The Evening News from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania on June 10, 1946 · Page 14
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The Evening News from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania · Page 14

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Monday, June 10, 1946
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7 14 THE EVENING NEWS, Hamburg, Pa., Monday, June 10, 1946 Walking Into It "These Days" ASSOCIATION BY COMPULSION New York CAVALCADE By LOUIS SOBOL King Features Syndicate. Inc. 11 Norm Market Square Harrisburg, Pa. Published every evening except Sunday 1'HJS FAl'KlOi L'uMfANY. established February 15. 1917 By GEORGE E. SOKOLSKY Copyright. 1946. King Features Syndicate. Inc. It is an inalienable right for an American to join and belong to VANCE C McCOKMICK President CHARLES H. MORRISON Treasurer and Business Manager ' HOMER B. MOYER , .. Advertisin Manager : DEAN HOFFMAN Editor ' V HUMMEL BERGHAUS JR. Managing Editor to unite for a purpose, it was nobody's business but their own, no matter what kind of an organization it turned out to be. There must be thousands of associations any association he chooses. He may be a Mason, a Knight of Co Address communications to THE EVENING NEWS. Editorial. Business or Circulation Departments, not to individuals Call Bell 525? Same number reaches all departments Single copy 4 cents. 20 cents per week, delivered lumbus, a Rotarian, a Kiwanian, a member of a couple of hundred Protesant sects or the Yogis of the Omnipotent Oom or Father Di of all kinds, representing all points! of view, all sorts of activities, all! Entered as second class matter at Harrisburg. P O. Under the Act of March 3, 1879 sorts of attitudes toward life. And MONDAY, JUNE 10, 1946 Americans joined them criss-cross.; vine's conclaves. He may be all these and a Republican, a Democrat, a Communist or a Prohi XTEW YORK, June 10. The old- ' fashioned red brick buildings right out of Edith Wharton's "The Age of Innocence" which still face the sedate Washington Arch in the Village . . . And farther down, where the business-like buildings of New York University stand, old-timers recall gray castellated homes which once harbored famous residents including Colt, who invented the revolver, and Samuel Morse, who experimented successfully with the telegraph and the daguerretotype . . . Morse was an artist, too, and one of Washington Square's original Bohemians . . . It was he who painted the striking portrait of Lafayette which hangs over the mantelpiece (I hope it still does) in the council A man might be an Elk and be HARRISBURG'S JULY FOURTH long to the CIO, the Presbyterian bitionist. Anybody can join any Church Rntnrv. thfi Cnnmhpr nf! L rl thing. Recently, I addressed the AFTER a lapse of a few years, the Fourth of July again will be "the day we celebrate" in Harrisburg. Under the direction of the Citv Park Department, a program is DAR at Atlantic City and watched the Cedars of Lebanon, in costume, being arranged in which young can participate, which old do their hi-jinks on the Board walk. Yet, in Boonville, Ind., Amerl Commerce, a golf club and a society for the prevention of cruelty to cats. Nobody cared. If that is what a man likes to do with his time, that is up to him. If he covers his lapel with buttons and insignia, that is his taste. And taste is something that even Con can watch, and which all can enjoy. cans sixteen of them were in There will be prize contests for children, a baby parade structed to resign from the local Junior Chamber of Commerce, or chamber in City Hall. gress cannot legislate nor the Supreme Court destroy. they would be expelled from District 11 of the United Mine Work A NIGHT of glory for a rising star Peter Lind Hayes But here is one of John L. ers of America. with more prizes, an exhibit of model airplanes, and the day topped off with a band concert and fireworks display. Probably one of the features which will appeal to most of the celebrators is the invitation from Park Director Leitner to all families "to pack a basket and visit Reservoir Park for a day of recreation and entertainment." As suggested in these columns a week or two ago, this is the year when families can celebrate. Reunited with! Henry Kearns, president of the Lewis', districts telling its members what it may join and what is United States Junior Chamber of prohibited. It would seem that Commerce, writes me: when an American ties up with a "The Boonville UMW men who were active members of their local Junior Chamber were forced to their sons and husbands after several anxious -war years resign. They had joined the Jay modern labor union, he not only renounces the right .to an independent mind but he sells his soul. PAC has, in effect, been doing that indirectly by telling CIO members for whom they are to they make the Fourth a family jubilee for all the holidays they have missed. cees because they were eager to make Boonville a better town in which to live by working for public health, safety, youth welfare, and the other worthwhile projects . 3- ..... vote, thus impairing the secrecy j &v makes his debut at the Copacabana and is cheered to the rafters . . . This talented young man, who reminds you occasionally of a younger Frank Fay blended with a younger Jim Barton, has an original style of gentle comedy which places him head and shoulders above many of his more experienced and publicized confreres especially those who have to depend upon smutty double entendre for their laughs . . . Among those who paid tribute to young Hayes (we're not counting his pretty wife, Actress Mary Healy) were Don Ameche, Lou Costello, Ethel Merman, Elliott Roosevelt and Faye Emerson, Louis Calhern and others . . . Scribbled street poetry on a station wall of the Third Avenue El: "Here died my love. Do you of a free election. And many labor With city parks available for picnics, and within easy reach, they should attract thousands of families who prefer i safe and sane holiday near home. The addition of a unions, particularly CIO ones, re of the Junior Chamber. When they explained to the union that quire their members, by a tax, to contribute to political campaign the Junior Chamber of Commerce was an independent civic organiza funds irrespective of their beliefs, opinions, and desires. That, of course, is compulsion. tion, the protest fell on deaf ears." continuous program of events will enhance the enjoyment. THE EVENING NEWS is glad of the opportunity to cooperate in arrangements for the celebration and hopes to see you there. Let's go ! Prentice McNeely, president of the Boonville Junior Chamber of Compulsion is a new, virulent Commerce, states: disease in American life, spreading in epidemic form. One method "This is to assure you that I, personally, was told by Ernest hear its ghost sobbing near the Goad, District Representative of W cr I J25S2-5rDlstr- y United Featurelciteri Tt ; 1. tracks?" . . . Joan Fontaine and the United Mine Workers, that Mr. of compulsion is to frighten independent Americans by smearing, so bitter, so unfair, so humiliating, that many men shrink from facing the consequence of such a barrage BUILDING BOOM A NATIONALLY known brewery has priorities to construct a new plant failed to in New her new bridegroom, Bill Dozier, obtain Jersey, Louis Austin, President, District Number 11, United Mine Workers sway through sambas on the tiny 18 Club's dance floor. of America, Terre Haute, Indiana, of infamy. It is growing increas ingly unpleasant for Americans to CUMMER days arrive and the sidewalk cafes present a gay join any organization that favors had ruled that the local mine workers could not join our Junior Chamber of Commerce, and we, therefore, were forced to refund paid membership dues to some of picture, almost pre-war Parisian . . . At LeRuban Bleu, Proprietor An American ideals as expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United WASHINGTON SLANT OF DAVID LAWRENCE thony Mele reminds a few of us which seems right and proper in view of the housing shortage. But elsewhere in New Jersey two large and elegant new race tracks are under construction. Doubtless the tracks' owners would be reluctant to reveal what strings they pulled to get building material at this time. But perhaps they will be good enough to set aside a few vacant corners and a little fresh straw for some of the veterans and their families who are still frantically searching for a permanent abode. States. Such Americans are there upon vigorously and hatefully described Fascists, Anti-Semites, June 10. .TF, HOWEVER, the President, WASHINGTON, Anti-Negro, Red-Baiters any Either of two sets of conse quences can flow from the deci these mine workers." So here is another example of coercion and compulsion. It used to be that Americans believed in live and let live. They prided themselves that they enjoyed a sense of humor. A gentleman was one who minded his own business. If a group of Americans wanted thing that comes into the heads of and will appeal to the electorate generally as a sensible course. . jJR. TRUMAN has been weighing the problem for several days to find the right answer. If he will re-read the principles .of Thomas Jefferson, he will find it. The answer is that Government cannot rest upon special privilege for any group and that the public interest must be served irrespective of the pressures by groups which seek materialistic privilege. The 'Case Bill is a measure to abolish special privilege and put management and labor unions on these votaries of compulsion by smear, who not only seek to inv High Wood pressure and stomach ulcers may result from many that his younger son is still in the Army, stationed in Germany so that as far as he is concerned, the war is still on . . . Jockey Sammy Renick, with four boxes of nylons under an arm, heading for the post office to mail them to Roddy Williams, the Bennuda tycoon, now in England . . . "These will make Roddy the most popular man in London," says Sammy. In Toots Shor's, Sidney Kingsley and the beauteous Madge Evans, after having surveyed the Equity Library Theater's fine performance prison the minds of our people but sion of President Truman this week, depending on whether he signs or vetoes the Case bill. This measure endeavors to remove violence and irresponsibility from the causes, including the daily headlines. signs the Case bill or lets it become law without his signature, here is what may be expected to happen: 1. Labor will threaten and criticize and attack but will support the Democrats at the polls just the same, for labor knows it can receive far more benefits by a con to destroy their liberties. acts of labor unions in their rela tions with management. POLITICAL GLEANINGS By CHARLES G. MILLER THE ONCE OVER Modern Casev at the Bat By H. 1. PHILLIPS Released bv the Associated Newspapers The bill is a mild proposal. It doesn't begin to do what ought to an equal footing before the law, Reproduction Rights Reserved HpHE Union League flareup be-1 proper moment could be thrown to tween M. Harvey Taylor andjTaft. James, and possibly his so-Joseph N. Pew, Jr., who, with! called political adviser, Colonel be done to eliminate the abuses of tinuance of the present administration than by putting a conserva members of his family, has been Estes, believed that James could tive Republican into the White House a natural and inevitable CHICK'S 'SPARES' CONFUSING LANCASTER, Ky Buford Mur one of the heavy contributors to the Republican State organization, was nothing new, according to result of any third party or deser collective bargaining and the damage that is being done to the public interest by extremists in labor's ranks. But it is a start toward a long overdue reform. TF, THEREFORE, the President vetoes the bill here is what may phy of near here has a small chicken which keeps him guessing as to tion of the President. 2. Most middle-of-the-road vot whether it is coming or going. The fowl was born with four legs and an extra differential housing. some of the other State GOP leaders. It was louder than some of the outbursts during the recent campaign when Pew let Taylor ers and many independent Republicans will support the President become the presidential "nominee with Pew's aid. James certainly believed it, for when the whole convention was going to Willkie James refused to change his vote from James to Willkie at a secret caucus of the Pennsylvania delegation. Pew, himself, then cast a vote for Willkie because a majority of the delegates were going that way. Un The extra parts are attached in such be expected to happen in America from both the economic and poli a way that the bird looks like he is of Kingsley's play, "The World We Make." . . . "Their production set them back about $70,"-the playwright pointed out. "The original cost us more than $20,000." TN 21, Charles Grayson, who re- cently married the pulchritu-dinous Daye Elliott, hands me a copy of his new novel, "Angel Town" scheduled for publication, on June 6 . . . It's about Los Angeles and some younger folks back in 1940 ... At another table, Billy Wilkerson and his bride here on a brief buying spree . . . As we leave, Admiral Mitscher enters much smaller than we pictured him to be ... On Fifth avenue, Louise Macy Hopkins, who, intimates say, is now being wooed tical points of view: on the theory that he is not an extremist himself and is trying hard to hold the scales even. This independent vote is far more likely headed south when he is actually going the other way. The "spares" are between the normal two legs. 1. Violence, illegal picketing, dis-j know what he thought of him as a campaign manager for the organization slate. It, however, was not unexpected, for there had been ill feeling brewing for some time. reeard for present Federal and State statutes, and usurpation of! to swing away from Mr. Truman " " ' ' fortunately, Tew missed the boat, lortunately, 1'ew missed the boat, ' , n if hp desert it than is the extreme . r - . . more power over management will 11 ne aeseris u uwn is uie exutme for the Pennsylvania vote was not "ole ',u"'rl . daw vnt. sn it is far mnrp im- labor vote, so it is far more MACAW STARTLES FOLKS BOSTON. Shoppers in Boston Because Pew was on the outsi be encouraged and industrial peace important in 1948 to the Truman Ad with Taylor, the recent New Guard, needed to nominate Willkie. often get a start when they see Miss Inez Flint doing her daily market will be further delayed. f Management will be discour Shroyer-Frank managers believed T'HE Philadelphia oil man i ing. For nearly 50 years Miss Flint better known throughout the . . 'aired and the incentive to under- campaign contributor, " . . for a time that Pew and his money would come to the aid of the independent Republican movement. State as a has been accompanied on every shopping trip by her pet macaw. She became attached to the bird in Ecuador and brought it home with her. than as a leader. He has helped out "ew i"Jc "c the party many a time when thea,ld the reconversion process will by a prominent radio executive . . . Former Secretary of Highways To La Martinique for the dizzy Shroyer, on the stump, lambasted money was running short or had gaiety provided by Ben Blue, Ben Grundy, Taylor and Owlett and ministration than a dozen TAC s. 3. Inasmuch as Mr. Truman was able to win the nomination against Henry Wallace in the 1944 Democratic Convention through the support of the anti-Communistic elements in the Democratic party, particularly important church elements, he will hold that support something that would be lost to him in the event of a veto. 4. The President will retain the respect of the vast number of citi criticized Governor Martin by im time or at least until a new President and a new Congress are elected who recognize that the inequality between labor and man- GOES MART ONE BETTER run out. When the State Committee bought the old Harrisburg Club building at Front and Market streets, it was Pew's mCney that plication but not by name. But BEDFORD. Nine-year-old Gary during the entire pre-primary Baker thinks he surpasses "Mary" of Mother Goose fame. His com agement will not promote industrial went into it. period Shroyer never referred to panion is a deer named Billy. The harmony. 3. Communism will be encour Pew directly or indirectly. DEW isn't what could be called animal followed a herd of cows to For several years the State Committee owed Pew $70,000 that he had advanced in addition to the thousands he had given to the the Baker barn when a fawn. Lessy and Patti Moore and to enjoy, too, the fine melodies of my old-time friend, Joe Candullo, now heading the orchestra ... A lively . night at the Stork with Host Billingsley moving from table to table, beaming because so many of his favorites are present including: the Don Ameches, Eddie Bracken, the Jerry Bradys, Maj. and Mrs. Albert Warner, Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh, and others. aged because it thrives on friction an independent, but he has not zens who, while disagreeing per and class war, been satisfied with the manage haps with some of the provisions State Committee and the other ment of the Republican party in of the emergency legislation pro- 4. A Republican president will be elected in 1948 who will not be Aunt Het Bv ROBERT QUILLEN Pennsylvania. He has nursed an posed in connection with the recent thousands that members of his' family contributed. These contri rail strike, had cause to admire ambition to be thcfctate leader since at least 1936, when he tried to take the leadership during the Mr. Truman for his courage. 5. To veto the Case Bill on some ill-fated Landon campaign. Up to THE street-artist on West Forty- specious pretext after having ad vocated sterner measures only a a progressive but a conservative. For the Republicans will figure they can win with anybody. Congress will go heavily Republican this Autumn. 5. More and more strikes will occur, for labor will figure that the President will uphold them in almost anything hereafter because he fears the labor vote. Extremism will be given an impetus. The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Mudville nine that day; The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play; And so when Cooney died at first and Barrows did the same A sickly silence fell upon the patrons of the game. A strangling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest Clung to the hope which springs eternal in the human breast; They thought, if only Casey but could get a whack at that, They'd put up even money now, with Casey at the bat. But Flynn was out on unpaid dues and Blake was out because The local had convicted hint of breaking union laws; So upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat For it seemed it might take Truman to get Casey to the bat. But mediators gathered; and they handed down the word To put a man on second and assign a "sub" to third; The players raised a protest but in time they said, "Okay; Otherwise, we'll have the Army and the Navy, too, to play." Then from the gladdened multitude went up a joyous yell; It bounded from the mountain-top and rattled in the dell; It stuck upon the hillside, and recoiled upon the flat, For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat. There was ease in Casey's manner as he stepped into his place As he flashed his union label,' with a smile upon his face; And when he then took out his watch, his overtime to scan 'Twas plain to see that Casey was a red-hot union man. Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt, And wiped them, by the rule book, upon his union shirt; As Local Thirty's hurler ground the ball into his hip Defiance gleamed in Casey's eye, a sneer curled Casey's lip. - And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air As Casy raised a banner with the printed words "UNFAIR" Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped. "Enslaver!" muttered Casey. "Strike one," the umpire said. From the benches black with people there went up a muffled roar Like the beating of the stormwaves on a stern and distant shore; "Kill him! Kill the umpire!" shouted someone in the stand But Casey bade them, "Silence. A fact-finding board's at hand!" "Conspiracy" thought Casey but a smile upon him shone; He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the game go on; He signalled to the pitcher and once more the spheroid flew, But Casey still ignored it and the umpire said, "Strike two!" His teammates from the dugout rushed with angry cries of "Fraud" Now Schellenbach was frightened still and Truman, too, was awed; Fact-finders huddled quickly; Steelman leaped into the breach (And somewhere in the distance Pepper made another speech.) And now the pitcher holds the ball and now he lets it go . . . And soon the President appears upon the radio . . . And soon a frenzied Congress meets to scan the baseball pact And pass a law or possibly tone down the Wagner act. Oh, somewhere in this distraught land the sun is shining bright, The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light; And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout, But there is no joy in Mudville . . . mighty Casey has walked out! Vanishing Americanisms "Full speed ahead! "It will be a pleasure to fill your order promptly." "Just let us send up the car for a ten-day trial." "Mr. Gromyko is sent every day to prod the American eagle, now on his beak, now under his wing, now in his tail-feathers." Winston Churchill. We hadn't noticed those around the beak and wings. . The Prod and the Eagle A prod the stately Eagle feels Before and after all his meals; He's prodded high and prodded low And patiently he says, "It's Joe." He's prodded where tail feathers sprout And where they ain't, beyond all doubt; By prods his spirit is not ripped . . . It's the suspense when he is skipped! fortnight or so before is an incon sistency that can never be ex that time Pew had been considered more of a Philadelphia adjunct of the party, and former Senator Grundy was willing that he should confine his activities to Philadel plained on the stump. To sign the butions went to the State Committee, the Republican Finance Committee and to various county committees. Republican leaders, who tried to keep the Union League ruckus under cover, ffnow that if Pew withholds his funds from the party the finance committee of the State Committee will have to do a bit of digging and that it is not likely that one family can be found which will show the same interest in the financial welfare of the State organization as the Pews. FDR, Truman, Winnie, Pal Joey or even your own on the back of a penny ... At the Embassy, Cary Grant and Senator Claghorn close to each other at the bar, inspires Henny Youngman to crack: "The Civil War is really over!" ... At phia and Montgomery Counties. Case Bill irrespective of the fate of the stronger measure is not only consistent but understandable There wasn't any more real friendship existing then between Grundy and Pew than there has been recently when Pew has been trying to brush off Grundy's followers in the State organization. the 18 Club, Roy Sedley reveals he once worked in a restaurant where if you watched your hat and JUST FOLKS By EDGAR A. GUEST Protected by The George Matthew Adams Service EVENING ERRAND coat, they stole youor food . . , Snapshots! By the time of the 1940 presi When she meets you at the door Historians have 'divided the his With a: "Darling, do you mind dential campaign, Grundy took a side seat to watch Pew's try for State leadership and National recognition. tory of Wyoming into five periods: Running over to the store "Henry just paid $200 for a pup. It looks crazy to me. You can get just as much love for $5 and what else is a dog for?" Publisher! Syndicate For some tea our special kind SIGN TRADE TREATY STOCKHOLM. A trade treaty has been signed between Sweden and Iceland, according to which Sweden will receive 125,000 barrels of salt herring, in addition to sheep skin and wool. In return, Sweden will export motors, refrigerators, pre-fabricated houses, separators, telephones and agricultural exploration and fur trading, emigration along the Oregon-California and Overland trails, Indian campaigns, territorial days, and state Oh, 'twas not so long ago When I thought my labors o'er I was often greeted so: "Darling, hurry to the store! Do this favor small for me. I forgot to order tea." I was cross about it then, DEW turned up at the Philadel phia convention that nomin hood. ated Willkie, with Governor James as a presidential entry. JNobody every really believed that James But I'd give my soul once more Sugar, butter, loaf of bread?" Let no bitter word be said. Though you've had a busy day And had hoped to settle down, Rest a bit, and get away From the noises of the town, Turn yourself about once more And go, gladly, to the store. Kentucky's State government this had a chance and many Republicans then thought that Pew was using James to hold the Pennsylvania delegation together so that the Pennsylvania vote at the year observed regular Memorial Day, lust to hear her say again: "Darling, hurry to the store. Get a loaf of bread for me!" Oh, how light of heart I'd be! hfHarvkbur) May 30, and Confederate Memorial Day, June 3. By MATT CURZON SHAD DO Cards had been issued for the marriage of William H. Hain and Jesse R. Brown and Miss Sylvia Millard were married in Market Square Presbyterian Church manse Miss Nan Motter, daughter of Mr. I ( COME CLEAN NOW. 1 rK . (YOU RE A I I A ( THANKSJ J K . WHER IS THAT jV V HOPELESS JW 2 S JL jLi and Mrs. John Motter, of this city, the ceremony to take place on June 23 at the home of the bride, Market street near Fourth. Miss Cora Miller and Louis Troop by the Rev. Dr. George B. Stewart, pastor. They were attended by the bride's cousin. Miss Laura Millard, of Steelton, and William C. Hunter, of this city. C. J. Guidott, of this city, left on a bicycle tour to San Francisco. After a week's rest on the West were to be married at the home of the bride's parents, 1509 Wallace street, on June 16. Jonathan Fortney, of Harrisburg, Coast he planned to return home by the same method. He hoped to make and Miss Gertrude Menear, Dills-burg, were to be married the following week. ! the trip in less than 37 days.

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