Pampa Daily News from Pampa, Texas on November 2, 1961 · Page 17
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Pampa Daily News from Pampa, Texas · Page 17

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Thursday, November 2, 1961
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THE PAMPA UAtLV NEWS , NOVEMBER 2 ( INI AN INDEPENDENT FREEDOM NEWSPAPER We believe that all men are equally endowed by theit Creator, j^ndt by afty government, with the gift of freedom, and that it fill every a4afi*s duty to God to preserve his own liberty and respect ' th* liberty ,of others. Freedom is self-control, no more, no Jess. Ta discharge this responsibility, free men, t<* the best of their , must understand and apply to daily living the great moral t '«tpfi§sed in the Ten Commandmants, the Golden Rule and th«hl3edaration of Independence This newspaper is dedicated to furnishing information to our P< readers!so that they can better promote and preserve their own «. freedom and 'encourage others to see its blessings. For only when [•'man understands Freedom and is free to control himself and all ,h« produces, can he develop to his utmost capabilitcs in harmony ||,. with the above moral principles. SUBSCRIPTION RATKft »". By Currier In PAtnpa., S5« jper w«ek, $4.60 par 3 monfn«, JJ.OO per « months, If 118.00 per year. By Jn'ail paid In advanea jtt office, UO.OO par year Irr retail 3 trading stone. $15.00 ptr yaar outitld* retail trad In g aone. 31.25-per month. 'Price per single copy fio dally, 15o Sunday. No nmll orders accepted In \i ~ localities served by carrier. Published dally except Saturday by the Pftmpa i ' Dally N*w«, Atchison at Somervllle. Pnrnpn., Texas. Phone MO 4-2526 all I department*, Entered M second elms matter under the act of March 9. 1878. Hankerings I: j: Syrians Want Less Socialism Personalities and Pan-Arab I* concepts seem to have played a Ijt minor role in the Syrian uprising |< that dissolved Nasser's United I»V Arab Republ ic- The basis of the Ij revolt was mostly concern over I*-vanishing economic freedom. I* Poor as the Syrians are in their \»- bleak, unyielding land, they have II a reputation as hard workers and I* eager traders' Nasser's government tried to herd them d own |1 the path to socialism. Recent decrees had placed a ceiling on income, and income over 6,000 pounds a year was entirely confiscated. Land tenure was limited to 100 acres, regardless of productivity of the land or the efficiency of the smaller farms. Nationalization of all major enterprises, of course, was a familiar course- No salary in the land was permitted to exceed 5,\\ 000 pounds save Nasser's, which Cairo in the New York Times, while the rich were easily cut down to size, in 10 years of socialism the poor were about as badly off as before- The Syrians couldn't see much future in that kind of economic approach and kicked the Egyptians out of the country. Back home in America we need not feel smug. None of our tax rates is 100 per cent yet (the lop is 91 per cent), but a man of modest income pays 50 per cent rales to the federal government on any taxable income over $16,000 — plus all the other state, local and sales taxes he must pay- We haven't nationalized all industry yet, but hundreds of government corporations are c o m- peting with private business, and in many areas you use federal electric power or fall back on kerosene lamps. And there's a ripple of talk now about public 'm Taking Your Adviee ' ( was a modest 6,000. (The pound I owncrship of lhe ro i|roacls- Farms i • i 1^ *> i nrt \ . l | J is worth $1.900 All this was supposed to level I < the society, doing away with the 1 rich and the poor, and producing aren't nationalized, but m any crops are under complete federal control and federally financed. So, when we begin to worry McLLMORE I may change my mind by tomorrow, but as of right now these are among my beliefs: That the best proof that the United States is not inferior to Soviet Russia in the ability to wage war is the fact that Soviet Russia has never seen fit to at> tack the United States. If the Commies thought they could lick us, they'd let us have it, That world opinion is' held in the same high regard by Russia as freedom of speech, movement, worship, and the dignity of man. The outraging of the world is one of the Kremlin's favorite indoor and outdoor sports, as witness Hungary, bomb tests resumption, East Germany, West Berlin, and on and on. That those who favor appeasement of Russia would stand more- chance of being understood if they would, just once, explain what the appeasement would gain, and when, where and how it would stop. That those who say they prefer to be Red than Dead might well wind up both. What guarantee is there that Russia, should it conquer all, would assure a safe, happy existence for those put under { the boot? That the only country in the world that Russia really fears is West Germany and will go to any lengths to keep W. Germany as weak as possible. That San Francisco's food is highly overrated and isn't in the same class with New York, Los AiiKele.s, or New Orleans. That the Peace Corps will be gone and forgotten within three years at the most. That half the people with fallout shelters would be too curious 'one big happy cooperative mid-' a |, ol ,t the economic freedom of die-class family. Yet, as Jay Waltz wrote from others, we might give a thought Allen-Scott Report: Exploring Plan to Arm West German Navy With Subs Carrying U.S. - Controlled Polaris Missiles WASHINGTON, — The U.S. is exploring the explosive possibility of equipping the West German navy with a small fleet of Polaris firing nuclear submarines. Under the proposal being discussed at the highest levels in both governments, the Polaris submarines would be built in the U.S. and then sold to the West Germans for dollars. In addition to the German crews specially trained U.S. naval personnel would be stationed aboard under a joinc agreement guaranteeing U.S. control of atomic warheads used in the 1,200 mile range Polaris missiles. Sale of four Polaris submarines to our own. Action And Reaction Government intervention in the economy is always engineered to |, obtain a direct result which is favorable to some special person or group. In obtaining it, government invaritably injures some other persons or g'roup. Government cannot seem to grasp the point that every action in the market place has an .equally powerful reaction. ^-^~ * ••."-!.• '.' • • --- : -— Morality Is Self-Control We have discussed the concept I Most evil in the world arises, j! of morality so many times and j not from a recognition of this It with so many people that a bit j principle, but in fact, from its as to what was going on outside | at a cost ranging from $900 mil- l.o stay in them. ; lion to $1.2 billion is under con- That basketball, the most pop- j sideration. These - prices include ular of games, is also the most boring. That "incongruous lies! word in the English 1 a n guagc, and that "enervating 1 shouldn't mean what it. does. That if Lawrence. Durrell gets the cost of the sixteen Polaris missiles which each submarine is is the tig-1 capable of carrying. These exploratory talks, launched earlier this year by Navy Secretary John Connally in a visit to Bonn, were extended to the re- more on the subject could appear to be redundant- violation, For it seems that as men continue to live together, Yet, the longer we live, the, they find themselves feeling that I, more certainly do we find that'they are justified in committing |>; an understanding of morality is nets of aggression against other ; the basic understanding of every persons without any more provoca- :C thing. lion than the disagreement of the KI i i n • t i-i . cent discussions in West Germany Nobel Prize for literature over . _ _ , ~ J between Deputy Secretary of Defense Roswell Gilpatric and West i Graham Greene, someone has made a grievous-mistake^ '*' That a Harvard man with a beard is impossible. That Mississippi would beat Michigan State by two t o u c h- downs. That rattlesnake meat has a better taste than chicken. That, the Ouija board is in for a big comeback. That operating an elevator in a department store should be the highest paid job in the world. That a chain of clean, comfort- launch intermediate range ballis tic missiles, missiles which can carry a nuclear warhead. "In addition, part of Russia's flotilla in the Baltic is being equipped with ground - to -. air rockets and short range missiles for use against coastal targets "According to our information the Soviets have around 70 de stroyers in the Baltic, among them 45 destroyers of postwar con struccion, 150 submarines; 330 submarine hunting craft, and 200 torpedo boats." Note: The west Germans wpulc also like the U.S. to equip theii small, 350 - ton submarines with a ballistic' missile smaller thai the Polaris, but which still could be fired while the craft are sub merged. Germany's Defense Minister, Franz - Josef Strauss. Members of the Joint Congressional Committee on Atomic Energy, which must approve any fin>al agreement, reveal that no sales accord is expected until after Chancellor Adenauer visits Washington next month and probably not until after Congress convenes in January. If finally approved, sale of the submarines will be included within the framework of an "agree- MORE POLARIS NEWS Polaris offer similar to the Wes German proposal will be made t France and Italy by the Kenned) Administration before the end o the year. , . .The U.S. is having its problems with Great Britain over the Polaris submarine oper ations at Holy Loch nava base in Scotland. In case on of these submarines c a u ses a nuclear accident, the Br t'sh wants the U.S. to pay a! Knowledge is largely a matter, other person in some area that f blc molcls wi ' h no fri11 *- and ! ment in principle" reached by H,e amimnlntinn of fnrtnnl sppmc imnm-lnnt In I horn low '' ntes - W0 "'a make a fortune. ,--,„„,•„_, c ' -...„_ .___ \\ of the accumulation of factual data. But wisdom comes with the U' proper usage of these data. And \.\ proper usage of anything depends | upon moral understanding. seems important to them. Man's inhumanity to man begins at the point of seeking conformity, U ends on the rack or in front ol a shooting squad, where i some men have abritrarily Many of the persons to whom brought other men thru violent I we have talked on the subject ap-' m eans. . , •_,,,!., against the middle, better Most people seem quite willing nny man j n history. '•.pear to be convinced that there Many travelers have no use, after a clay of hard driving, for three Gilpatric and Strauss in their Bonn negotiations. Under terms of this accord, TV sets, a kidncy-shaped swim- ... , ; lfc "" B "' ""' ™" lu < , u i ,i n , West Germany has promised to ming poo, a basketbn court, ai , ., J ' ,. , , .. ,, , i speed up its rearmament and at pitch and putt go f course, and a . .. ,,,,,,,, , ' . . the same time help the U.S. cu K»*a fta f\t /"• M »-\« t*t £»c» IM d\F(J t'\J »^r>f1iY1 . * brace of canaries in every room. That Tito plays both ends than «is no such thing as morality. Their conclusion appears to stem I from the "relativity" discernible ~' t in so much of our thinking and teaching nowadays- to accept the idea that no one should invade their persons, their That Castro would shrivel down to size were he given one-fiftieth its international payment deficit by purchasing annually more than $600 million in arms in this conn- ! try. properties or their rights. Butl o f t | ie publicity he gets, having so concluded, many of' these same people conclude that How can one be certain of mor-1 , hey are s() se |r. rignleous lhev al law? How can one be certain^,,; wUh impunityi inv ade t h e of any absolute rules about any-, persoils property or rights of otn . < nm S- jers so that conformity can be oh- Moral law rests upon a univer-; taine(i . Am , ,, ore js ,' he hc j, innillg ' sally recognized principle which. j of u , e br eak-down in morality, tho recognized, is only rarely put ; into words. This principle is the precept that man may not commit aggression against others of his' kind. If we define aggression as consisting of the first initiated act of violence wherein one person, without provocation, invades the person or the properly of another, we are at the threshold of a grasp of the principle- Having defined it this way, we have been able to establish on each occasion that such an action would be invari-1 .ably in conflict with rightness. | Universally, men abhor the in- i vader, the attacker, the person The instrument of universal invasion of private rights, lives By United Pess International The Almanac and property is, and always has] ' been, government. Thus, many | men have adopted, unknowingly I perhaps, «n acceptance of a double standard of moraj values Today is Thursday, Nov. 2, the 30lkh day of the year with 59 to follow in 1961. The moon is approaching its An action of invasion which ncw P hase ' would deprive an individual of his' The momhl S "tars are Mercury own money or property is considered wrong and evil if an individual or a gang of individuals and Venus. and Saturn. American frontiersman and ex- outside of government perform, , _ , , , the action But the identical ac- p ' orei : Damel Boone WM born °" lion, if committed bv a person in, thls date '" 1734 ' government, is considered correct i °" this d , a >', m h ' St ° ry: „ , In 1889, North and South Dakota proper. who without provocation commits I .. r ! pencimg upon """"" of t: If ! be both moral and immoral de- were admitted into the Union as ^ power . ' the «"«* «ih states. BUILDING THE BUNDES- WEHR — In exchange, the U.S. is giving West Germany new assurances to supply Bonn's armed forces with a powerful nuclear delivery capability, including the Army's 500 - mile range Pershing missile that is now undergoing final tests. Only the delivery systems will he given to the West Germans. All nuclear warheads for the missiles will still remain under U.S. control. Also, the U.S. is offering to integrate the two countries' military logistic systems in West Germany and to "sell" other types of late models of U.S. military arms, including tanks and planes to increase the fire power of the Bundeswehr. These West German armed forces, now five years old, passed the 310,000 point this month toward the goal of 350,000 men under arms by 1962. The West German navy received the first of twelve 350 • ton conventional - damage costs and claims. They are pressing the State Department to put this guarantee into a joint U.S. - British agreement. The State Deaprtment is taking the position that negotations on this touchy subject should be delayed until after Congress acts next year on legislation to make indemnity coverage on nuclear accidents available outside the U.S The U.S. is offering West Germany a chance to participate in a joint research and arms development program that includes new weapons for use against submarines . . . .Within 30 days, the U.S. will have a total of six Polaris submarines in operation. Together, they carry a tot-al of 96 IRBMs. All will be zeroed in on Soviet targets. 'he Nation's Press COMMUNISM AND THE BlGtilTV OF MAN (the Cariina Israelite) Meeting in Israel, American ewish leaders and officials of ewlsh agencies arc discussing he monetary requirfcments for ke ertstiirig years. Immigration nto Israel has accelerated recgnt- y and it is estimated that 206 nillion dollars will be needed in he next 5 years to consolidate on firm economic footing the 47.5 arm villages into which 132,000 efugees wil be located. You need no involved dialectics o see that this is the work of ree men. Since 1945, the problem of set- ling the few survivors of the zi holocaust into the emerging state of Israel has required mil- ions upon millions of dollars, fews who lived in the freedom of the English-speaking civiliza- ions -have responded with generosity. Not a single dollar of these many millions has come from Jews in Russia or Jews in the satellite countries of Russia. Ye these Jews are no different than any others. The Jews of Poland Roumania and Hungary are the oldest Jewish communities in Eastern Europe. It was the Rus sian Jews who gave impetus t Zionism and were the first to settle in Palestine as far back a the 1880's. These Jews not onlj feel for their brethren but cj>.?r> the same -burden of. history, Bu the difference is this: the govern ments under which they live do not permit their .participation o charity. ;The Communists indulge no charity and while the Federa German Republic at Bonn has made vast restitution payments to individual survivors, to comma nities, and to Israel, not one dol lar of restitution has been made by the Communist regime of Eas Germany. Charity is one of the great evi dences of human dignity. Charity is the right of an individual to help his more unfortunate brother elsewhere. The American Poles in Buffalo, N.Y., in the days of the Czar, tithed yearly for a Free Poland; the Greeks in America have built hospitals- and cathedrals in the homeland; once a year the Swedes of the American Northwest toast the Swedish king; the Irish of New York and Boston were instrumental in making the establishment of the Irish Free State a success; and the Constitution of the Republic of Czechoslovakia was founded in the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. With the advent of Hitler, the Jews of America rose as one man to help. The Communist governments did not allow the expression of human dignity. For the Communists, the idea of human dignity is only defined politically, never emotionally, never with a touch of the miracle of kindness. OUR ANCESTORS ''Can't you speed It up, Mr. Brady? We're In full retreat now!" Pegler Says: Testimony Offered That * i • Salem Witches Were Real By WESTBROOK PEGLER It is self-apparent whatever any , & ^^ Q{ ^ one has to say about it. No one! al and , hen • a|| men wishes to be victimized. , ,, , ,, first „„ . . lu udhere to it. But we must, There are, of course, various ways of interpreting "without provocation " There are also various land in Palestine. i ister Strauss wants the Polaris _ v . Jn 1920 stat.on KDKA began the submarines lo counter the Soviet schedl ' le of '' adio at the same time, resist , |, e j lm>adcusthts by reporting the re- teniixttiun to invade the lues tulns °' 'he presidential election. . . . , I rights ur propertv of others in an i In 194S ' Pr « id «» l H« r O' Tru- ways of interpreting invasion. But : effor( l() make ' Uiem ^.,f ormj man and Son- Alben Berkeley. the principle holds. And so deep- n lQ QUr standaids Aggression D-Ky., were elected president and 1 J - •' •" ' u "" "" vice president of the United States- missile threat in the Baltic. He reports that the Soviets have armed their Baltic fleet with medium and short range rockets that could do tremendous damage to West Germany in case of a Soviet nuclear attack. The Defense minister gives this rundown on the Russian Maritime missile buildup: 8 , "At present there are eight base of all law and $11 m oral j posed of people less than 30 years j always sure: a:\d the sure man i cruisers berthed in the Day of Len- *W5tofl»- Ipld, . j who is always dull." lin|r*d fitted with equipment to :ly rooted is it in the mores of |l human kind that we suspect it to be at the base of the bulk of ! ~~ i is always immoral. A thought for today: American 011 the commandments in the About 45 per cenc of the popu-! editor and satirist Henry Mencken li Decalogue, as well as being at the hujon of Hawaii. 50th state, is con-'said: "It is the dull man who is SEAL CAMPAIGN SOON WASHINGTON (UPI) - Mrs. John F. Kennedy will open the national Christmas seal 1 campaign at a White House ceremony on 0. i Life upon the wickea stage may not be what some suppose^-but its ill repute existed a long time. Japan's artistic kabuki theater was under 9 cloud for centuries. In the beginning, men took \yomen's parts and women dressed as men. Banned for immorality, kjbuki reopened with boys in women's parts. But it was banned, again. On the next try t grown men toqfc all the parts. Nobody was offended. The kabuki theater i« still an all-adult male production. Bid For A Smile BEAUTY Some folks in looks ta-ke so much prlda They don't think much of what's Inside. Well, as for me. I know my face Can ne're he innclu a Hiing of A.inl so I ralher think I'll iee How i can fix Ih' inside O' m» Some folks'll say, He looks Ilka sin, ^}ut ain't he beautiful within! — John Kendrlck Bangs. NO CASH, BUT ... PITTSBURGH (UPI)—A trio of jandits who entered a Pittsburgh aakery Monday was not easily discouraged. The crime of witchcraft which bedevilled a prim and generally obedient society in Salem, Mass, in the sixteen-hundreds has been ridiculed by many arbilrary individuals, most of them scriveners, who may not have ha d the fortitude to disparage the Law of the Land at the time. Miss' Inez Robb, whose personal friendship has been a spiritual treasure in my estate for more than 30 years, recently expressed this cynical attitude in an essay which went no further, however, than to insist that no Salem witch ever was burned at the stake, As to that, I accept her authority. But she seems to suggest also thai burning at the stake would have been cruel and unusual punishment for an adjudicated witch if the law had so provided. That is going too far. Does she think Mickey Cohen's sentence of 15 years for tax evasion is too severe? Miss Robb is a lady of obstreperous mind, but T entreat her to restrain this anarchy and yield a decent respect for the Law of the Land. Disobedience is the stuff that juvenile crirne.,is made of, and immodesty of speech in the New York theatre. I recall that in Palm Beach during Prohibition, when Miss Robb was a cub reporter doing Society for the New York News, we both, and others, chafed at Prohibition but faithfully obeyed the law. Whatever our secret desires, we were loyal subjects of the Constitution bf the U.S.A. including the 18th Amendment. I would never suspect that Iney entertained the faintest, inmost longing for a portion of gin in orange juice, I hope she honors my own purity. Or anyway, won't squeal. Under tbe law of William and Mary in Salem, Mass., witchcraft was a capital crime. I am a little aback at the news from Iney that no Salem witch ever was burned at the stake. But I have precious old documentary proof out of the court records of Salem | that witches were put to death by Store owner Joseph Moros told' law, though by hanging, not by them he had no cash on hand. The thugs settled for four dozen doughnuts. the faggot. It is an unjustified assumption now to hold that there never Football Fable Answer to Prtvtou* Punl* ACROSS i 1 Shoulder—— i 5 Bight —— ; 8 —posts 12 Fish sauce 13 Sturgeon egg* 4 Abrade 5 Made a mistake 6 Negative word 7pismantles 9 Titans EOBC1H taaULSC G1G313 G9UE-1 araa raacia 15- aaa maia " Food fish « Comfort DisepprQvto* t^rriTi laaagi NBH sound 32PostpopemenU 44 Hireling 25 Aleutian island 35 Forsaken 45 Companion 26 Jump 38 Coupled 47 Notion 27 Top of the bead 39 Legal profession 49 Sleeveless ; 32 Marthai 33 Wooden tutt 34 Depot (ab.) ,85 Permits 99 Night before tm event : 37 Assume ' 39 French head ' covering 41 Air raid precautions (ab.) 42 Blemish 43 Zodiacal riga •48 Beach ^ destination SO Glacial ndgei §i Poetic ^ contraction 63 Arabian gulf 28 Always 29 Rescue 40 Wandering 42 Billiard term garment 49 Grafted (her.) S3 Anger were any witches. The law there were witches. I earnestly entreat Iney to think upon tht grievous implications of her airy comments on witchcraft. I know there were witches in Salem. They made cats sun up chimneys through roaring hearth- fires, and kettles tilt and wet down the burning sticks without the aid of human hands. The courts were the most learned and fair in Christendom. Testimony was written down and I have some of it before me today. The witnesses gave their names and confronted the accused in court. They were persons of good report. They could be impeached for kissing out of wedlock. The Salem courts were th* best authority that was humanly possible. Can Miss Robb conscientiously say that of our own Supreme Court? I refer to the case of a woman who was possessed of The Devil, and accordingly was hanged on June 10, 1692. Abigail Williams and An (cq) Putnian, a child, swore in court that the defendant, Rebekah Bishop, beat them that very'morn- ing. This must have been a.super- natural affair, for the witch wai old and feeble and she had whined in her defense that, she had no injury herself "but my o Id age." She also said, "I can say, before my eternal father that I' am innocent and God will clear my innocency." The judge said, . "If you b« guilty, may God discover you." But witches, like some tax- evaders of the present day, • are without conscience. This one offered the cunning idea that The Devil, having known powers of evil, had assumed h«r body and done this wrong to spite one of God's loyal fold. This, of course, put the judge on a hell of a spot. Still, he did his best. One June 10, George Corwin, sheriff, wrote: "According to within written precept, I have taken the body of the within named Rebekah Bishop out of their Majesty's gaol in Salem and safely conveyed her to the place promised for her execution and caused ye sd Rebekah to be hanged by the neck until she wai dead, all which was according to the (something) within required and I so make return by me." The town crier was the press then. He had no editorial privilege so there was no irresponsible outcry to frustrate justice. That, too, would have been a crime in a better society than ours today. They had no Lindbergh extravaganzas in Salem! There is no mention of tht witch's husband, but Mr. Bishop may be pardoned a sad consolation in riddance of a demon who had imposed on his sacred trust in holy wedlock. SSBittervetcii 66BinJ' 67 Act sM^f 5§»*y News Briefs SALES LEVEL OFF WASHINGTON (UPI) - Factory sales leveled off in September after seven consecutive months of rise, according to tbe Commerce Department. The department said Monday declines in sales of new cars and building materials offset small improvements in sales of food, beverages and textiles. Museum Fashion Show Brooklyn Museum of New York has the largest collection of fashion pictures in the world. Its costume exhibits inchidt several thousand exampJei of wearing apparel from America, Europ* and

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