The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 23, 1940 · Page 4
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, January 23, 1940
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PAGE FOUR BLYTHEV1LLE (ARK,) COURIER NEWS TUESDAY, JANUARY 23, THE BLYTHEVILLB COURIER NEWS THX OOURIDl NKW8 OO. H. W. HAINE8, Publisher J. GRAHAM 8UDBURY, Edltot SAMUEL F. NORHIS, Advertising Manager ~" Sole National Advertising Representatives: Arkansas Dallies, Inc., New York, Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis, Dallas, Kansas City, Memphis. Published Every Atternoon Except Sunday Entered as second class matter ut the post- office st Blyfhevllle, Arkansas, under act of Congress. October 9, 1917. Served by the United Press. " SUBSCRIPTION RATES By carrier In the City of Blythevllle, 13o per week, or 05c per month. By mall, within a radius of 50 miles, $3,00 per year, $1.60 for six months, 16c for three months, by mal) in postal zones two U> six inclusive, }6.50 per year; In zones cevco and eight, 110.00 per, payable in ad"snc«. Jobs More Important Than 'Isms' In u way, the war abroad has shifted emphasis awtiy from solution of tins country's main problem- You citn scarcely blame politicians for jumping on Nazis and Fascists and Communists and Silver Shirts and liundsmon ami White Camellias and Christian FroiU- ist.s. They make easy targets. And they do offer n distraction, for a linn: at least, from the main problem at hand—unemployment. The "isms" in this country aren't so important—or at least, they shouldn't be. Isms don't generate where men arc busy working. They're simply the manifestations of the principal weakness— the symptoms of the cancer. Provide jobs for all employables, and yon won't over need. to worry seriously about isms. Lunatic schemes don't appeal to men who gel pay checks every week and who can feel reasonably assured that they will eat next week and the week 'after. At a meeting of the Society of Automotive IJnjjineers in Detroit a few days ago, William L. Ball, chairman of the Business Advisory Council of the Department of Commerce, said: "1 am not nearly as much concerned with the menace of the 'isms' as with the certain reactions of the men out of work. Because it is our number one danger, .it is our number one job." Mr. Batt is fully aware of the problem. He suggested that business men and engineers concentrate' on developing new means of guaranteeing "regu- laraation of employment." Not only must new men be put on jobs, but the old "workers must be-assured of continued employment. Planned production and purchasing was recommended as one way in which industrialist:! might keep their output at an even keel- Recent estimates have placed the unemployment figure at 0,500,000. Jlen without jobs become disgruntled after a time. Those who still have work become uneasy, aware of the competition in the labor field and of their own precarious positions. Only if this situation is allowed to continue too long will isms become an active menace. City, county, state, and federal officials have wrestled with the enigma for 10 years. They have instituted many plans lo overcome unemployment. They have watched the business curve slide downward and then turn and light its way slowly toward the top again. They have watched industry restore its production to pro-depression levels. And they have been discouraged lo discover that jobless workers were still almost as abundant as they were in the blacker days of the thirties. Officials can hardly be blamed for turning their attention away from this fundamental economic problem and organizing instead tin offensive against the isms. Here, at least, they are on safe ground. Here they can lake a definite position with a minimum ol criticism. But when the ism limit grows cold, they will have to turn back again to unemployment. Somewhere there's an answer if it can only be found. They may as well get busy once more on (his dilemma, and the isms will take care of themselves. SIDE GLANCES by GalbraKh e Nice Lo l.Jte Censm-'Idher When That Man (or woman) comes to your door and begins asking a lot of questions, you'd better answer them. That is, If you want to nlay out of jail. You may feel that he's a little nosey, bulling into your affairs and wanting to know a lot of silly things, but that's the job of the census-taker—finding out how Americans live. If you don't answer his questions, you may be fined $100 or sent lo jail for 60 days. If you give him intentionally incorrect information, the ante may be raised to $500 or one year in the jug. Business men who refuse to submit reports for their linns may bcr fined tfoOO or sentenced to 00 days; and, it" they give inaccurate information, the fine may be $10,000 or the sentence, one year. Even though the questions may not make much sense to you, Ihc government will probably collect a lot of valuable information. Uncle Sam isn't worried about people getting defiant. Only ijarely, during the past 150 years, has it been necessary lo bring charges. Census-takers will probably find, again, that most people are willing to, co-operate. A. Rose by Any Other Name— California's .Hum and Jiggers haw quit mumbling about their election defeat and are picking among the wreckage of their pension scheme to salvage what they can. In the first place, they've dropped ?10 a week from their plan and they've changed the slogan. It, won't be "?30- Every-Thursday," b u I "?20 N o w." Short and snappy. City, county and slalc taxes have been clipped out in favor of a general 3 per cent gross income tax. And the new plan makes certain labor's right to strike, a provision that was dubious in the original proposal. The whole thing sounds like a revival of an old flop with another title to lure the customers. In Arizona, «'combination of the Townscml and Hamami-Eggs plans has sprung up with a ?(iO monthly pension provision for persons over GO. From lime to lime, we may expect new schemes, sprouting almost anywhere in the country. The song- is ended, but the .memory lingers on. COPR. IMOgVKf* SERVICE, we. f. M. Kit. U. S ''Tnuirruid.ypu'rc not paying close attciilion! Let's put it Ibis way—Clark Cubic, a Roman, leads his legions a.i,'nij;3l Cjirlhuye, which is ruled by Frcdric March." THIS CURIOUS WORLD By William Ferguson PEAL EARS, TAKEN FROM AN AFRICAN* ARE USED ON THE ELEPHANT FAINTING ON THE WALLS OF THE SPORTSMAN'S CUUB, • CHICAGO, ILL. T. M. RtC. Y.3, PAT. CFF. BEES ARE SOLD ' BV THE O SERIAL STORY BLACKOUT BY RUTH AYERS COPYhlCHT. 1939.' NEA SERVICE. INC.' YKSTKKUAYl Vlurrnt »i iiion* JInl.v. Jit' JH In :i jiuit, rciil- IxfH KfoCl.uiJ VlirLj fM hunlfiix him. Ili> l>rns IHT-IO coniu ivilh him. Tlit-)- rlitp mil of London lo 1 ftnuiU alriifirl. A lilmiij in wiile- liJIf. Vliu-viil imluU mi uifraiMlve ivonl iik-lur' of :i liuneyniucjii in f/ic (Ifxert. 'Suiry lifKH lifm tti K(uy ruid fucc iiuulhliiuuut. lie tlru(;i IKT lo the vlimc. CHAPTER XXV drew back with new- J - found strength. "Vincent, you're playing the part of a (ugilive. You'll be h'jnled down, perhaps killed. I'm willing to wait for you. You can't escape. You owe it (o yourself to slay! You owe it (o mo!" He turned and there was something In his face she had never seen (here before. In review, everything came into focus. She thought—he's ;i soldier, yes, bul willing to fight tor the cause that pays most. He's likeable and charming but (here's nothing behind it. No matter where he flies, there'll always be a day of reckoning just over the horizon. And some day he won't be lucky enough to escape K. ''There's not another second to spare. Coming with me?" She stared at him. "Please—for my sake," she tried to say. He shook off her hand from his firm. "So long," he said almost jauntily, "I love you, but I'd rather face a firing squad than stay here a prisoner. If you v/on't go wilh me, I'm going alone." As a mechanic stepped out of the plane, Vincent leaped in, pulling on helmet and goggles. The plane taxied along the runway and then lifted, its wings at sharp angles against the.morning sun. Slanding tliere motionless, Mary knew then that when he went, some part of her life went with him. Always, she'd remember the way he'd smiled and the crooked lift of his eyebrow. Ho loved hei —the gay part of U—the carefree part. She knew, too, that Vincent hac planned all this. The borrowed car, (he wailing plane. He'd even iscd her to shield his getaway. Yes, he'd ralher die lha;i be im- irisoned. Perhaps he was In this py plot deeper than she knew. But even if he were, she could lever hate him—she could only pity him. • * « 'TURNING toward Vincent's car, Mary saw another auto pulling down the sandy road. Startled, she thought it was a Scotland Yard patrol. Instead, she began to remble when she saw Gilbert Lenox's red head. She ran towards him, her arms outstretched. "Oh, Gilbert," she cried. "You're the one person In all the world I want to see most. Vincent's gone. I couldn't stop lim." "I know." Gilbert put her head igainst his shoulder. "As soon as you walked out of the hospital, I knew I had to follow you, foolish, loyal little idiot that you are. f kept track of you when you ioined Vincent at the tobacco shop. There were some awful minutes ivhen I (bought you might weaken nnd liy (o go wifh him. But when I guessed his destination was this air field, something told me you would stay behind." Mary broke down in the comforting protection of Gilbert's strong arms. "I'll have to go to Scotland Yard at once," she began in a strangled voice. "It's jny laull that Vincent got away." "Come on," Gilbert salu gently, "although I've a hunch you don't have to worry. The morning papers are filled wilh your wonderful feat. You're England's heroine today—and I'm proud you have my name." She could only stare at him, all her heart looking out of her eyes She'd wanted to spare him this hateful publicity — and here he was, glowing wilh pride in her.' 1 In Inspector Babcock's office, i 1 was as busy as it had been hours before in the excitement of Carl. Marchetla's capture. The inspector saw Mary ant beckoned to her. 'My dear, 1 know what you're going to leU me Vincent Gregg got away—but it' ot your fault. And It re;; ocsn'l matter (or fhe present.' , legcncy Is saved and we've ha u|l confession from Felix, j larchetla woman's real conf rate. There's lime enough to ae other members of the ring He leaned closer, his eyes ci'ly as they rested on her dra ace. "Because of the great sej ce you've done for us, wo ,w, I ivepared to do nothing worse' I •our sweetheart than to exile 1> I Vnd now he's done 'that himse^ I "Thank you!" Mary's hfl ropped. No time now to cxpl; [ o Inspector Babcock that Vine- I vas no longer her sweetheart. 5 ast loyalty to him had en.' vhen he'd waved goodby from JI plane. •' i I * * * ILBERT was wailing for heij | liislcar outside. "All set?" ho was smiling. Joy at (he sight of him ov! flowed In Mary. This red-heat, doctor was so slrong, so steady' I exactly everything that a real n; | should be. "It's like coming home," sighed as she leaned against h I "You bet it Is," Gilbert F j niskily. "I've loved' you i'i from the start—in the air raid I "irst night and from the rnin | .-on were brought into the hosp. an Anna Winters." Anna's name brought a Ih i sand memories flooding b; Anna Winters, the dear, gei English girl who'd died on Mornvia. But Anna,' dead, 1 I lived on in ihe happiness she'e I last brought to the girl wb | taken her name. "No time for tears," Gilbert v I saying, his handkerchief patt; her cheeks. If all Scotland Yard had looking from the windows, wouldn't have cared as he bent' kiss her. jl As if it had been a signal, ;;[ broke through the London I. "Happy is the bride," Mary m| mured, "the sun shines on." ( No blackout could ever bloE I her happiness again. '• The Enil , IVE THE COAAAAOKJ NAMES FOR THESE ZODIAC SI ANSWER: Aries, ram; Taurus, bull; Leo, lion; Capricornus, goal. ' NEXT; Arc birds related (o dinosaurs? develops after a time which seems to Invalidate the operation, and nvestigators are working on changes in the technique to prevent tills complication. Tlic operation is exceedingly difficult. There are only a few men who try to perform it, and Us exact value is not yet eslaj}- Mshed. Dr. Bricn King developed n plastic operation to overcome paralysis of (he vocal cords, sometimes occurring after operation on the thyriod gland. Another surgical procedure corrected i\ serious condition, sometimes appearing at birth, in which an opening from the large veins into the aorta docs not penult tiie blood to pass properly through the heart. A better surgical method \va? developed for transplanting tissue from the cornea of tiie eyes of babies who die in birth into persons whose eyes have been in- fectcrt with resulting development of scar (Lwiic over the pupil to produce blindness. Philadelphia scientists tested ihe effects 01 ireezin^ on cancer tissue Apparently such freezing will sto) the growth o! the tissue and tern to brin<j about soltcning. The mtth- I believe from my heart that the cause svincn binds together my peoples and o«r gallnnl i"'.« faithful allies is Ihe cause of Christian civili- sation.—King George VI of Great Britain. •THE FAMILY DOCTOR New. Surgical Techniques Developed To Help,Doctors Save Human. Lives ocl hns been tried, however, onl; in fatal cases, and its exact us; fulness is In no sense established Studies in the treatment of can cer were also made wilh the cyclo Iron, the ncv-' alom-sinnshing ap paratus developed In the Universlt of California. Human beings were I not been given, treated with neutron rays produced In other words by this device, with the Idea that 'hose BRUGE CATTON IN WASHINGTON By BKUor. CATTON may draw a pension. This Courier KCWK Washington Correspondent would make any veteran's \v | WASHINGTON, Jan. 23.—Presi- eligible if she married the vet | lent Roosevelt already has 19(i "> >'«"'s Prior to h ls death,, Iclegatcs for the next convention, llvc(l witl1 him during- those y, I f you believe nil you hear The odd' II Is estimated the annual \\ >Rit is that no voter has,yet expressed himself—and the President Isn't a candidate. The President, has been "prom- scd" Ihe delegates of Ohio (52) by State Democratic Chairman Arhur Limbiich; of Pennsylvania (72) by Senator Jos Ouffey; of Illinois 1531 • by Mayor Kelly of hicago. and of Florida (14 > by Senator Claude Pepper. Illinois :mrt Pennsylvania elect their delegates in April; Ohio and Florida elect theirs in May. Florida has no preference primary at all. Illinois has one. but it's purely advisory; the delegates vote on which candidate shall be supported. Pennsylvania Iras a prefernec primary, hut so far no one has even filed petitions to put FDR's name on the ballot. In Ohio, each candidate for delegate musl say what presidential candidate he's for, but he can't use a presidential candidate's name without the owner's consent —nnrl lo date FDR'.s consent hns vonid be around,$2,000,000. ; '*'»-» T ' ' VEW MARITIME CUT IS FORESEEN The. $50,000.000 cut infliclei e U. 5. Maritime Commissioij :)ie House appropriations conll tee will be made considerably cfl cr, if important GOP congresi| liavc their v:ay Wngc-ll law may escape important am'I mcnts at this session. Congres; [ Graham Harden, ils leading fc : I willing lo delay action until Co I Fleming has had more time ti ] vamp the act's administration. Attorney General Murphy Is I ported sore at J. Edgar Hoove suddenly releasing the story the Christian Frontiers. Ml | was to have made ((, public Hoover beat, him to the puncl 1 Down Memory such rays break down the self-productive cancer cells. wild, and BV 1>U. MOHK1S ITSIinKIN Kditor, Journal of Ihc American Medical Association, and of I llygrln. the. Hrallh M,ig;izinc Advancement in surgery continued, with work on a new operative thus help to bring about remission in Ihc cancer. In the forefront of scientific interest was the work on the causi- | procedure (or people with pcrma- tioil of high ,,| of)rt 1>el - s . s ure by Gold ' nent lo^s ut hearing because of I blalt ol Cleveland. These studies hardening of (lie tissues in the car. showed (lie importance of comli- Jn Ihc new operation, n window is made directly Into the internal car. Unfortunately, new tissue OUT OUR WAY By J. K. Williams OUR BOARDING HOUSE . with Major HoopJe 1 WJEW HE COD\.D FOOL ALOMQ TH' WAV EMOUGH TO SOAK.TH' BOTTOM OUT OF A PAPEE BAG, BUT NEVER DREAMED HE'D BE \_ON& EMOU6H TO LOSE TH' CEACHERS THRU A lAYEPi OF CELLC7PHAMB,A LAVER CAR.DBOARD AWP A LAYER. OF vXiiXED PAP£R. THE WORRY WAR.1 EGAD, JAKE, YOUR ' ~^J2:( RUM? BROTHER AMOS, \%i JAKE GRABBED GALL 15 STUPENDOUS.' MI™S BABY 6OE<3 LIKE A ^(TH6 MfcJOR'6 EYE T. CANNOT FORGET' WOW }^.TI(IE;P OP AM AUUEV.' ALL >?> TEETH. LAST YOU FILCHED M.V AMTtQUE >y HIS FOLK'S WAS FLYERS—) SUMMER ANO« ARCHLUTE,SOLblTFOR*3pO UllS FATHER WAS GITOOT, j NOV^ HE'S TRV1WS (ions which interfere ivilh (lie actions of ll\e kidneys. Technique;; were introduce:! tor no voter li four states has even been . but, he'll approached on Ihc matter the President hah hecn lold got nil the delegates. * * * C.HOW YOUR OWN MOTOft Write down "cliemurgy" word you'll hcnr during the cam- palgn. Among (lie Republican congressional committees which nrp seck- g clatn-oii which the liartj- .saving blood in blood banks, for | base Us faun policy, is one headed serum, and for using J by Congressman Roy Woodruff of Michigan which lias been looking nwilic 01° dvojwy f'uul as » .substi- lute for blood. machine ArfUlS.MAMWV WAS Aw GvVAN) ~~ <3O THEY SCRIXM, FCr< SHORT/ HIS FULL PEDIGREE MOMCKER is REAL FAMCY 3CRAWWOLO PERCY PROFIT AND CAN THIS MOM6REL YOU CRAMKFURTER. POR TME German pilots are toting by hiving oim- jras mounted on. the wings, to lake piclures pressed ,lhc lris?cr rclca.se the cockpil Announcements Tiie Coiirler^News has been formally nulhorized to announce the following candidacies for ofhce subject to the action of the Democratic primary ill August. Jlibsissippi County Jurtsc ROLAND GREEN Sheriff and Collector HALE JACKSON Treasurer R. L. (BILLY) GAINES (For Second Term) y and Prolraln Cirri; T W. POTTER For Second Trnni 10 Vears Ago ; Washington — Emergency a alien fcr Rear Admiral Byrd's -;l arctic expedition lias been req ', ed of the state dcpartmen I ! Byrd's backers. Byrd has rep 1 1 i Dint, the lives of several mer'j of his party are at, stake, A quiet, but solemnly impri marriage ,scrvice \va.s used last nlng at Piiragould when Pearl LcRea Moore became bricic of Elton West brook Ktr Five. Years Ago Mrs. K. D. Carpenter Is vis; relatives in- Monticello, 111. .' into the imtter of using in indus-| Mta ola I!ol) H » rris 's able, t try materials produced on Ihc "l> following an operation a! farin--ch('miirgy. in sliort. This committee lias heard a dozen tccli- nirimis. and Woodruff cnlhusi- He suggests that if the government. would put a tariff on divers I'ts and oik which American Invmet.-s could grow but don't, and il the government would contribute eicrylhing possible in the wny of scientific research, and would tiKourni'e the use of alcohol as an automotive fuel, a tremendous Baplisl liospltnl L. G. B of Lenchvlllc is attending, to ness here toriny . \Vi!s County ni"A' market, vvould be opened for Hif virmer. . , . , 'To sny that \vc could i\\ this «»v use the products ot 100 million iicrev, Is mighty conservative." he wiy.s "We couldn't do U n!l at oiler-, of course; but in the iminc- diate future v.c could at least off- MM Mi? -lo million acres Ihe .icimin- if-'ruLion is trying to take out of i'K-ilmtion. if we could pul. the __ |!o«n- of government and iudus- Tlie courier News has been au-hu h"hmd'llie idea." ,«,i,_j i^ »,imr,nnre the lollow- ' ' on at the, MOttK, ciVJt WAR to be held VKXSIONS IX PROSPECT Some jnOO women who married Civil War veterans when 'the veterans were In the sere and yellow leaf will go on the government pension rolls if a bill just okayed by thr House pension committee Al picstnl. no uoman who mar- I'icd u civil War vet after 1903 of Memphis was a Blythcvillr itov today. One Year Ago Washington: Two army ofl ; told Ihe hr.usc military committee today (hat, the IT States should provide ullm -~ cm weapons in peace liihe quate lo equip an army ot one j lion men soon after the oull> of war. April 2. Municipal DOYLE HENDERSON (For Second TerrrO C.KORGE W. BAP.HAM City Clerk FRANK WHITWORTI1 flly Altoincr ROY NELSON Prized Territorial Flag In Pioneer's Posses YAKIMA, Hash. (UP)—Mr.-; tee Owens. Yakimn valley pl(' ( owns a flag of terrllcrlal \\ Ington wlilch was made cs|tc. for the territory's Ilrsl 8ovt r Isaac I Blevens. to use In t negotiations with tribes o( JUJe. The flue v.-as tasUloncd by Owens' graiiiihiothcr and aiiut.s. K tirst Was otticialiy furled Christmas day, 1851 It tallied 15 stars. Ocv. Stcvem the Pag flown at virtually -. his peace councils with 1: and it was the principal baivf, llic l'n>t Icsislallvc bjil u[ .st.itc. Mrs. Owens i;iid.

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