The Salt Lake Tribune from Salt Lake City, Utah on May 31, 1965 · 15
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The Salt Lake Tribune from Salt Lake City, Utah · 15

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Salt Lake City, Utah
Issue Date:
Monday, May 31, 1965
Page:
15
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TTTT- TT7T -rrTTTTTT?rrrrTry fc S. p n f i r ait fake iihmt Salt Lake City, Utah Monday Morning May 81, 1965 S.L. Park Riot Hurts 4, Police Arrest 13 TV Fare, Page 17 Second Section Tops in Sports Local News Page 15 w r Dan Valentine's i Nothing Serious MONDAY WASH LINE: A Salt Lake ladies shoe retailer says womens feet in Utah are getting bigger. In fact, he says, the feet of American . women are get-ting bigger all over the country even petite Jackie Kennedy wears a size 10! . The average 'family in the In-Dan Valentine termountan West is worth $16,400 in true wealth this includes house equity, money in the bank, cars, furniture, clothing, etc., etc. . . . A few columns back reported that Dr. W. Melvin Strong, head of the adult education program for the Granite School District, had never received his diploma from Twin Falls, Idaho High School years ago because he was one unit short. Last Thursday, at the graduation ceremonies in Twin Falls High School, Ernest Ragland, superintendent of schools announced Mr. Strong was being given an honorary diploma from his old alma mater in recognition of his fine accomplishments in education . . THE ANNUAL CONVENTION of the Utah chapter of the Little People of Ameirca will be held at 7790 S., 2730 East next Wednesday evening. To be eligible for membership in the club, you must be 4 feet, 10 inches, or shorter. Mrs. Shannon Carstens, 24, stands exactly 4 feet tall shes the president. All short people in the area who qualify are invited to attendthe meeting .. . The city of Fillmore, Utah, has erected a large new sign at the outskirts of town. If proclaims Fillmore as the Cleanest Little City in the U.S.A. (Lets hope they keep the sign clean!) . . . June bride note: Egyptians were the first people in the world to use wedding rings in the wedding ceremony. (And tbok what happened to Egypt!) Mrs. Cedric N. Thompson is now a resident of Idaho Falls. Back in 1960, she was mayor of Helena, Mont.! Any other former lady mayors around! Don't throw those chewing gum wrappers out of the car window as you drive along the highway it costs the state of . Utah $150,000 a year just to pick up the litter along the highway. DID YOU KNOW that when you hear the telephone, the rings are six seconds apart? I didnt either. A recent news release reports a new machine has been invented that talks back to people. (So whats new about a machine that talks back to people. Every American husband has had one for years. Its called a wife!) . . John Porter, the Sage of Rex-burg, Idaho, says: From the time a baby tries to get his toes in his mouth, life is one struggle to make ends meet! Saw a car going down State Street Sunday morning with this sign on the bumper: If you wanta race, go to Indianapolis! I see where a group of teenage rock hounds are banding together into a club to study and gather rocks in the area. Actually, 'young people shouldn't call themselves rock hounds theyre more alike pebble pup-.Pies ! ' Well, the state of Texas has topped us again. My only Texas reader Ann Thompson of Bryan, Texas, postcards: The Texas Legislature has just passed a new tax on cigarettes, which brings the state tax on smokes to 11 cents a package. What do you think of that? . . . Just give us time, Ann, just give us time. . . . TODAYS VALENTINE A collective Valentine today to all the parents of seniors who graduated at Box Elder High 1 School in Bri-gham City Fri-Jjr day evening. The Parent?. realizing gradu- -1 ation night is a special affair, sponsored a gala party for the graduate. It started at midnight and continued almost until dawn. Ther was a full program of e n t e rt ainment, refreshments, music and fun. Dr. Robert Shelton was chairman of the affair ... A fine project. It gave the seniors a party to remember . . . and kept excited and enthusiastic June grads off the highways and out of trouble. And a Valentine to all concerned. SAM, THE SAD CYNIC; SAYS: Be careful driving today. Its a holiday and the highways will be filled with women drivers of both sexes! . Three policemen handcuff youth at intersection of 6th East and 13th South as officer with a Canine Corps dog, at left, holds off crowd of spectators. About 400 youths staged a sit down as police withdrew to reorganize riot formation. Salt Lake County deputy sheriff shotgun in hand faces part of crowd at an intersection near Liberty Park. The two-hour riot Sunday ended when officers formed flying wedge. Before trouble was quelled more than 100 officers were engaged. Time of Contrasts Memorial Day 65: Utalins Remember Law Routs 1,000 Via Dogs, Gas By Doyle E. Smith Tribune Staff Writer Fighting Sunday in Liberty Park which readied full-scale riot proportions several times within a two-hour period ended with at least four persons hospitalized and 13 persons arrested. At its peak the melee involved an estimated 1,000 persons, police said. About 100 law enforcement officers, including at least 60 Salt Lake City patrolmen, 35 Salt Lake County deputy sheriffs and 10 Utah Highway Patrol troopers finally used dogs, tear gas and night sticks to quell the disturbance apparently triggered about 6:20 p.m. by a fight between two intoxicated persons near the parks south edge. f Arrest Thirteen Sunday at midnight police had arrested 13 persons, all .over 21 years old. All were being held in city jail on charges ranging from resisting arrest to using foul and abusive language. Salt Lake police were called fjyeak up a fight at the extreme south end of the citys largest and most popular park and were greeted by approximately 500 persons including many teenagers. When Sgt. Dave Campbell fired six tear gas shots into the crowd to break up the initial fight, Officer Harold R. Burke was kicked in the groin by a participant in the melee. Thats when a call for emergency help was made and about two dozen officers were dispatched to the scene. Crowd Swells - Within 15 minutes the crowd swelled to 1,000 with another 2,000 teen-age and adult observers standing on the sidelines and the first of several riots erupted. Aftermath of Liberty Park riot: Youth-one of 1,000 involved in disturbance has head bandaged by Salt Lake Police officer. Auto Rolls Over in Tooele, Woman Driver, 37, Killed WENDOVER, Tooele County (AP) A 37-year-old woman from the Goshute Indian Reservation was killed Sunday in a Traffic Toll one-car accident in remote west central Utah, raising the states 1965 traffic toll to 101. Tooele County sheriff's officers said the victim, Mrs. Rena Bonamont John, was traveling alone in the car on a j,irt road about 50 miles south of Wendov-er. Officers said the car failed to negotiate a, curve. Mrs. John was found inside the vehicle, which had rolled and landed on its top. . Officers said she had just left her husband, .Melvin, ' and three children at a store about a half mile from the accident scene. The Goshute Reservation straddles the Utah-Nevada state line. Tooele County To May 3lf 1965 ' 7 To May 31, 1964 5 All of 1964 12 Takes Goods, Coins - f ' An undetermined quantity of cigarettes and change were taken by burglars who broke out a window pane and entered the premises of Beehive Lodge No. 407, 248 W. South Temple, police were told Friday. . By Bonnie Mathews Tribune Staff Writer In a day of contrasts, traditional when the living pay tribute to the dead, Utahns Sunday observed Memorial Day rites. Steady streams of cars poured into cemeteries from early morning until late evening filled with the young and the old bringing spring flowers for the graves of loved ones. In the Salt Lake City Cemetery children frolicked among bright spring flowers to the admonishments of their elders to watch where youre walking. Stone Angel A bright, young robin perched on the head of a pensive stone angel while cheerful hawthorne trees bloomgft alongside stately, dark pines, yews and weeping willows. Copper vases, stone urns and coffee cans filled with yellow and purple iris, white snoyballs, and deep-red peonies vied with formal floral arrangements and bright artificial roses seemed t be growing from the ground. Veterans organizations held ceremonies throughout the day in honor of all comrades who made the supreme sacrifice. Conducts Service Edward M. Rees', commander of Post 409, Veterans of Foreign Wars, conducted a service Sunday at 11 a.m. at the Veterans post in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. Graves were decorated in sunrise services at West Jordan Cemetery, Redwood Memorial Estates and Wights Fort Cemetery by the West Jordan Post -119, American Legion. Let us bear in mind the awful cost of disunity and resolve that we shall keep alive those glorious traditions bought by the blood of these patriots, (George L. Carey, state commander of the Disabled American Veterans, said in the sunset memorial service held by the United Veterans Council of Salt Lake City and County in Memory.Grove.' Place Wreaths , Wreaths were placed at the memorial rotunda by several veterans organizations and auxiliaries led by Mrs. Lucile C. Van Dam of the Grand Army of the Republic.. Highland High School cadets advanced the flag and were escorts of honor under the supervision of Lt. Col. Gilbert A. Waite. Taps were played by Johnny A. Perry? Offers Blessing The Rev. John G. Berris, minister of Holy Trinity Giek Or thodox Church offered blessings at graves in Mt. Olivet Cemetery Sunday, 3 p.m. He will return Monday at 9:30 a.m. to bless other graves. The Most Rev. Joseph Lennox Federal, bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City, will celebrate Mass Monday, 9 a.m. in Mt. Calvary Cemetery. Members of the Japanese American Citizens Lagues of Salt Lake City will hold a community service Monday, 10 a.m. at the Nisei Monument, Salt Lake City Cemetery. Rev. George Hirose and Rev. Kenji Kikuch of the Japanese Church of Christ, Rev. S. Isha-hara of the Buddhist Church and Rev. J. Ogawa of the Nichiren Buddhist Church will participate iff the ceremonies. Principal speakers at services Monday at 11 a.m. at the Ft, Douglas Post Cemetery will be Max E. Rich, executive vice president and secretary, Salt Lake Qi amber of Commerce, aand Col. John A. Rankin. 1 Tribune Staff Photo by Earl Conrad Blood streams down face of young man as he is led from riot in Liberty Park by police officer. At least four were injured. By Jerome K. Full Tribune Staff Writer Utah famers are under new and strong i pressures from the federal government, technology and a nature which has been kind to water users but harsh to fruit growers. Reduced Demand Those forces are operating in When the officers attempted Aiffererirways to create some- to disperse the crowd with the canine corps, some teenagers started heckling police. The crowd began cursing, throwing full and empty beer bottles and cans, rubber hose, pieces of lumber aHd other debris. Salt Lake County Hospital officials said at 10:30 p.m. that at least 15 people had checked into the emergent room for treatment of dog bites apparently suffered in the fracas at Liberty Park. Cool It Cries from the unruly crowd ranged from Go Home; The Show Is Over, to Cool It and Drop Dead. Several teenagers used daring tactics, running uj? to a police dog with a broken beer bottle, knocking off an officers hat with soft drink bottles and grabbing at officers uniforms. All officers were then ordered to leave the scene and meet at the comer of 8th East and 13th South to mobilize which triggered a sit down at the intersection of 6th East and 13th South by about 400 of the riot-minded teenagers. This, lasted for about 10 minutes, before the rioters ad-1 See Page 24, Column 6 Farm Labor Glut? Possibility in Utah thing approaching labor surplus this a Utah farm year, accor- Shop Today? Better Wait Till Tuesday Like shopkeepers throughout the nation, members of the Salt Lake Retail Merchants Assn, will observe the Memorial Day holiday Monday by staying closed. However, to accommodate shoppers, stores will be open Tuesday until 9 p.m., according to Fred F. Auerbach, association president. Federal, state, county and city offices will fc closed Monday. All schools will be closed and so will all offices associated with the New York Stock Exchange, banks and almost all grocery stores and other offices. Utah liquor agencies will all be closed. Motorists parking in Salt Lake City will not be required to feed parking meters. ding to preliminary, estimate! , Sunday. There remain the usual difficulties of getting the right number of workers to the right areas at the right time with clean, comfortable housing for their families. Frosts and technology have reduced labor demand. Federal programs are increasing the labor supply by encouraging summer farm employment of high school and college boys. Farmers and some agricultural officials are shaking their heads in doubt about the ability of young men from urban homes 1 to do the hard, hot field work expected from hardened migratory workers. Migrant Problem A key factor in the field worker crisis this year and almost every year brings a new crisis to agriculture will be the decrease in Mexican nationals entering the country. Congress last year refused to extend the special law allowing entry of the Mexican laborers the braceros. U.S. labor organizations strongly resisted toe program. Utah has used about 600 braceros a year, but some other agricultural states have used tens of thousands. Loss of toe braceros wont be crippling to Utah, but their loss in California has caused a much greater competition for American migrants. Tomato Question That had been anticipated to drain the supply of labor usually See Page 24, Column 1 Flag at half-mast and massive stone cross form somber frame for Memorial Day rites at Salt Lake Gty.pemetery as veterans Tribune Staff photo hr Borgo B. Andersen organizations pay tribute to the dead. This scene was repeated throughout Intermountain Areas cemeteries Sunday,

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