Timmie Go* Hans Song Khala R<*a Jar old* Mia* Prairie Chick Jet Justice Mr Beeker Col Monroe Mi** Rounds Also: Gold Price. Second rare, purse *800. 4-year olds and up. claiming prlre $1,25«. 6 furlongs, Cast Royal Red Royal Jerry Moonlight Mr Cortil Baby Wagon Benny Tour Maude B. Basy Jet Plenty Rough Third rare, purse $89«, 3 and 4-year olds, maidens. 6 furlongs French Route \oung Dancer Living 1/Cgend Northern Rose Sassy orphan Cheer Acre« Spicie Punch Errard* Blossom Prince Sudden Spot O Broun Fourth race, purse MOO. 4-year olds and up. claiming price $1.250, 6 furlongs. laird »Selkirk Andys Venture Micky O'Hara Kiss Rrr Key Rojo Mu» Heneri Bond King Baay Future Fifth rare, purse $800, 4-year eld* and up. claiming price $1,350. « furlong*. Find Run Inn Bay Bloom Swiaa Guard Diameter Greek Ace Julies Chance Birmingham Miss Polished Gem Sixth race, purse $800, 4-year old* and up. claiming price $1.308-11,091« $’* furlongs. Star Fleet Fuzz Lu* Rover Plucky Rose Yankee Sailor My Five Grand Belle Martin Major Kam Oterry Qua Also: Pilisa, Chere* Love. Seventh race, purse $900, 3-year elds, claiming price $1,600 *1.500 «'is furlongs Big Rick Battling Dog Conty Mi*t Bargo Errant Entry Mow» Barr Boot Up Shimmery Luc lie* Boy Ma retain# Also: Michigan Mermaid, Tarry* Last Eighth rare, purse $800, 4-year elds and up, claiming price 11.300-81.000, ill furlongs, a ProvoRae Brown Banner Glamour Qiant Early Grace Red Cloud Girt Neal Summer a-Bernolee Big Jafea Sandhill«' % a—Ray Dvorak entry Oklahoma Kansas Okla — Hart (Vachon kick) Okla- Hinton 12, run (Vachon kick) Okla — Stephenaon recovered blocked punt In end zoe (Vachon kick) n Okla—Meacham 8, paas from Burgar (Vachon kick) Okla — Jackson 1, run (Vachon kick) Attendance 41,500. NYLON 4-PLY DEEP, DEEP TREAD GATES AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE SILENT TRACTION by DUNLOP BUY YOURS NOW 837 So. 27 432 21U SNOW TIRE Ga. Tech Rolls On Birmingham. Ala. (UPI) — Seventh-ranked Georgia Tech, stopped cold by a tenacious Auburn defense in a driving rain storm, rallied in the second half Saturday to win 17-3. Tech quarterback Jim King scored on a 4-yard run In the third period a few minutes after Bunky Henry had booted a 29-yard field goal to tie the score 3-3. Speedy wingback Jimmy Brown iced the Yellow Jackets’ fifth straight win in the fourth period with a sparkling 59-yard touchdown run on a punt return. Continued from Page 1 session, the Huskers took over on their own 20 early in the first quarter when a K-State field goal from the 32 was short. Nebraska then moved methodically the 80 yards to paydirt with Gregory, Harry Wilson, Churchich and Tatman taking turns carrying the ball two, three, four and five yards a crack to the KSU 37. Churchich then hit split end Dennis Morrison with a 16-yard pass to put the ball at the 21. Tatman gained nine, Gregory bulled for two and Churchich combined with Wilson on a play mixup that gained six and a second and goal at the four. Tatman carried the ball over and Wachholtz kicked the PAT for a 7-0 lead with 3:55 left in the opening quarter. The Huskers didn’t score again until late in the first half when the nation’s highest scoring defensive middle guard, Wayne Mey* lan. found a hole in the K-State line and blocked Bob Coble’s punt from the KSU 20. After the ball eluded several other Huskers as it rolled toward the end zone, Meylan finally caught up with it. It didn't elude the swarming Husker junior, who eorraled it in the end zone for his second touchdown on a blocked punt in as many games. Wachholtz, second straight PAT kick with 4:33 left in the second quarter gave the Huskers what was thought to be a comfortable 14-0 halftime margin. But it wasn’t so comfortable in the fourth quarter. A K-State field goal by Tom Barnes from the 27 with 9:24 left in the third quarter cut the margin to 14-3. but the lead still appeared to be comfortable. K-State made it uncomfortable in a hurry, however. They took the ball on their own 20 early in the final quarter after a Joe Armstrong punt went into the end zone. Nossek fired a 29-y a r d pass to Jones and a six- yarder to Mike Duncan, but a holding penalty moved the Wildcats back to a first and 25 at their own 34. This merely slowed them down. Cornelius Davis, the Big Eight’s leading rusher and fourth best in the nation, picked up 11 yards around right end and then Jones maneuvered his way behind NU defenders Wachholtz and Kaye Carstens. Nossek hit him with a pass which he carried to the Nebraska eight-yard line before Carstens could catch up with him. But on t h e next play, Nossek hit Cain for the TD and K-State was back in the game with 9:31 yet to play. After Nebraska had put the game in the sack with i t s insurance touchdown, the Wildcats continued to fight back and nearly scored again, running two plays with no time left on the scoreboard. The game had apparently ended when Nossek was stopped for no gain on a third and 15 play at t h e KSU 7. but the Huskers were offside and since the game can not end on a penalty, the Wildcats g o t another play. A pass interference call at the K-State 37 gave them still another play. On this one, Nossek fired a pass to Jones, who raced to the NU seven-yard line before being knocked out of bounds by Carstens to end the game. in the game which saw Colo* rado bolt to a 20-polnt lead. “I know this must hav» come as quite a surprise to the Cyclones because they had been prepared to stop McCall,” Crowder said. “Kelly is a different kind of quarterback in that he is more of a scrambler and is a more versatile runner.” “At the beginning of the season I had planned to start Kelly,” Crowder said. “Just before the first game he be- c a m e very nervous and seemed to lack a little confidence. This prompted me to play him on just a spot basis, but today I felt he was ready and he is now my No. 1 quarterback.” Iowa State coach Clay Stapleton agreed with Crowder. “We were just not prepared for Kelly,” Stapleton said. “We figured we had to stop McCall and we geared our defense for him.” The Buffaloes marched 64 yards to score with the opening kickoff, opening up a 20- point lead early in the second quarter. But Iowa State, which had little luck offensively in the first half, began chipping away after the rest, closing the gap to six points, 20-14, before Colorado reassumed command. The Buffs scored again after a fourth down fumble had stopped Iowa State on its own 38 and Colorado once again had a comfortable lead. Colorado .. 14 8 0 21—IS Iowa State 0 0 7 14— SI Colo-Harrl* 2 run (Farter kick) Colo—Kelly 10 run (Farler kick) Colo—Farler 1 run (kick failed) ISU—Webater 1 run (Busch kick) ISU—Busch 38 pass from Van Gaidar (Busch kick) Colo- Kelly 5 run (Farler kick) Colo—Kelly 2 run (Farter kick) ISU Webster 11 run (Buach kick) Colo—Bank* 20 lateral from (Farler kick) Attendance 24,000. COMPLETE ONE-STOP DISCOUNT AND AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER 48ih 8, laighlon, OMN EVÍ8Y NIGHT — 10 o nv to 10 p m — loe Noon to 4 p.m. TumMmsnaxBJEm u > nsnmmm 7-17 3 Tech ..................... 0 0 |0 Auburn o 3 0 Aub -FC. Jonea 39 Tech FG Henry 26 Tech-Kin* 4 run (Henry kick) Tech—Brown 59 punt return (Henn kick) Attendance 54,000. Everything For Your Car Shock Absorber^ Universal Joints Transmission Parts (Std. & Auto.) Power Takeoffs Custom Trailer Hitches Hub & Drum Bearings Create Seals SINGER BOYS 2000 N 23rd & Adams JAYCEE FOOTBALL SPECIAL Nebraska vs Kansas University November 5, 1966 5*^ par pmott Special includes bus transportation to and from the game wiches on the bus going down, and your game ticket, wilt kave Lincoln at 7:00 a.m., and will return from Lawrence after the game at 7:00 p.m. Only 500 tickets available , so semi for yours today! Mail your check, along with your name, address and phone number to: LINCOLN JAYCEES, Chamber o! Commerce Bldg. Lincoln, Nebraska — 68508 UNDER-THE-CHASSIS SERVICE DIPT. opmaL ALIGN WHEELS 527 Ad,us. .3 IB, lo# out) ad)u*t caster, camber. Steering system check. Mere car*. 3v eppoint- mjfit. WHEEL REPACKING 77 * Cleon, re bearing*. Check urea** «aal* remove foreign mattar, iy aopomtmanr. BRAKE ADJUSTMENT 77 * inspect, adjust on four brake*. AM fluid If needed. Undercarriage 1 By appointment. BRAKE JOB 1483 ReliM All Four Wheels MOST CANS to 6 Sunday Phone: 434-3033

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