The Billings Gazette from Billings, Montana on November 25, 1973 · Page 31
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November 25, 1973

The Billings Gazette from Billings, Montana · Page 31

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Billings, Montana
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Sunday, November 25, 1973
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Page 31
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alr gtUttifrt (tarttr smrjey. NWfor 25, 1973 -Morning Edition 23 AN APPEAL FOR FAIRNESS THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON September 5, 1973 SIXTH IN A SERIES THE ASSASSINS The media have found President Richard M. Nixon guilty! They scandalized him, they brutalized him, they savaged him day after day, night after night, and now they have come to bury him, draped in infamy, with the White House for a coffin. All the pious rhetoric and mind-curdling acrobatics of reporters, columnists and newscasters will not alter the S'SSIeiwi11- Hlstorv wil1 iudge them for what they are WE, THE PEOPLE, CAN NO LONGER REMAIN SILENT Dear Rabbi Korff: So many friends have called my attention to your "Appeal for Fairneaa" campaign that I wanted to thank you personally for stepping forward in this way. Your support at this time reaffirms my belief that faith in our country continues to be strong, and that the people of the Nation who have contributed so much to the progress of mankind will help tttfl Administration to achieve the great goals we seek for America and for the world. With appreciation and best wishes. ANATOMY OF A LYNCHING SYNDROME Fromn article bvPairjck J Bucharan, NYT U Washington Exhibit A: On the Monday mghi (Oct. 22) before Congress mum, lnt mug ft evening news ran nineteen separate attacks upon the President including commentaries), many calling far resignation and impeachment, balanced by iwo unvarnished defenses. Exhibit fl: Rather than wiling the firing of Archibald Cox and the "Stennis compromise" in perspective, Hie Saturday night network specials contributed to the national hysteria. In Hie phravs P? T''l": columnist Boh Wiednch, the networks,' "almost paranuid," indulged' themselves in "manufactured lervor, and "instant panic" Exhibit C: On the evening of Henry Kissinger's press conference on the Middle East war and national alert, N.&C. ran all four questions and answers (excepting unly one question) dealing with press suspicions that the military alert had been ordered bv the President for domestic political reasons thus hammering into the national consciousness trie media's own esoteric suspicions. Exhibit D; Archibald Co was given, by a worshipful Walter Cronkhe on his CBS. evening news, an almost mi-pieualented ten minutes of interview time, for two minutes worth of news a privilege accorded by Mr. Crnnkite only to Messts. John Dean . and: Daniel Ellsberg in the past. (Cos, a longtime Kennedy political functionary, who on more than one occasion, professed his "antipathy" for Richard Nixon, stacked the decks ngainst the President; employed a host of Kennedy-ttes to harass the President; and plotted in Ted Kennedy's home, where he leaked sensitive information, for which he laler felt "contrite." The Senate panel, however, failed to in- sincerely, Torn Paine brilliantly and most effectively took on the entire British Empire with his pamphlets. He circulated them by the simple means that were the only ones available to him and to the British TODAY eigh,een,h centul- NOT SO WHOM DO THEY THINK THEY ARE KIDDING? No individual citizen, including the President of the United States, can hope to compete with the communications media existing today whether owned by the British Empire or by the corporate empires known as CBS, NBC, ABC, the New York Times, the WjgtonPosl, etc. Whom doTFiey think they are kidding? Freedom of the Press, indeed! Not freedom but license-license for them EVER E7l?wfE AN T ASSASSINATE WH0M' WHAT IS FREEDOM OF THE PRESS? The media would have us believe that the enormous technological advances since the First Amendment was enacted in the eighteenth century affected every phase of the lives of all citizens except THEIRS. uT,??uSuirT1pl? fact is tnat in the lsh and even in the 19th century it took but little capital to produce njqusSPaper' and ttier" " com',etin8 tech- Not so today! Today all of us know that tens of millions of dollars are required to establish a metropolitan newspaper and even more to make it survive. The same enormous demands dominate radio and television networks. Moreover, the electronic media are even more lethal in terms of their impact on the listeners and viewers. A GIGANTICALLY DECEPTIVE COVER-UP The technological revolution has resulted in freedom of the press NOT for the people, but for t corporate giants with unlimited power to sway public opinion and hold captive the government as well as the people. These giants hide behind the First Amendment to flim-flam the people in a gigantically deceptive cover-up that dwarfs Watergate and forebodes frightening consequences to the United States and the world. When Khrushchev warned Eisenhower "Your grandchildren will live under Communism," he didn t mean that he would invade the United States' he didn't have to; the media would do it for him' Moscow's Pravfla has already granted its imprima fur to the New York Times. NBC, CBS, ABC networks and others of their ilk to lay waste the Presi-dency-"the world-wide U.S. military alert was a desperate ploy by the President to divert attention from his domestic troubles." This power held by the media was made possible by advanced technology. Fortunately, some recognition of this fact is finally emerging in a form which can reasonably be applied to newspapers The Florida Supreme Court upheld a Florida statute that requires a newspaper to give equal space for a candidate to reply to adverse editorial comments. The intent of the statute is obvious to assure fair treatment by the press for individuals, whoever they may be. HE PUT THE PORCUPINE OUT OF BUSINESS! In the eighteenth century, the person offended could have started his own newspaper or printed his own pamphlet or even, if the damage was bad enough, sued and recovered for libel or slander. Remember the Porcupine and Dr. Benjamin Rush' He put the Porcupine out of business. ONE OF THE GRAVEST CHALLENGES . . . -rJJdr.ErCt?,fv!!,JNCATI0NS MEDIA. PARTICULARLY THOSE WHICH ENJOY THE PRIVILEGES OF MONOPOLY, USE PART OF THEIR ENORMOUS PROFITS TO INFLUENCE BY INTIMIDATION COERCION BLACKMAIL OR OTHERWISE THE VERY AGENCIES OF GOVERNMENT THAT ARE SUPPOSED TO ASSURE US THAT FAIRNESS PRE Tv'NrT IlllSf THE MED,A. NIXON WAS GUILTY LONG BEFORE HE BECAME PRESIDENT AND ,H,ET9,0P0UNDED H,S DEFIANCE OF THE MEDIA WITH AN OVERWHELMING VICTORY IN 1972 THIS WAS UNPARDONABLE! CLEARLY THE MEDIA ltlW$ 2yjF TUNE W,TH THE COUNTRY. WATERGATIL-GAVE THEM THEIR CHANCE TO BRING JHE COUNTRY AROUND. THEY SHALL NOT SUCCEED. THE COUNTRY IS NOT REVERSIBLE! The NCC for Fairness to the Presidency warned ?tR7l!9mJ5endvet?rm in a J?aid advertisement ($5,732, New York Times. 72973). We stated-- . . the unfair allegations of the media were being echoed in the Congress. A maior ally otth! media in the anti-Nixon blitz has been the Ervin Committee of Senate investigators ... The pur-F !: 1 E!v-in Committee is not to bring out the truth, but to bring down the President." The corporate giants of the media determined to abort us denied us a forum. Through paid advertisements, however, we have been a iu t0, reach between three and five percent of the American people . . . More than 76 000 Americans in fifty states responded We need more than 76,000 mouthfuls of water to put out the media's seditious fire Our aim is to reach millions of Americans. The battle lines have been drawn by the media and by the weak-kneed and self-seeking politicians who would, by ordeal and villainy assassinate the thirty-seventh President of the United States. To remain passive now is to aid .and abet anarchy. The President needs you now, and those who will succeed him for the next two hundred years need you We call upon you and Americans of all persuasions Democrats, Republicans and Independents to meet one of the gravest challenges that has ever beset our beloved country. We need your support, your MAXIMUM CONTRIBUTION to challenge the corporate giants of the media and to support one of the greatest Presidents in the history of this nation. Won t you please mail your contribution today? Solicitor General under Kennedy and Johnson, when Bobby Baker took the rap . . . Tailed to interrogate him on his conduct and his confidants' during his tenure as Special Prosecutor.) Exhibit E: CBS. ran, in recent weeks, three network news stories, one of eight minutes' duration, about Mr. Rebozo, the competing bank and proposed savings and loan in Key Bbcayne. leaving the nation with the suspicion or massive influence peddling. This despite the fact that no such unfair influence has been demonstrated, and, as The Washington Star-News wrote, "there is no evidence of anv political influence figuring in either Federal ruling, a lull check of the files made available by the controller's office indicates." What of the President's contention that terms such as pirate, dictator, "lust his senses" have been linked with his name and conveyed to the nation by the national media? Herewith a few samples: ". . . Hanoi radio said the bombings indicate President Nixon has taken leave of his senses" Walter Cronkite, Dec. 31, 1972. The United States "lias embarked on a targe-scale terror bombing" with the operative word. "unrestricted -Dan Rather, Dec. 20, 1972. Mr. Nixon is acting like a THE PRICE OF THIS AD Had we not paid the price of this ad, you wouldn't be reading it And yet, when the Florida legislature and courts have the courage to create and preserve a mechanism that would yield a modicum of protection to some individuals against abuses of that vast power, the media CRY OUT that the First Amendment is thereby violated. In truth, an honest observer must conclude that such laws are more consistent with the spirit of the First Amendment than the concentration of power for which the Cronkites and Brinkleys and Chancellors and Rathers and Kikers, ad nauseam are the highly-paid and well-trained spokesmen. ' . 'The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is supposed' to protect us from abuses of that power in the radio and television industries It has established some rules that read well and sound good. But one need not investigate too many instances to find that FCC rules are one thing and their implementation by the networks and enforcement by the FCC are another. Another abuse, which has probably existed since the days of the first reporter, has been so obfuscated by modern technology that new methods for dealing with it had to be found. Alabama has led the way by enacting a law which requires those in business of gathering and disseminating news to disclose publicly as individuals ALL of their sources of income and gratuities. Those who have the increasingly exclusive power to write about public officials should adhere to those same high standards which they demand of other public servants. NATIONAL CITIZENS' COMMITTEE FOR FAIRNESS TO THE PRESIDENCY NON-PROFIT ,NctTED NON-l'ARTISAN INFORMATION CENTER: 618 INDUSTRIAL SANK BU1LU1NC, PROVIDENCE. R.I. 0Z903 TELEPHONE: 401-331-3952 Irfwnil Uairmsn Vki-Chlirmtn Rabbi RarttchKortf Olof V. Andr-rson P. Hoy t Fitch Frank A. Fusco John S. Bottomly Cha.lH Vogtl Tirasnrrr Srrrrtnry jLspphF Fernandes Thomas W. Pearlm SPONSORS r Mrs. AudreyN Gallon fret WnlrD.WwI-e-AtTyCrurlesS ' Morrow MissOurothyG MuSCtllllJ Prof Joseph R.RtjiB RahOiMdurrfhwanr SenaTor ftjcfaro A. Snyder AttytttmirdO.SporK Mr. Archie Hovarieiian. Si MrFrriMJtompson Wnn kA B t Mri.ArsdrewDorBgh WOrtclsKMknAu AltyJerrnLeonara MiAileenrSweran Mr. Thorn alK.SWr tar IrMrs.r.ASlarle, 1 l.es't Mrs.L.R.LrWbrtler Mr Mrs CurluC rVrs RuihDa-.itfson Mry Anrsa BtirnG"! SlS Cirol,nE Jcrrrs 'IKS!.. Robert KHy ft.JrrteptiKie.man sr.- NrcholasLaiarOA Jr.GeoraeLkhIKrift.il! sir Uidoret.ipschLjIZ 1 i Mrs. MUCVV. M V-'rr-r i.lL A. i,! -.M:!er Sir HlbrjrtP PaCrOVlE.Sr rjXthelynPaik Hr iWrsGeorseO.Pubano 'rcl Menaher-'Scv :J..r rtr.WallerC Schrjltr ' rlr.GwrgeM Shap.rO l-ij'jiD Ih.p rrj !S Marpj?rJr;WMen A RMhLHTirHiCCtVI'arl ': f r,ir!-..r,'1-pr..-, I) fe.nns Mrs.Don9fichpf:' Mi''BSChSteSV'CaS!B Mrs. Marfiara.l C MrCirarfe Capt.JamKDAndrim.USr. Mf.MktWlfkirhory MrTrTw t tit Ws.HubyDowf:a.'d Mrs VeraHjehe: MK'"'HD'rwSel! Man M'tM?'i,,".iM'..-n'V'.. MjosepnroNtii UylMrJ Mr.jachMcLauihlln Mrs. Ernilr Moore MrgjCiFJoHr SEbilECwiiTS Anlelman AltyJotlnfJoWnir, Mrs FrancnGranam Mr.flooenP.Grunineer Mr CUxUR Hmor Wr ClerHemeon .SI.S tfrgrnuhCwdrrl IheRcv.J.C Mann Mrs MaryUtMrern Mrs. RulSS auheiM Vr. c,tl Vli(1lss.rl Sir' r.-Cn-TVV.VMrn Vji;e Vmrwrt Dr Samutlflagrrs r.JamesW.Geofrl said Ralph Nader, tu which Mr. Muskie cried "Dictatorship." and Congressman Knch retorted "iawhrenker." "We nn longer have a President; we have a dictator," said The New Orleans Stales-Item, and to The London Times correspondent on the scene . . . "The whip of the gestapo was in the clear October air." Mr. Anthony Lewis' sensitive nostrils picked up the "smell of an attempted roup feint." To Julian Bond, the President was an "outlaw," the "Jesse James uf Washington, D.C. Senator Robert Byrd had a dual entry: "Brown shirt operation and "gestapo tactics," while Prof. Raoul Berger asserted the President was leading us down "the road to tyranny, dictatorship and Hitlerism." Senator Kennedy's speech-writers weighed in with ... "a reckless act of desperation by a President : - - who has no respect for law and no regard for . men of conscience" All this over the firing of Mr. Cox, and the offer to have Judge Stennis rather than Judge Sirica hear the tapes. GIVE US THE TOOLS Newspaper and maga7ine readers, TV viewer and radio listeners are not robots! They will no longer tolerate the media's flagrant prejudices cloaked in a self-serving air of patriotism. They will no longer allow the debasement of principle for pecuniary gain. They arc sick of the sophisticated, slick distortionist, breast-beating writers, columnists and newscasters. Ai.icricans will rise lo the challenge. They will not surrender their President to insurrectionists, and they will not yield' their own independence to the weak-kneed politicians, to the vested interests, to the radicals and left-wingers, and to the predatory McGovernites. Give us the tooh, your rooml and financial support, and together we will, in the words of Julie Nixon Eisenhower: "Fight, fujjhi, fihtr Jr Eluablhfttx;lsnceOalev i. Robert Lincoln r CtutlesG L dur ch Brochhoiiw AHvElimCnHIMurnll i yT,m:.C.-V'n lb Cornel rfr GaryZi-fichkcrrbaurrs Mr.TonrDWTWOd M: ,t Wr: crS Draughts M-i ;,.w.lveilrilsiin Mrs ftheitllipoori Mr. Walls-Fuller Mr.HirtrMGHis t rj ftrjOtnson II Vamar Arty 1 Mrs BM i Irani. Farky jeffiuM Jtt l"" j WON'T YOU PLEASE MAIL YOUR CONTRIBUTION TODAY? Mk clwcki payable tor Fairrmt to Iha Presidency. Mail Cane of United National Bank, Norton, Matt. 02766. I Sir Enclosed my contribution: D?5 QUO D$25 $50 $100 other J m support of "AN APPEAL FOR FAIRNESS." I ( ) Voumayusemynameforfutureadvertisements. j ( ) volunteeftohelpinmycommunity. Yr r:fLlc, Kiv; ntlCtiarlnrreUm &.Gmr!.4.MurIJrr, Mr Henry Ouli Mn &irHIT.0uilai CripnMr(r Dr. 'Franc ii it Htill,Jr. Mr.HuliellO.fr.-eTi MnJi!WhSBori MriMn.ftowdlCflifflfr At ri. Suian Krw I to Knowtes Mr.rtfrC.LoHf Mr. Anfhory i MaMrra Mr.Cnarjjgfl DrJLtanlOfwr Mr t Mrs tnfjklJ Hrj Wrs R.ToJ!iir OUarSnma Ml.flullinaAIBilI Mr! RasmaChai sVFlVjiVficr, ftf VillramD Wplburn Mai Gran juiuiKlfrn.AUS(rttl M. 11 rr Nation serifs IRicMirjvn jJJJJ HiiiFranMiShint Mr PasHfl Sfrotmam HiKMarj5li ftv.EirtiL.SMsr AltTEorriE.flirnat Prof Jamait ftchmorrd NAME . Mrv fittxeca Hlottom Ms.9,ntr;C.Bwrflniin Mr tpitefJ.BratJiriaw.Jr DwilySht.,rlRicl)aiI fwnortaaMa Mr.PcerO.Carlrro flrrv.ClartrKtP.Oaltgn rlt GsnH trM STiMn EHrtOicUni sSfSa. Hr.iMn H A Swtirfl wr. tMre. WlifnaC Thurmen KkfcrtihC.Hatir Mi rVmtJ.Gnninr r.'rlrtprlT.Wit. Mr.lMn DraflaBW Wr pt MUlrnMLOHlwl Mr JamniC Mamihati HrvwnnnHiHKhrari rlMfl.S.W,WOforri. Mr. L. tonwrwysrstrtarfl T''KRih MrlflGIIOifrMn MnV.uiKltMvn MrbajVliSJtjrlrv Mr. A rtftiGurrrff ai DoroinyHenM If iMn C Dowlas ft

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