Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California on January 22, 1964 · Page 20
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January 22, 1964

Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California · Page 20

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Redlands, California
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Wednesday, January 22, 1964
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Page 20 REDLANDS, CALIFORNIA JANUARY 22, 1964 California goes after import-export business California, the leading world trade state with more than S3 billion in annual import-export business, is establishing foreign offices to help stimulate this phase of the economy. A California trade representative office opened in Mexico City this week. Others will be established soon in Paris and Tokyo. Monies for this program come from the state's general fund. These offices will provide California exporters with current information about trade possibilities and will assist in obtaining new outlets and maximizing the potential of existing markets. Each trade representative also will promote international tourism to California and seek establishment of foreign plants, branch offices and foreign investments in California. Although only a state, California and its economy is larger and more significant than many foreign countries. Only because of its size and the possible trade to be developed can such a program as this pay off. The mainspring of the economy is trade whether it be domestic or foreign. Anything that contributes to stimulating and expanding trade pays for itself. If the program is properly administered and kept to its assigned goal, the taxpayers may profit from this new attempt to get business for California. The sole risk is that of making this another political boondoggle. Time will tell. Anything GOOD for us? So you've kicked the cigarette habit. You no longer automatically reach for a pack that isn't there every time you sit down to a cup of coffee. Brother, you're still abusing your system. Better dump that steaming cup of dark, delicious delight down the drain. The American Heart Association reports that a long-term study of over 1,000 men who participated in a heart disease experiment indicates that coffee intake and heart disease are related. There was 'a significant correlation between the use of coffee and the later discovery of coronaiy disease." So stop smoking. Stop drinking coffee. Stop eating foods high in saturated fats. Cut down your caloric intake, meaning candy, butter, potatoes — all the good things. Better yet, stop eating entirely, for with every bite you're taking in traces of chemical pesticides which, like radioactive elements, accumulate and accumulate. (By the way, do you REALLY know h o w much strontium-90 is concentrated in your bone marrow?) Most important of all, stop breathing, because the air over our cities is simply loaded with pollutants that are corroding away your lungs and related innards like crazy. Above all, enjoy life. Ontario may be biggest city Ontario may become the number one city in San Bernardino county in size, exceeding that of the county seat which has historically been by far the largest population center. So says the County Planning commission as a result of its population studies. With more than 61,000 population now Ontario is still far from San Bernardino's 104,000, but its rate of growth has been greater in recent years. For many years Redlands and Ontario were nearly the same size, in fact Ontario had slightly fewer residents. Now Ontario is nearly twice the size of Redlands, although recently our community has been keeping pace. As the population boom continues who can say what will happen to any city? One thing appeal's certain. All of the cities will be bigger, probably far bigger than anyone thinks today. The Newsreel Between Goldwater and Johnson we would have a clear choice. What does the country want — conservatism or economy? We are trying to convince foreign friends that they can see America inexpensively. Bus companies are asked to cooperate by pulling down the curtains while passing through Las Vegas. The man at the next desk says he's about in the mood to vote for the first man who comes along without an image. The Central Intelligence Agency conJucts its first press conference. The new feeling is that it's all right to be top secret as long as you're not anonymous. We are glad that the President of the United States is an early riser. It is consoling to remember, when we sit down to breakfast, that he has already been at work for an hour and a half. We're almost ready to believe that America is ahead of Russia in outer-space. After all, it's not nearly as incredible as that we should be ahead of the Australians in tennis. It's typical of the old fogey who has so much trouble getting in and out of the modern automobile to blame the design of the car rather than the fact that he himself is put together wrong. With a Grain Of Salt By Frank and Bill Moore Kathy Langin, University of Redlands co-ed objects to the rules at the University which restrict bermudas and capris to four places: 1. the dorms, 2. the Student Union, 3. breakfast each day except Sunday, 4. library on Saturdays. The rest of the time the coeds must appear with skirts and blouses or dresses. Kathy says that the reason for the rule is that dresses "look nicer." but she disagrees. "A dirty skirt with a hanging hemline looks pretty sad compared to a pair of clean, neat capris."' Also she says that because most women who work in the professions must wear dresses, college is the time to get the habit. Kathy can't see why she should be uncomfortable for four years "just to get into a habit that would be acquired anyway." We can't sec why Kathy settles for bermudas and capris when she could just as well go for the slacks styled along the lines of the skiing stretch pants. But what's the difference, rules arc rules and there is no getting around them. Once in the Wardman Park hotel in Washington, D. C. wc appeared in golf attire hoping to get a quick breakfast in the dining room. No necktie, the maitrc d' observed. Sorry, you must leave. Besides embarrassing us, it required a long trip back to the room to get a necktie. Wc didn't think much of the rule, but senators and congressmen who lived in the hotel apparently didn't like the look of their constituents in golf clothes. That was back in the days before Ike got in the White House and out to Burning Tree. Probably in the present day one can get a glass of orange juice in the dining room while nccktic- Icss. If Kathy turns out to be a golfer she will find there arc all kinds of restrictions on what she can wear on the course and in the clubhouse. In some Southern California clubs the rules prohibit a woman golfer from wearing cither bermudas, capris or slacks. She must wear a skirt on the golf course no matter what day of the week. Kathy, this is worse than the University of Redlands. f4» Washington Window Johnson succeeds in creating image By Ljle C. Wilson W TH£ MINUTE YOU HBAfc. OF ANVON£ SOU^NG IN HfSTENf Redlands Yesterdays FIVE YEARS AGO Temperatures — Highest G7, lowest 37. Robert A. Covington of Redlands promoted from county planning director to the county's top non-elective position as administrative officer to the board of supervisors. Market Basket advertises for bids on Feb. 11 for its new Redlands market at Brookside and San Mateo which is expected to cost S400.000 plus fixtures and inventory. Mrs. Kitty Peeling, formerly of Redlands and Dolly Varden, announces she'll run for mayor of San Bernardino. TELEVISION Some clubs even legislate on swimming attire. As the trend is to more and more brevity, the rule makers find it more and more difficult. Kathy can't remember back to the day when the male swimmer dared not appear without his "uppers" — trunks alone being considered indecent. This was long before (he French invented the Bikini. At Harvard in the early thirties gentlemen students were expected to "dress" for dinner one evening a week — meaning wear a Tuxedo. That was in a dorm. Imagine a dinner jacket for dinner in a dorm. Few students ever like the rules about dress, no matter what the school, or where. But they may as well get used to it. We've got to start and stop some place. And Kathy, lest you do not know it, within your lifetime a pope ordered fig leaves placed on all the statues in the Vatican museum. One Minute Pulpit He remembered for their sake his convenanf, and relented according to the abundance of his steadfast love. — Psalms 10G45. God puts something good and something lovable in every man His hands create.—Mark Twain. TEN YEARS AGO Temperatures — Highest 60, lowest 31. City reports it will need the reservoir on Fifth avenue, which has been used as a swimming club for 31 years, for water storage next year and the lease will not be renewed. Study of various possible routes for the proposed Redlands freeway to be undertaken by Planning commission. Mrs. Dorothy Cope Wcllcr appointed Red Cross home service chairman. Her father, Edward M. Cope, held that post for 37 years. FIFTEEN YEARS AGO Temperatures — Highest 45, lowest 40. Difficult orange marketing year forecast by Ray Lamm because of small fruit sizes and damage from frost and thrips. He is manager of Redlands Citrus Exchange. Those attending Council of Churches annual meeting get special treat when Mr. and Mrs. John Raitt do several numbers upon request. Kyle Pratt of Redlands assumes management of Timber Lodge in Running Springs. Sticky end to short career LONDON' (UPI) — Angus Ogilvy, wealthy husband of Princess Alexandra, Queen Elizabeth's first cousin, divulged a long-kept secret Tuesday when he said he had once worked as a waiter during a strike — but for only two days. "My career of promise came to a sticky end," he said, "when I desposiled an omelette at the feet of a customer." WEDNESDAY NIGHT 5:00— 7—Hawaiian Eye 9—Engineer Bill (C) 13—Thaxton Hop 5:30— 5—Whirlybirds 11—Mickey Mouse Club 5:40— 4—Believe It or Not 5:45— 4, 13—News 6:00— 2. 7—News 5—You Asked For It 9—Follow the Sun 11—M Squad 13—Touche Turtle (C) 6:30— 4, 5. II—News 13—Rod Rocket (C) 7:00— 4—Death Valley Days 5—Leave it to Beaver 7—World of Giants 0—People Arc Funny U—Gallant Men 13—This Exciting World 7:30— 2—CBS Reports 4—Virginian (c) 5—Addograms 7—Ozzie and Harriet 9—Dobie Gillis 13—Adventure Tomorrow (c) 8:00— 5—Lawman 7—Patty Duke 9—Movie (C> 11—Sam Benedict 13—Disc Jockey Special 8:30— 2—Tell it to the Camera 5—Detectives 7—Farmer's Daughter 9:00— 2—Beverly Hillbillies 4—Espionage 5—Championship Wrestling 7—Ben Casey 11—I Search Adventure 9:30— 2—Dick Van Dyke 11—Bold Journey 13—Silents Please 10:00— 2—Danny Kaye 4—Eleventh Hour 7—Channing 9, 11, 13—News 10:30— 9—Movie 13—Country Music 11:00— 2, 4. 5, 7—News 11—Movie 13—Movie 11:15— 4—Johnny Carson (c) 5—Steve Allen 11:30— 2—Movie 7—New Breed THURSDAY DAYTIME 9:00— 2—News 4—Say When 5—Romper Room 7—1 Married Joan 9—King and Odie 11—Jack La Lanne 13—News 9:15— 9—Babysitter 13—Guidepost 9:25— 4—News 9:30— 2—1 Love Lucy 4—Word for Word (c) 7—Love That Bob! 11—Movie 10:00— 2—McCoys 4—Concentration 5—Restless Gun 7—December Bride 9—Movie 10:30— 2—Pete and Gladys 4—Missing Links (C) 5—Mr. Lucky 7—Girl Talk 11:00— 2—Love of Life 4—First Impression (c) 5—Cheaters 7—Price Is Right 11— Jean Majors 11 :25— 2—News 11:30— 2—Search for Tomorrow 4—Truth or Consequences (c) 5—Peter Gunn 7—Object Is 9—Spectrum H—Philip Norman Time 13-TV Bingo 11:45— 2—Guiding Light President Johnson's 1965 budget and the publicity maneuvers preceding it have created the public image Johnson intended to create. It is the image of a slow man with a buck. Not a penny pincher, maybe, but a dollar pincher. Almost from the moment he succeeded to the presidency, Johnson focussed public attention on his forthcoming budget, on his yearning for economy in government, on the obstacles to any reduction in government spending. It was pretty definitely understood by those who had heard him discuss it that Johnson expected to send a S102 billion spending budget to Congress this week. The President carefuly explained to visitors that there were some new- billions of built- in spending which had been voted by earlier Congresses. Regretfully, the President would conclude that he was stuck with a big spending program. On at least one occasion, however, the President firmly stated his determination to hold spending under 5100 billion. "I am not going to be known." he said, "as S100 billion Johnson." Cuts Kennedy Budgets Surprise! Surprise! When the budget figures finally were revealed, spending had been held to S97.8 billion and the deficit for fiscal 1965 had been cut to S4.9 billion. That was a great impro cmen' on the la'.? President John F. Kennedy's budget for fiscal 1964, a S5 billion reduction in the deficit. Thus, the new President roughed out his public image as an economizer by substantial cutbacks from the spending program of his predecessor. The big political question now pending is this: Can President Johnson make it stick? Johnson now must try to maintain before the public his image as a careful man with the taxpayers' dollars. If he can do that, Johnson will de­ prive the Republican party of what probably is its most effective issue against the Democratic party. That issue is government spending and the Democratic policy of vastly overspending government revenue. This policy has been realistically stated as tax and tax. spend and spend and elect and elect. There always has been reluctance, however, to tax sufficiently to pay all of the bills. Johnson's economy pledges will improve his standing with conservative Democrats. But he already is in some trouble on the left. Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) is unhappy. It congratulates Johnson for carrying on the Kennedy program but objects to curtailed spending. ADA Criticizes Budget ADA is thinking in terms of spending tens, of billions of dollars in the next 10 years on Johnson's unconditional war on poverty. "Liberals," said an ADA statement, "have much cause for concern about how the President will prosecute his unconditional war within the conditions he has imposed by a smaller budget in a growing country and a growing economy. The war against poverty will require massive and expensive federal programs. The amounts contemplated in the budget are not enough to make a good start." The budget asked for more than SI billion as a starter. ADA scorns that sum and contends, further, that there must be increased spending to obtain full employment. ADA represents the New Deal heritage of the Democratic party and, to some extent, its egghead element. The new President will not be able to make party conservatives happy and also to keep the peace with the Left ADA troops. He shortly will have to make a choice. 11:55— 4—News 12:00— 2—Burns and Allen 4—Let's Make a Deal(C) 5—Thin Man 7—Seven Keys 9— En France 11—Lunch Brigade 13—Movie 12:25— 4—News 12:30— 2—As the World Turns 4—Doctors 5—TV Bingo 7—Father Knows Best 9—Mr. District Attorney 1:00— 2—Password 4—Loretta Young 5—Movie 7—Ernie Ford 9—Cartoonsville 11—Gale Storm 1:30— 2—House Party 4—You Don't Say! (c) 7—Pamela Mason 11—Movie 13—Robin Hood 1:45— 9—News 2:00— 2—To Tell the Truth 4—Match Game 9—Movie 13—Vagabond 2:25— 2, 4—News 5—L.A. Today 2:30— 2—Edge of Night 4—Make Room for Daddy 5—Movie 7—Day in Court 13—Ann Sothern 2:45—11—Movie 2:55— 7—News 3:00— 2—Secret Storm 4—Bachelor Father 7—General Hospital 13-Felix the Cat 3:30— 2—My Little Margie 4—Movie 7—Queen for a Day 3:45— 5—Corris Guy 3:50— 9—News 4:00— 2—Life of Riley 5—Just for Fun 7—Trailmaster 9—Mighty Hercules (C) 11—Superman 4:30— 2—Movie 11—Cartoons 4:45—13—Rocky and His Friends DOCTOR'S MAI LB AG Tuberculin test shows degree of immunity By Dr. Wayne G. Brandstadt Q — Does the tuberculin test show whether the tubercle bacillus is present anywhere in the body? A—The tuberculin test shows whether or not a person has had enough contact with the tubercle bacillus to build up an immunity to it. If a person's test is positive, it may mean that he has some active tuberculosis, but is in the process of overcoming it. Far more often, it means that the battle has been won and all the soldiers have gocn back to their families. In medical school we used to say. "Give us this day our daily tubercle bacillus." Mild exposure, if repeated often, is the best way to keep up the body's resistance to the disease. But even the resistant person can get the disease as a result of an overwhelming exposure. Fortunately we now have effective antituberculosis drugs that greatly facilitate the treatment of this disease. Q—What would cause me to continue to have a sour stomach even after surgical removal of, part of my stomach? A—Unless you have a peptic Teletips Chan, show. LIGHTER SIDE By DICK WEST Longer working hours??? "How does it feel to hare an international network of agents named after you?" WASHINGTON" (UPI) -Some states, notably Maryland and North Carolina, have adopted a practice of permitting certain prison inmates to hold outside jobs. Begun as a rehabilitation measure, this policy enables the prisoners to leave their cells during the day and work a regular shift for a private com pany. They draw the same pay as other employes, which they can use to support their families or put aside as a nest egg for the time when they are paroled or have finished their terms. They dress in civilian clothes while on the job, they work unguarded, and in some cases tbey ride public transportation! to and from work. Moonlighting is impractical, however, because the prisoners arc required to return to confinement at night. As was perhaps inevitable, there recently arose a question of whether convicts who have bor union. The matter came up in a petition filed by the Teamsters Union to form a bargaining unit at a plant in Charlotte, N. C, where two convicts were employed. After due consideration, the National Labor Relations Board ruled that the prisoners should be excluded from the election to determine whether the union would represent the employes. The board held that there was an "insufficient community of interest" between them and the other workers. It also excluded the son and the brother of the company's president, but that is another story. I wouldn't for a minute question the board's wisdom, but I rather regret that it acted as it did. It would have been interesting to see what would have happened if the convicts had become members of the union. My guess is that a situation these positions should join a la- something like this would de TOP SHOW: — 10:00, 2. Danny Kaye variety Art Carney and folksingers Joe and Eddie make return appearances. Rod Serling makes a cameo appearance and Danny and Art present a two-man variety show. 8:0O — Chan. 13. Disc Jockey Special. Allan Sherman and BUI Dana head up a 90-minute variety program featuring Los Angeles disc jockeys. 9:00 — Chan. 4. Espionage. "The Final Decision". Richard Carey has just three months to live, but they may be busy ones: the Government wants him for a very special intelligence mission. 9:30 — Dick Van Dyke. "The Life and Love of Joe Coogan". Rob is paired with a new golf partner who sent Laura some sonnets before her marriage. velop: As their first act as union members, the convicts would demand longer working hours. Almost anything being better than prison, they would want to spend as much time on the job as possible. They would, therefore, also demand that holidays be abolished. Which would naturally lead to a demand to eliminate vacations. If the company refused to grant these concessions, the convicts would resort to the ultimate weapon. They would go on strike to make the company pay time-and-a-half for under­ time. ulcer, in which case the acid- forming glands in the stomach would put out too much acid, an overabundance of acid in itself would not cause any symptoms. On the other hand, if you regurgitate sour stomach contents after meals, this would taste sour even if the concentration of the acid were normal. The cause of such regurgitation m a y be eating too fast, worry or nervous tension, failure to chew your food thoroughly or an allergy to one of the foods eaten. There are many antacids that you can take for temporary relief. If you have a great deal of trouble, you shoud have your doctor determine steps to eliminate it. Q—You recently said that a tumor of the thymus is sometimes the cause of myasthenia gravis. What kind of tests is given to determine whether you have a tumor of the thymus? A—The thymus is a gland of uncertain function. It is now believed to be an important factor in helping the child develop immunity to various infections. It attains its largest size at puberty, after which it dwindles and almost disappears. It is located between the thyroid and the heart. Unless a thymus tumor is very large, it is likely to go unrecognized. When the thymus is enlarged, an X-ray of the chest may reveal displacement of other structures in that region. Even then it is hard to tell whether the gland is larger than normal because the dimensions of this gland are so variable. THE ALMANAC Today is Wednesday, Jan. 22, the 22nd day of 1964 with 344 to follow. The moon is approaching full phase. The evening stars are Venus, Jupiter and Saturn. Those born today include the English romantic poet, .Lord Byron, in 1788. On this day in history: In 1789, the first American novel, written by Sarah Morton and called "The Power of Sympathy," was published in Boston. In 1S01, Queen Victoria of England died, ending the longest reign of any sovereign over a civilized nation. In 1917, President Woodrow Wilson—seeking a quick end to World War I—asked for "a peace without victory." A thought for the day—President Woodrow Wilson once said: "There is such a thing as a man being too proud to fight."

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