The Baytown Sun from Baytown, Texas on January 15, 1954 · Page 8
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The Baytown Sun from Baytown, Texas · Page 8

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Baytown, Texas
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Friday, January 15, 1954
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Page 8
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! PAGES— THE BAYTOWN SUN. FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1954 Enoch Is Contest Chairman Rules Listed For Veteran f s Poetry Contest LOOK MA, I'M ACTING! •CRAZYLEGS'—Elroy Hirsch, the great Los Angeles Rams fool- ball player, is currently serving an acting: stint in the film of his life "Crazylegs." The picture will play Tuesday and Wednesday at the Brunson. Pictured with him is Joan Vohs, new starlet who plays his' wife. Hospitalized veterans in Texas will have a - poetry contest this year under the auspices of the Texas Council for the Promotion of Poetry. Hobart Enoch, chairman of the contest committee, has announced rules and final plans now underway. The contest will open March I, he said, and will close on July 31. Manuscripts submitted must be postmarked" by midnight July 31. The awards will be presented on Poetry Day, Oct. 15, by the Council. There will be S50, first prize; $25, second prize; $15, third prize v and S10, fourth prize.- Honorable 3 mention awards will include books * of poetry contributed by Texas authors. Rules are: 1. Any veteran hospitalized" in the. state, of Texas is eligible to enter the contest. . ... 2. All poems submitted should be typewritten, -double spaced, on paper with -wide, margins.: Three copies (not carbon-copies) will be submitted of each poem entered. The poems must be unpublished, original works. Po'ems may be in any form( rhymeJ, free verse, syllable count, etc.) but should not exceed 24 lines. of the contestant and the:Texas Council for the Promotion of Poetry retains no publication rights without first receiving .the permission of the author. 7. All : contestants .must abide strictly by the rules—decisions of 3. No writer's name should, "ap- the judges are,final. pear on. the manuscript. All'en- trants should list titles of poems on a separate sheet of paper and their names and hospital addresses should 1 appear on this sheet. This should be placed in a sealed en- t velope and sent'along with poems. 4. No poems submitted will be returned and all entrants should retain a copy of the manuscript submitted". No correspondence will be entered into with any of the contestants. 5. All poems should be mailed to Hobart W. Enoch, Chairman, Veteran's Poetry Day Contest Committee, 508 South Circle drive, Baytown, Tex. 6. All poems remain the property 'Crazylegs' Plays Himself In Biography Movie Due Tuesday At Brunson; Actual Newsreel Films Of Games Used • .By WANDA JONES' ' Tony Curtis couldn't play football in "All-American," John Derek wasn't much good in "Saturday's Hero"—so Hollywood got a real football player to play "Crazy- Jegs." 1" They chose "Crazylegs," himself, 29-year-old Elroy Hirsch- All good "Ganders will enjoy seeing the:.film .-next Tuesday and .Wednesday- at -the Brunson. Featured ;in it are 18 'of' Hirsch's .teammates with the -Los Angeles Rams, among them "Bob Waterfield, Tom Fears, Norman Van Brcoklin, Tank Young- PRINTING NEEDS FOR QUICK SERVICE FROM matherne's Phone 8090 to have the forms you need to work with to start'54 er, Night Train Lana and Larry Brink. .And we local yokels will enjoy seeing Texas lads Volney Quintan, of Grant Prairier, V. T. Smith of Sweetwater • and Jim Winkler of Temple play on the Rams. Remember, Quinlan was a TCU man; Smith, Abilene Christian College, and Winkler, a good ole Texas Aggie. : It's a rare thing when-the life of a 29-year-old still living is the.basis of a movie, but his is a rare story.. A small boy in a poor, family, Hirsch weighed only 125 pounds when he turned out for high school football-and failed,-to make.the squad.- He spent a summer developing an elusive stride, by dodging among trees in a grove near his home town, in the meantime gaining 40 pounds. . When he reported for football again the high school coach, Win Brpckmeyer, saw possibilities in this lad with the curious gait And the lad fullfilled the hopes by setting. Wausau scoring records as-;a starting- '(halfback in his ; senior year. Although he wanted to.work and support his parents, they persuad- "ed him to go to college. He chose the University of Wisconsin, and •After being injured oii this latter team he was told he'd never play but he determinedly worked himself back into shape and in 1919 the Los Angeles Rams offered" him a contract. In 1951, when the Rams won the iworld's championship, Crazylegs set a new National Football league record by gaining 1,495 yards, end tied Don Huson's ;NFL- record -by scoring 17 touchdowns on passes. . •: Quite a boy, this Hirsch. . ,' SWEET LIL 'ole Jane Powell has joined the rank of the daring darlings in her new film, "Three Sailors and a Girl.' . . Janie plays the girl, a Broadway, glamorpuss and best friend of. three sailors on leave in the Big Town. Oh, there'll, be music and 1 comedy and maybe, a story thrown in, to enhance the newfound sophistication of La' Powell. A sizzling dance is on the agenda as Janie tries to out-do Marilyn's jig in "Gentlemen Prefer". Blondes." Ann Miller's in "The Band Wagon" and Rita's' in "Miss Sadie Thompson." ;.-.;• . . But speaking of- some real dancing, Gene Nelson is in the r-pieturc- A former ice skating star with the in 1942, his first year on the'wis- 'Sonja Henie show, Gene is about consin varsity, he was named Ail- American halfback and won the lasting nickname "Crazylegs." Enlisting in the Marines, Hirsch transferred-to ' the University ot Michigan site of the V-12 training program and again made All- American in 1943- He also became starting center on the basketball team, star pitcher for the baseball nine and leading broadjumper on the. track squad. (Nothing slouchy about .this kid.) the best dancer in Hollywood besides masters Astaire and Kelly. Gordon McCrea is another popular star in the picture. And the third of the sailor trio consists of 350 pound's. He's big fat, funny Jack E. Leonard, imported from the New York night club circuit. "Three Sailors and a Girl" is billed for Sunday and Monday at the Brunson. THE BOOKING for next Thursday through Saturday is "Miss While'-'In uniform, w ; ibh rank of Sadie Thompson," three dimen- _, ,_-^.. ..,...„., >,.. „ .1 , lieutenant, .Hirsch starred for the El Toro Marine Base eleven and served overseas in the Pacific theater. Shortly after his return to civilian life, he proposed to his high school sweetheart, and the couple were married just before the 1946 All-Star Game at Chicago, where Hirsch scored the only two touchdowns of the game and won a contract with the Chicago Rockets professional team. sioner already viewed by a slew of Baytonianas' when it played New Year's eve at the Brunson. Rita Hayworth has been nominated' for an Oscar in this one and if it weren't for Audrey Hepburn in "Roman Holiday," she'd probably get it. For once, the current Mrs. Richard Haymes comes up with a beautiful basket of acting, Maybe it was due to her lofty company in the film—Jose Ferrer, the Cut your driving costs with a '54 Studebaker TOiiki tW.tnJl lira ud ebnxm wbnl dba cpUoctl la til DodN< M MM Gas-saying Studdbaker! most modem tarmAmerica! CJTCBEBAKEH'S far ad£)' vanced design haswon 30 outstanding awards in international competition. Read here what some of'America's foremost authorities say: "In th* tfyl« department; Studebakvr is 50 miles ahead of any other American car!" —Mechanic Illustrated "We (rave awarded Stwde- Mrar our Sold Medal for outstanding design and distinctive styling.*! —New York Fashion Academy ^Stwdebaker, which was •Mf fcKtwki setting early: postwar auto styles, may now be setting the pattern for the next few years." —Wall Street Journal "There can be no question about it—Studebaker has, with its new model, made every other American car look ten years olderl" —Motor World ATTENTION! BUYERS OF USED CARS! Sound, solid crafliman- ihip and dependable gasoline economy are even more important in a used carlhaninanew one. That's why the experienced buyer of uted cars always keeps an eye out for a late-model Studebaker. MT Mil MWHI WUU«I MT A HSU STWtUKIIU Own this car that insures you tap ntsol* value I /^ ITT the most advanced auto- vJT mobile in all the world. Get. a 1954 Studebaker. Studebaker's out-ahead new ftyling i* like money in the bank for you as insurance of high resale value. Studebaker's brilliant modern engineering eliminates old- fashioned excess bulk and dead weight that serve no useful purpose. You .save gasoline sensationally. Studebaker'g structural soundness protects you against upkeep expense—gives : you the most wear-resisting aa well as the safest car in America. Come in and try out a 1954, : Studebaker now I J. B. HOLLA WAY MOTOR CO. 310 N. MAIN "Your Studebaker Dealer for Over a Quarter Century" DIAL 8131 genius actor who plays a hepped- up sin chaser. •Aldo Ray, the'cute blond whose voice sounds like a car wheel spinning in East Texas mud; sup-, plies a great deal of Rita's company, however, as her Marine sweetheart. • The story is an interesting one, being, composed many years ago by W; Somerset Maugham. Remember, Joan- Crawford played in the first film-version, "Rain." They should have . stuck;' with that original title,-too, considering how much .is splashed around in the South Seas drama.. . .Miss Sadie Thompson is a lusty night club entertainer stranded on a tiny tropical isle, A U.S. Marine outpost. (But Guam was never like this, they're saying.) A husky ser-. geant, Aldo, falls in love with her and urges her to go to Australia where, after his , hitch is up, he will join her to get married. At this point, however. Jose "no fun-on earth." Ferer brings pressure on the governor of the island's to have her deported back to the United States. •In the meantime we are en-' tertained with -"The Blue Pacific Blues," a lot of rain, and Hawaiian scenery in Three-D. It'e a fine show. •-' , . ' " • IF, YOU. live on a diet of the second-run p i c t'u r e s, here are special desserts for next week: "Little Boy Lost," Bing Crosby's best effort for '53., will play Sunday and Monday at the Decker; "So This Is Love,'• biography of the late Grace Moore is due Wednesday and Thursday on Decker premises. Looking way into the future, don't miss "Roman Holiday" when it plays Jan. 24 at the Bay. RUFUS HUNNICUTT, - Brunson manager, announced this week that "The Robe," in cinemascope, is slatecT for one whole week starting Jan. 24 at the Brunson. Here's a picture that makes other movie seem inslgnifi- it is quite wonderful, New French Play Is Empty Script By JACK GAVER • NEW YORK, Jan. 15 —IIP)— The latest attempt to transplant a work of the very popular French playwright, Jean Anouilh, to Broadway has been no more successful than the preceding four. In fact; "Mademoiselle Colombo," which the author has been quoted as saying is his own favorite, isn't nearly as good as his "Antigone" and "Ring Round the Moon," two of his works seen here in recent years. Robert L. Joseph and Jay Julien have given the new one, adapted by, critic Louis Kronenberger, a sumptuous production, but this only serves to »how the emptiness of the script. Whatever it may have been in its original French version, the play shows up here as an unjelled mir.lure of moods and 'styles in. which farce or slapstick is predominant although such an approach does not seem to be what the piece should have. There is the broadest caricature — and very familiar and worn caricature at that—next to tender scenes filled with ; irouy- . The tale, against a Paris backdrop of 1900, tells how a .rather mousy young wife and mother, married to a straight-laced, argumentative fellow, is thrown into the 'tinsel world of the theater when he has to enter the army. She gels to like it to the extent that she becomes unfaithful and chooses to stay in it' at the expense of her marriage. Julie . Harris has the title role and is, by turns, properly wide- eyed and sophisticated. She is excellent, but the role is nothing like as good as those of her recent plays through which she achieved stardom. Edna Best plays a raucous, fading grande dame of the stage with relish and provides the production with most of the juice it has, al- Lhough this type of character is trite and has been done to death :n nanny mediums. Eli VVallach, William Windom, Sam Jiffe, Frajik Silvera, Harry Bannister, Mikhail Rasumny, Edna Preston and Nehemiah Perse ff fill the other roles acceptably. Harold Clurman's direction is rather obvious at times and it is possible that a more subtle touch by him here and there might have helped matters.' But not much, probably, ;because the script just doesn't have it ; ; Too inviting .HOUSTON, Jan. 15 —UP—A cafe's name proved too "inviting for a burglar, police reported Tnurs- day. • .' •• •-. -. •'' '•' • .They said someone ducked into the Duck Inn and Wobble Out cafe and wobbled out with $25- Contributions of money or books of poetry should be mailed to the Texas'Council for the Promotion of Poetry, Box 2032, San Antonio 6, Tex. Film Fare BRUNSON Sunday and Monday, "Three Sailors and A Girl"; Tuesday and Wednesday, "Crazylecs"; Thursday through Saturday, "Mi»s Sadie Thompson," BAY . Sunday and Monday, "Glass Web" and "Battle Circus,"; Tuesday ana Wednesday, "Terror on a Train" and "Torch Song-'; Thursday through Saturday "Blowing Wind." DECKER DRIVE-INN - Sunday and Monday, "Little Boy Lost" and "Crosswinds"; Tuesday and Wednesday, "So This Is Love' and "Kid From Left-Field"; Thursday only, "Corporal Dolan Goes AWQL : ' and "Desperate Search"; Friday and Saturday, "Thunder in the East" and "Golden Blade." PORT THEATER Sunday and Monday, "Easy to Love"; Tuesday and Wednesday, "Glass Web" and "A Lion is .in the Streets"; Thursday and Friday," Three Sailors and-a Girl": .Saturday only, "Trader Horn" and "Sequoia."' Tallulgh To Star In TV Drama Tallulah Bankhead will debut •in her first dramatic role on television in the Henrik Ibsen classic, •'Hedda Gabler," on the United States Steel Hour at i- p.m. Sunday via Channel 2, KPRC-TV. The volcanic star of'the American theater will be seen as the be- devilled Hedda, a ruthless, vengeful woman driven to self-destruction by egotistic ferocity and lust for power. This role, one of the most challenging in dramatic repertory, has, long been a favorite of Miss Bankhead's, although she will be playing it for the first time in this television appearance. Heretofore, the tempestuos star, has confined her TV activities to comedy roles. ...•••' '....'.-. "Hedda G-aWer," . first produced in 1891,: is one of Ibsen's greatest tragic works and has .been compared to plays of the early Greek theater. .Featured in the cast will be Luther Adler as Judge Brack, John Baragrey as Eilert Lovborg, Alan Hewitt as-Hedda's husband, George -Teaman, and Eugenia Rawls as Thea Elvsted. In "recent years, Miss Bankhead has•: sparked Broadway with her electric personality in such plays as "The Little Foxes," "The Skin of our Teeth," "Foolish Notion" and "Private Lives." Her motion picture successes include "A Royal Scandal" and "Lifeboat." "Hedda .Gabler" is adapted for television by Erik Barnouw from the English translation of Noel Langley. The Steel Hour is produced by the Theater Guild ancf directed by Alex Sogal. Is "Kinsmen' A Shakespeare Play? "The Two-Noble Kinsmen," a play attributed to a collaboration between .William Shakespeare; and John Fletcher, may become a theatrical .cause • celebre in the next couple of years. Antioch College's Area Theater is in,the process of, presenting all of Shakespeare's plays,-.'ah enterprise, which will be completed three years, from • now. The •Antlaciians- v.-ill include "The Two Noble, Kinsmen." Back in the Thirties, the." Pasadena,Playhouse preened itself for-presenting all of the Bard's plays, but they .didn't do "Kinsmen.". ..The point at issue, .which .can. be ar- gued during lulls in the debate on who wrote Shakespeare's plays, is: How complete is a complete Shakespeare cycle without "Two;' Noble Kinsmen?" ':.... , • ': !, , ".-. Enough concrete was used In biulding Boulder dam to build, a broad highway across the United .States.. • .'." , ,,'-. . . •'. : : '"'. New Division In State Fair For Women's Art New Draina Based on Ad Television Playhouse- (N.B.C.) may create a precedent by doing a drama based on an advertisement. The ad, headed "The Big Squeeze" which appeared in the New York Times, was a full-page . ,. . . . ' '., • ,,, eulogy of the merits of the movies A new division in the Women's ae ° „<.„„„„ f m m HIV* wnrrips. department of the State Fair of Texas next fall will offer $600 in premiums for oil and water color paintings by amateur artists. The exhibition will supplement the jury professional show held each year during the fair by-the Museum of Fine Arts, Mrs. Leah Jarrett, manager of the department, said. Space limitations have prevented such'an exhibit in the past, although numerous requests for it have been received from, amateur artists throughout the state, Mrs. Jarrett said. The fair's new Women's building, now under construction, -will provide adequate space for the division for the first time. Only residents of Texas will be eligible to' enter and paintings must have been completed within the "past three years, Mrs. Jarrett said. •'••' -•' ' ''••• ''•". "••' • '"Portrait, landscape, maxinc scene, and still life , classifications will be listed for both 'oil and water color paintings, with; premiums for oils $50, S30 and $20 in each clasification, and $25,. $15 and $10 in each water color class. Too Many Smiths INDIANAPOLIS. I"d., Jan. 15 —UP—The Robert Smith family and the William Smith family were routed by a fire Thursday from a duplex owned by the Smith and Smith realty firm. None of the Smiths is related. as an escape from life's worries. Television Playhouse producer, Fred Coe, is planning a satirical script, based on some of the reasoning presented in the ad. 24-HOUR WATCH REPAIR SERVICE I FACTORY METHODS * FACTORY PARTS I REASONABLE PRICES AT j MAYFAIR JEWELERS The House of Diamonds DANCE TONiGHT TRI • CITY CLUB GARY KILPATRICK and the YEARLINGS BAYSHORE LOUNGE JAM SESSION SUNDAY 2 TO 6 P.M. Music by the GREY GHOST BOOGIE BAND BAYSHORE LOUNGE LISTENING GUIDE 1360 ON YOUR DIAL FRIDAY EVENINQ 4:r,S—News Headlines 5:0(1—1360 Club 5:00—Sports Review 6:05—Local Newti G:l!i—Sports Diary 6:30—Sportsman's Calendar fi:40—Altnr Fires G;. r ,5—News Summary 7:00—Hnrlem at 7 7:DS—News Headlines 8:00—Parly Line 9-00—It's Dance Time " 9:30—Dick Haymes 9:45—Guest Star 10.00—News Headline? J0:03—It's JJance Time 11:00—siRn uii SA1UKQAY MORNn.'U 6:00—Sign On 6:00—Farm Reporter 8:15—Saturday Session S:28—News Headlines 8:30—Saturday Session D:00—Social Security 8:i!i—Latin Hour 11:15—U. S. Army Air Force Show 11:30—Words of Love 11 MS—Society Page SATURDAY AFTERNOON 1200—World News Roundup 12:15—The Ballcs Brothers 12:-15—The Vaughn Family 1 : oo—Melody Corner 2:00—News deadlines 2:fi3—Blues and Rliythm 2:DS—News Headlines 3:00—Blues and Rhythm 4:00—Teen Party Line NOW JOEL McCREA-YVONNE I CARTOON * -NEWS' DECKER DRIVE IN THEATRE • MOW • 6 :30 P.M. FEATURE 2nd Feature HUMPHREY BOGART —EV_. •• . ... .,. "MALTESE FALCON" Saturday 10 AM. Doors Open 9:30 AM MY DOG SHEP —with— Tom Neat 6 CARTOONS Plus Serial Chapter 6 ROAR OF THE IRON HORSE —1'Ius— ' . Kegulnr Feature "BORDER RIVER" PORT LAST DAY "STRANGER WORE A GUN" SATURDAY ONLY 3.BIG FEATURES ROY ROGERS • " • —IN— : "HOME IN OKLAHOMA" —AND— • '•'•• •• "CRY OF THE HUNTED" —with— POLLY BERGEN A Friendly Message From i H. E. Brunsoh I have been watching our theatre patrons for the: past ; several months. I have noticed some fall- • ing out of line ( and after a spell . . . see them again, coming back to our theatres. I wish to ; say; .T. V. is.all right Tor a time, 'but when people stay home, they soon 'dry up, die; so I thought it well to call, to your attention s. line I sometimes quote:' "KEEP YOURSELF GREEN ENOUGH TO GROW OR YOU WILL SOON .DIE OUT" People need to have consistent- contact with'others in the differ-: ent -recreational program's or they will fall into a rut, become stalemated, sour, their minds become molded,, their eyes foggy, life becomes draggy, steps slow down and the sand man will soon claim, the "Dust There Art"! We have': endeavored to keep our theatre screens filled with those interesting pictures that cause people to come back and keep coming. - Habits are easily formed. Bad habits are just.as easily attached to us as those habits that are good. We say; DON'T GROW OLD STAYING AT HOME! Make your evening pleasant, - TAKE YOUR WIFE AND FAMILY OUT TO DINE, AND THEN SEE A'GOOD SHOW. Dress ,up at least once each week and take a look'at yourself in the mirror. If you feel you are GOOD LOOKING ... Then let others see you and for these things and others, you.will be glad for the privilege of rubbing shoulders with others. We cither put something on or take something off when we rub shoulders with people. THE THEATRE IS ONE OF THE BEST PLACES TO FIND HAPPY PEOPLE . . . TRY IT TWICE A WEEK . . . RUB A LITTLE GOOD OFF YOU ON TO SOMEONE ELSE. . Howard E. Brunson Brunson Theatre ' • •"BayvTheatre : Decker Drive In Theatre Port Theatre, La Porte Sanja Theatre, Channelview * BAY THEATRE * NOW SHOWING THRU SATURDAY TRADER HORN the v/hip — until the White Hunter came! OYSTERS ON THE HALF-SHELL FILET MIGHON WITH SALAD STUFFED FLOUNDER OUR SPECIALTY 8-Oz 2,00 10-Oz 2.25 THIS WEEK-END DANCE FREDDIE REAL'S CLUB FORMERLY — "HAGEE'S" Freddie Real & the Melody Boys FLOYD TIM MAN MITCHELL FAMILY FRIDAY SATURDAY JAX. 17 AND THE Complete Sea Food Or Steak Dinners Served Daily .Except Wednesdays ZEISIG'S Only 15 Minutes from Bnytown on Morgans Point Road Under New Management... * STEAKS AMD SEAFOODS * OPEN 5 A.M. TO 1 A.M. Where Good Friends Meef fo Eat 4 Humie Waff!e Shop Cafe E. A. GRIFFIN JUST ARRIVED FRESH SHIPMENT OF SEA FOODS FRESH FLOUNDER, FRESH TROUT, FRESH RED SNAPPER AND OYSTERS. COME'AND ENJOY A DELICIOUS SEAFOOD DINNER AT BAYTOWN'S FINEST RESTAURANT Go to church — then meet your friends at The Rebel Inn for our special ROAST TURKEY DINNER Delicious Turkey With All The Trimmings Enjoy Life-Eat Out More Often! GOOD FOOD IS GOOD HEALTH Rebel $ iMTft Dinlnjr Rooms to Serve VMI

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