Del Rio News Herald from Del Rio, Texas on April 13, 1971 · Page 6
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Del Rio News Herald from Del Rio, Texas · Page 6

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Del Rio, Texas
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Tuesday, April 13, 1971
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Page 6
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6-DEL RIO (TEXAS) NEWS-HERALD, Tuesday, April 13, 1971 Amistad Zoning Proposal Aired by County Officials Proposed legislation to authorize the Val Verde County Commissioners Court to adopt zoning regulations in a portion of the county adjacent and near Amistad Reservoir, was aired here Monday afternoon. More than two dozen landowners, .conservationists, and other interested citizens accepted an invitation to the public to meet with the Commissioners Court to discuss the measure. The bill introduced by State Rep. Hilary B. Doran Jr. of Del Rio is now being worked oh in House committee and is expected to be reported out next week. The commissioners, continuing discussion after the informal hearing was completed, decided to ask two minor revisions in the current draft of the bill. First, the Commissioners Court wishes to 'retain the authority to appoint members of the zoning commission, which would oversee enforcement of the regulations: to serve for fixed terms of office. As presently drafted, the zoning commission members would name their own successors. Second, the Commissioners Court will ask removal of certain specifications for members of the zoning commission, allowing the court to name qualified members to the panel from the citizenry of the county at large. As now drafted, the court would have to name one businessman, one Realtor, one woman and one member at large. Also during the informal discussion, the commissioners indicated they plan to institute regulations aimed at preventing pollution of surface and underground water resources on a county-wide basis. R.H. Weiss, Kerrville, Region Commission U.S. Section superintendent for Amistad, in reply to questions stated that almost one half million acre feet of water was released from the reservoir during the past month. Approximately 300,000 acre feet was released by the U.S. . Coleman Newman, National Park Service superintendent for Amistad, stated that the current federal budget includes approximately $150,000 for operation of the national recreation area, but zero for construction. Newman said that funds for the completion of the Diablo Municipal League Backs Amendment AUSTIN (AP)- A proposed amendment to raise the interest rates on state water bonds would bring in needed federal funds for sewage treatment plant construction, the executive director of the Texas Municipal League says. Richard D. Brown said Monday—the league supports the amendment, which would allow up to $100 million in general obligation bonds to be sold at 6 per cent interest or less. The money would go toward low Interest loans to finance sewage treatment facilities on the local level. "With the help from the clean water amendment, the__local share will drop to 45 per cent, and 25 per cent of this would come from the state loan," Brown said. "The federal share would rise to 55 per cent." The incentive to up-date the sewage treatment facilities would be lost if this amendment is not passed, he said, not to mention the loss of economic as-, sistance to the state with almost $300 million in jobs from the projects. • The league's clean water for Texas committee has initiated a program to educate and inform the voters for passage of the amendment, which is on the May 18 ballot, Brown said. Audit Reveals Funds Missing HOUSTON (AP) - The suburban city of Deer Park is missing $16,017, an audit revealed Monday. PatrickE. Kronin,38, former finance director who has been missing since March 27, has been charged with forging the signatures of city administrator Clovis Mann and Mayor Earl E. .Dunn to a check for $500. Mann said the shortage is covered by a bond. East sewerage system were obtained through President Nixon's pollution abatement program. David Allen, Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept. game warden, revealed that 25 water safety infraction cases were filed at Amistad during the Easter holiday weekend alone. The group expressed concern about the number of beer and soft drink cans and other trash being thrown in and around the lake by fishermen, boaters and campers. Park Supt. Newman stated that he has two men working full time and one working part time picking up trash. Unless there is improvement, a crackdown involving filing of charges against those caught littering may become necessary, the group concluded. George Gregg, manager of the Del Rio Chamber of Commerce, told of examples where property at other lakes lost value because of failure to adopt protective regulations such as proposed here. Commissioner Whitehead said that two counties adjacent to Padre Island have zoning authority siich as proposed here. Enactment of Doran's bill will make Val Verde the third county in the state with such authority. Whitehead predicted such authority would be statewide within a matter of a few years. SWEARING IN-Eagle Pass school trustees are sworn in during a meeting Monday when another trustee-elect was refused hif seat on the board. Left to right, School Business Manager Cliff Butler AT EAGLE PASS administers oath to Anacleto Vidaurri and Steve Lynn. Seated is trustee Danny Acosta. (News-Herald Pho,to) Ritchie Refused Seat on Board SEC Renews Probe Of Sharp Dealings VI regional engineer for the Texas State Department of Health's Wastewater Technology and Surveillance Division, was present for the public discussion. ''.:'.'He revealed that the Texas Water Quality Board has adopted an order to allow Val Verde County to begin enforcing standards for septic tanks and other anti-pollution controls. Commissioner L.D. Whitehead Jr. told other members of the court that it appears all that is necessary is for the court to enter the regulations in the minutes to be empowered to enforce them on a county-wide basis. The zoning bill would involve only portions of the county near the lake. It would give the county the same type of authority the city has to protect the area from pollution and undesirable development. The county would be authorized to regulate and restrict the height, number of stories, and size of buildings and other structures, the percentage of lot that may be occupied, the size of yards, courts, and other spaces, the density of population, and the location and use of buildings, structures and land for trade, industry, residence, and other purposes, and regulate the placing of water, sewerage, park, and other public requirements for those areas of the county. > Agricultural land is specifically exempt from such regulation by the bill. Those in attendance were generally agreed that protection of the lake area is necessary; however, some of the landowners attending stated they feel the entire county should be covered by the provisions. Several interesting points regarding the lake emerged during the conversation. Tom McGuire, International Boundary and Water DALLAS (AP) — Government investigators were ready to inspect documents from the business firms and banks of developer Frank W. Sharp in Houston today in a renewed probe of stock fraud allegations. A spokesman said the Secur defendants in the original SEC suit. Out-of-court statements given the SEC last fall and winter by about three dozen individuals cannot be used as evidence during the Aug. 30 trial. Most of those persons will be Mattinglyand James Lovell and Father Michael Francis Kennelly, president of Loyola College of New Orleans and former president of the Jesuit Fathers of. Houston. EAGLE PASS—Former Eagle Pass School Board President Charlie -Ritchie, who resigned last October and then led the vote getting this month when he sought re-election to his own vacancy was refused his seat at Monday's school board meeting. A motion by outgoing trustee Bruce Randall to seat all of the newly-elected candidates except Ritchie carried by a 3-2 vote after a 1V4 hour hassle between board members. Randall, in his motion which was seconded by defeated incumbent Leon Miller, said that his move was not personal but was in the interest of the school district because Ritchie was bringing a nepotism violation with him. In a lengthy oratory before the board, school attorney David Hume said that at the request of the board president, Enrique Jimenez, he had made an exhaustive study of the law and could conclude only that the board would be inviting trouble if they seated Ritchie without first discharging r his nephew from the teaching staff. According to Hume, the move by Ritchie to get back on the board after resigning in order that his nephew could be hired, could only be interputed as a deliberate attempt to evade the nepotism law. Several of the trustees had obtained opinions from private attorneys and a series of exchanges were voiced as each trustee was convinced that he had the correct advise. However, with the support of Randall, Miller and Jimenez, Hume's opinion was upheld and the board voted not to administer the oath of office to Ritchie. Ritchie, present at the meeting, interrupted the meeting at one point and questioned Hume, "Can I be seated? Yes or no?" Hume replied, "Not until we get rid of Michael," referring to his nephew, a migrant teacher. "Either way we go, we will Mayor Resigns At Floresville FLORESVILLE Tex. (AP)Mayor Wilbert Teltschik re- a week election ities and Exchange CommissiorT^feliuestioned with representa- hoped to uncover 90 per cent 'of tivles of all .defendants present permitted tocrossexamine. The resulting depositions can be used as evidence and would shorten the trial. The depositions the bank and stock records which were unavailable prior to the Jan. 15 filing of a civil suit against 28 companies and individuals, including Sharp. The SEC has ordered still more depositions to be taken in Houston, starting April 26, after examination of the documents. About 45 individuals are due to be questioned, including political figures and their associates who will be asked for sworn testimony in Austin. A number gave affidavits late last year and are due further examination. These steps are in preparation for trial of the SEC's suit seeking a permanent injunction against what it alleges are illegal dealings in insurance stocks. The case is set for Aug. 30before U.S. Dist. Judge Sarah T. Hughes in Dallas. The SEC got only about "one- tenth of the records we sought" in preparation for a preliminary injunction last February, a spokesman said, "so we are now beginning the civil discovery process to get the rest." Asked to produce documents for SEC examination Tuesday are Sharpstown Realty Co., Oak Forest Realty Co. and Oak Forest Investment Co., all Sharp-owned firms named defendants in the stock fraud suit. They were asked to bring copies of all books, records, cash receipts, canceled checks, stock transfer records and other documents in dealings since October, 1967 with four Sharp controlled firms—National Bankers Life Insurance Co. of Dallas, Olympic Life Insurance Co. of Fort Worth, Master Control, Inc., of Dallas and RIC International Industries, Inc., of Dallas. T' All but RIC, which is in bankruptcy proceedings, were named also can be used to question persons outside the Northern Judicial District of Texas and to submit their testimony as evidence during the trial. Only defendants can be subpoenaed to testify at the trial. The procedure being followed will allow depositions to be taken for the testimony of such Austin residents as Gov. Preston Smith, House Speaker Gus Mutscher Jr. and State Rep. W. S. Heatly of Paducah. InHouston, depositions willbe taken next month from these others outside the Northern District: Astronauts Alan LaVern Bean, Thomas Kenneth MAP A Plans New Boycott at Uvalde Olio UVALDE,Tex. (AP)-A Mexican - American parents group, seeking changes in the Uvalde school system for the past year, says it will urge a one-day boycott of classes here Wednesday. The date marks the first anniversary of a walkout that lasted for six weeks through the end of school and involved as many as 600 Mexican-American pupils. The boycott plans were disclosed Monday night after the school board refused to hear demands originally presented by the Mexican-American parents' association a year ago. Answer to Previout PuzxU ACROSS supply 1 Train track 42 Months (ab.) S Office holders 43 View 8 Rich fabric 44 Sign of the 12 Within zodiac (comb, form) 47 Surgical saw 13 Female rabbit 51 Morally 14 Afghan prince corrupt 15 Brew 16 Sea eagle 17 Vocalize 18 Armed fleet 20 Hurls 22 Metal cymbals of Trains Collide At Round Rock India 23 Fish 24 Manliest derision 27 Pronoun 31 Meadow 32 Hasten 33 Celtic Neptune 34 Social insect 35 Building addition 36 Feminine name (var.) 37 Hollow receptacles 40 Reserve. 52 American humorist (1850-96) 54 Musical quality 55 Memorandum 56 New Zealand bird 57 Pseudonym of Charles Lamb 58 Golf mounds 59 Writing fluid 60 Freedom from activity DOWN 1 Biblical character 2 Biblical name 3 Newspaper paragraph 4 Ligulate (bot.) 5 Utopian 6 Correlative of neither 7 Sentry 8 Young girls 9 Friends (Fr.) 10 Excavation. for ore 11 Units of energy 19 Bengalese timber tree 21 Poem 24 Certain European 25 Hawaiian bird 46 Arachnid 26 Consumes 48 Upright food 27 Lubricates 28 Patron saint of sailors 29 Shakespear- ean king ' 30 Unrestrained 32 Capital of Finland 38 Bestows approval 39 Geological time division 40 Indian weight 41 Seesaw 43 Meat cut 44 Gentleman (ab.) 45 Cry of bacchanals Trustees said they could not discuss the demands since they are involved in a $150,000 suit against the school board. The demands seek such changes as bilingual education. Earlier Monday in Del Rio, U.S. Dist. Judge John Wood Jr. setaJune 1 hearing on the suit, which was filed last August as a class action on behalf of the boycotting pupils. "I don't have time to go out and manage the schools," the judge said. "I wish the attor-. neys in this case would try to settle'this thing among themselves." He ordered the plaintiffs to file a motion stating more precisely the complaints against the school board. Olga Rodriguez, speaking for .the parents after the school board meeting here Monday night, stressed that the boycott would be for one day only. All sympathetic pupils willbe asked to stay out of school, she said. "We haven't lost hope," Mrs. Rodriguez said. "We want'to talk about it and would be willing to settle out of court if the board will discuss the matter." Ne wly e lee ted board pres ident Garvis Marsh said, "There's nothing we can do as long as it (the suit) is in federal court. We cannot discuss it." The suit claims the board failed to hold a fair hearing on the demands. School officials denied this. signed Monday night, after the city council here, Teltschik said he resigned for personal reasons but said he will be acting mayor until the next council meeting in May. Last week's city council election saw the defeat of a faction that had supported Teltschik on a disputed garbage collection tax. Three new city councilmen, representing a group called the United Citizens of Floresville, were sworn in during Monday's meeting. The United Citizens group had opposed the tax. have a lawsuit," explained the attorney—Michael Ritchie has been offered a new one year contract and could bring suit against the district if they fired him to make room for Charlie Ritchie. On the other hand, Charlie Ritchie indicated that he would bring suit if he were refused his place on the board. In other questions to Hume, Ritchie asked, "What is my next move now, do 1 file against the school board or what?" indicating that he would pursue the case in the courts. Following the debate and the seating of newly-elected trustees Anacleto Vidaurri and Steve Lynn, President Enriquo Jimenez was ousted from the presidency as the new members, all considered Ritchie supporters, elected John Lettinuch to succeed him. Lynn was elected vice-president and Danny Acosta, a staunch Ritchie backer, was re-elected as secretary. After taking the'president's seat, Lettinuch closed the meeting by saying, "Let's let this thing stand until we see where we stand and' hope Mr. Ritchie withholds from filing anything." Another meeting has been set for April 19 at which the new board is expected to try to seat Ritchie without firing nephew Michael Ritchie. TRUE VALUE TRUE VALUE TRUE VALUE TRUE VALUE PLAN A COOL SUMMER Heat's Already On New heat records have been set this year and prospects are for record heat all summer. LET FRIEDRICH COOL IT FOR YOU -a^&fiHSa FRIEDRICH PRICES START AT $ 195 » II u F riedrich ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS 25 Models from 6,000 to 33,000 B.T.U. UJSSELL HARDWARE 775-3502 506 E. Gibbs TRUE VALUE TRUE VALUE TRUE VALUE TRUE VALUE standard 49 Cuckoo blackbirds 50 Tidy 53 Oriental coin ROUND ROCK, Tex. (AP) Two freight trains smashed together Monday night and wreckage blocked the Missouri Pacific Railroad tracks here this morning. An explosion and fire followed the pileup, which knocked 11 cars off the rails and left some Texas Soldier Killed in War WASHINGTON (AP) '4- The Defense Department said Monday that a Texan is one of 18 servicemen on the latest casual- •„..-, . ., , ty list as a result of the fighting tlon. ^ach train carried four projecting more than 30 feet into the air. JoeCarlin,32,saidhe "heard a whistle, then an explosion." After that, he related, "You could hear the box cars piling one on top of the other. Railroad supervisor V.M. Driskill of San Antonio said he was told that a 40-car local freight was supposed to be waiting on a siding and it was struck by a €5-car freight en route from San Antonio to Palestine, i Two crewmen were taken to a Taylor hospital for examina- 12 15 34 13 8 14 10 11 in Indochina. He was Army Sgt. Michael L. Crossley.son of Mrs, lleene C. Tann. 6403 Del Wonte Drive, Houston. men/-' A train hit a car at the same spot here 'six days ago and the crash killed Mart in Anderson, 75,afprmerRoundRock mayor. 37 mmfm* 44 51 55 58 •MM 45 MMW 46 /_ I '" 38 42~ .' 39 '- fnttrptiti Aun.) /i \ \, He whoMias a thing to seB Am} goe$ and whispers in a b not so Apt forget the doBan As he whadfob* a tree and holers. ^fe£B

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