Brownwood Bulletin from Brownwood, Texas on March 29, 1968 · Page 10
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Brownwood Bulletin from Brownwood, Texas · Page 10

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Brownwood, Texas
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Friday, March 29, 1968
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Page 10
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iUltttlM ... m ,,_ mm ^, :J ^,,^ 1MI ••-'"•°^ Sweeping Grade School Changes Proposed Cotnbining of four present ele- jfleniary school campuses Into two larger schools was among recommendations of the elementary school sub-committee presented Thursday night to the citizens school improvement Study committee. The possibilities included abandoning the present N'orth Elementary School campus because of its undesirable location, and closing East Elementary School for reasons of economy. The sub-committee then suggested additional classrooms be built at West Elementary to serve students from North Elementary, and that a new building be constructed for Woodland Heights Elementary to handle bn with the notaUotl g n ad . II i." &.*.«*•««! Mfk**Al 1 i«** nnffr\Htpriril .. ° .^. . „. - its present enrollment plus stu- dehts now attending East Elementary. THE SUB-COMMITTED noted most experts say elementary schools should have between 500 and 750 students for the most economical operation. Disposal of the North, Elementary campus was suggested dition to West Elementary to handle students from North would cost much less than building a complete new school elsewhere. Only the newest segment of Woodland Heights Elementary was recommended for retention, with construction of 28 new classrooms suggested by the sub-committee. NORTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CAMPUS * . , committee recommend* relocation The sub-committee 'report also j possible from Coggin ahd South WOODLAND HEIGHTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL , . , replacement it recommended touched on the need for new buildings to replace Coggin and South elementary buildings but added construction of more than two major projects is almost impossible now because of total costs involved. TO HELP EASE the problem, the sub-committee suggest- to the new buildings. Extensive changes in the Coggin Elementary school boundary to lower enrollment there were suggested, as well as moving speciale ducation classes there to another site. It was then recommended removal of Coggin's third floor, construction of a kitchen, and ed moving as many students as | installation of false ceilings to help ease lighting, heating and acoustical problems. Modern healing was also urged for Coggin. Similar suggestions were made for South Elementary including cutting down the district size, construction of a kitchen, and lowering of ceilings for better heating and lighting. A plumbing modernization program was also suggested for South. Increased maintenance for all elementary schools was suggested. IN CONCLUSION, the subcommittee report on elementary schools said, "This committee realizes that we do not have a completely satisfactory solution to the problems of our elementary schools. "The compounded ills of 40 to 50 years of neglect cannot be cured all at once. There are no easy answers for these problems. Our recommendations are simply makeshift. They offer partial relief until money is available for additional new elementary schools." Also suggested was another complete evaluation of the elementary school situation in five [years. I "The importance of beginning ; construction on this five-year ! plan cannot be over-emphasized. We repeat, the plans that we have recommended for immediate action offer only temporary relief until the entire system of elementary schools and districts can be reconstructed," the report concluded. NEVER PRAISE PATNA, India (AP)-Bihara State Food Minister K. D. Singh says housewives curse him all day long. Singh says that in his enviable position a housewife starts the day cursing him for the coal shortage when she tries to light the morning fire; she complains during the day because of the shortage of sugar for tea, and she is not in an "endearing mood" when she thinks of the high price of kerosene for lanterns at night. BY COMMITTEE Administrative Facilities Eyed Three alternatives were posed for improving facilities at the Brownwood Junior High School by a report of the sub-committee studying that problem to the citizens study committee Athletic Panel Proposes Look at New Stadium Long A thorough study into the possibility of a new, re-located football stadium and fa- c i 111 y was recommended Thursday night by the subcommittee on athletic programs of the citizens study committee on school improvements. Also suggested was a complete overhaul of the present stadium, which could be used for junior high games if a new stadium were to be erected. The present stadium was criticized by the sub-committee for its lack of parking spaces, for its poor restroom facilities, and its inadequate dressing room facilities for both the home and visiting teams. Other recommendations by the sub-committee include: ONE—Some type of additional hard-surfaced playground area each elementary school with a standard size in equipment at each for basketball and other physical education or fitness programs. TWO—Other fields improved for flag-football at the elementary schools. THREE — Consideration of more adequate outdoor practice fields for sports and physical education programs at the junior high school. FOUR — Some seating for spectators at the senior high track. These recommendations, if carried out, would remedy all inadequacies of present facilities pointed out by the subcommittee's report on athletics. Stepped-Up Maintenance| Program Suggested ( n A stepped-up program of building maintenance j was recommended Thursday night by a sub-corn- I mittee studying that facet for the citizens study j committee for school improvements. | _ Recommended were an increased budget to j ONE—Using"the present ad- I provide more adequate maintenance of school fa- | ministrative building as the cen- | cilities, and increasing the salaries for mainte- | ter for the school complex, de- | nance employes to be in line with similar work | molish the Rogan building and | elsewhere in this community. Sub-Comm/ffee Proposes Move of 9fh Grade fo BHS Thursday night. The alternatives: rebuild in its place a wing of g classrooms in this area. When this is accomplished, demolish the Austin building and rebuild in its place a wing in this area which would tie into the gym either by a covered the Also suggested was creation of a composite g maintenance crew to handle the work, and creation | of a small maintenance satellite shop at each j school to speed minor repair work by the crew. | It was further recommended by the mainte- § nance sub-committee that all room space heaters j Rogan m be vented to toe outside, that all fire excapes be | building and replace it with a | examined for adequacy, availability and opera- | modern two-story structure suf- jj tion. j ficient to accommodate two j Also noted was inadequate lighting equipment | grades, taking into considera- a in many dty school c i assrooms . = tion a projected growth factor. § g Renovate the administrative ^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilliiiilliiilllllliii building as required, and demolish the Austin building and A I. . • /* . I turn this area into campus /\ /f GmOf / V6S 5 UQQ 65/6(3 space available for future de- ww velopment. THREE— Demolish the Rogan building and replace with a new structure to accommodate one grade. Move the ninth grade to high school, demolish the Austin building and turn that space into campus area, and renovate the administrative building as needed. The sub-committee report also noted the need for addition of Moving the ninth grade from junior high school to Brownwood High School was recommended here Thursday night by the high school sub-committee of the citizens study committee for school improvements. The report noted the move would provide additional space at junior high school as well as allow for a more flexible senior high school program. HOWEVER, THE report noted, such a move would overcrowd senior high facilities within two years. So it was recommended construction of five more classrooms at the senior high by 1970, and five more about every five years thereafter to keep up with enrollment Increases. It was noted the present senior high building is generally in excellent condition and lends itself to expansion. However, an enlarged maintenance program was suggested to help keep the facility in top shape. The high school committee also recommended construction of a new football stadium. CONSIDERATION of modernizing teaching facilities and system was also touched on by the high school sub-committee. Among areas recommended for study were closed circuit tv; team teaching; student groupings Lccording to abilities; vocational training; mobile laboratories (sight, hearing, reading, icience, etc.); micro- filming of'books, lesson plans, courses for individuals, etc.; audio facilities for worldwide reception, and involvement in systems being developed in our area for teaching and communications between widely placed individuals, colleges and public schools. THE ONLY change in physical facilities at the school recommended for immediate action by the sub-committee was installation of drapes or curtains over glass walls of the inside rooms. "The glare and distractions through the glass is very bad during most of the day," the report said. "These should b« installed immediately." sufficient cafeteria space any construction planning. in VOTE TARLTON FOR MAYOR (PAID POL. ADV.) Let us show you HOW LITTLE IT COSTS to air condition your home! CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING til through the iff si/mmer fang Cool comfoft can b« your? by simply adding ? G-E space-saving spyt-syt- tem to your central beating system. th » easy and costs mu«l yj>M ever expected. t »«t Urn* i Jlw t Tovgh fwroel finish resiiti w t f FOB A i?0 S. Broadway Brother Says LBJ To Run, Not Walk By FRANCES LEWINE Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) - President Johnson's brother, Sam, thinks there's a tough election campaign ahead and that Lyndon "will run rather than walk." Sam Houston Johnson, 54, seldom seen or heard in public, has joined the Johnson family in the White House and aims to help the President "all the way I can"—and to "keep out of trouble myself." He says he'd like to see the PRESCRIPTION VISIT QUR FOUNTAIN ' AND SNACK BAR GIFTS 8n4 COSMETICS FOR EVERY OCCASION PALACE DRUG CO, H'UEPE FRIKNPS MFBT H19 Austin. Ph. 643,4716 FAST~FRE! President "get out there and talk about the issues—and defend himself." "Everybody enjoys a good, clean fight," said Sam in a rare interview during which he lamented that brother Lyndon is too busy with problems of his presidential office to devote as much time as he ordinarily would to a campaign. Tall, lanky and possessor of a Texas twang much like his brother's, Sam Houston recalls many of Lyndon's campaigns. He predicted this one "won't be as tough as '64" or 1948, wiien Lyndon first won a Senate seat by just 87 votes. Sam, once privately described by his brother as "the smallest politician in the family," shrugged off questions about what role he might play in any Johnson bid for re-election. But it was learned he has a desk at Democratic National Committee headquarters. And a longtime associate said it's safe to say that if campaign strategy is being mapped, Sam Houston is among those at the drawipg board. For Improving Junior High New facilities to house administrative functions of Brownwood Public Schools was suggested by a report of the administrative sub-committee of a citizens study committee Thursday night. The present administrative office area was called comfortable but inadequate with personnel normally associated with the administrative functions scattered throughout the school system. Lack of parking except for metered spaces or on near-by property owned by others was also cited, THE SUB-COMMITTEE suggested an adequate building designed to handle all administrative-related functions as well as storage for system-wide material and supplies. But it pointed out whatever action is taken, adequate off- street parking for both present and future needs should be provided. Two possible alternatives were posed in the sub-committee's report. One was construction of an administrative office building on a tract at Tenth and Slayden, which is adjacent to Brownwood High School. THE OTHER was conversion of the present East Elementary School into administrative facilities in the event that school is merged with Woodland Heights Elementary as recommended in another committee report. But the report concluded that despite shortcomings of the present administrative facilities, priorities should be given to providing adequate teaching facilities. Of the school tax office, the sub-committee suggested either providing for off-street parking at the present site or moving the office to another location. THE ADVISABILITY of leaving the tax office in the downtown area was noted, however, since many people pay taxes in person. Also touched on in the subcommittee report was the possibility of future economies by consolidating various tax offices in the area into one complex. OPBN 7 A.M. • 7 P.M. H.ICT Bert Massey YOUR ITATI Representative Political Advertisement HEAR THE BIBLE FACTS CONCERNING CREATION OF MAN AND SEGREGATION AS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE.,. EVERYBODY INVITED. Hear Moore £ubank, Brooke, Tex., present the Bible facts concerning creation of man end segregation as mentioned in the Bible, SUNDAY, MARCH 31 10:45 A.M. May Church of Christ MAY, TEXAS Everybody has a special invitation to hear these facts- SPRING IS A WOMAN'S WORLD AT LEVINES Women's Patina SAILOR'S BOW • HI-RISE SWHtSTKATE FOR WE SRt£ OHBOMB WOMAN • ' • SUBrUECOHTRASTMIHEDOUBIXFEATVEOSMflt COUAR BOW • SQUARED TOE AND SCUUTUW) HEEL • BLACK, BLUE, BQME WMI • SIZES 4>ATOW DRESS SHOES 5QWK TOE PATINA THI "AUNT f AURO« SASH STOAP* TOE f WWES SUI5 MX P*Ur t *?M *£ 19 » "SALT AND PIPPH HUITKOIOR PWWHUl • tEAWK WITH PMIW 4CCEHT t WHITE WITH BUCK. O«AKGE 4 VELUJtf TINY TMANGIB ( STBAPED FUT HUH PERFORATIONS PATM4 I SUES 8>/ t TO } Levines On The Square Downtown Brownwood

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