Pampa Daily News from Pampa, Texas on April 25, 1937 · Page 1
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Pampa Daily News from Pampa, Texas · Page 1

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Sunday, April 25, 1937
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flON SUNDAY , WARMEtt IN NOftTft POR* ampa Bailtj A Dependable Institution Searing Pfctnpa and the Northeastern Panhandle TONS IN ItPON THE tnoii ftbsiUft tfotdS • fit THE FAMPA DAIL* NtW8 At fffll ' TOP O 1 TEXAS, COVERttifO TH8 PAfta HANDLE DAILY FROM SUNRISE lt> SUNSET. (1315 KILOCYCLfiS). 81, NO. 17) Full At* Leased Wife fAMPA, GRAY COUNTY, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 25, 1937. 22 PAGES TODAY (PRICE FIVE CENTS) t MEET MOST SUCCESSFUL HISTORY Texas Fiesta' Chosen As Name For June Celebration JIVCtE CONTEST PIE ONLY ONE TO SUBMIT EXACT PHRASE THAT WON Top O' Texas Fiesta! That's the name selected by the judges to be the title of Pampa's annual early summer celebration to be held on Thursday and Friday, June 3 and 4. The winning title was submitted by Mrs. W. H. Qelger, Route 1, Pampa, and she was declared the winner of the $10 cash prize in the recent celebration title contest conducted by the Junior Chamber of Commerce and the Pampa Dally NEWS. The check for the prize money will be mailed by the Jaycees to Mrs. .Gelger on Monday. The judges deliberated long over the many splendid suggestions submitted in the contest. Mrs. Geiger was the only one to submit the exact wording, "Top O' Texas Fiesta." Only 'Fiesta' Submitted A number of suggestions included the "Top O' Texas" idea, which the judges considered to be the catchiest phrase of any interest, in w that it designated the state, section of the state surrounding Pampa and included a catch slogan which the Chamber of Commerce hopes to publicize to identify this particular trading area including the Top O' Texas territory. However, none of them contained the word "fiesta", which is described by Webster as a "general holiday for public festivities." Each of the five judges was presented with a list of the suggested titles to study before their final meeting at which the name was to be "selected. At this meeting two of them had picked' Mis. Geiger's. entry, without knowing who submitted it, and two others had chosen titles with the "Top O' Texas" idea. Only two ballots were required for unanimous opinion of the five judges to select "Top O 1 ' Texas Fiesta". W. B Weatherred, head of the general fiesta committee, said last night, that a meeting will be held with Jaycee board of directors tomorrow night when plans for the two-day event will be outlined. Chairmen of various sub-committees also are to be announced early next week, Mr. Weatherred stated. .The general celebration will feature . dances, a rodeo, shows, free attractions, a huge street parade, and various other features which will be outlined in detail later, according to members of the general committee. Tl IS IN EFFECT TODftK (By Tho Aanoclated Praia) Nearly one-third of the population of the United States moved clocks forward an hour today (Sunday) as daylight saving time went Into effect In hundreds of communities,. The' advanced time became effective at 2 a. m, and will remain In effect until the last Sunday in September. It is being observed to a greater or lesser extent in seventeen states. About 10,000,000 will observe daylight saving in New York state, 4,200,000 in New Jersey, 3,200,000 in Pennsylvania, 1,700,000 in 'Oonnectl- cut, 4,300,000 in Pennsylvania, 1,700,000 In- Connecticut, 4,300,000 in Massachusetts, 4,400,00 In Illinois, 700,QOO in Rhode Island, 300,000 in Georgia and smaller groups in other states. SAN ANTONIO, April 84 <#)— Four prisoners escaped from Guadelupe county's new "break proof" jail at Seguln at 5:30 this afternoon and after robbing a woman of her par, escaped in a director* that had not been traced tonight. The fugitives were August De- Pape, 40; Frank L}ttay, n; Marion Staney, \t, and Justo Trevino, 37. The men gained access to a venr tilator from their ceils, crawled up the ventilator and by kicking a hole In the ceiling gained an entrance to. the runaway from where they were able to break into the f°o>n of Jailer kQUte Bunker where they arm' e4 themselves. AtoouJ; gjx fclacls from, the Jail they he$ up Mrs. Mjyrcus Terry. Her par had just been jjijed with gasoline &nd the men thrust her and. fled,, DAM SURVEY TO BE MADE -.. , p —— ® PANHANDLE CONVENTION TO DRAW MANY DELEGATES Pampa will be the convention city for the 34th annual session of the Panhandle Association of Odd Pel- lows and Rebekahs to be held here Tuesday and Wednesday. Registration will open at 9 a. m. Tuesday In the city hall building. The Grand Warden of Texas. M. M. Madison, and Mrs. Madison will attend the session. Mr. and Mrs. Madison are to arrive in Pampa at 6:10 p. m. Monday, from Sweetwater. A special effort has been made to have as many out-of-state officers as possible attend the meeting here, E. C. Rupp, president of the association, said. Mrs. Ethel Mae Clay, secretary- treasurer, has received most of the Panhandle lodges' per capita tax and each lodge is sending a large delegation. The fact that Pampa's Rebekah lodge last year had the greatest membership gain in Texas is expected to create interest and swell attendance at the session. Pampa Teams To Compete Members of the Pampa I. O. O. P. degree team, winners of last year's contest, who will compete against other Panhandle teams at this year's session, are: parl Baer, captain and conductor, H&A. 'Peebles, John Hall, Roy Sulll- 'vaiV'H. H. "Davis, Roy Kretzmeler, Jess Clay, Otis Brinkman, Joe Brown, Alva Phillips, Otto McDonald,, Murry Donald, Bob Miller, Steve Donald, J. W. Crlsler, H. H. Nichols, Harold Baer, J. W. Woodworth. The Rebekahs team: P. H. Faron- Sce NO. 1, Page Z PUPILS TO GIVE PUT flT A safety play by pupils of Sam Houston school will be one of the features to be presented at the weekly meeting of the Junior Chamber of Commerce in Schneider Hotel on Tuesday. The school play will be presented to the members by A. L. Patrick, Sam Houston principal, and M. P. Downs, member of the Klwanis club safety committee which is sponsor- Ing the school play contests in connection with annual Safety Week to be conducted May 9-15. Title of Tuesday's play, Mr. Downs announced Saturday, will be "Average Pampa Family Gets a Lesson in Safety." C. P. Osborne, noted Panhandle plains stock breeder will be the principal speaker at the Tuesday luncheon. Construction Cost of Huge Lake To Be Estimated In a special session Friday afternoon, Gray county commissioners approved the proposed survey of Beaver Dam lake site on Mc- Clcllan creek, and appropriated $175 to finance cost of the survey. The commissioners accepted the proposal of Mark Denson, engineer to start a survey on or before Tuesday that will cost $175. The court's action followed unanimous approval of the survey by Gray county taxpayers on April 6 in the city hall, when J. N. Duncan offered a motion that the county authorize and finance a cost estimate and survey of the Beaver Dam lake site. Engineer Denson specified that he would make a careful survey of the heighth; sounding of materials of both abutements; specifications describing manner of making tests for the substructure of the dam and spillway outlet; and an estimate of material yardage and cost. Lake Size Indicated. Briefly, the survey will show the plete estimated cost of construction. The complete cost of the survey is $175, of which $50 is to pay for the report and map. At the meeting April 6, it was estimated that the cost of the survey would not be more than $300. At the same meeting the lake was pictured as being 50 feet deep at the dam, two miles long, one mile wide. Those attending approved a plan to vote between $100,000 and $200,000 in a bond Issue for the project. The commissioners rescinded an order substituting in its place another calling for the purchase of 22 sewing machines out of the general fund, allowed $120 from the salary fluid for office rent and fuel for the justice of, the peace, of. precinct 5;' and made shifts in the location of the offices of the county agent and county surveyor. Offices Switched. The first order called for the purchase of 22 sewing machines at a total cost of $294.92 at 8 per cent Interest. The commission decided to buy the 22 sewing machines at a cost of $303.67, paying for them out of the general fund. The machines are for the WPA sewing room, are to be bought from the Singer Sewing Machine company of Dallas. Office of the county agent, now located in the federal building, will be changed to the county commissioners and county surveyors' offices In the court house, and the county surveyor will be given an office on the fourth floor, the first office west of the sewing room, under another order of the court. All members of the court, except Commissioner John Haggard, were present. U. S. TEMPERATURE READINGS (At Pampa) 6 n. m. Sat 35 7 u. m.— SO 8 a. m J6 9 a. m SO 10 a. m —-58 11 n. m 58 12 Noon 66 1 p. m. 58 2 )>. m. 62 8 \t. m. S6 4 p. m 59 5 p. m, 57 6 p, m. 66 7 p. m. 68 8 p. m 61 !) p. m 49 10 p. m 47 11 p. m 46 Sat. Mid 46 17 Intentions To Drill Are Filed In Week Filing of new locations continued brisk in the Panhandle field last week when 17 first intentions were recorded with the local office of the Texas Railroad Commission. The number equaled that of the'previous week. HutcWnson county jumped into the active list again with six of the new locations. Gray county recorded four with Moore and Carson getting three each. The other test will be in Wheeler county. Three of the Hutohinson county tests will l>e drilled in the new gas area north 1 of Sanford and near the Moore county line. Phillips Petroleum Company announced four intentions to' drill,' three of them in Moore county with the other in Gray. Announcement of the large in? crease in allowable, to become effective on May I, is expected to further stimulate drilling, Intentions to drill: Alms oil.company grie Thompson et ai NO. 1, 330 feet ftom the north arid we,st Hue of section 15, bjpck M-3, TC&RR survey, Hutch- inspn county. Qtt co.rp. w, B 4, 330 feet from the south and S90 feet from the west lines of section 5, block M-21, TC&RR survey, Hutchlnson county. Phillips Petroleum Co. John Purdy No. 1, 2,310 feet from the south and 990 feet from the east of sections 164 and 171, block 3-T, T&NO survey, Moore county. Phillips Petroleum Co, Mary Beth No. l, 3,310 feet from the north and west lines of section 17, block M-16, AB&M survey, More county. Phillips Petroleum Co. E. W. Nelson No. 1, 2,310 feet from the north and east lines of section 232, block 3-T, T&NO survey, Moore county, i T., G. Nichols j. w. Moore No. 2, 330 feet from the north and west lines of SVj of SW'/i of section 22, block M-21, TO&RR survey, Hutchinson county, Timms-Robinsqn Oil Corp Haiie Heirs No. 1, 330 feet from the nOrth and west lines of Tr. 3 subdivision of sections 14 and EVj of 15, block 1, KL&RR, section 24, block M-21. TC&RR except 8,1 acres of septlQn 24, containing W0.6S acres, inson county. (See NO, SLMI KILLED OFFICERS RESISTS ARREST AFTER SHOOTING BRIDE OF YEAR DALHART, April 24 (/P)—Jlmmle Rogers, a former Dalla.m county farmer, was slain by officers here early tonight as he resisted arrest following the killing of his bride of a year, Mrs. Oracle Kenney Rogers, 35. Rogers fell with a bullet through his head as Deputy Sheriff Bill Randolph and Chief of Police J. C. Dickey, opened fire on him. He fell with a rifle in his hands. Rogers was slain about 6 o'clock, an hour after he is said to have slain his wife at a tourist camp on the southwestern outskirts of Dai- hart. Three eye witnesses were quoted by County Attorney John B. Honts as saying the woman was slain as she read a newspaper. One of the witnesses was John "Big Booger Red" Rogers, brother of the slain man. County Attorney Honts said the killing occurred about 5 o'clock and that Jlmmie Rogers called the sheriff's office at 5:25 o'clock and asked for Sheriff Harvey Foust. He was told the sheriff was out of town and Honts quoted him as saying: "Tell the officers to come and get me." "Where are you?" asked Honts. "Well, I'm at the AP tourist camp," Honts quoted Roger? as saying; and the attorney—asked, "Will you Be there?"—to which he said Rogers replied, "Tell them to keep hunting until they find me." Deputy Sheriff Randolph and Chief of Police Dickey began a search for a truck in which Rogers was said to have left the tourist See NO. 3, Page Z Pampa high school's one-act play, "Cabbages," won first place in the regional tournament at Canyon last night over the Crowell entry, "Sparkin'." ^.Also victorious in the regional were Katherine Barrett in senior declamation, Alta Marie Terrell in typing, Geraldlne Mitchell In shorthand, Elmer Watklns, first, and Kenneth Brown, second, in golfing. Dorothy Jane Day won third in essay writing. It was the third time in four years, the Pampa play won first, and the second consecutive time the Pampa actors and actresses nosed out the Crowell play, Collen McMahan was unanimously chosen as the outstanding actress of the meet, and a Crowell boy who played the leading role in the Foard county comedy was chosen the all- regional boy actor. "Cabbages," directed by Kenneth Carman, will represent the four Panhandle Interscholastio League districts in the state meet at Austin where Pampa won first three years ago and went to the finals last year.' The other first and second place winners will accompany the one-act play cast to Austin. Members of the championship play's cast are Miss McMahan, Dickie Kennedy, Betty Rains, Richard KHgore, Gene Finkbeiner, Annie Johnson, and Alber- tlne Schulkey. The judges gave Pampa three first places and Crowell two. Pampa's district champion debaters,, Don Taylor and Dan Buzard, were eliminated in the preliminaries by Amarillo in a 3 to 2 decision In which Dr. S- H. Condron of the WTSTC faculty voted for the Pampa boys. Amarillo and Lubbock went to the finals in the debate tourney, -~-r. . II* FATHER-SON BANQUET A father-and-son banquet will be given at 8 p, m.. tomorrow at the American Ljegiqn hut. A'l World War veterans who have sons are invited to attend, as are sons,, adopted sous, and steprsons Qf veterans. The motto. }n Bjemory of Kins IWr ward VJH, npw on sale at Wool* Popular Orator and Eagle Scouts in Program The Rev. Heytt Boles, left, O popular Presbyterian minister of Tulia, will give an address on some phase of scouting Monday night at 7:30 o'clock at the high school auditorium in connection with the awarding of Eagle Scout badges to the four members of troop. 80, sponsored by the First Methodist church, left to right, seated, Ray Boyles and A. C. Green Jr., and left to right, standing, Kecton Rhodes and Doyle Aulds, pictured above. A large crowd Is expected to hear Mr. Boles. He addressed a large crowd of parents and Scouters at the high school cafeteria here in December, and his talk at that time was liked so •well he was asked to return. The program tomorrow night will include, in addition to Mr. Boles' address, a Court of Honor in which numerous advancements and merit badges will be awarded, a short dramatic sketch with the four Eagle Scouts and their scoutmaster as members of the cast. L. L. McColm will preside at the court. •? Members of the court will be R. B. Fisher, L. L, gone, R. A. Selby and Carl Schulkey. The entire public, Including all Scouts .their parents, friends, teachers and Scouters, are invited to attend the program, A conference of Panhandle-Plains superintendents will be held at Pampa in the high school auditorium, next Friday and Saturday, April 30 and May 1, according to an announcement from Supt. Frank P. Wilson of Gruver, secretary. H. B. Webb of Olton is president. The week-end session will be the third and last meeting of the fiscal year. Officers will be elected for the following year. The first meeting of the current year was held at Plainview last fall and the second at Amarillo in January. An important subject for discussion will be the 12-year school system. G. M. Sims, superintendent of (See NO. 4, Page Z) J Heard * • Mayor Wi. A. Bratton declaring that the All State band contest last night was the greatest musical event ever held in the Panhandle. Jn fact, the mayor became so engrossed in the concert that he forgot to attend the softball game and When his honor misses an athletic event there is always a mighty good TO BE GIIEI A reception and dance at the Pampa Country club will be the principal entertainment for 125 visitors from Wichita, Kas., next Wednesday evening, it was decided at a chamber of commerce meeting in city hall Friday night. The Goodwill committee, headed by Frank Oulberson and the entertainment committee, headed by W. V. Jarratt, were called in to make the plans. The Wichita chamber of commerce is sponsoring the goodwill trip, which is the 30th annual goodwill tour. The delegation will arrive at the Santa Fe station Wednesday at 7:45 p. m. M. P. Downs was appointed chairman of a group to have a large crowd of businessmen to meet the train. He will likewise be chairman of the reservation committee for the dance at the Country Club. All Pampa business men and their wives and friends are invited to the ,<6ee NQ, 5, L. C. Graham of Pampa was awarded contract for construction of a four-room parochial school for Holy Souls' church and for removal of the old C. T. Hunkapillar home at the corner of West and Browning streets where the school will be erected. Graham's low bid was $20,000. Townes & Funk of Amarillo are the architects. Five Pampa contractors and three from Amarillo entered bids which were opened last week. The contract was signed Friday afternoon Work of moving the residence will begin next week and construction of the church should be started within two weeks. Contractors bidding were Mr. Graham, Wilson Hatcher, W. A. Gray, W. E. Davis, and O, L. Boyington, all of Pampa, Erhard & Wertz, Neal Singleton, and Gau and Vogel, all of Amarillo. The contract calls for construction of a brick building of four rooms. Two of the rooms will be divided by folding doors which can be opened to make an auditorium. A stage will be located in one of the rooms. Four Incarnate Word sisters from San Antonio will come to Pampa as teachers at the opening of the fall semester. The school will "be open to Protestant as well as Catholic children, Rev. Joseph Wonderly said. All grades up to and including the seventh will be taught. All state requirements and standards will be maintained. It is expected that between 70 and 100 children will attend, some coming from White Deer. OKLAHOMA CITY, April 24. (/P) —Quick action and a high wind prevented possible damage in a thickly populaxed residential section of northeast Oklahoma City today when a high pressure gas line burst at the Big Chief drilling company's No. l Sooner well. Resident within a two block area were ordered to extinguish all fires but workmen succeeded in shutting the gas off in the line before any was HARVESTER BAND WINS FIRST PLACE IN MARCHING BY SUE VINSON. Awards made at the close of a concert by the pick of student musicians, ended last night the most successful meeting of the North Texas School Band and Orchestra association and emphasized the opinon expressed by judges that Texas schools are developing: musical organizations of high quality. Students playing last night to an audience filling the high school auditorium were those chosen as best In their sections for the all- state band. Two bands were formed from the large number selected, each playing half the concert under direction of the judges—widely known college band directors—and of two Panhandle directors, Oscar Wise of Amarillo and W. Postma of Pampa. 1,350 Registered. The variety of color in their uni-< forms was reflected in the scores of other uniforms In the audience, a sample of the color that has deluged Pampa while the 1,390 young musicians were in the city. Out-of- town attendance is estimated to have reached 2,000, as numerous directors, teachers, and parents accompanied, the students. A distinguished visitor Saturday was Mr. Vandercook, director of a school of band music in Chicago which bears his name, nationally known as a teacher of band music and a. composer for band Instru? ments. Many of his compositions/ were played in the contests here. He was introduced at the luncheon given for directors, school officials^ and presidents of Band Mothers clubs yesterday, and in a short,talk congratulated North Texas schools' on their progress in building good, bands. Quality of Bands Praised. Judges also were Introduced at the luncheon and each responded! A. R. McAllister of Joliet, 111., presU dent of the National School Band Association, urged continued attention to a program which is showing rapid improvement in large and] small schools; William Kunkel, director of University of New Mexico Band at Albuquerque, remarked on the superiority of Texas school (See NO. 6, Page 2) Quartets from Lubbock and Mo-t Lean, and from other music organl- ations In the Panhandle, and from. Oklahoma, will be among the visitors in Pampa today attending th9 Gray County Singing convention to be held at the Harrah chapel, beginning at 10:30 a. m. There wity be a basket lunch at noon. Among McLean representatlvea will be the McLean quartet, Keaton quartet, and McLean trio. The Stamps-Baxter quartet Is expected to attend from Lubbock. Fred Staggs is president of thq convention, AUSTIN, April 24 (ff>—The High* way Commission announced today bids will be received May 14 'on, projects In 11 counties as follows: Potter — Highway 5, Canadian river bridge and approaches north, of Amarillo. Howard—Highway 1, base course and double asphalt treatment from, Martin county line to Big Spring, Gray and Donley—Highway 75, bituminous surfacing from Rockledge to Carson county line. f Saw . 11 Those two jolly Harvester motl}» ers, Mrs. Roy N. Jones and Mrs. R. E. Showers, demanding that this corner announce that a Picnic for members of the Harvester ketball, football, track and and tennis teams find their ents will be held tomorrow e ing. The parents or the. ttpyg asked to be at the high §c, gym with a basket of lynch fey, 9 o'clock. If the parents can't co.m.9 the boys are asked t9,brln£ a

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