The Brazosport Facts from Freeport, Texas on October 12, 1959 · Page 2
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Brazosport Facts from Freeport, Texas · Page 2

Publication:
Location:
Freeport, Texas
Issue Date:
Monday, October 12, 1959
Page:
Page 2
Start Free Trial
Cancel

THE BRAZOSPORT FACTS EDfTOttAI PAGE Brazosport and B razor ia County, Monday, October 12,1959 1IM BISHOP- REPORTER Salute to an Ugly Fish . HOW^BQUT A DEMONSTRATION' The big beau move across the dead calm sea slowly, like rat old ladies under tiny para •oi* They trail * lacy rratn and « man rocks gently in the I'OURu .low's <ieSt The skipper on the bridge watches the little plane in the sky, and listens to the loud speaker After « while, the plane pilot speaks •A patch of red three points oil your starboard, skipper A big patch Four hundred yards ahead and three point* to the right The fat boat moves Su do some of the others, loafing on the bedspread ol the ita The obey the gnat in the sky. When they reach the area, the skipper gets into a small boat, the mate gets into another They start the'engines and, as they leave the mother ship, a net unrolls from the two boats The skipper and the mate have done thirn many times They circle the area from opposite directions, meeting on the far sidt As the net is hauled aboard the mother skip by winches, the fish flash foam. These are menhaden Nobody wants them. Fishermen call them mossbunkers The menhaden are the ugly cousin* of the herring. From June until October, they swim in gimt schools between Maine and the Carolinas, and across parts of the Gulf Coast From the air the schools look red Menhaden have big heads and no teeth There is no fight in them and no food either Still, the industry Is big and becoming bigger The purse «emers net 200.000 tons of these fish ev«yaurrimer this ik 40 percent ol 'alt the fish landed around the United States The btdlahk 'used to bury « menhaden Ui every second row ot corn, So did the pilgrims They #x bigger com Men haden were great as fertilizer Today there are six major companies in the menhaden in dustrv -<\ good boat brmgi m 7 o tons ol fish t day The 19 men oi| each boat are paid according to the amount offish. No fish, no pay Lots of fish, big pay. The boats dock at « fish plant rhere, the menhaden rtde up on a conveyor They are ground up, put through cookers which blow live steam on them, and the oil Is drained off by centri fugalforce. ,,-, The solids are used as food supplements for poultry and pigs. The water, which is laden 'with •vitamins, is also Used to grow bigger chickens The oU--75,000 tens of it- -is mainly sent to western Europe, where it is used to make mar gerlne. .ft is hydrogenated and is tasteless and odorless Now it appears as though we have 'been selling something we need. A white-haired young chemist named John Holston has great faith in menhaden oil He is a technologist in the Department of Interior. He works in the Bureau i,of Fisheries and ex haustlve test* indicate that the old mossbunker may be one of the answers to hardening of the arteries The discovery is so new that Mr. Holston is reluct ant to discuss It For years, thesovumment arid trie mennaden muustry nave felt - that 'here is great therapeutic value in this fish oil Ctierni cllly, the important ingredient is poiyunsaturated fatty acid It iound like something to be taken while pinching :the 'nostrils, but it isnt ' C«ie ol the offending agents in hardening ol the arteries, and in heart disease. ire,placd,ues. These . arc' like:' patches on a tube, except thai they are on the inside ol the artery. They narrow the hole in the artery, leaving less room for blood to pass through. The older you get, [hemoreplacquesyouhave. High cholesterol in the blood is a cause of placques. Some vegetable oils will lower the cholesterol count, but so much oil must betaken that the patient often becomes fat while taking the cure. The Bureau of Fisheries has learned that a small amount of odorless, tasteless menhaden oil. will do the same job and'do it better. It will do more than that. Mr. Holston believes it will also diminish • placques already in tlie arteries :• When it is added to a'baby's formula, the result Is found to be close to the goodness of breast feeding. , In the aged, a Utle bitofithelpstheabsprp lion of food , ; ; In one test case, four grams a day for 60 days conricte4» chronic heart condition; ft isn't ; magic, but. the next time I im .out on the Atlantic fishing, and I see a dead mossbunder float by, I am going to stand solemnly. at the rail and raise my cap v MONDAYONTHEV(§!QNI EDUCATION USA THE LIGHTER 5<D% ^ _^ ^ g Could Have Got a Horli By LOUIS CASSELS United: Press International The number of U. S. college students majoring in. science and mathematics rose sharply during the first year of the space age! .The upsurge of undergraduate interest which ..,-todes well for the nation's future supply of ^Kientists is dramatically revealed in a sta- ' tistlcal ' survey just completed by, the 0. S. Office of Education ; :/..•' , It shoVs that the. number of. college juniors : electing majors in physical and biological sciences '• • i -'.By. FRANK tLEAZER United Press International" . 'WASHINGTON (UP1) Air " planes are Wonderful. Big jets this winter will hurtle sun -lovers from Miami to New York in 2 hours and 35 minutes before they can fade This trip . takes a hard three days If you dftve, Other jetliners meantime flash from Atlantic te Pacific so fast . you can eat lunch at both ends . i of the line as well as en route, -f By car. thai kind.of travel re • j quires every bit of a week ; And take the New York to Washington run This is a \traui ride of 3 hours-and 35 minutes It's a five-hour, ex eursion by car But by plane. I learned the other night, it is possible' te cover the course in r= That's nappen ; to ,havt any luggage Waiting for the bags te come up of course always take* a few minutes extra . The airline folks in New York were eversq.nice on the phone 3£ tafibwi to - - -— _ th* Ea'srSifci Air Terminal by 4-58 they would pop me on a- bus to the airport and squeeze me onto a nice evening flight to the capital with dinner'aboard • The, plane, a • two-engine propeller type, would Have La Guardla': Fjeld: at 5-50. and arrive at Wasrongton .National Airport at;* convenient. V-OS I.made it to the terminal in timf. to find out there wasn't really much hurry The. flight, and the connecting bus run. had been set back 40 minute* Just enough to'relax, tead;the who * ttaln'k=£s*t*r rand^jispatch-a picture - "•'••'"—''" postcard to the office - > By the time we got to the air port an additional So minutes delay had been posted Atten dams said the plane was late leaving Albaj^ Thje wjsather^,, This allowed time for a coke ' and a call to a fellow 1 roomed with for awhile at Columbia On my investment of a succession of three dimes in the pay phone we hit high spots of the intervening couple of decades>arid •decided to 'cover 'the 'details' " . . . -, . There,; we're 50,513 juniors majoring m^ these fields ur 1957 and 55, 771-a year later . ',' ', The increase was three 'times, as great as might have been expected on the basis of the general growth of college enrollment. ; The survey focused on juniors because concen ,, iration in a specialized field usually begins in i*B|t$rd college year , The newly-published figures should offset some of the gloom that spread through official quarters here in the wake of an earlier report from the Office . of Education That report ; compiled * several ^months ago showed that undergraduate Recorded engineering enrollment dropped 4.5 per cen from the fall of 1957 to the fall of 1958. , . . The decline in engineering enrollment was particularly . disturbing because it seemed to mean.that American college students were not responding to the national need for'more tech- mologically-trained manpower a need vividly demonstrated on Oct 4 1957 when: Russia's Sputnik I went into orbit *""' It now appears that the mystifying drop m engineering enrollment may have resulted, at least in pan from students switching into math'and science, majors ,:, Educators; point' out that a' shift of only a few courses-tan change afteJiBfiieerlngmajor intoamathor sciencemajor. This thesis Is supponed by another set of figures whieh show there was virtually no change from" 1957' to 1958 in the total percentage of third-year college students majoring in science or engineering':-. ' -ij In 1957. the combined enrollment in both fields was gsjiasuutenjs,, jj 2f£ner.c«tpfrthe.toul third-yew-sruoenfpcipolation '"' ".-"".' ' " In 1958 the combined'enrollment was 102,975, or 25 4 per cent of the total Thus there was relatively little gam in the aggregate number of students preparing for scientific or technological careers HrGHUGHTS WASHINGTON MARCH OP EVENTS:: M . ,. . ; . C»««u« to Giv* Lint On fepulellen deck Accuracy Fin) •» Our Nete Ceunti Aulhensed leek in 17W atatia ' By HENRY CATHCART Crntrnl Pres* A.isocintton WnnMniitoii Wrtttn TTJASHINGTOX One of the ruult* of the nafonwtde df ». ctnniai cenaua to be launched April 1 nexi veat which will b» of high intereat here i* how eloaethV official tiliv will compare with the eatimated note ciunu »n tht Population or Cenaua Clock which adorn* the main lobbv of tht .Department of Commerce building Tr^ clock reveal* the eitimatf « " i*"." A " '•• •*'•"* '""' ln ' r * f »:» net jfitn »f «n If,'; M ••"-? c * n '•'•'"n every ri aecond* 7 Thi» l|< ba»d "ft" ^^tj on ari «*'>mated birth evtrv "? »eronda • <1eat|1 * 1 "^' 20 teronda ah immigrant *m\ Ing op theaf ahnrev *verv 1'^ mlmite* and a.n emigran' departing »v«rv 20 mtnutea '.- tneirientall\ the'ilerennial noae rount ataftd bv.Unr'n Sarr. wa» oriirinaUv authonzed bv »n art of Cengrea* back )n 17»0 for the purpojf nf allocation of repreaentatlvec in Congrea* Hnu»v*r it w»> not until 1802 tha' thf Cenau» Offlre wan made permanent Befor* that it A -», ) u ,t , protect thai u-ontrt he revived »verv 10 y«ar» The C«»H»I • HAl-HV MHIP T;he wcreaamK.v active ro> Prealdeni Biaen hower ., p.vinr m both foreign and dome.t-r tff.'r. wouw •mt. th, ,mpre»a, OB that the White H»,, w .. , t, nw ' hui v dlv ' hntth * *" '" *" a ««f fr liST I/ "^ """«P h «' a et e>f friwdhn.*. d Daughter that WM m.aain, until * «i Orl ' ' •'' „>. . Vane.ua rea«on» hax» bftn m«, fnr »h> change Th. Haw ataff from preaident-a wai.tanU ^own >"*.„„ , •ualv m,rrormg th. Present » H.m« pop,, , rttx " i *** "•" r * h(1Jh «' »»»'- h *»n HOT. fre-m th. , x »r.it,v. year m»,d.r» t,l. tha* the op, r ,t.or.» ' he " th ' lauw """ 4<1 rtt «rtmf Pr«ai<(e«t : With Adam, Heparmr. u, n t.th« fee In, . s h,t w »» *,th *«,* lac for a tou*;r. •mreawnmK man vbn m the i>eur« of broOKina »e nonaenaf orooKf rr uoiw «.nV -itlier. - , * KB. the white Ho.** ataff V.*w«mit mo r , „ 4 ,, Mn , , Kalv . L" 1 * fllm * lv '"*"*" **W4pr*v 4 ? rt »e..a*i » , *"" " nd " th " ««•" ' P"-«"«"«n. x. M. -,er B Jerry Peraona A'hA -. th» perwmfica' 01. or if/a f Had T known, we,could have • covered them then - However , his supper was waiting 'ft turned out mine* was too, and' would be for quite a while Airline attendants were helpful They announced periodi cally that my flight hadn't yet reached New York A little later they wereable to announce, periodically that it had, but that on account of the inclement wea ther and the other planes that had got there first it was waiting its turn to come down As soon as it landed, the man said it would load for Wash major* Well almost as soon as it Und«d Well almost as soon as it landed First it had to refuel after so much circling over Mew Yort Fin ally they opened the gates and ,at first it wasgreai just sitting .down, after all that standing ..around '."'' ': : •'* -.;.• ' -•'••'-. : Bv 3:02 when we started eas ing out to the runway I had e* perienced sufficient relief for, mv feet, and was ready to fly So was the plane And after growling at the end of the strip for 25 minutes while other planes landed, it did Bv 20 minutes to 10 the stevv ardess a charming girl named Manna gave* me a warm smile and a meat pie I was glad for the smile and for the fact mv itomacp apparently hadn't quite closed up shop 'or the night It tool, i hour and l&rnmuies to flv,»f« Washington like Martha announced it would But again those .other plane* were there firsi We tetled onto the run wav at U:13 and pulled up to the ramp late bv an even four hours Uke i intimated »i the start the airplame if here tr> stav b would he better though if li didn i aometime* ha> e tr> stav quitet? long in one plar e TRY FACTS CUSSIHEDi! High Rates for Hotrods By VERN SANFORD Texas Press Associate AUSTIN, TEX -Rural and small town residents will have an advantage over their city cousins when the new auto insurance rating plan goes into effect Jan I Under the new system" worKeo out.by trie State Board of Insurance, a driver's auto msur ance permiums Will br raised or lowered according to his driving record Each accident or ticket for a moving traffic violation puts a 'black mark' on the driver's record and moves his insurance premiums up a notch In the .congested streets of the larger cities one wrong move, even if unintentional often brings a nckei or a crumpled ftndei o> both IP most small 'owns the local lawman w not usually 'oo exercised if one of his friends ano neighbors makes, a I'-turn on the main street Purpose of the plan is to pui the biggest par? of, the burden for insurance, payrrients on the'-; people who bring on the most damage ano expense People who have a history of numerous traffic violations according to Department of Public' Safetv statistics are the ones who have the-most accidents It •{ also hoped ot course thai the plan will encourage careful 0rtvinp with its cash incentive Drivers with no record of af. accidem ot violation lot the past -/hre* vears- will get a 20 pei cent reduction in then insurance rates Drivers with one poinl against them will pa\ current rates Those with 'rom one to five points agauisi them will pav inc reased rates OP » sliding scale and those- with six o; more point; will pav through the nose double rates Some activities will be very expensive point wise Drunken driving, hil and- run driving and negligent homicide wfJJ cost four points An accident with damage nver $2ft brings two points running a red light ohlv one point In most cases the effect of a violation on insurance premiums will hurt the pbc'ketboo 1 worse than the usual fines STlLl *.T IT -For the impteenth time Texas high-powered legal talent has gone to Washington tc- do battle for the state's ridelands before the United State* Supreme Cpun' Gen Price Oanie) and Atty. 0ej> vviJ. Wiisor. head rn* tearnv presenting 'Texas ' riaun thai n row the submerged lands for three leagues ot nearjv if 'miles tntr the GuJJ Federal attorneys arguf :.rh>t ''tit ' state owns 5 the land only'hr« rrn'«f."<iur ':", . ' •; Former Supreme Court Justice .Ijjjjej P Hart w '.. rairv*-; Bougbem .« ; fatwu ^assistam attornev nenfral ajsr «ieol tc VV|shiri«ton tr join IP tht presentaiw , : -. Other r^ Coast state* which a r« 'tn : the »amf , bo»j. .with Texas or, th* tidelanos '$su« are alsr partiripanng ir> iru novi historir strugale SAHNHFRf ASK5 Rr TRIA1 Forrr-er Insurance r -oinmissiofier .1. Byron Saunaers is asKing for * new trial ol .the perjury, charges against him Saunders was convicted in an Austin district court and sentenced to two years in prison He was accused of having lied to a legislative in vestigating committee as to shy the now-bankrupt 1CT Insurance Co paid rum $7 OOf while he was insurance commissioner Saunders contended the money was payment lor his interest in oil royalties OP a piece of property he sold the company It is the first time in the history of the state thai a person has been charged with perjury as a result ol statements to a legislative committee Saunders attorney; nave vowed to tafcr it all tlif wav to the US. Supreme Court if necessary • PANEl ON AGING -Sen Crawford Martin of Hillsboro has beer named to head the Governor s Conference on Aging This group will study problem* ol elderly. people and takt'the state's report tp the 1961 "White House Conference on^ Aging ' ' ' Also named b\ Co\ Daniel to the panej art State H el/a re Commissioner Johr> Winters State Health Commissioner }.• E Peavy State Employ . tneni Commissioner Perrv Browri Di 'C 1, Ruilmann state director ol mental health and Hospitals and Jess Irwin the governor » budget, director Also Mrs William B Rugglei Herbert Shore ana Eldred Thomas all ol Dallas - ' GBBJ RE CALLED Joe P Gibbs ha» loi thi third tune been tapped to join the high .command ol the State Board of Insurance Cribtf served as in insurance commusidpet irorr. 1941 to 195? as an appointee of Govs W Lee O'Danie) and Beauford .Tester He served agair, I rom 195'' through February 195S aftei Ccn Dame) made appointments, 'o an entirely nevi reorganized board : THE BRAZOSPORT FACTS llll Mwrl* Vrttmv 'tXinlri' a(io»'lnlfn«ri t 1 ''im Himn> HEATH , O«or«i ((icwr Advrrllilni Dinsbi ni Cdilnr f.v .rr«> Kltet draici CMii . Olllci Mintiti MIW IU I-H41 l»Hrn«U«n» CHANNISL 2 CHANXRI (I KtiHT-TV 0 CHANNEL KHOt'-TV 13 i f| OJ h.ni v Show 'The Sn.iriytj, Intrude! Edmund Puidom' W» LUpmo Of) AiiivricHn Bandstand^ f) Bnm the .Clown . \ rtine Th* BMcIf Peart/. Pnlrlcin Medina Anthony Stctlc Kurt KakMiat Low Chnne.i .Ir « pean aroui- en urecfl in »eV*rfi) p»i- ffij Kitfriii 8nu _,~_ Showtime _ Beat' stupe'rrrmn •.. Hi'nillej BrlnWey I 1 nendly Uimii Don* Ed\v« rrt« News ; MONDAY eVKfrlNg' .._. •00 H N«>vli, Sptirta O Biolox'.v 161 m Lilt- ol.Kiley 09 Ne\v». frVenther -ift O New* Weather JB'Jiirm Daly; Newl^ Ts» O Rich""' Diamond — Met ut (imtt 1 imolvea • xrntelul derelict mid N prettj kllln Q) Hlglwii} Pnlro) OD Cheyenn* - The Rebellion uoncernl « plot to assassinate H Mexican patriot . • ; _ ., _ , , :| .. "S^Ufl f) Steve Alien" «• CrySS ,fn.v l/>r Marvin the Mini Rl«'ter*. COI.OR tO ltenne»e>' Jlmml* Komack as n wealthy, playboy^ turner! N"_^_< l *J!ti»t i I'M nfjiiM A1ty*on - "A Summer* Ending.' June Allyson Dick Powell; » couple hplleve they are m '•' love when they meet •« H summei resort .• '>'' 09 Walter Wlnchell •Hot NiRht __ _ MathemRtlc8132 _ _ 't'M CJfLuve Hiiil ,M»rri»((e — •Slubby Pick* M Winner 1 01 The Texnn • An unscheduled *t«ge *lop bring* together * bitter group 7 SO O Weltn VITRO — An embittered woman alda In trftlllnf holdup men O Prospect! of Mankind - Special hour program with Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt and guests- 'New Poulbimiet f o r Coexistence' : ID Father Knows Best — Bud gets Into a French class by mistake Q9 Bourbon Street Bent— "The Mourning Clonk" about » murdering ghost ^ at '« derelict plantation ,', :'»!*»..O Petei Oimn - "The Comic ' Shelley Herman; ft comedian fears hl» wife la trying to do awaj with him Q) Danny Thomas "- Danny argues a traffic cnse. with Francu. X Bushman, I guest __ _ " 1:30 O Goodyear Theatre — "The Incorrigible*' with the late. Paul Douglas ; in Incompetent con-man anil •» teen age delinquent «re paroled Into each other'* custody . "... Q| Ann "Sotliern - '•••• The rodeo comes to town with _ Guy Madison Casey Tlbbs Harlan May Dean Oliver and Mo Sager» . - , QD Adventures' in , Para- plan * pfrlect erlm« (D News Weather '•:.••••. : ' Q3 This : Mnn D*WMJB -•—"'• Debut Keith Andes stars In H series ahnut the battle against organised crime 0) Jack Pair - P»»i* '»• turns trom vacation'. Clllf,.' Arquctte. Dlahann Carroll, Vlctoi Borge . fl Nrw« H'eaTher «porl« Q3 Night Edition News- New lime lor the new», weather comments, sports progrnm O MOM "Theatre — "*••• Klgnmrnt I n BrltUliy," Jean Flerre Aiimont, Sara* • Peter* ; *u*pen*e with .9 French Intelligence officer pmlng ** *t N«ll . ' '• • 09 Movletlrae — "Confei- sion • D e n n 1 1 O'Keefe, June Lockhart; a writer bl assigned to do » story about a man believed to be a great homr.nltar'lan U:00 01 Late. Show — 'D«nf tr Island,- Peter Lorre Jean _ Hcrsholt . _ 11:M iO~N»ughty MarietU TUESDAY MORNING Cliaainej, yregram "«!00 Atomic Age Fhjrato* 1C '.SO 10:45 11:00 «:SO O M o d e i • CliemlMrjrs COLOR S!85 Q3 Good Morning Don - 6;M 0) Morning~Report CDS QI Farm Report 7:0* 0 Today — Brltlah Falice Constable Normaa . Nlble. chorua glrla from "The World «l Suato Wong" tO Glnny Face Shew 7:10 O Biology 161 Q) Romper Room IB Morning 'Edition Newt S:M m Morning News • ' • . P Cartoona '.' S:W O MathemaTlcsa 138,, ,' Try and Stop Me •*—. ——By BENNETT CERF D KAN-MARTIN; whose career has been.rpore meUorlc thun evei since; he shed Jerry Lewis as a partner, is lond oi pretending that he drinks more and oftener thar hi» inend Joe E "Lewis He expressly orders- - M C s at night clubs to introduce him as ' 'And heief our star—straight from the haj—Dean Mar- tiM-Vln hu introductory remark he'll include lines like- I m not drinking anymore On the other hand 1m not drinking any less' or 'I drink moderately In fact I've got two cases of Model- ately in my dressing room thit rnmute :' ',' Th* fact of the matter, however, is that th« heavy drinking bit is all an act Martin, his wife, and his seven children are today a conservative, church-going, publicity-shy group ol typical suburbanites. .... • •..»•• . ' . Th* uiuai worntd wife conaulttd the p»ychtatn»t y»uv» mat in atone, likt Una belore "My poor huaband thlnk'a ha a i miitVr,'*'' ah» rtportta - and you can charge aa much aa you like te cure .him became he »h*da a lot"- ; ... J - •••:'.•'• , DAILY CROSSWORD ACROSS J Curae icolloq I fi Smoothed 1 — ,uppn ' a time 12 Venerate 13 Heathen Image. 14 Gum- yielding tree IB Seethe 17 Know iBcol i 11 Package 80 Greek letter 12 Gloomy apace i myth i U Pokt» around J» Rope with running knot Sfl Poieeu ing 32 female fowl S3 Captain Kldd for one Sp Malt 4 Alabama city 5 To caper 6 Readme desk 7 Polynesian drink S Part of chicken P Great 10 University office; 16 Elizabeth Retina •abbr i 19 the Lion JO Fpt 21 In what manner 28, 'The Girl" Si Employ 25 Coin ..'•'• iJap l 87 Apex 28 Nicked 31 Diahol aplnach it Land meaaure 35 City iFl* i 36 Weapons 31 Girl a name Siturdiy > Aaiwtr 38 Arab V chie/tain . 40 Set of boxe* (Jap i 41 Down i prefix I 43 Any fruit drink \ Sfc Of pottery 42 Fabricate - :,. again 44 Ancient 5 weight 46,1'nmarried gin 46 Portion 4' Tatter* 4|> Celebe* ox DOWN ! fitting cap ' . i,"i p », r ;> Ol "" urofi -*• *•• * 1*

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free