The Knoxville Journal from Knoxville, Tennessee on October 28, 1928 · 15
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The Knoxville Journal from Knoxville, Tennessee · 15

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Sunday, October 28, 1928
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15
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of Cottage i 1 404,11b : , - 446 ' 464.1 1 Into, :. .... . -1'Bii.1.1db:i'-i- 2 Häiii ..(16si.. - :cilt...' -,-' --,-..:'....But'Dothli,Gié.eiik-i,';'2,014 ATHENS, Ga., Oct. 27 (U.P.)--A reported crippled Geor- . gia team sent its crippled stars into action here today to turn a loCito-t 4 victory over the Green Wave of Tulane, the Bulldog's first conference game of the year. Georgia scored two,touchdowns in the opening quarter before the Wave found itself. In the last half Banker, of Tulan:, led a crashing line and aerial attack that narrowly missed being disastrous to the Red and Black. . , A 40 yard end run by Hill to the , Tulane one-yard litIP early in the . , first period accounted for the in-1 Mat touchdown. Rothstein took th e !BADGERS COME ball over. Again the Georgia backs' . got start 15 ed. Dudley made yards. 1 Hill passed to Matftt for 2$ and a BACK TO DOWN touchdown to make the score 13 to O. The Tulsae line appeared weak. MICHIGA N;7-0 TULANE CAME back strong in nen period. Banker, halfback. , rushed and pounded the tackles for first downs to the Georgia 35-yard AN N ARBOR. Mich.. Oct. 27 C. mark. Baumbach passed to What- Wisconsin's 23-year, quest for a ley -on the fiveyard Han and the football victory over Michigan end-ball was pushed across. I ad tottsy as theloBadgere-rrallied Georgia's third touchdown came I late in the fourth cinarter.to score ' when Starrett scooped a fumble in a single touchdown and yilit bY 7 Ph. .third period. racing from the Tulane 25-yard line. Johnson kick- I to 0. i'''. r ed-goal to make the score 20 to 7. - it was not only Wisconsin's arta Later In the period the 'Mane back. victory in nearly three decades but field started another drive. Banker history was also the first time In tne lid a 35-yard run around right eqd. A pass was intercepted and of football relations between Georgia was out of danger. the Institution's that the Badgers were able to keep the Wolverine .FAJLANE OPENED an aerial at from scoring. Outplayed throucolack In- the closing minutes. Banker Out the second and third periods and,,Seenms drove for compistent and with. honors even In the finer . ten and Banker went across tor salon. the Badgers got the batf the-that tally after a series of brit- near midfield. A nrst down and a ilan t. passes. , pair ofxtut- sts at the line and Behr . The lineup: I twung far back and passed to Cute, Georgie ' , Pos. Tulane I Inter over Michigan's left side. The Manett LE Hollis L quarterback olught the ball as two - Bryant L.T McCane blockere fiatttrned Captain Rich and .Wobson L.G Pelkers other Badger runners prepared the Lunceford C rvans open road to the goal line. Backus Haley ' RC Bodenger added the extra point. Lautsenheiser ..R.T Rucker 0--.. Smiths ILE Roberts w Johnson . Q.B.... Armstrong Banker Ole Miss Loges RiLl; L.11.11 Dudley' LH B Seeuwa Rothstein ' 3 Hooper Score by periods: To' Loyold,,-.34114 t; fortis- - 13 0 7 0-23 nein 7 7 0 0-14 NEW ORLEANS, Oct. 27 UPI. Scoring touchdowns: Georgia A 93-yard run for a touchdown was 3Aaffett 2. Rothstein. Tulane-1-1. the bright spot in a one-sided game ' Whatley. Banker. here today between Loyale and the - ?acme: Georgia 5 out of 9. Tu- University of Mississippi. won by ' lane II out of IS. First downs: the former. 34 to 14. ..loortria.13: Tulane 12. In the third quarter. Moore or ' Officials: Referee. Deuence of Loyola. received the ball on the. Oberlin: umpire, Powell. Wiscon- kick-off and raced uninterrupted fig 'sin: bead linesman. Cunningham!. yards across the goal. That appear-Vanderbilt: field judge. Moriority. ed to take the snap out of Ole Miss St. Marys. and 0241 never scored again. 1--,------.---- By JOHN W. HEISMAN. - GEORGE PFANN. . Played quarterback at Cornell university, Ithaca. N. Y, 1921-22- 23. Born 1902; home town, Marion, O.; fraternity, Sigma Alpha EPalio: all-American. 1923; ancestry. German American; height, 5.8; weight. 170; speed. very fast: captain, 1923; coach, Doh le; reside., Oxford. England; occupation, student at Oxford university. '." - Cornell haa just won her 22nd , straight victory on the gridiron no rival having humbled her In three , . -,- -, , -, straight years, in fact no opponent , isl,,,, 1 has been able to hold her to a tie. 'o- They are up in Dartmouth today '-',. and 22 players are straining at the ' 4 least, awaiting the whistle of the '"-" . , referee which Ithaq announce the - opening of hostilities. t ,' , IT COMESso does the ball. k Cornell receives it and runs it to A - Ne ,, the 25-yard Rue. makes a fumble - ," I - on the first play attempted but re- covers.it.' At once in this danger- - .,z, m Des territory. Piano passes to Ram- ,-, "Sy successfully foes IS-yard lain. ' ,4 ,, ,4 4:.'s (la Ikevarr gloat play Mann takes 7.:. ,' . 1- '- -,-, tie ball and goes more than half .-' . .,,,,.' ' - 1 4,. , the length of the fild for a touch- 1 .,,.. -, ,,- 1 ilOW B. , 4 l I ,,-- 1 Vain Is a phantom to Dartmouth all:day long. He bursts into breakwly runs on the slightest provo- WO .ition-ror none at all He hurls ' passes asd takes them: he punts - GEORGE PFAUN. ' tad "gives signals. he tackles and . lien. for a change. makes a lot he or the illustrious "Chuck" Bar store long runs. Cornell scores rett wax the more brilliant witt four touchdowns and kicks two the ball under the arm. It is to be field' goals. set down as another valuable Is AGeINST PENN three weeks set of Pfann's that he was very later. Pfann. on the first play fol- game and courageous. He nevet . lowing a kick off, "poen IS yards ran out of bounds to avoid a hard around right end. Now he does tacklenever cut into a group ot something Kaw could not dohe tackles as into a mattress thereby plunges through the Penn line three shunning the one bird who would times in succession for another give him a nasty.side-swipe. George first down. Os the fifth successive always took the yardage that be-play he again takes the ball and longs to the run no matter what goes around left cad for 15 yards. the cost to himself. th All places in e Penn line look --o alike to 'him. A newspaper report polliuguEsE To wEAll of the triune said: "It took three and four men to draw him down once he got started on his pile- driving plunges. with knees flung high and feet flying in all directions." In a few minutes Cornell . bad th ball on Penn's 34-yard line. SHOES, LAW SAYS Piano oozes from the Cornell mess. I Many 01121- numerous other passes in the Other G takes a pass for 20 yards. runs 14 People n more and has a touchdown. He tries Go Barefoot, However. takes game and In the fourth quarter be is awarded the ball on interference WASHINGTON. D. C.Failing on Pentts 5-yard line and takes a to wear shoes is against the law in . slanting shot outside of tackle for 1 Portugal. Because of the many , a second touchdown and victory. I 14-7etaking it 24 straight games I adults who bare been in the habit that Plana has played in for Cor- of going barefoot. in the cities as , sell without once tasting defeat. well as in the country districts the KAW WAS A bard man to stop authorities according to dispatch-in '21 and 12. but Mon was worse. es, are expecting difficulties in en. The writer was coaching Penn in forcing the new statute which be 1922 and Kaw wax captain of Cot- same effective. Oct. 1st. nett He was good but we stopped "This unusual law draws atten- him. Then they resorted to Mon tion to the great number of peoand we did NOT stop H1Mand plc in the world who still gto unthat was all there was to it. He ihod." says a bulletin from the started faster than Kew. ran fas- Washington, D. C., headquarters of ter. dodged better. stiff-armed more the National Geographic Society, wickedly. tore more fiercely and. in "and to the varied kinds of foot-general. Just had that extra ounce wear in use from the Polar regions that spells the difference between to the Tropics. excellent and phenometua if Pf Inn --- "The tropical countries are the hirnielf was a very good passer and strongholds of the great unshod. a fine potter. In Africa, parts of Central Amer- ON RECEPANG passes he was a aellard and a dames eombinedha Ica. the northern portion of South had a way at earelopiar mange tys Amer1 ca. and in southern Asia. the something that made bin invisible majority of the born" feel are de' to the defensive iteeendsry men as void of any covering through. the he sneaked on out for a passthat seasons and from the cradle to the was wizardry. His cleverness in grave. In the cooler parts of the catching them was magic. The way earth both rigorous weather and , .- TR 0 uNc - .4.4. ' , , .;-rimson 1 , Georgia Takes 13-0 Lead In First Period Only To Have Tulane Stage Comeback And Lead By 14-13 At Half; Fumble Decides Tilt For Bulldogs. AN N ARBOR. Mich.. Oct. 27 f.A2). Wisconsin's 23-yeaz . quest for a football victory over Michigan ended toley as theoBadgersorrallied late in the fourth naarter.to scorw a single touchdown and wln bY Heintan's Hutidred In Football Hall Of Fame - he or the illustrious "Chuck" Barrett was the more brilliant with the ball under the arm. It is to be set down as another valuable Is-set of Pfann's that he was very game and courageous. He never ran out of bounds to avoid a hard tackle---never cut Into a group of tackles as into a mattress thereby shunning the one bird who would give him a nasty.side-swipe George always took the yardage that belongs to the run no. matter what the cost to himself. -41 POATIEESE.TO WEAR that Plana has played in for Cor- of going barefoot. in the citiee as sell without once tasting defeat. well as in the country districts the KAW WAS A bard man to stop authorities. according to dispatch-in '21 and 12. but Mon was worse. es, are expecting difficulties in enTto writer was coaching Penn in forcing the IIPIPt statute which be 21122 and Kaw was captain of Cot- same effective. Oct. 1st. "telt Ho WWI good but we stormed "This unusual law draws atten' him. Then they resorted to Pfann tion to the great number of peoand we did NOT stop HIMand pie in the world who still gn unthat was all there was to it He ihod.'' says a bulletin from the started taster than Kew. ran fas- Washington, D. C., headquarters of ter. dodged better. stiff-armed more the National Geographic Society. wickedly. tore more fiercely and. in "and to the varied kinds of foot-general. Just bad that extra ounce wear in use from the Polar regions that spells the difference between to the Tropics. excellent and phenomenal. .f Pfann - "The tropical countries are the blintelf was a very good passer and strongholds of the great unshod. a fine patter. In Africa, parts of Central Amer- ON RECEIV940 passes he was a wItayd and a damns combinedbe Ica. the northern portion of South had a way et eareloptur himself tyi America, and in southern Asia. the eornothIng that made bin timfiribte maJortty of the batman feet are do- ts the defensive eeeendary Men as void of any covering through. the he sneaked on out for a passthat seasons and from the cradle to the was wizardry. His cleverness in grave. In the cooler parts of the catching them was magic. The way earth both rigorous weather and he ran. with It after that was phe- the greater activity of the people nomenat It's a question whether have made foot coverings neces - TENNESSEE - 41Maryytile 41Centre . 13Misaiio ssP1 12 ;5Alabama 4..; 13 6Wash. At Lee 7 - TULANE ' 65Louis. Normal. 0 61M13a. A. & M... 0 0-0a. Tech - 6Vanderbilt 13 14Cloonr1a 23 KENTUCKY 61Carson-Newntan 0 11Wash. & Lee.. 0 0Northwestern 7 1Centre 0 WASH. & LEE - 66Lynchburt ... 0 $6N. C. State 6 0Kentucky 0W. Virstnia.... 22 7Tennessee 26 PRIATaTOX,Flgo.-- RIAT.cET9N,:.FIE'flap...--.:00A4 -bowNs; cofiNald;..:374:-',.:'- By BRYAN BELL. Associated Sports Writer PRINCETON. N. J., Oct. 21 UM. '--Princeton won the first football game played with ' Cornell at Princeton in 23 years today by proceeding on the principle that if a touchdown is not available. a goal from the field maybe made to serve. The Tigers managed to get close enough to the Cornell goal in Ale third period to permit dashing I Dave Lowery to boot the ball between the uprights from the 17- . yard line and that was all the scoring there was. IN PRINCETON'S,3 to 0 victory most of the 35.000 spectators thought that was the ball game when the oval sped through the goal posts. Nothing either team had shown up to that time had sugested there would be any more There were some Oreats from time to time after the placement had won for the Jungaleers but something .always turned up to stop a score. Cornell ran into fumbles at critical times when the big red team seemed about to accomplish something for Cayuga and penaltiee set Princeton back at vital moments. The Tigers were penalized enough to make up for the normal quota of three or four games. THE TWO teams seemed about as evenly matched as the score indicated if not more so. Cornell had the better of rhe argument in ground gained in the scoreless first half. the visitors making six first downs to two tor the home team. In the second half each team registered first downs. Cornell made a bid at the start of .the third period when the ball was driven to Princeton's ,20-yard but. Deltrich. who was Corners best ground gainer. fumbled and Hockenbury. a sub Princton tackle. recovered. After an exchange of kicks. Requardt made a first dowp on Cornell' s 45-yard line and then took a pass from Lowery on the 22 yard line. IN FOUR PLAYS with Requardt getting a lift once from Strubing the ball was advanced to Cornell's 11-yard line. Three plays nettedi only two yards and with fourCb down and the ball on the 9-yard line. Lowery dropped back to try for the goal. That everyone believed would win the game. Strubing held the bail and dashing Dave calmly sent on its way. It was straight as a ball could but was perillously low and almost grazed the cross bar as it shot by Llayette Loses To West Virginia EASTON. Pa.. Oct. 27 (. West Virginia's university fighting, football team ripped and torsi through the Lafayette linehere today to An 17 to O. With "Cassie" Ryan. third spring half-back and liwnsi caller running tge team. the Mountsbeers virtually swept the La Fayette warriors off thair feet after a eg.oreless first porlodi nece in ssary dur14t the winter months at leest. "It is the warm regions Justout side the Tropics' such as Etypt and Mesopotamia that we can trace civilization farthest into the past. There the slaves and lower classeS could go comfortably throughout the year without protecting their feet. but the use of shoes for the upper classes developed at an early date. The primary consideration was to protect the bottoms of the feet. therefore the sandal was the first type of shoe to be Invented. It was merely a at piece of some protective material bound loosely to the foot. Since wood was difficult to obtain in the Nile and in the Tigris-Euphrates valleys, sandals of ctudely plaited straw and reeds were first used. Later the Egyptians made sandals and light shoes of beautiful workmanship from leather and kid. Hebrews Wore Sandals. "In Palestine. the ancient Hebrews wore sandals made of a heavy piece of leather of cloth. or less frequently of wood. A few of the latter, for rough use. were shod with iron. The Greeks and Raman, starting with a simple sandal. improved on it in time by adding edges that turned up along the sides and and at the hack. A network of thongs passed over the top of the feet and around the ankle, foreshadowing the closed shoo. The thongs became sheets of leather. and, so shoes and boots were born iturope. -In Cents- and Northern Europe the cold -winters made it necessary. of course, to cover the feet and legs when out of doors. In early times, crude sacks of skins were made. Grass was stuffed in under the soles of the feet and around them tp add warmth. Later well mad é 000ts of leather replaced this crude footwear. A parallel evolution took place among the American Indians and the Eskimos where moceatties and soft close-fitting boots of skins came Into see. Heels Supplant Long Toss. - "The Crusades, which affected the habits and custotps of Europe so signally, marked the appearance of really serviceable leather shoes on that continent. -- - VANliEttlfiLT 20-4-Chattanooga ' 0 12Co brats '7 4 13----Texas 12 13Tulane 6 1 114---Vincinta' 0 ,S1ARVLAND , 31--"Vaanineton 41- 10---N. Carolina 2,1 7-8. Carolina 21 23w. Maryland 0 0-11. it. 1. 0 10111114NA STATZ 441-8. W. U. Col 0 41Louts. Col. - 0 31Miss. A. & 0 SOfloring Hill 7 V. NI. L 14Hamden Sid 7 31Roanlke 13 Tech ' 13 6Richmond 6 9-1trorinia 0 0----Maryland 0 GEORGIA TECH 12Notre. Dame 0 13Tolane 0 t.20N. Cr111121.11 , 311381381E1'1 25Arkansaa 0 0Alabama g 27 12Tennessee 13 - 10-,-Auburn ' 0 34 31138. A. 20Ouach1ta e 6Tu1ane 51 0Alabama 4e 31 $OI-TH CAROLINA 19Ersk1ne 0 6Chicago 0 24IT tralnia 13 31Maryland 13Presbyterian 0 0Clemson' , 22 .with the winning score. , Cornell made one final gesture Just before the final whistle sounded. Scott tossing a pass to Kanich for a 15-yard gala. The next one grounded after traveling a third the length of the field and the game ended before anything more could be done about it. i3oth tcampains were injured. Howe of Princton. being removed in the first half, although he came in the second. and Schoales, the Cornell leader, leaving the game in the final period. Score by periods: Princeton 0 0 0 3-3 ICORNELL 0 ' Os 0 0-0 Princeton scoring: Goal from field. Lowery1 f-xxits..csleersso. fomrztv ( Bobcats Gol To Columbia; K. H. S. Plays Citthedral Knoxville grid fans will not receive their full quota of high school football games this week. While the Trojans remain at home to engage in a skirmish with Cathedral Friday afternoon, Coach M. B. Banks takes his Bobcats to Columbia, South Carolina, where they meet Columbia high school Friday afternoon. The Blue and White eleven exhibited both a strong offensive and defensive attack last Friday when they swamped Lenoir City high scoors Yellow Jackets 54 to O. Centrare Cats also scored a decisive victory in their game last Thursday over Jonesboro high school and added another win to tkeir list Friday, administering a Si to 0 licking s to Harlan Kentucky high school. The Columbia outfit that the Bobcats combat -Is one of the strongest high school elevens in the Caro They have already defeated Wilmington North Carolina high school, last years state -champions, and Charlotte high school, 1926 state champs, and a strong bidder for the title last year. With the possible exception of Notre Dame prep the Columbia eleven will probably prove to be the toughest foe that the Red and Black team has encountered this season. The Bobcats will have the services of their three star backfield ILLINI DOWNS NORTHWESTERN BY 6 TO 0 SCORE - MEMORIAL STADIUM. CHAMPAIGN. III.. Oct. 27 (dP).--Illinols. western conference 1927 football champions. continued its triumphal march toward ,a second Big Ten title today. turning back Northwestern. 6 to O. before a homecoming crsowd of 63,000. - With Fritell Humbert carrying the ball In the second period th,e Zuppkemen smashed their. way from n2kl.fle1d to the 24-yard line where the touchdown and what proved to be the margin of victory. Norwack's attempt at goal from the placement for the eztra point was wild. - Milligan Sweeps To 56-0 Victmy it rilli IN rall. Personal Service in All Cases. , 1 g DR. WILLIS FRIrrs- i DOG and CAT 4 HOSPITAL 4 at Irwin St: and Bearden Plaee Just Off of North Central St. kOld PhoneWalnut 1541. Res. PhoneWalnut 3047. Ltegat....m..11...11,AL.m.atal INSURANCE OF EVERY KIND Alin- Allen, Jr. Bohlen Bank MC.. Knoxville. Tenn. 1 , 't 'NORTH CAROLINA 63--Wake Forest 0 26Maryland 19 0Harvard 20 '14--V. P. . 16 7Os. Tech 20 : AUBURN ;,-01-13,uthern 4 0---Clemson 0Florida 27 - 0-01e Miss. 19 v5--Howard 6 4 ALABAMA1 27-411eelseP01 0 .:46Mlas. A. & o 13--Tenneasee 13 42Sewanee 12 - CLEISON 30Newherrl 0 6Davidson 0 TN. State 0 t 6Auburn 0 52--Erattne . , 0 32South Carolina 0 NA,' Ai., t'" 4 ,PlitiLADELPITIA; Oct. 27 (1T.P.)Into Navy territory. but the Mid--The Navy's second - touchdown dies stopped .the drive on the of the season accounted for one Navy's, 15-yard , line. - , A li-yard of the biggest upsets of the year penaitY, set the Navy' back almost today when the Middies crashed to its own goat line ,,and Welthel the hitherto undefeated Pennsyl- was forced to drop behind thelillte vania football teanv6 to O. to punt. Shober ran the kick back A CRCLIND of 75.000 taxed Frank- to the Navy's 26-yard line. Scull. Un field to capacity. Pennsylvania halfback.- made grst -!Pennsylvania's goal line was down on the 16-yard line at the crossed for the first time in five third period ended. , -' games this season when Moret. ON FOURTH down Murphy was who had replaced Crane at left- two feet abort of making the die-end& took a pass on the 10-yard tance and the ball -went to Navy . line from Gannon and ran the re- Welchel again was forced tookick sluing distance for a touchdown. from behind the It a Ty's goal line Gannon attempted dropkick was and Shober returned to the Navy's blocked. 40-yard line. The Nay, intercept-Pennsylvania opened up with a d a pass a 'moment later and dazzling pass attack in the third Pennsylvania's last chance was period and carried the ball deep lost. men. Bonin McCollister and Query this week. These players were ruled out of 'last Thursday's contest for disciplinary reasons.. 'Nig Watson, a reserve back who has shown up as a dependable backfield man in the games that he has seen action in, this season will also be back in his moleskin togs. after a week on the sidelines with , a sprained ankle. It will be several weeks before the Trojans will be able to put Nell Corum in their lineup. Corum sue-tamed a broken collar bone last week and although the bone is healing rapidly it will take at least four weeks for tit to completely knit. , . , , - wrren 1 kvn ovtrn kvn Ivo cylityn rrO kV) ar SritTISTATI reirilra"..1019-7 k NO Ca u.v..-Aict AtAz-- A.Iwzr..41rANz....-AttAK- AFAN---74 CAW CIAIWCIAILL A A 1411w I , tb.76 amok. .. g-'-- nrst Difertnq Li t , almmoloommo , -- Pt; , - E .. ,, a1 .1 1 0 g , : , e ' c a I 1 3 - a 4 , IN- -4 0711- 4 JOHNSeiN ernr. Tenn.. Oct. 27 k..---t(4 tSpl.) The Milligan Buffalos swept Bennett college aside here b' tonight by the score of 56-0 in the largest score ever totaled by a Buffalo football learn. in scar- s. ing its fourth straight win of the gtani.., season. three complete teams were -N sent on the field by Coach Ed- wards and they all ran wild to pile up the large score. r7r-or-or-irr-wr-wr-or-7r-org .141 PRWATE 1 DISTEMPER N KENNELS Pm...mos I ,. 1,.. : S 12 P' 111;---4 P.; bwr4 ON-"u11-11 w - , - Ao, - - 61410.i.Oile0 g N. CAROLINA, STADE'. 57Elon 0 ' 41Wasb. &It; 33 - 9-,-Clentson - .." 6 '37Wake Pores t 0 7Plorlda 14 VIRGINIA - 60Rantk Macon.-: 0 13-13. Carolina .7. 24 0Princeton 0 0V. M. 9 0Vanderbilt 34 GEORGIA - 52Mercer 0 6Yalo 21 , 7Furman 23Tolima 14 - SEWANER. , 14Bryson , 0 - 0--Texas Azgtes 19 13Transylvania 14 38--Cumberlanct . 0 12--A1abama 42 FOR 1929 SEASON LODGE AND COTTAGES WATER AND LIGHTS NEW LAKES AND ROADS GOLF AND TENNIS SWIMMING AND BOATING FISHING AND HUNTING Wonderful Medicinal Waters CORPO L S. U, Trihs; Over Springhill BATON ROUGE, Oct. 27 Making their aerial threat against Louisiana State university here today' the Springhill Badger t! proved the first to cross the Thor goal line this season. though Louisiana State gametasily 30 to 7. Springhill opened up in the closing periods with two long -passes that brought the ball to the Tiger 12-yard line. Line plunging netted two yards and then Quarterback Leduc passed to Roach. who was across the Tiger goal. Roach kicked the-extra. , - Percy Brown thrilled the Tiger rooters when he twice got away for long rune around end both of which led to touchdowns. ' ,.; You are co' rdially;invited to visit this scenic 'spot a Lea Springs, 17 miles from Knoxville on the Lee Highway, via Burlington. L 37Roanoke 7 14Co 1rat, . ... 35 6N. Carolina 14 34KIng 0 FLORIDA ' 26-r.S3uthern 0 27Auburn 0 23-44eroer 14N. C. 7 SPRIINGS AT! ON I Captain Earl Smith 'flays': , , , Star Role In Tide , Victory Barna Wingmah Converts Two Intercepted Passes Into Touchdowns; Tigers Baffle Wademen. With Tricky, Deceptive Passing Attack. ' , , BIRMINGliAlst, Ala., Oct. 27 (M).--Sewaneets grim little band of Purple Tigers was crushed by! Alabama's husky Crimson Tide, 42 to 12, here this afternoon- In the twentysfith gridiron tussle between these two elevens. 1 - Earl Smith, rangy Alabama cartain and end; led the-Tide to yictorK with a great exhibition of defensive play, intercepting,. two passes, and converting them into touchdowns after long runs through a broken field ' , , Se,:ranee nniootled 'it tricky and OHIO DEFEATS INDMNA, 13-0, To STAY . .. . ' I moomiNaTox. Ind., Oct PT (1170.--Ohlo state ,kept Its Big Ten slate clean. 'crushing Indiana.. 13 to O. before a homecoming, erinsd of 16.000 in Memorial , Stadium bere today. - The Buckeyes skirted the ends and plunged through large boles in the Indiana line opened by Ohio forwards to pile up a lopsided advantage. -The Hoosiers showed fairly sustained defensive, but their attack could get in littio against a line that was 13 pounds heavier to thes,roans It was when My began skirting end, protected bysplendid interference by .1Cruskamp. that Ohio added mpst orits yardage. , PurdueSmothers-- , Chicago 40 To CHICAGO. Oct. 27 (dn.Purdue university; eleven ' today invaded Stagg field and smothered the tintversity of Chicago. 40 to O. the most decisive defeat suffered byChicago ,in a decade. -, ' ' - It was the 32nd. meeting of the two on the gridiron and the fiftieth victory for Purdue since 1892. -- "Pest", Welsh and Ed Caraway, both .Texans. were Chicago's greatest griefs. , Each scored two touchdowns and Caraway kicked three goals, after touchdowns. , , Modern electric vans for deny,. ery of letters and parcels. Atre to be used by the London postoffIce. deceptive passing attack that J?affled the Crimson in the second and final periods. Schoolfield passed 19 yerda to Piper,' end, for the Tigers': first counter and completed a series of short passes in the final minutes of play to send Reuben Bean, Remité hatlfback, alter with their second touchdown. - , THE BATTERING of Tony Holm 1)( and Dilly Hicks 'gave the Tide two touchdowns in the first, period. flicks gave the Tide two . touch- downs in the first period. Hicks crossed the purple (coal line n81,1 on a reverse play off tackle after he had bmken away tor 25 yards (a the second period. - , . Catupbell raced 35 yards after IT- ceiving a 25-yard heave from Hicks ,for the Tide's fourth touchdown. Captain Smith finishing the scoring with a 28-yard sprint and another tor 55 yards in final period. -Skidmore, Alabama tackle made six perfect kteks from placement for extra points. Hicks circling end . for the aeventh point after touchdown. Boyd for &manes missed both:tries for goals, Score by periods: Sewanee 0 8 0 8-13 Alabama ....,..14 - 7 14 , 7-43 Sewanee scoring: Tottchdownk, PiPer, R. Bean, (tub for Craven). Alabama - scoring: Touchdowns. Holm, I-licks (2.); Campbell, E. Smith (2). Points after touchdown Skidmore (6): (Placement) kicks (from scrimmage). , Oflicials: Referee. Strupper, (Georgia Tech); umpires. Castator.. (Trinity); bead linesman, Slier (Bushnell); field Judge, Collins --- (Vanderbilt). ' , , i o , unpitt (stopping drunk motorist).- Are you drunk? 'N., Drunken , Motorist: No. shit'. Cop: Do you. know Abrahant Lincoln? , ' ' . , D.1 M.; Heel) a pertenal frient of. . mines. I Cop: Drive on.---Columbia Jester. SPRINQ LAKE,- THE' FIRST bF LEA LAKES Reservations of cottage sites are now being made.. Opening pricesS300 to $1,000 with lights and water. Select your home-site now and build your cottage next spring. , LEA SPRINGS CORPORATION, General Bldg., Knoxville. tenttlemen: Pleate send me full information abo Lea Lakes. -."1r14 NZ, t I t...ty lo -4 1414-1416 GENERAL BUILDING Name -' .,....,1 czb-4 1111'1.----, Main 2944 - Hemlock 2944 4 - i SZ I A Address . - ... . , . . . . - .. ..... 1 :1411 .. . , PP,.Ral LYQ92R9A702:92092EQDAIra 9. TA0n9ATOATATEMFAQOAT(E910A.TQ9ATOR9ATO4W1-02Z50E9N . mm-- . ! , 7 4 -, , , a . . x, , . . . . . , , . . . - - , - . - ,: . . , , , . , . - , - P' . . , . . . . . - -.. , - , .. , . . . - . . - .. . . , - , . , - - 1 7 ' - . , t . - , . .. , ' - - ------ . . . . . . - -..., -- - --. ---- -----,. --------- --. - --. -----,,.-----,,--- .--..----------- - -- - -- - - --.. -. ,----. l' P -4 , ,, I . t . , , :: 1 ' - A,11 ....- , . .. . . ':. rtri, , , ' A - 07LP' , , - L'''' .1 4 Al 3 . I , e , .. -Monday, 1 ctober 29th . 4 C.- 1 ' g) c 1 v B cordially-invited to visit this scenic 'spot at 0 I r Springs, 17 miles trom Knoxville on the - t-.:1 , -- - 1 ur Lee Hiehwav. B lineton k k - i, , . . 460, SF 0 , , , - ,.- . . . P.14 ' ,,.' , - ,,z,,,, ,:26.3, EASON,. - - i -- -,,,,,,:-.1x,--;;.;..,,,,:-:,,:rs,:r.,,........,:...:?...:-.,:,,,,-..,i:,,,,....,-,,,,..,,,,,,,,,:,:.:,,,.,,,,,i,.;:,,,,,,,,.-..-,..:,,..-;,..;,,,,.,.......,;.,..,,,.....,,.....,,....,.,.....: ,.,......,..,,,,,...::..,,:..,i,,:,;:,,,i,,,....,,,,,,,, 4.,- .- stoo,,;,.,:-.:,,-,,-,i,:,,,:;:.?:0;.:.:,-,g,.,,i-..,t,,,,i;?a,,,,,..;:,.:,,.:..,,.,.,,,f,-..::,,,,,..;:,..,,,,:,,,::,.......,. ., .,,,,tr..--., ,,;ros,,- --;..... ...,,.,,.,.,..,,.,..........,... .,......,...,...,......,:c....?;-?,;;;:,,,,,,;:::,-,....,,,,,,.,-,,,,A:4z-,,:,.--,,,.., i : , ,,, . . -4--ot.,,,:;,--:::t;,,,,,,:-.,.::-.::u:,K,x,,,--,x;,:-c,,,.,,,::,.;,,,.,,,,i,.,-:,,.:;:,,,::,,,,:,4.,,;,.:,,,,;:,,:5,,,,A,,,,,.,,,!,.,:,,5,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,:,,,,,.,;,f,, . ,. d .,;- , ..., 1 -',. , , ' :::-, .::;'' . t,' ..::'":',,;:r...5':',..:.,,;:':.::::::::,:;-!::,::";9,7. A::;:::,',;2.::-:,;,',-:.:,Z,:x,..,,,,t0P'.4,...;,,,,,,K 4, ''.",,,...,:',,-'1:,. ' Aomme. . ,, 1 ,-' : '.:,'. ::;:, : '.:,-'',:::',.:'''.-.' .,'tlit-,.,,,,.:,..,,,:,.f., :-.:;::::::;,'::;:;f';'.';;::,'.,'.::?-;:,rf'.;';''.'.';::: ''.'',.,:,,,'-'':',,, ,,)0, '.,,, ".$ ' "'''' ,,. , ,'-'3Ork:44A; .;..V.:;',....'n:i.,X.'',:::'.....,,.,::;;;:e:';7:-':'. ''H'.;; 47.,',',,,A';''4. , 3- ' ' :'- -. ...''!'-:'-',....''':-;-.'-''''.'-:';'."'-'..".--,---;.-.if-?i-.:.:;.',':"-....-':':i?,::f--;j'e"----'-',''','00,4,-,-,---z,..,,, -. , . I ,,,.,,,..ir,:.,.i,---.:;---sJ:',..-,-;.;--?-.:,.; -r:,-.-:-.....,-,,r,,,,,,,,,,',:,,,.:-...;;;-;;;..::-,,,--;-.44,--,;, ,- -:-: " - DTI-AGES ' ,r-,':.::::,,.::',,:a.,,,.,,,:.,;.-,:,-,,,,-::.,',;:?,:,-.,,,,K...----1.0,4 , , .,. :-.!.;:i::,,,..,...,..!?....,7:-,:1;., ,,,,i,,,, 1 ,-,':,:-...,..,-::.:,:,-,-...-i:,,.,,,:ii,,if.,..,..:?:.;, 4,1iiz,-- '. o. .4 - : i ,!iforte 7.....:,:fii.f.,,,:-,':'-::-:;-, : - ,.!,, ... LIGHTS .., . - - ''. 1 " 0-al , , --I..- ii, ,,,,,,,,t; . , , --i,;i,e,;.,..;- - - FD ROADS 1 - b.- .4 ' rENNIS BOATING i , , -.4 s , , . ,, . ,,,,,,,,; : , - . .,, ,, - i.,,,. . , , --,..,;4:::,..,,.....,, , , 'i - . -ILINTING ' '', ''''4 '' '' '. '"' -244.4,,,,....,.41-.or -4t.;t-..i.Z.;.:-.:',"'" , ,,-,44stire4momm4ovi,...,,,,,,,;,,; ' - 41 - - 1 , - , , ' ",r.-.? ;' 4 '..--,'.1',....,7 ,-. , .,...;,....,,,, ..........-.1,:r"..., , ' ).k.3;;X --44.,4. ,.,-..4-....- -:.5 , i 41,-,4...0,i,-..,,-,$-4.'''..,.11-tt.-..:.:!,..,-; 4.1 - , " ,.; --,..--" :.10.7-,--.,:-.1.,,, ..-,5-4t,:t-,, ful , .t '-t.;...-:;.,,,,,,,:,,,,,.,,,,,,,K.,,.. ; Pti..,. s, ' , ,,--.3,-..:,..;p:.,,,....,,,,.-,,..:,:-;;;;:,,,,,,,,56,....,,,.--,,, , 4 ..,.. ,1,,,,--,,,,,,,,.;:-;, ..,,...., .::.:,,,,, ,,,4 Vaters' ,, , ,;.:..,,,,. ....., , '- ,-.. - -- - SPRING LAKE. THE FIRST b'F LEA LAKES ; ' : - . . : .' ..', ri 1 : :.. , . , , ., : , . , , , . ,.. . .-. . ,M M. 1. . . .. .. I being made: I lights and d build vour , I LEA SPRINGS CORPORATION, General Bldg ., Knoxville. 1 i tentlemen: DI--- ----t tAt t A, II . Dmlauon MID0111 k..1 ) I - - ; 1110 L4LL I -- 4411ce-LIATEarVE: - 5--Alabl -6Wash fly To Have Isis--141"uis. 4-13 At 41---Vandi ogs. 14Cloort - KEN ICarso 45Wash crippled Geor- b - , , ., , , - - , TIM Kr;oxvium sum:ay Jourtnist. ,KNoxvniz, TENN-, ocrogErt 28, 1928. , - . , , - ,., - ., . - , , , , , , GRO I l 1 I , - , , GONER t S k , ' , , - (11 OPEN A PTE '' ';'. C .411P . .. ..1 , - . ' SON . - - - . - . - : 44 ' 400. $ -, ... - '-', - - - . 404,4, , 40," -, 4,,," - ' 4644 - - ,- . 41.410.. '-' - . it ' - ' , Ills - - - , , , 'S' . ' - .. t Crimson i 1 e . a K , Takes , 0. Camp a., eanee Tigers Into C.rnp 42 tibt . y. . . . . . .. ... w . . . , gs C ., . . - - Captai t, Smith Plays . .. Close .. all t,, 7 . . .. ., , - - ' Wit .s no n, Sou ern Conference n Ear I S I : - .. Bulldo Have , - TENNESSEE - - ' VANDERBILT 1. GEORGIA TECH ; a '. 'NORTH CAROLINA N. CAROLINA STADE , V. P. L . '' . 41Maryville ,.i... A , 63Wake Forest ... 0 77--Ylon , 0 37Roanoke , 20-4-Chat.tanOOKIII 7 , , ',26--Maryland ..d., 19 4IWash. at Lee 33 , 33-11amm,Sid. 7 . But Down Greentes, 20-14 4 ICentre ..... 7 "', 12Colea to ...... 1 7 ' 13--Miasissio.91 4... ,12 - 13--Texas ......... 12 , , 12Notre. Darn 2. 0 0Hervard ....... 20 - 0,-.-Clernacn . 6 14Coleate 75 , . , ' - 15Alabama - . 4.o ; 13 13Tulane ...-.,.. 6 13Tulane ....... 0 14--V. P. I. 16 '37Wake Poies. i.... 0 6N. Carolina ... II Star Role In Tide Victory ,,, . 2. :- 6Wash. A; Lee .. 7 34Vireinla ' 0 ,.20--N. Crallna ... 7 ,p 7Gs Tech 20 7Plorlda 14 54K1ne .. .;,.., 0 . , - ' TILANE 4- . -,stAKILAND , .. 311S11177111.117 ," - - AI-BURN , ' . VIRGINIA - FLORIDA ' - , Georgia Takes 13-0 Lead In First Period iih , Only To Have 6 615--MiseLoula. A Nortnal36. 31"Vaabineton .. , OT ' 25Arkanaita ... 0 r 4 60en; 0 , 26--rSouthern . 0 . az . 0 0 19,--N Carolina ... 26 a 0Alabama g g ,, . 2 0Sluthern Rck 7 1,. 0--Clernson 6 13-13. CarolMacon. , ina ,,,.. 24 27Auburn ..,,,....., 0 'Barna Wingman Converts Two Intercepted Passes Into . Tulane Stage Comeback And Lead By 14-13 At , 0-0s. Tech - 12 7-8. Carolina .., 21 12Tertnesee .. . 13 0--Plorlda 27 0Princeton ..... 0 23--merver . a ., ' Touchdowns; Tigers Baffle Wademen With . . 6--vanderbut 13 23W. Maryland.... 6 -19--Auburn ' 0 - 0-01 Wes 19 0--Ir. M. 1, ,.....,, 9 14--N. C. A State... 7 - Half; Fumble Decides Tilt For Bulldogs. 14Goonria CKY STATE ........ 23 0-17. M. 1. 0 ,,14--Lovola ....... a 3L . 34 'VSHo LC 9 ward t .... 6 0Vanderbilt .... 34 Tricky Deceptive Passing Attack. ,, ., , , - . KENTU -, ' LOUISIANA MISS. A. ! LABAN.,, ' ' GEORGIA - - 61Canson-Newman 0 48-41. W. Lt Col 0 20Ou12h1tp. - 6 ,, 27 Mississippi .. 0 52Mercer 0 , itil-LIIV , - 1--wasn & Lee 41Lcoute. Col. - .. 0 6Tulane1 51 446--Mles. A. & M.. 0 8---ylue . , 21 ' , - ,. CC rl., rIa-t -1 7 i I 1 P 1A rAnnrfeti rrinnitbri Gem-- A ST, S. .. 21aalmtila- A- & It 0 0Alabama 46 13--Tertruu .. mpe - . IA , vm...--:..' ., - niRmiNt-, lliAm All Oct. 27 a--S l.twaneets 'TIM little 1 1 LS110111111AVit Ala., uct. ter).----,-"cwance grim tiktic I band of Purple Tigers was crushed by Alabama's husky Crimson I tet- 4 howv th;c nftArrs"rtvt- Iry th,- tt-Atlic"...4qt-h errietirrin I 1 - iti-s-sii be-t;v-eeicih-e-setuT-o-elev-e-n-s: - 7 I--; ---,-- - - r---.1 , Earl Smith, rangy Alabama captain and end; led the-Tide to ' - ' victork with a great exhibition of defensive play, intercePtints,. reithel ieUfle icatiatwrchskeit. slate to; 6.111 here tc pi ywas &AI" LC ;e: vtahanend t aIpni ch kick forwar LI sTairrs fairly was . - It w , - terfere tt' added and e p t. bat teeaalvirni )1es 1111 Ohio ?,d adved a but HUI undo shirt. Id in Ohto Pu - alost re to- CV roved Uni" Stagy re re 111 81 Si tiam nt ee rs - , 441 ro 0 I Purdue articled S I. 1.1al E e most ( of tha ( fiftieth )2. ( rews3r, three clog-passel; t' Tiger ar n etted rback b o was e , kick- d Tiger away )th of e Er run5 vA,vr,ssEcoND -NARK . i - ,, 0 1 OF , . , . , PIIILADELPILIA; Oct. 27 (IT.P.)Into Navy territory. but the Ind- 1 The Navy's second - touchdown I dies stopped . the drive on the the season accounted for one I Navy's l-ard lino , A 11-vard , --,,- 1 - - . I goale after touchdowns. , , 4r 5 ; 4 0 - - or Modern electric vans for denyery of letters and parcels, ,are -to be used by theY London nostoftice. LI Ak, EP, L elP-111 " t749 b7-41 .dlina 'IMP tZI 6.7"r4 "MOW tzb. ízrla

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