The Baytown Sun from Baytown, Texas on January 11, 1954 · Page 3
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The Baytown Sun from Baytown, Texas · Page 3

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Baytown, Texas
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Monday, January 11, 1954
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Page 3
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Scientists Study Mars 1 'Life Planet To Be Nearest To Us In 13 Years Japan s Merchant Fleet Comes Back THE BAYTOWN, SON. MONDAY. JANUARY, ' l 9S4r~ Amateur Uranium Hunters A re Giving Up 1 > . (i ' < • 4v * • " a i ' Parlor-Trained Geopriysicists Come Home Disillusioned WASHINGTON, Jan. 11 —UP— In June, Mars will be 40 million seen with a powerful telescope. The age-old quesfinto whether life miles from the earth, thp nearest From polar caps that vary in size exists on Mars-thered planet- in 13 years. It will be close to the Uh Martian seasonSi huge dark will b« carried on this year by a horizon m North America but dir- 1nnra ~> special expedition to BloemJfonten, ectly over the star gazers. areas extend toward South Africa, the National Geo- One goal is a more exact meas- equator. These TOKYO, Jan. 11;—TO— Japan's war-crippled merchant fleet recovered considerably during the past eight years, but there is still a the nlanet's wide gap between Japan an( * other countries. change over the A recent transportation ministry graphic Society announced Mon- urement of the planet's diameter— years and also with the seasons check showed that Japanese mer- day. about half that of the earth—a_nd although general outlines remain The party will include a team from this a better understanding relatively fixed. of astronomers from the society of Mars' internal makeup. Another The seasonal changes are be- and the Lowell Observatory, Flag- is an investigation of the "blue en- lived to reflect vegetation which staff, Ariz. Its findings will later velope" that clouds the planet's once was thought to be giant lakes be co-ordinated with those of the surface when picture are made O r seas. In 1877, the Italian International Mars Committee by blue light. astronomer Schicparelli claimed formed last year to take observa- By red light the cloud is pene- he had discovered faint lines which tions from all the major continents, trated and surface details may be h e called "canals" or "channels." This gave rise to the implication that they may Have, been dug by intelligent beings. Dr. E. C. Slipher, Lowel Observatory Martian expert, will lead Liquidation Of PAD Is Taking Some Time By HARRY WILSON SHARPE the'oil arid gas division resume WASHINGTON.'Jan. 11'—UP— on its pre-Korean basis. '"" Liquidation of.the Petroleum Ad- This means it would, have the work at Bloemfontein. He will use the 27-inch refracting telescope of the Lamorit-Hussey Observatory there, most powerful 'in the South- emloration no ; Geo g raph ' ic p res ident • Dr. Gil- chant marine tonnage, which;,was 1,300,000 gross tons at the time of the surrender-in. 1945, rose al-. st fhree times to 3,030,000 gross figure is 78 per cent of the 3,900,000 gross tons possessed by Japan in 1934-36 and 54 per cent of the 1940 peak of 5,600,000 tons. However, the total of ship bottoms held by the United States increased to 25,040,000 tons in 1952 from 9,340,000 tons in .1939 and Panamanian, registered ships regr- istered a rise to 3,610,000 tons from 720,000 jover the,:saihe: period; ..... Japanese vessels, including tankers, carried to and from Japan in 1952 a total .of ,.12,400,000 tons of which imports totaled ; 10,800,000., This is only 49 per cent (36 per Retired General Raps Pentagon 'Oligarchy' — .* . . —^ , . . . , -^ .-TM' • j. * ; vacusi ct wuiu jrieoiucuL ±JL. VJIA- ministration. ; for Defense, which power,- such as .PAD s, to issue bert Grosvpnoi- said the 100-inch kept government relations with the directives nor could it interfere in te i esc o De a t,Mo"nt Wilson and the = ent for imports-.and. 20 per: cent oil and .gas industries on a har- contacts between, the oil industry 200-inch Hale "big eye" at Palo- for exports) of the average of 25,- monious'keel during the Korean and other federal-agencies such as mar j n California also will be *00,000 tons (imports .17,200,000 and war, is taking more time than ex- the State, Defense and Treasury turned on Mars at intervals during exports 8,200,000 tons) carried dur- .pected,; it was: disclosed Monday. : Departments. tn year ' '•• ing the 1934-36 period. ..When,'finally abolished, PAD's . It would confine its job to policy • • ' . ' duties,; tout not .its arbitrary pow- and administrative matters and ers,.,will;be taken over by the K- serve as "a channel 'of commuhi- terior. Department's oil and gas di- cation" between the industry, and vision. .The powers will die as PAD the government ; : .'•'-• 'died.. They, will include authority to -Meanwhile, the old 21-man Mil. .allocate scarce, oil and gas field itary Petroleum. Advisory Board : goods and to impound for the mil- would be revived and the Foreign ."itary,,.whatever products "were es- Petroleum S u p p ly Committee ''''•'sential to the national defense. would continue operations.'These Deputy PAD Administrator Jo-: are th e main obstacles to closing WASHINGTON, Jan. 11 .—(IP)— character assassination culminat- seph A. LaFortune moved swiftly down PAD because they involve Brig. Gen. W en d e H Westover ing in their dismissal or transfer." to close the agency's doors after legal issues which must.be made (Ret.).; charged Monday that a He asserted that the objective the Korean war ended, but his Jan. clear before the transfer can go "hidden oligarchy" in the Penta- of this "coterie" was to "perpetu- 1 target date bumped into so many through. gori is costing the taxpayers $4 bil- ate their . autonomy as empire obstacles he'had to move it back Both the MPAB, and-the FPSC lion a year in waste by blocking builders.'' .-..•' to February. Even that may ex--would be composed of qualified oil adoption of a single supply cata- In its editorial, the association tend into March. industry leaders to advise on "mil- logue for the Armed Serives. magazine said that "Ike's lieuten- As of now it appears the. Na- itary aspects" of oil and gas and He made the charges in an ar- ants in the Pentagon have been tional Petroleum Council's recom- to keep tabs on worldwide supply tide written for the Reserve Of- .captured bv the service politicians mendations for .closing the agency problems. • fleers Association magazine which who have opposed successfully to will be adopted. This is up to Sec- Most, likely candidate to head, the gave them its editorial endorse- date the development and use of retary of th e Interior Douglas Me- oil and gas division is H. A. Stew- ment and urged th e taxpayers to a single language of supply." kay. In the past he has followed art, pre-war head of the agency r is e up.in protest. • NPC suggestions, and present deputy assistant to Gen. Westover said there is .within the Defense Department "an unnamed coterie ,of military bureaucrats" who, 'to • perpetuate their behind-the-throne power, are willing to impale the people of our country on the barbarous sword of military autocracy." . A Senate Armed Services subcommittee held hearings in single- By CLAIRE COX NEW YORK, Jan. 11 -(&— Discouraged amateur uranium hunters have decided to call it a day and are leaving the 'rush for atom-age riches to the experts, a physicist who helped set off the bis scramble reported Monday, Parlor-trained would-be geophysicists who rushed over hill and dale with geiger counters, lunch pails and reams of glory have come home disillusioned, he said. They've decided it is more fun to go fishing after all — even if all the big ones get away. Meyer H. Reiss, a physicist who quit government atomic energy work to go into the nuclear age equipment business, sold thousands of geiger counters during the uranium rush of '1949. ; - •' • He persuaded manufacturers to turn out a S49.50 model, and would- be prospectors bought them at department .store sporting goods counters. The uranium h u n t e r s tramped miles and miles over, barren countrysides, hopefully listening, for a geiger. lick that/could mean millions of dollars. " But, Rei?s reported, about all "they got was sore feet and silence, so they have given up. They've put their geiger counters in the attic or given them to junior to play atom age scientist with. Reiss is president of Hadiac and two affiliated companies, Atomc Center for Instruments and equp- ment and Atomlab, Inc. The companies manufacture and distribute equipment for hospital atomic research laboratories and other nuclear scientific work. "The first ones who rushed to buy geigcr counters were looking to be millionaires," Reiss said. "They were buying a toy with a SIO.OCC prize dangling from it if they found the holy grail. The government offered $10,000 to:anyone who found uranium; "The.people who are looking now at least have done a little reading up on the subject,'but most of, them are 'trained for. : prospecting. It still isn't too .-expensive, even' with 'a $100'.geiger counter, because' that's, all, a person needs to start "Then,-after a strike is made, the geologists can come in with their $20,000 equipment and verify it. ' - , " ' ' "What started out as an oddity became a popular novelty and now it is taking its place as a serious prospecting tool.", Reiss admitted_ he dabbled • in uranium prospecting 1 once, himself. "I satisfied my own supressed desire and went down to a spring in Virginia where i»e water is known to be slightly radioactive," he said. "I actually was on a business trip but happened to have,my geiger county with me and stopped to check. "I came across some hot areas, but did not have time to stop. I understand there was a very valuable strike in that'area afterward. It makes .me feel certain I was on the right Glaciers Disappearing YOSBM3TE NATIONAL PARK; Calif. —(W—Officials here revealed that the several glaciers in the park -are .geting smaller despite the heavy snowfall of the past few years. " '-'\ Innocent'' -•FORT S WORT%, < ' NJ ~ f \^-f * *t. • along-the "streetTnilnding her own business, 'when' "tjfo e»nj|jj,colUde«i at an ' intersection.; She/Wai < the only casualty, being kno-ckechJown by a door 'that flew off 'one of the vehicles. 0 HAS1Y SYRUP AT 900 N. MAIN PURE FLORIDA RIBBON CANE CALL ED HASTY The coun-cil has proposed that LaFortune. President Drops Universal Military Training As Issue Wild Turkey Man Keeps Sales Secret By JOHN W. PINNEY the President, met immediate con- catalogue proposals in-1952 and directed the Pentagon to adopt a WASHINGTON, Jan. 11 —(IB— gressional opposition. President Eisenhower . has elimi- Under the'proposed UMT plan, single-supply system. Secretary of nated Universal. Military Training the first 100,000 18-year-old trainees Defense Charles E. Wilson told a as an. issue in'the present Congress. would be sent to camp not later press conference last fall that the by ordering it sidetracked until the than Jan. 1, 1955, for six months Job is so big that it will require military reserve program is thor- training, followed by 7% years in months of time and cost millions ougly revamped, it was announced the military reserves. • Monday. Flemming's report was ordered Defense Mobilizer Arthur S. to determine if the nation has of dollars. Westover asserted that 15 supply in BELLEFONTE, Pa., Jan. 12 OP) —Ernest N, Latham of Julian, Pa., raises wild turkeys—and never reveals a sale. Latham raised about 500 wild turkeys in 1953—mainly for sportsmen's clubs which liberate them on their own grounds. But he also sells them, discreetly to hunters who want to make sure of a kill. Most such hunters stake their purchase and shoot It. Flemming disclosed Mr. Eisenhow- enough manpower 'dr'St tagon alone This also was brought e ine present m andTaW system ana saia — J.v--.".»*i»*j-, VUUU**'>-<V.U. *l*-fc • .l^*M>r *•••••' -• •-««'-'«^U. J.UU.l*t^W '• >-i "U * L*ll IMlti <^J- UA U ., ^^ _ . . fn| n\tf hlltlff'TIP'' er's stand when he released his and UIvrT simultaneously. Flem- °^ e ^ ntH ^ a & 0 f whi°ch oaried the bird over his Moulder, recommendations to the president mmg and his committee on man- government reorganization wnicn for a complete overhauling of the power resources for national secur- sai d billions _ of dollars m waste nation's military reserve forces to ity also were directed to review the f. nd duplication could be saved key them to "an age of peril." problem of proper distribution of tnrou gh a one-catalogue system. Mr. Eisenhower accepted Flem- manpower between the military ming's suggestion that it would be a n d industry in event of war. premature to consider starting With the size of the armed forces UMT until "fundamental decisions" to be cut to about three million have been made on what kind of men starting next year. Flemming reserve forces are needed for full said there is "adequate manpow- or partial mobilization. er" for a UMT program of 100,000 Like UMT, the problem of main- m ™ annually- He suggested, how- taining active, healthy and well- ever - that until there is "a deter- trained reserve forces has been un- mination of the size, composition der congressional study in every an d training of our reserve forces, session for years. . we hold in abeyance any decision Flemming told the President cur- °" the recommendations" for a unscrupulous or ruth- campaign of he sold a certain hunter a turkey, ho says: "I don't recall any such incident. If a. man buys a wild turkey from me, that'i his business." The pupil of a tiger's eye J* rertical while that of «. lion i* horizontal. ROOM AND BOARD By Gene Ahern rent reserve forces are not "adequately organized and trained to meet the needs of a national emergency." The National Security Training Commission recommended to Mr. Eisenhower in December that UMT be started as soon as possible, run- program. Northwestern Sets Up Traffic Center tions, drawn up at the request of THE "EXTRA-RELIEF" MEDICINE ATTACKS All COLD SYMPTOMS AT ONE TIME;. IN LESS TIME "Ho ordinary pain-reliever csn make this claim . . . but 666 can. The 666 formula contains a combination of prescription- type ingredients not found in any other cold medicine. For that "extra" relief try 666 liquid or tablets. Remember . . . 666 docs more became it has more. [11., Jan. 11 —HP)— Northwestern University has established a national Transportation Center featuring a. program aimed at the solution of major problems in the nation's transportation industry. The center, a joint undertaking of the university's school of commerce, technological institute and traffic Institute, will carry on a program of research, uncfergrad- uate tarining and graduate study of problems in the highway, rail, air, pipeline and water divisions of transportation. The center was established because, in the words of the university's president, J. Roscoc Miller, "transportation has become increasingly complex and has created many unsolved problems—economic, technical and social." New Historical Group Plans To Rebuild Forts * FOGHORN* MAS GROSSLY VIOLATED THE RULES OF SOCIAL ETIQUETTE BY LONG OVERSTAYING HIS VISIT AND \TS TIME NOW FOR HIM TO GO/ •••I CANT BRING MYSELF TO TELLING HIM ABRUPTLY TO LEAVE, ON ACCOUNT OF OUR, KINSHIP-SO MAYBE YOU CAN SUGGEST A WAY. ROBIN.' THAT GUY IS HARDER. 1 TO REMOVE THAN A TATTOOED EAGLEA"• GtVE ME TIME TO THINK IT OVER.AND I'LL COME UP WITH SOMETHING, BUT NOT AS ROWDY AS GIVING "HIM THE BOUNCER'S DRAG AND BOOT/ IN IS THE HOUSE IDEA MAN DAILY CROSSWORD FORT ANN, N. Y.. Jan. 11 Restoration of thn last several colonial and Revolutionary War forts which gave this community its name is being planned by a newly organized historical associatoin- The group, to be called Fort Ann Restoration, Inc., has taken a 99- year lease on the original site. Work of remodeling the building into a museum will be completed by May. Authorities are seeking Revolutionary relics or Indian artifacts for the museum. They are also hunting old letters, books or documents dating back to Revolutionary times. New 54 DODGE NOW ON DISPLAY of your iworby Dodg* (footer's ACROSS I. Short haircut 4. Protuberances 9, Poem 10. Ooze out 11. Cartridges •without bullet* 13. Force 15. Old Dutch (abbr.) 16. Obtains 18. Sailor (slang) 19, Republic north of Palestine (poss.) ?.2. Toward 23. External seed coating 24. Knocked 26. Meshed fabric 28. Letter of the alphabet 29. Goes by 32. American Indian 35. Gold (Her.) 36. Stimulating 38. Sphere •40. River (Afr.) •41. Decigram (abbr.) •42. Kind of fuel 44. One's mother's brothers 46. Sailing vessel 45. Marshy meadow 49. Gull-like 1 birds 60. Ever (poetj DOWN J.More courageous 2. Harem room t. Native of Bengal *. Wise old counselor 5. Farm animal 6. Imperfect bomb 7. Prepare for publication 8. Legislative body 11. Missile weapon 12. Know (Scot.) 34. walked 17. Brittle cookie 20. Storage cribs 21. A public show 25. Persian fairy 27. Topic 29. Raised deck on a ship 30. Apprehenu 31. Ducks 33. To make dear i-u. Saturday's An«w«r 34. Ova 37. Tavern 39. Large bundle 43. High, craggy hilt 45. Sheltered side 47. Upon IS 19 2.9 35 36 41 30 Zo 2.b 39 Ib Sfe 12. Zl 40 4T 10 20 n 1} Z\ T.Z SO Ib 25 45 6 Zi 41 Vt ® 701 N. ALEXANDER DRIVE- OPtsC AM. to 8 P.M. 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