Corsicana Semi-Weekly Light from Corsicana, Texas on March 3, 1939 · Page 2
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Corsicana Semi-Weekly Light from Corsicana, Texas · Page 2

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Corsicana, Texas
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Friday, March 3, 1939
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Page 2
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FIRE (Continued From Pag« One) fire, fanned by a SB-mile wind, •Many Injured In Jumping, Firemen said men and women In night clothes were clinging •to window ledges and screaming -tor help when they first reached the scone. Many jumped- from upper stories and sustained grave injuries. Authorities said there had been about 117 persons In the hotel and expressed fears many had been trapped by the swiftly spreading flames. Several were lean at smoke- filled windows trying to escape, only to fall back into the blazing .structure, Eighty seven guests and about SO hotel employes were In the building when the fire started. Several injured persons wore taken to Victoria general hospital. The hospital switchboard operator said attendants had not had time to count them but had been /advised to expect 15 more patients. Saw Several Fall Back. "I don't believe we got half /'of them out," said one fireman. All of Halifax' fire apparatus, was rushed to the scene. Witnesses said they saw several persons trying to get out, only to fall back into the burning rooms. The wood and stucco building is three stories high in front and four at the rear. The fire was discovered short- 'ly before 7 a. m. (5 a. m., CST) and spread quickly to adjoining buildings. After a half-hour the r front of tho hotel toppled Into the street, tearing down power and communication lines. Fanned, by a brisk 25-mile wind, the fire spread to adjacent buildings. The four-story brick Canadian Electric building, the National Drug company's five-story brick ctructure, a brick block housing several stores and wooden buildings along historic Water Street all caught fire. DODD (Continued From Page One) pital and doctor bills for the ne- gro girl. HANOVER COURTHOUSE, Va,, March 2.—(fl>-Dr. William E. Dodd, 69-year-old former ambassa- ador to Germany, withdrew today his plea of Innocence to a charge of hit-run driving involving an Injury to a four-year-old negro girl and changed his plea to guilty. Lelth Bremner, a member of 'Dr. Dodd's counsel, announced 'the change as the case waa called for trial. Judge Frederick W. Colman discharged Jurymen summoned for ,the case and proceeded to hear a ,'statement from commonwealth's attorney, E. P. Slmpklns as to circumstances of the accident, Simpklns told the court the state could put on witnesses In .support of its charge or he could summarize the evidence, whichever the court preferred. It'was •then agreed he would summarize. The accident in which Glols Primes was hurt occurred Dec. 4. The girl's condition Is fair. ». . More Baby Chicks ''Are Fed'Bed'Chain Ohtch Starter ~*every yearTlt elves better results. Distributed By * McCOLFIN GRAIN COMPANY " . ; Telephone 470. MAKE THIS MODEL AT-HOME THE CORSICANA DAILY SUN DAILY PATTERN CORSELET-TYPE COTTON FROCK • PATTERN 4026 For morning wear we recommend Anne Adams' Pattern 4026 - - - as pretty a frock as ever graced a breakfast table or park promenade! Isn't It sprlnk-llke In Its charm, with those impudent little sleeves and tho youthful corselet waistline? (It's a dress the Easter bride will hurry to Include In her trousseau.) Instead of the cap sleeves, you may have an open-puff style— and Instead of brief revera and ribbon bow, gay collar and buttons. Pockets are ever so handy when you're tydlng up after spring housecleanlng. You can rest assured that you'll complete thla frock quickly - - - since the pattern and Its Instruction sheet are very cay to follow! Pattern 4026 Is available In misses and women's sizes 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40 and 42. Size 16 takes 33-8 yards 39 Inch fabric. Send fifteen cents (15c) in coins for this Anne Adams pattern. Write plainly size, name, address and style number. Plan a dashing new spring ward robe from Anne Adams New Pattern Book - • - whhsh means — order your copy at' once, If you want to finish your sewing- early! Choose trim sportsters, dress-up flatterers, cheery housefrocks, dainty undies — all made easily and thriftily at home. Find out what's new In play- clothes for crulso and resort wear. See fetching designs for kiddles, growlng-ups and brides. Also — 'specially summing modes for matrons! Send today! Price of Book fifteen cents. Price of Pattern fifteen cents. Book and Pattern together, twenty-five cents. Send your order to the Dally Sun .Pattern Department, 243 W. 17th St., New York, N. Y. News of County Home Demonstration Clubs .; How Can I Insure ' My Insurability? —SEE— LOUIS SIMS •Insurance Agency - Jester Building Corbet. Cozy quarters for baby chicks, waa discussed by Mrs. W. N. Slone, poultry demonstrator and {president of the Corbet Home ' demonstration club, Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 28 in the home of. Mrs, T. C. Baggett. Mrs. Slone gave a demonstration of how a home made brooder could be made using a coop or box size depending on number of chicks to be housed. Use a galvanized tin bottom and cover with sand to prevent burning of chicks feet. The coop should be elevated and lamp placed under to provide heat. A runway from the coop to the ground should be provided to make going in and out of coop easy for chicks. Ventilation can be provided by the use of screen wire. There are five club membtrs having oil brooders, two having home-made brooders and five plan if, make brobders. . ,,,, ' Corbet is proud of the fact they have two poultry demonstrators, Mrs. J. E. Slone and Mrs. W. N. Slone. Also have three kitchen demonstrators, Mrs J. I> Womaok, Mrs. Rufus Pevehouse, and Mrs. T. C. Baggett. The hostess Mrs T. C, Baggett assisted by Mrs. J. I* Womack served refreshments consisting of Ice cream and cookies to fifteen members and one visitor, Mrs. Blllte Baggett, Oak Valley. The next meeting will be in the home of Mrs. W. M. Long, March 14. —Reporter. Millinery Fashions Week Large showing qf Spring Hats, ready for ,your setoction. Style, Variety, Value, Felts, Fabric, Straws, High and low crowns, small and large brims, ribbon, flower and feather trims. $1.95 to $15.00 NEW HAND BAGS $1.00 - $1.95 - $2.95 KATE SIVLAJUL^ELY MILLINERY • lit WEST COLLIN • HANDBAGS COUPON SPECIAL SAVE25* ENAMEL It's the enamel-of-all-work for the home-SherwIn-Willtams famous Enamelold, for walls, woodwork and cabinets, .furniture, toys,, odds and ends. Enamelold Is fun to use-dries quickly and levels out to a hard, smooth finish that shows no tell-tale brush marks. One coat produces a brilliant, porcelain-like finish as washable as a china dish. Comes in a wide choice of the most popular colors. Get Enamelold today-save money on a quart or m,ore with this coupon. Act now-thls offer is good for one week only! $135 ENAMELOID REMIUM.V $0,M W.-WITH COUPON 1 QT. LyotfGray Lumber Co. '- PHONE iT INTERNATIONAL (Continued From Page One) resist, despite the French hopes and reports of an impending na- alonallst offensive with almost half a million men. British and French recognition of the nationalist government was accepted calmly by the people 01 Madrid, who waited for a broadcast Negrln had arranged. Some expected he would announce constitutional steps to elect a successor to resigned President Manuel Azana. Big Alrforce Cost Increase. In London, Air Secretary Sir Kingsley Wood submitted estimates for the fiscal year starting April 1 which would raise Britain's alrforce appropriations from about $431,000,000 for 1938-39 to more than $1,100,000,000. They boosted the total of Britain's 1939-40 defense costs so far announced in her stepped-up program of reaarmament to $2,677,131,905. In Warsaw, the foreign office publication summed up .the results of the five-day visit there of Count Galeazzo Ciano, Italian foreign minister, thus: Poland recognized Italy's territorial aspirations as justified but did not commit herself to a joint policy with Rome beyond "mutual understanding." Billboard notices In Rome called to the colors the classes of 1917 and 1918 and men born during the first four months of 1919. The purpose waa to keep the standing army at full strength and foreign military observers estimated there would be 300,1)00 new conscripts to replace those completing their service. The Imperial household In Tokyo announced the birth of a daughter to Empress Nagano. The new princess has two brothers and three sisters. Naval Officers to Die. BURGOS, Spain, March 2.—<XP) •Nationalists reported today three republican naval officers had been sentenced to death In what was said to be a spread of revolutionary activity agglnst the Madrid regime. The reports coincided with predictions that Generalissimo Francisco Franco soon would loose an offensive against the one fourth of -Spain not yet in nationalist control. " ' Flower Mart The florist that will serve you with courtesy. Fresh cut flowers used in all designs, funeral work, baskets, bouquets, pot plants and seed. Try us. Office Across from T. P. & L. Co. Day Fhone 418. Night Phone 707 or 86 Alter 6s80. WEST END FLOWER SHOP. 1577 West 3rd Ave. Phone 844. SHORT COURSE (Continued From Page On?) Taking up the loss of markets, the speaker said lack of uniformity of staple had much to do with the drop In exports. He suggested a cotton program of better quality staple, a neater package through use of cotton bagging and greater use of cottonseed byproducts through livestock as aids to income, He presented the statistics on the improvements resulting from competition in the 'ono-variety community" contests. W. J. Greene of the Farm Security Administration In Dallas was the second speaker and had as a topic "Meeting Changing Conditions In Farming" Among the changes enumerated by the speaker were loss of foreign and domestic markets, lowered Incomes, rapid development of substitutes for farm products, loss of soil and fertility, Increased farm mechanization and Its resulting problems, and changed credit conditions. In offering possible solutions of the troubles,' Mr. Greene suggested farmers should raise only marketable products In -quantities needed, and the adoption of the recognized balanced program of farming which "included llvinj at home, better soil and water conservation, and establishment of greater varieties of farm Income through production of livestock, poultry, and dairy products. He also suggested possible Income from pulp wood, and other farm crops. He then outlined the efforts of his organization In aiding tenant farmers after asserting this was one of the principal problems to be solved In agriculture—the increasing number of tenant farmers rather than land owners. Trench Silos. The concluding speaker of the morning session was E. R. Eudaly dairy specialist for the extension service of Texas A', and M. College, who talked on "Importance of Trench Silos In Sound Farm- Ing." Discussing present conditions, Mr. Eudaly said they wore nothing new, but there were a few things that could be done about the business. Taking up some of the suggested means of augmenting farm Incomes, the speaker went over the list of hindrances to such a program and some of the complaints Usually registered in connection with them.. He stated the only way livestock and poultry and products could be marketed and income Increased was through the lowering of the cost of production. He declared that grass was the creapest and handiest feed : for livestock, because It was especially rich In water content, protein, lime and phosphorus anu also vitamin A. He urged that some of the good land diverted from cultivation under the present, program be devoted to tho creation of permanent pastures asserting a greater income would come from such pastures than from crops. Much Peed Lost. As 'Feed insurance" and as auxiliary supplies when grass was not available, Mr. Eudaly proposed trench silos as the most economical and safest .means of having a perpetual feed supply, He declared more feed was lost in Navarro county each year through Improper methods of keeping than was fed to stock or used. He Insisted trench silos had been In use more than 4,000 years and they were not now—"Just new to us"; he asserted they could be easily constructed and would work on any type of soil and under any conditions. Ajnong the speakers scheduled at the afternoon session were George McCarthy, poultry sped: 1- 1st and Miss Jennie Camp, food specialist, both of the extension service. An inspection trip to the Walker Frozen Food plant was scheduled to complete the session Thursday afternoon. Speedometer Service If your speedometer Is noisy or falls to give the proper service It is supposed to, we Invite you to drive in and let us repair It. We guarantee our work and our prices are reasonable. TAYLOR'S MAGNETO HOUSE Announcement We wish to announce that 0. A. (Ernest) McBrlde Is now connected with us. He Invites all bli friends and patrons to come by, HEROD RADIATOR AND ELECTRICAL Fourth and Main CONGRESS (Continued From Page On*1 measures today to get them out of the way before Saturday, when President will address the 160th anniversary session of congress. Democratic Leader Barkley predicted the senate would wind up its acrimonious discussion of foreign policy and pass the $358,000,DOO army expansion bill tomorrow. House officials forecast passage about the same time of the $499,857,936 "war department appropriation bill. The president and Chief Justice Hughes will participate In Saturday's ceremonies. While capltol politicians had no Inkling of what Mr, Roosevelt would discuss, some speculated ho might go beyond the bound of nn historical address to mention contemporary world affairs. The address will be Mr. Roosevelt's first In Washington since his conference with the senate military committee several weeks ago engendered the foreign policy con- trovrsy which has dominated recent senate debate. What he said at the conference remained a secret of himself and the 17 committee members, although one of them, Senator Lundeen (Fl-MInn), Indicated yesterday eventually 'I might come out. "If the American people ever learn what was said there," Lundeen thundered, "the nation would bo shocked and stunned by the secrecy and what was said there." Administration leaders won a victory In the house yesterday when they obtained approval of a $17,206,000 TVA appropriation, for work on the Glibertsville and Watts Bar dams on the Tennessee river. The senate had voted the fund after the house rejected It previously, Air Navigation Aids. WASHINGTON, March 2 —</P> —The army reported today a construction, program calling for complete a program of installa- tion of communication and navigation aids at army air stations. The army said the proposed construction included Kelly Field, Texas, $15,000 communications building, $3,500 fencing; Hensley Field, Texas, $1,500 beacon building, $4,000 towers; Sloan, Texas, $1,600 beacon building; Randolph Field, Texas, $16,000 communications building, $2,500 beacon building; Biggs, Texas, $2,500 towers; Dryden, Texas, $4,000 beacon buildings. Texas Congressmen Active. WASHINGTON, March 2.—<ff>— Texas congressmen introduced bills In the house of representatives yesterday which touched on labor and industrial problems. Rep. Thomas' bill would exempt clerical workers and newspaper writers and reporters from the hour provision of the National Labor Relations act. Rep. Keckworth proposed an appropriation of $10,000 annually for the experiment station for Ushur and other East Texas counties, for Industrial development of the sweet potato crop. Dispute Heads for White House. WASHINGTON, March 2.—(fl>A dispute between two government home financing agencies appeared today to be headed toward the White House for setlement. John H. Fahey, head of the home loan bank system, testified yesterday before a senate sub-committee against an expansion of mortgage insurance limits for the Federal Housing Administration. One senator, who asked that his name not be used,, said administration supporters wanted President Roosevelt to decide the matter. Stewart McDonald, FHA administrator, has urged congress to double Its present insurance limit of $3,000,000,000 and continue numerous other powers scheduled to expire July 1. LEGISLATURE (Continued From Page One) taxes than any other Texas natural resource. State Capitol Quiet. AUSTIN, March 2.—W)—A no- tlceablo air of quietude, contrast- Ing strongly with the hurly-burly of activity the past two months since the legislature has been In session, sctled over Texas' big statehouse today. The anniversary of Texas' declaration of Independence closed the doors of all state government agencies, Including the halls of the legislature. Many of the lawmakers, Go*. W. Lee O'Danlel and state officials were In Washlngton-On-The- Brazos, where a huge celebration was commemorating the signing of the Independence declaration 103 years ago. The legislature was adjourned until Monday. ^ SINKING SHIP (Continued From Page One) board, had radioed she was sink- Ing and in Immediate need of assistance. The message to the Radio Signal Service, however, did not gay whether the Newfoundland would take off the Ranger's crew or take the sealer In tow. The 354-ton Ranger left St. John's yesterday for a sealing expedition in tho Quit of St. Lawrence. Lort Something? Sun Want Ad, Try a Daily New Spring Hose Are Here In the new acreenllte shades as "fashion-right, styled by MOJUD'S Hollywood Fashion Board" to coordinate with every Important oos- tume color of the season. OLIVIA SMITH HOSIERY SHOP The First One Just Around the Corner Off Beaton at 108 WEST COLLIN STBEET Try us once tor your Permanent wave or Manicure, In fact an; line of beauty Work. We guarantee to please. Call 247 for appointment) or come by 108 West Sixth avenue. NOBRI8 BEAUTY SHOFFB Your Glasses They SWodern? Your clothes are-comfortable well-fitte'd and IN STYLE - - - but what about your glasses ? Do they fit ^comfortably ? Are they "right" for your eyes - '-. - and are they MODERN? . Below we are listing a few examples of articles that you use and buy every day. Under this proposed act, the Manufacturer can fix a price that his product is to be sold for and it will be unlawful for us to sell it to you for a lower,price, no matter what it may cost us. LOOK OVER THIS LIST BELOW AND FIGURE HOW MUCH IT WILL COST YOU EXTRA EVERY DAY IF THIS PROPOSED LAW GOES INTO EFFECT And Remember: There are Many More Items Not Listed - - This Is Just a Few Examples ARTICLE FACE POWDERS Max Evening In Three Ayerlatocrat TT * . FACE CREAMS IT. H. Ay res H.H.Ayres Beautifying 13... H. Hi Ayres Max PERFUMES & COLOGNES Evening In Evening In Evening In Our B«ry liny Prlco 77c 89c 89c $1.89 69c 94c 94c $1.39 $1.39 89c 46c 49c 89c 89c 46c 54c Price Under Proponed Law $1.00 $1.10 $1.00 $2.00 83c $1.10 $1.10 $1.75 $1.75 $1.00 55c 60c $1.00 $1.10 55c 65c Extra Co»t to Von 23c 21c lie lie 14c 16c 16c 36c 36c lie 9c lie lie 21c 9c lie ARTICLE DRUG SUNDRIES (Phillips) (Upjohn) Cltrocarbonate TT«. (Fletcher's) Vick's (Thedford's) Syrup of LIPSTICKS Max Max Rlchnrd ROUGE Max Richard H.H. ASTRINGENT Max / Oar ET*ry I>»r Price 36c 76c 29c 24c 17c 69c 96c 89c 42c 29c 42c 42c 42c 42c 89c ; Prim Under Fropofted Law 50c $1.00 40c 35c 25c $1.00 $1.20 '$1.00 50c 35c 55c 50c 55c 55c $1.00 Brtra Coot to You 14c 24c lie lie 8c 31c 24c lie 8c 6c 13c 8c 13c 13c lie Home Owned • Home Operated DEPARTMENT STORES Home Owned • Home Operated WRITE YOUR LEGISLATORS —"NO PRICE-FIXING" Are You In Favor of a Law That Will Raise Your Living Expenses? THAT'S JUST WHAT THE NEW "FAIR TRADE PRACTICE ACT" WILL DO— HOW YOU CAN HELP KILL THIS BILL YO.UT Senator and your Representatives will welcome your views. If we whp oppose this bill do not express our opposition, our Senator and Representatives may honestly get the Impression that'very few people oppose the bill. Write or otherwise let them know how you ieel. ' THESE MEN REPRESENT NAVARRO COUNTY AT AUSTIN Rep. James E. Taylor • Senator Clay Cotton • Rep. Doyle Pevehouse Those Living in Other Counties Should Address the Senator and Representatives From That County. - > w )''*i. . i. <"i , V*M< *#*,"&£:':$ ';.' tu , ''"• / '^'^.^il!&A^)^M^&i»^^it," J -k 0*>vis( f

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