The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas on May 14, 1959 · Page 1
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The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas · Page 1

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Thursday, May 14, 1959
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V&; Vol. 63 No, 134 OTTAWA, KANSAS, THURSDAY, MAY 14,1959 7 CENTS SIXTEEN PAGES Mrs. Verne Alden To Receive Honor At KU "It's the last thing I would have expected," Mrs Verne Alden of Wellsville said today of a new hono coming to her. Mrs. Alden is one of four alumni o University of Kansas who have been named to receive the citation for distinguished service to mankind given by the University and Alumni Association. MRS. VERNE ALDEN Side Swipes "We're all looking forward K," Mrs. John Going, chairman of the Ottawa Chamber of Com merce committee arranging Kansas City tour for Ottawa High honor students, said today. The group leaves at 11 a. m Friday morning by bus, and will •pend the day touring sites ir Kansas City. The schedule wa arranged, in cooperation with a committee of the 34 students se lected for the trip. As for the funds for the trip Mrs. Going said there has been "a good response" from loca persons and businesses that hav been solocited. "We are just abou to get enough money,""she said. Her Birthday? FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP)— Someday the daughter of the EC ward L. Fossetts may ask fo birthday parties on both May and 5. The clock in a Lexington hos pital showed 12:25 a.m. May when the baby was born. But in view of Kentucky's vary ing time zones Fossett, an assist ant attorney general, asked th opinion of a colleague. The reply: Lexington is on day light saving time but state law prohibits the official use of any other time than standard. So th< child was born Monday night—a least officially. Slight Error OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (AP —•Jim Craft of Oklahoma City ad mits he is "a real talker"—but i would take "quite a few first class talkers" to run up the tele phone bill he received — $9,999, 910.51 for the month of April The Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. assured him there had been an error and a new bill would be issued. Gen. Twining Has Cancer WASHINGTON (AP) — Cancer was found in the exploratory operation on Gen. Nathan F. Twin ing, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, it was announced today. Surgeons removed the upper lobe of Twining's left lung in an operation Tuesday. A bulletin issued at the Pentagon today said cancer was found and added: "The entire diseased portion of the lung was removed at surgery and there was no evidence of involvement in other areas of the ehest" The 61-year-old air officer underwent the surgery at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The Weather COUNTY FORECAST — Gen- rally fair this afternoon, tonight and Friday; continued cool today and tonight; a little warmer Friday; low tonight 28-45; high Friday 70-75. High temperature yesterday—69; low today—10; high year ago today—81; low year ago today—63; record high this date—90 In 1915 and 19-11; record low Uil« date—35 In 1904: hourly temperatures, 24 nours ending 8 a. m. today: 8 a. m 65 9 p. m 49 10 a. ro ...66 10 p. m 49 11 p. m 47 Midnight 45 1 a. m 43 8 a. rn 41 3 a. m 41 4 a. m 41 B a. m 40 6 a. m 41 T a. m. 43 Announcement was made toda by Chancellor Franklin D. Mu phy and Claude E. Chalfant o Hutchinson, president of the asso elation. K.U. does not confer hon orary degrees. The citations, t be presented during Commence ment exercises June 1, carry similar distinction. Mrs. Alden is the former Evely Hitchcock of the class of 192< Her work as community leade with increasing responsibil ties culminated in 1958 in t h presidency of the National Horn Demonstration Council for a year term. This summer she wil go to Edinburgh, Scotland, to rep resent the council at the 1959 Tr ennial meeting of the Associate Country Women of the World. An active member of F i r s Methodist Church, of Ottawa, Mn Alden served on the official boar and as superintendent of t h junior Sunday School. She ha been a member of the Kansa High School textbook committe and served two terms on the Kan sas State Board of Education. She was a member of the Whit House Conference on Educatio in 1955 and a member of the Kan sas committee of the rural edu cation division of the National EC ucation Association. In over quarter of a century she has hel most of the positions of honor ir local, and state as well as na tional home demonstration work Accompanying Mrs. Aide abroad will be her husband, wh operates the home farm : and i associated with an Ottawa ac counting firm. Expected to be present with th Aldens when she receives her cita tion Is the couple's son, John Alden, and his wife. A membe of the U. S. Army Signal Corps lie will be discharged May 15 i LaPlata, Md. He plans to enm in University of Kansas for th summer session. Others receiving citations ar Stanley Learned, class of 192' assistant to the president of Phil lips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville Okla.; Dr. Alexander Marble class of 1922, of the Harvar Medical School faculty, Boston and Dr. Clifford W. Seibel, clas of 1913, assistant director of th U.S. Bureau of Mines, in charg of all helium activity, Amarillo Tex. 11 a. m 67 Noon 68 1 p. m. 6? 3 p. rn 67 3 p. m 65 4 p. rn 61 8 p. rn 57 6 p. ro. ........55 7 p. m. 51 I p. m. 60 Get To Work Or Else, Warns GOP Chairman HOLTON, Kas. (AP)-Flrst Dis :rict Republican leaders were tolc .ast night to get down to worl immediately if they hope to spu a political comeback for thei party in 1960. State GOP Chairman Sam Mel inger and several other State Cen ral Committee officials outlined asks that must be performed to prepare for the 1960 campaigns He told county chairmen to: Fill precinct vacancies by June 5; hold a meeting of county cen ral committees by June 30 to adopt a campaign program; anc o appoint a candidate selection ommittee. "If we don't go home from thL meeting and go to work your time and our time will have been .vasted," Mellinger told a district meeting of county chairmen, vice hairmen, legislators and severa "OP state officials. Bill Whorton, Wichita, heading P a "recruit for '60" campaign, aid Kansas needs 45,000 new GOP recinct workers, or about 15 in ach precint, to beef up a sale earn to contact voters. He asked county chairmen to ppoint three-member committees vhich in turn are to name similar ommittees in each precinct to park the recruiting drive. (C Vice Squad Arrests Nineteen KANSAS CITY (AP)-Seventeen nen and two women were taken ito custody by two vice squad fficers early today in a raid on he Cellar Club. Police said the club, off a down- own alley, is the newest spot in the city specializing in after-hours drinking. The bartender, booked as Joe Mangiaracina, 45, was charged with selling liquor without a license. Others arrested were charged with vagrancy. Police records show Mangiaracina has 65 previous arrests here. la. m. 48 Lamb Insured Payment Plan, adv PREPARING to welcome guests is Harry Smith. (Photo by Lamar Phillips) Harry Smith To Hold Open House The latest store rennovation on Ottawa's Main street will be displayed officially Saturday. The Harry Smith Auto Supply, 110:112 S. Main, has picked that day for its grand opening to show greatly expanded facilities. The firm started remodeling shortly after the first of the year. It moved into the space immediately south of its former home, a tavern, to gain space needed to display its line of auto supplies, tools, car accessories, power mowers and machine shop equipment. Smith will be on hand Saturday to serve refreshments and point out the remodeling of the store's interior and exterior. Franklin County Construction Co. did the general contracting work which included a new aluminum front. Electrical installation was handled by Johnson Electric. The firm now employs seven persons. Smith started the sup ply concern nine years ago. Prior to that he worked for Goss & Gentner, now Budge's Hardware, and for Robe's Auto Supply. Daring Rescue When Navy Blimp Crashes At Lakehurst Base LAKEHURST, N.J. (AP)-One crewman was killed early today when a silvery Navy blimp crashed into a hangar while attempting to land in a dense fog. Six crewmen were hospitalized and several others suffered minor injuries. The wreckage was wedged in the hangar roof 150 feet above the ground. Rescue workers clambered over the roof and removed the injured crewmen who had been trapped in the blimp's gondola. Names of the dead man and the injured were withheld by the Navy pending notification of next of kin. The freak accident left the wreckage near the top of the 160- 'oot high hangar. The whole roof;op was shrouded by the limp folds of the blimp's great gas bag. Drop A Charge Against Banker HOLTON, Kan. (AP) — The tate dropped a criminal charge .gainst Orion Williams, president 'C the defunct Hoyt State Bank ,t Hoyt, Kan. State bank commissioner John D'Leary recommended the dismissal as Williams was scheduled o go on trial yesterday. O'Leary said Williams' brother, eff, cashier of the bank, assumed nil responsibility for embezzlement of $157,000 of bank funds, 'he commissioner said Orion did ot get any of the bank's money. Jeff is now in prison. Orion was harged with certifying false tatement's on the bank's condi- on and with accepting deposits •hile knowing the bank was in- olvent. The commissioner said the harges were filed before Jeff ave himself up. Dismissal of the criminal case oes not affect Orion's civil liabil- y to the bank's depositors and eceiver. John Kirk, the receiver, esti- nated depositors will get back at ast 65 cents on the dollar. Rescuers had to reach the scene with aerial ladders and then tunnel beneath the deflated bag to reach the gondola car where the injured lay. It had rammed partially through the hangar roof and remained stuck fast. The ZPG-2 blimp was returning from a routine 21-hour anti-submarine patrol early this morning. It was making a radar-controlled instrument approach through a swirling fog that blanketed out everything more than 100 feet away. "They probably never saw the ground until after they hit," said Lt. Cmdr. Herman Spahr, administrative office of Squadron 3 to which the craft was attached. "The fog was so bad we radioed the blimp to gain altitude and try to come in again," said Spahr. It was just picking up speed to 45 miles an hour when it hit. The huge bag was ripped by the wreckage and its million cubic feet of helium w o o s h e d out through its rent sides. The gas is non-inflammable and dispsersed without harm into the fog. 1 Saw Him Pull Out The Pistol And I Grabbed For It," Judge Says MADISON, Mo. (AP) - "I saw him pull out the pistol and I grabbed for it, but I wasn't fast enough." ' Recovering from a flesh wound across the chest, Walker Duval, husky mayor and police judge of this town of 575 population, told how he was shot yesterday as an explosive climax to a brief court session. It was like a S9ene out of a western movie. The 6-foot, 210-pound Duval, 41, a 9-shot, .22 caliber pistol from faced the defendant across a small table as eight or nine others watched in the little city hall room. The slightly built defendant, J. P. Dunaway, 63, Madison electrician with many jail terms for drunkenness behind him, was convicted on the same old charge. "Ninety days in jail and $25 fine," pronounced Duval.' Cursing, Dunaway arose, pulling To Move Office Of School Superintendent Miller Leaves Church Here The resignation of Gordon D Miller, pastor of First Christian Church, Ottawa, was announced today by Vincent Skidmore, president of the church board. The resignation was effective May 5 The minister and Mrs. Miller have gone to Texas for a visit with his father for a time. Skid more said Mr. Miller has not announced his future plans. He came to the church here in June, 1957. Keep Mum On Steel Talks NEW YORK (AP)-Contract negotiations resumed today in the basic steel industry but both sides maintained the pattern of not telling whether things are going well or ill. Since "stripped down bargaining" began earlier this week, spokesmen for both the industry and the steelworkers have given out only generalities at daily news conferences. The talks themselves are secret. The government apparently is equally in the dark whether its lp will be needed to reach an agreement. * * * Ike To Meet With Head Of Steel Union NEW YORK (AP) — President Eisenhower arranged to meet to day with David McDonald, president of the United Steelworkers Union. Arrangements for the conference at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel were announced as representatives of the union and steel industry concluded a two-hour contract negotiation session. The announcement was made by White House Press secretary James C. Hagerty who said the Eisenhower - McDonald meeting would be "just a social call." Plans to expand to the Ottawa High guidance service and move the superintendent's office downtown were reported this morning by Su'pt. Henry Parker. "The board of education has approved this change a while back, and we have been looking around for some time," Parker said. The board leased the downstairs of the Old Southwestern Bell Telephone Company building, 114 W. 3rd. Parker's office will be moved into the downstairs. The building is being purchased from the telephone company by Richard 0. Skoog. The transaction is still in the process, anc the price was not announced. Into the public school business office's present location on the second floor of the Senior High will go Principal Norris Burke's office, Parker said. A new guid ance office will be moved into Burke's office. Parker said P. K. Worley, music teacher at OHS this year, has joined the guidance staff. He and Mrs. Bonnie Hugheson will handle the guidance counseling next year. The superintendent explained that the board felt there is a neec for an expansion of the guidance office. He also pointed out that the State Department of Public Instruction, by 1960, will require schools the size of OHS to have two persons on their guidance staffs. a pocket. Duval flipped the table over against Dunaway and lunged for the gun. "I grabbed his wrist and was twisting the gun from his hand when it fired," the mayor said. Duval got the gun, then sank to the floor beside the overturned table. Dunaway stood quietly. At a hospital in Moberly doctors said the bullet struck a rib o Duval's right side, deflected anc lodged under the skin on the lef side. They took out the bullet an Duval returned home. Dunaway was taken to the Mon roe County jail at Paris. Prosecutor James Reinhard Paris said he would investigat the case today. Duval said he found Dunawa drinking in the city hall Monda and told him to appear in cour Tuesday. But he didn't see Duna way again until yesterday, whe he put the man in jail. Dunaway wasn't searched. "We've never had any reason t expect this kind of trouble from him," Duval explained. KCC Approval To Ottawa Firm TOPEKA (AP)-Northern Telephone Co., Ottawa, has been au thorized by the Kansas Corporation Commission to bu/ 13 southeast Kansas telephone exchanges. The KCC granted Northern a certificate to operate exchanges it is buying from United Telephone Co., Abilene. They are Altoona, Benedict, Coyville, Fall River, La Fontaine, Neosho Falls, Piqua, Thayer, To- roto, Quincy, Mapleton and Mound City. The. KCC authorized Northern to borrow 1.7 million dollars from ,he federal government to finance the purchase and to convert to dial operations. Fort Scott Firm • v Low On Bid For Street Sweeper A Fort Scott company was ap parent low bidder on a n e w street sweeper for Ottawa, ac cording to the bids opened at the Commission meeting last night National Engineering Co., en tering a net price and allowing for a trade-in, .offered tq. ( seU the city a 2-yard sweeper for $7|'doc and a 4-yard sweeper for $8,526 Commissioners said they wil take the bids under consideration in order to check the details o the specifications further. They will award the contract at a late date. Commissioner Jim Grogan ex plained that the old sweeper, pres ently used by the city, "has been giving the street department a lot of trouble." It is a 2-yard sweeper which was bought by tin city in 1954. The other two bidders, Elgin Sweeper Co., Kansas City, and Wentz Equipment Co., Topeka submitted bids slightly higher. El gin's bid offered to sell a 3-yarc sweeper for a net price of $9,10C and a 4-yard sweeper for $10,200 Wentz's offer stood at $8,564.2 for a 3-yard sweeper and $9,897 for a 4-yard sweeper. Both are ne prices, allowing for the trade-in In other business, the commis sioners heard the first reading of an ordinance which will re-zone :wo sections of Ottawa. They are in the vicinity of llth and Burroughs and 6th and Maple. The commissioners earlier approved a recommendation of the Planning Commission to change the zoning. The ordinance is designed to set the change down as BARN FOR SALE 'he Ottawa Board of Education s asking for sealed bids on met- .1 roof Horse Barn located at 5th & Ash Streets. Bids to be in Board of Education Office by lay 29, 1959. The Board reserves he right to accept or reject any all bids. Adv. Doubt Russia Will Consider Package Plan GENEVA (AP)-The Western powers proposed to Russia today that divided Berlin be made a united city under Big Four guarantees as the first step in a sweeping package plan to unify East and West 'Germany and begin global disarmament. > As a package the plan had no prospects of even serious consideration by Russia. Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko has already rejected it as a "tangle" of unrelated issues. But parts of it, esr pecially the Berlin proposal, conceivably could lead to some bargaining. The massive, four-phase Western program was introduced in the fourth session of the Big Four foreign ministers conference as the Western response to Russia's demand that West Berlin be made a free city. It also countered Premier Nikita Khrushchev's call for a peace settlement with divided Germany. The proposals provides for successive disarmament measures, including initial limits of 2% million men in the armed forces of the United States and Russia, and leading eventually to limitation and possible withdrawal of all foreign troops (Soviet and Western) from Germany and neighboring areas. It would unify Germany in 30 months. United Germany would be free to elect membership in either the Atlantic Alliance (NATO) or the Soviet bloc's Warsaw Pact or to choose a neutral policy. Whatever the choice, the big powers, Germany and other European countries would take steps to avoid any change in the East- West balance of power .and could enter into agreements against aggression. Western leaders have long expressed confidence Germany would line"up." with "the West. Berlin, in the first phase of the package program, would be united by "free elections to be held through all Berlin under supervision" of either the big powers or the United Nations. The United States, Russia, Birit tin and France would keep (heir troops until the final German peace settlement provided for in the fourth phase. A city council would b« responsible for administering the whole city under the general supervision of the Big Four, but the powers could intervene in city affairs only unanimous vote. How this arrangement would affect East Germany's capital in East Berlin wa» not stated. The West made a compromise approach to Russia's demand that East and West Germany must negotiate reunification directly be- ween themselves. It proposed in he second phase the creation of a mixed German committee of 25 West and 10 East Germans to make plans for increased con- acts between the two Germanys and to draft an all-German elec- oral law. As an alternative, the United States, Britain and France report- idly will demand that their right o remain in Berlin and their right if access to the city be spelled out, with the East Germans as well as the Soviets underwriting he agreement. In return, the iVest will agree to East German ifficials controlling the access outes to Berlin as agents of the Soviets. An imporant disagrement remained to be settled between the Americans and British on the one and and the French and West Germans. The Americans and British fa- r or a sort of United Nations high ommissioner to be posted in Berin and U.N. supervisors at check- xrints on the access routes. The 'rench, backed by the West Germans, argue that the situation al- eady is complicated enough with- ut introducing the world organ- zation. DEAN IVATKINS ANITA VANN HERBIE HARBAH JANIE KNIGHT SHERM SPEARS The young religious leaders of Ottawa selected officers Vann, CROP representative; Herb Harrah, vice - president} for the coming year. The new officials of the Christian Youth Janie Knight, secretary; &n& Sherm Spears, treasurer. (Photo Council, a* pictured above, are Dean YVatkins, president Anita by Lloyd Ballhagen) Don Hewitt Named Co Turnpike Board TOPEKA (AP) -Gpv. George )ocking says he will appoint )emocrat Don Hewitt, Kansas City, to the Kansas Turnpike Au- lority if he will accept the posi- ion. The appointment will open up uly 1 when the term of Republi- an Tom Griffith, Manhattan^ ex- ires. Democrats then will take •3 control of the Authority from he Republicans. Hewitt, manager of a cemetery, a close personal friend of Docking. He has directed prepara- on of the Kansas civil defense urvival plant. lummage sale Mem. Auditorium, at May 16, 8 a.m. B&PW Club. Adv.

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