Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa on November 28, 1967 · Page 7
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Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa · Page 7

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Carroll, Iowa
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Tuesday, November 28, 1967
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Page 7
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Sees Great Days Ahead in Hollywood By BOB THOMAS (AP Movie-Television Writer HOLLYWOOD (AP) - That astute observer of Hollywood flora and fauna, David Niven, has returned for another of his periodic expeditions. He concludes that while the flora is flourishing, the fauna is not. Niven has been coming to these shores since 1934, when he arrived in search of gold. After a couple of starving years he began succeeding as an actor. But the golden period didn't come until he returned from six years of wartime service and was elevated to top stardom as well as Oscardom— "Separate Tables," 1958. In recent times he has been an infrequent visitor, all the better to gain a perspective on local conditions. He is now here to play a bewildered parent in "The Impatient Years" for , MGM, and he paused for some i observations on Hollywood today. "It's sad, really," he remarked. "When I first came to this town, MGM was crawling with activity. The stars that were here in those days! Gable Garbo, Tracy, Crawford, Shearer, Beery, MacDonald and Eddy, Powell and Loy, Dressier. Plus a great company of character actors like Lewis Stone. "And down in the schoolhouse were a bunch of youngsters training to be stars as well as learning their arithmetic— Judy Garland, Lana Turner, Mickey Rooney, Ava Gardner. And later, Elizabeth Taylor. "And today there is only one picture shooting on this lot! "This kind of situation naturally causes insecurity, and that's what is so sad: to see all these able and talented people living in uncertainty about the future." Niven, whose home is now in Switzerland, finds the social atmosphere less changed. He has attended dinner parties at the homes of chums, and observes that entertaining is much the same as in the golden '30s, though the parties are smaller and less formal. Niven's outlook on Hollywood isn't at all pessimistic, despite David Niven the depressed working conditions he has found. "I think the greatest days are ahead for Hollywood," he said. "Movies are still the greatest entertainment there is, and nowhere can they be made as well as they are here. The only danger is if the studios believe they can turn out any kind of product, aiming at the television market." Earth Could Support Up to 40 Billion Weather Elsewhere Fun to send . . . Fun to receive g CHRISTMAS CARDS - STONE'S * Carroll, Iowa By The Associated Press High Low Albuquerque, cloudy 40 29 Albany, cloudy 43 26 Atlanta, clear 58 30 Bismarck, clear 20 5 Boise, cloudy 41 31 Boston, clear 47 31 Buffalo, cloudy 42 24 Chicago, clear 29 20 Cincinnati, clear 43 20 Cleveland, snow 38 24 Denver, clear 39 14 Des Moines, clear 30 15 Detroit, snow 35 21 Fairbanks, cloudy 10 -5 Fort Worth, rain 56 42 Helena, cloudy 23 15 Honolulu, rain 80 74 Indianapolis, clear 36 21 Jacksonville, clear 82 50 Juneau, snow 29 24 Kansas City, clear 42 25 Los Angeles, cloudy 70 59 Louisville, clear 46 24 Memphis, cloudy .... 51 24 Miami, clear 81 70 Milwaukee, clear .... 26 15 Mpls.-St. P., clear .. 19 7 New Orleans, clear 76 51 New York, cloudy .. 55 31 Okla. City, snow 49 37 Omaha, clear 34 18 Philadelphia, clear 56 30 Phoenix, clear 69 52 Pittsburgh, cloudy .. 38 21 Pllnd, Me., clear .... 47 28 Rind, Ore., cloudy 45 37 Rapid City, clear .... 34 7 Richmond, clear .... 61 24 St. Louis, clear 39 22 Salt Lk. City, cloudy 41 22 San Diego, cloudy .. 70 53 San Fran., cloudy .... 58 51 Seattle, clear 47 38 Tampa, cloudy 82 68 Washington, clear .. 59 31 Winnipeg, clear 8 3 (T-Trace) Pr. .11 A Little Town in Mexico Becomes a Factor in Quest for U.S. Presidency .03; T. .31 i .06 .09 .01 .01 WORKER KILLED CEDAR RAPIDS (AP) - Gordon Davis, 56, o! Cedar Rapids was killed in a construction accident Sunday. By HAL BOYLE NEW YORK (AP) - Things a columnist might never know if he didn't open his mail: How many people can the earth feed? No one knows the real limit, but some scientists estimate the full use of nuclear- generated power—it could pump desalted sea water into arid areas—would make possible the support of 40 billion persons living at a subsistence level, or nine billion living at present U.S. standards. Members of European royalty once used to paint the veins in their temples bright blue so that the lower classes would be sure to recognize they were blue- blooded. The stripes on zebras, like the fingerprints of human beings, are individualistic. No two patterns are exactly alike. Since zebras commit few crimes, however, no massive file of their markings has been made. The male ostrich has a lot of fun in life, but he pays for it in the end. Although he has several wives, they generally insist on laying all their eggs in one nest — and then largely leave to him the task of hatching them. You don't have to be big to cause trouble. Viruses are so small that 25 million could huddle on the head of a pin. Yet they create ailments ranging from polio to mumps and warts. By spreading the "common cold" they cost $5 billion a year and 150 million lost workdays in the United States alone. How thick is the earth's hardened crust? About 15 to 20 miles in most places, 3 or 4 miles in coastal areas, and up to 35 miles beneath the Rocky Mountains. Quotable notables: "I venture to suggest that patriotism is not a short and frenzied outburst of emotion but the tranquil and steady dedication of a lifetime." —Adlai E. Stevenson. Power of the press: People who read newspapers are more likely to practice family planning that those who do not, according to a worldwide study of human fertility by Dr. Dudley Kirk, Stanford • University professor. One of the best ways to please a wife is to take her to dinner at a restaurant, and lots of husbands seem to be doing so. Americans now spend more than $20 billion a year dining away from home. . Know your language: In early day America a 10-cent piece was called a "hog". A spendthrift who willingly squandered an entire dime on entertainment was said "to go whole hog." (Guv. (iporgc Kumney nf MIcl- Run who formally threw bin hat into the presidential ring last week, wan horn In Mexico. Hln R arentK were T.S. citizen*. Does e still qualify as a "natural horn citizen" of the United States? Politicians and lawyers debate the point and a little town In Mexico suddenly become* a factor In the quest for the presidency of the United States. If ere, lit a look at Colonla Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico, the town where Komney was born.) By ROBERT H. JOHNSON JR. (Associated Press Writer) COLONIA Dublan, Mexico (AP) — It is the Mexico you read about: harsh desert, tawny grasslands, vaqueros riding, blue mountains, villages of sunbaked mud. And then—can it be true?— prim, two-story, red brick houses with red-haired boys romping under the trees. This is Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua—birthplace of George Romney, the man who could become the first foreign-born president of the United States. "Isn't it just like any other Western town?" said a plump, middle-aged grandmother with a note of civic pride. Yes, but— Among the Victorian bricks squat Mexican adobe houses. Along the one paved street and the rutted, dirt side streets wander dogs, horses and ambling cattle. Here is a school, rows of glass panes winking, sharply angled, low-slung contemporary, fenced with steel chain links. And there in the school yard, herded by tall, fair-skinned teachers briskly calling good mornings in English to James and Estella, the children line up for the flag ceremony. They stand stiffly at attention, right hands rigid over their hearts in knife-edge salute while they change the pledge of allegiance, in Spanish, and the autumn breeze unfurls the red, white and green—the flag of Mexico. George Romney's parents, Gaskell Romney and Anne Pratt, grew up here as children of Mormons. Colonia Dublan was one of a series of colonies established as havens for poly- gamists in the 1880s by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. But the colonists, along with other Mormons, gave up plural marriage after the church accepted federal law and began excommunicating polygamists in 1890. George Romney's parents were monogamous. In tHe fighting and fears of the Mexican revolution in 1912, Gaskell and Anne Romney fled with some 2,000 other Mormons into the United States in a movement' unfailingly called The Exodus here. George Romney was then 5. The U.S. Constitution says that the president must be a "natural born citizen." Romney is a citizen because his parents were citizens. He says studies in the past have shown that the Constitution was not intended to deprive children born of citizens abroad of their change to become president. But Isidor Blum, a former professor of constitutional law at New York Law School, wrote recently in the New York Law Journal that the authors of the Constitution meant born within the United States when they wrote "natural born." He traced this meaning back to the English common law of the 14th century. Colonia Dublan is about 135 miles due sothwest of El Paso, Tex.—200 miles by highway—in a mile-high valley on the east side of the Sierra Madre Occidental. It lies on the north edge of Neva Casas Grandes, a commercial center of about 20,000 population. About four miles Times Herald, Carroll, la. Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1967 southwest of Nueva Casas Grandes is the original, now smaller town .of Casas Grandes. Some five miles beyond Casas Grandes lies another Mormon colony, Colonia Juarez. Colonia Dublan and Colonia Juarez each has a population of about 2,000. Of these, Church records show that as November began there were 263 Anglo Mormons in Dublan and 389 in Juarez. The rest of the approximately 1,530 persons in the Juarez Stake—roughly the same as a diocese—are Latin Mormons. Practically everybody else in this cluster of towns is a Catholic with a Spanish-Indian Mexican background. The colonists keep up with events "out there" by watching two El Paso television channels and by subscribing to El Paso and Salt Lake City newspapers and U.S. magazines. When a television set breaks down, it is sometimes months before enough parts and skill can be gotten together to repair it. Dennis Wagner, heads the colonies' largest and most modern business—Wagner Bros., a farming, packing and distributing enterprise. "We have more business than we can handle in Mexico," he said: George Romney's Aunt Emily rocked in her sitting room in Colonia Juarez and smiled through a network of fine wrinkles that softly overlay the years. Yes, she remembered George. "We didn't see him very much. It was a long way between Dublan and Juarez in those days. At parties is the only time we saw him. He was a real congenial young fellow. And he's still a fine young man." But as a presidential candidate: "I hope he doesn't get it. It would be just too much for him. I think if anybody could get the job done, he could, but I think it's a position that no one would want. It's too much responsibility." Harvey H. Taylor, remembers Romney, too: "Oh, he was up and doing like most boys." Like many Mormon men, Taylor stayed in Mexico at the time of the Exodus. He became a supplier for Gen. John J. Pershing when the U.S. cavalry was chasing Pancho Villa. Once, pistol on his thigh, he faced down a Mexican officer who had issued a warrant for his arrest. Now 77 and holding the title of state patriarch, Taylor still works several hours a day on his farm. He keeps a stack of U.S. magazines on the table beside his chair and had just read "a pretty good article" on Romney's career. Whatever Romney's political future, the young Mormons of Dublan are content that for them life will always be just a little different—and better— than the lives they might have led "out there." "Of course," said Harvey Taylor's granddaughter, Shirley Robinson "all the girls who go out there'to school are thrilled hy the supermarkets and the movies and the freeways and all George Romney those lovely things. But soon it's the strain—it's the pace—that begins to wear on you. "Here we seldom lock the doors. Oh, we might ask somebody to watch the house if we are going to be away overnight, but we don't feel any real need to lock the doors. "Here it's a quieter, safer, calmer life." New Self Polishing Floor Cleaner Puts High Luster on Vinyl and Linoleum Floors in Carroll If your linoleum or vinyl floors look yellow and dull from the wax you are using, here's a new floor cleaner that cleans as it polishes, gives an amazing new Lustre to hard surface floors. It's mirror clean, goes on quickly and easily and brightens up yellowed and dull floors in an amazing way. One trial can will make you truly happy with the beauty of your floors. Get it at Bierl's Store of Floors Carroll SCS Accepts 2 New Cooperators Two new cooperators were approved by the Carroll Coun-j ty Soil Conservation District commissioners Monday night at the Soil Conservation office. They are Gerald H a u b r i c h, who farms 160 acres in Roselle j Township and Arden Hinners, j who farms 320 acres in Wash-! ington Township. j Marvin Larson, soil conser-j j vationist, reported that work is j j expected to be completed this year on the county's first group soil conservation project near Breda on the Reiff and Pudenz farms. The cooperative effort is | designed to control surface erosion. DISCOUNT G-MART TOY CENTER Shop Early on Lay-Away! Open Mon. thru FH.-9 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday-9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday-1 p.m.-5 p.m. Why Not Get the Best? new 7968 COLOR TELEVISION HANDCRAFTED for unrivaled dependability PATENTED COLOR DEMODULATOR CIRCUITRY Extracts color from the incoming signal with peak 'precision for unsurpassed/ true-to-life color hues. GIANT 23" RECTANGULAR 295 sq. in. picture FEATURES THE BEST IN COLOR TV PERFORMANCE HANDCRAFTED COLOR TV CHASSIS Handwired with no printed circuits and no production shortcuts for the utmost in dependability. SUNSHINE© COLOR TV PICTURE TUBE for greater picture brightness with redder reds, brighter greens and more brilliant blues. Pierson Marine Killed in Vietnam WASHINGTON (AP) —Marine Cpl. Mark C. Petersen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carson L. Petersen of Pierson, Iowa, was killed in Vietnam action Nov. 9, the Defense Department said Mon,day. The family said funeral serv- ces would be held Wednesday at Pierson. Cpl. Peterson returned home briefly in August to attend the funeral of a brother, Kelly, who was killed in a one-car accident at Volk Field, Wis. Buy Your Color TV Where You Are Sure of Quality and Service Up To 36 Months To Pay For Your Color TV Coast to Coast Store Elmer Friedman and Duane Taphorn PLEDGE SORORITIES Three Carroll area students at the University of Northern [owa, Cedar Falls, are among 118 students who have accepted invitations to pledge social sororities at the school. First semester freshmen may 'be pledged during their first semesters, but may not be initiated until they have earned "C" averages or better in at least 12 credit hours. Prior to this year, pledging during the first semester was not possible because of a scholarship requirement, Lynn Grantham of Lake City pledged Alpha Gamma Delta, Delia Miller of Templeton Alpha Xi Delta, and Jill Blanchfield of Lake City Phi Sigma Phi. ON PARTY COMMITTEE Ann Fister, daughter of Mrs. Bethane L. Fister, a junior at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, is serving as treasurer ol the University of Iowa centra party committee this year. The committee plans large all-uni versity entertainment for the school, including the Homecom ing dance, Dad's Day concert a concert by Duke Ellington and a presentation by th "Fantasticks." She is a junior Big cuddly 17" b«ar in soft brown pile plush has fin* qual- 18" Tubsy Doll Sh« likes to take q both - playfully tf ^^^ slaps the water. «p | (lOO Has turning head. I \J 23-1103 Fun Pizza Oven Actually makes a delicious pizza. A real 'oven with cheese pizza mix. 23-1301 » i Trap Drum Set *17' s * Monza Road Race Tonka Stable Set Professional -like drum set with 3 drums, 12" drum sticks and cymbal. 23-2181 Newl Steeply banked Monza curved wall! Set includes jeep, «tak« truck, pickup truck w/ trailer, 2 horses! 33-1711 NO MONEY DOWN 20'track, jj-utz He Money Dew* Hands Down $397 Ouija Board $338 Mysterious pointer spells out answers to questions, tells fortunes. Party funl 40* Hiawatha 4» s Teaches by talking 1 . Pull ring—hear name and musical sound of each instrument. 1 Plenty of action—lots of laughs! Watch out if the joker's on you! Ideal for all ages. It's the "Squirt Game" or "So Sorry I Mist You!" Rollicking fun for everyone! Fly over hills on a slick Sled itreamBned for four-knee sled! Royal *?••«• "«« ««««« ' Racer has T-ihaped "•" ^ '"J*^' " runners. k hardwood. 23-2762 Midget Ughts Colorful twinkling light let. with green wire, pdd-on plug for additional sets. Outdoor Ughts $494 Light up your home for Christmasl 35-lighl set has / gr««n wir«, add- on plug. UL Outdoor Lifts 4 »7 25 Me weatherproof *et. Green parallel wiring, tempered iteef dipt. UM* C-9 bulb*. Tinsel Garland 77' Feather-cut silver plot- tic garland to drop* •v«rywhir«l 15x3", fireproof. 43" Lamp Post $39$ Nostalgic red and whits plastic outdoor lamp post has holly Uaf trim! 6' cord. Troo Stand 87' Enameled red end green steel stand holds trees with up t« 3'A" trunks. Savel

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