Estherville Daily News from Estherville, Iowa on February 2, 1972 · Page 1
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Estherville Daily News from Estherville, Iowa · Page 1

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Estherville, Iowa
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Wednesday, February 2, 1972
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Inflation, Taxes J ent st Wage Earners Lose Buying'Power NEW YORK (AP) - Wages and salaries have been so seriously depreciated by higher taxes and inflation that breadwinners who gained increases of up to 30 per cent over the past six years may have actually lost buying power, the Tax Foundation says. Five base incomes analyzed by the private, nonprofit foundation show that in the six-year span a 30 per cent increase in dollar pay resulted in a decrease in "real" pay. Dr. Elsie Waters, senior re­ search administrator for the New York-based organization, said economists and tax people "are considerably concerned by the trend. They are focusing on whether they will ever be able to control government spending. It seems to have run away." The Tax Foundation based its calculations on a family of four, with one person working. A 30 per cent increase in a salary of $10,000 in 1966 would be worth $13,000 today. How much is it worth in buy­ ing power now? Actually $156 less, according to the foundation, which deducted $745 as the increase in taxation in that period, and $2,411 deducted as the inflation bite. This represented a 1% per cent decline in purchasing power. A raise in salary from $20,000 in 1966 to $26,000 in 1972, less the $4,596 inflation bite and the $1,722 increase in taxation, resulted in a net loss of $318 in buying power, the foundation said. A raise in salary from $30,000 to $39,000 in 1972 minus the $3,244 increase in taxes and the $6,523 deducted for inflation, resulted in a net loss of $767, or 2% per cent less in purchasing power. Dr. Waters blamed the loss of purchasing power on escalating inflation and rising state and Social Security taxes. "State and local taxes are going up faster than federal taxes," she said. "From 1965 to 1970 these taxes rose by 12 per cent a year, which doubles them every six years. In that same period consumer spending was up 7 per cent, and the gross national product was up 7 per cent." Dr. Waters said that 30 per cent was a "conservative" estimate of salary and wage increase since 1966. "But the figures make It quite clear that you would have had to get increases of at least 35 per cent in that period to just stay even in terms of buying power," she said. The Forecast AILY NEWS 104th YEAR; NO. 85 Estherville, Iowa, 51334, WedMiday, February 2, 1972 WEEK, 60c; COPY, 15c Meet Dolliver's 'Big George' Fifth graders (from the left) Susan Olney, Becky Pierson and Tim Hendrickson learn anatomy in a unique way. See story on page 8. Iowa Senate Trapped In Teen Rights Fight List Draft Numbers DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) Galleries in the Iowa Senate were packed, with mostly high morning as the Senate started debate on a bill to grant majority rights at age 18. Just before the session started, the Senate Schools Committee drafted an amendment to the measure to allow school districts to prohibit possession of beer or liquor by students on school property, at school functions or on the way to and from school. A roomful of high school students looked on as the committee approved die measure that would allow school boards to expel students who had alcoholic beverages in their possession on school property or at school functions. The bill, passed by the House 90-4 after only a few hours debate Jan. 13, now sets the drinking age at 18— same as other majority rights, responsibilities and privileges. But a strong movement has begun in the Senate to change the minimum drinking age to 19— when most Iowans have completed high school. Sen. Harold Thordsen, R-Davenport, who has been keeping a count of supporters for making the drinking age 19, said late Tuesday that his position the Methodist said in a statement that was to be delivered now has 29 supporters—three more than needed to pass it. *w to each Senator Wednesday. The secc ze— The Methodists contend there ^rjam ^admi^ number Is subject to cl either way. "I'm all for young people taking part in government. But when it comes to alcohol— that's different," Thordsen said. "Many of the 18-year-olds are still in high school and still go tag with 15-, 16-and 17-year-old kids," Thordsen said. Lt. Gov. Roger Jepsen also is supporting changing the drinking age to 19. But Gov. Robert Ray says he prefers staying with 18 and giving privileges at the same time as responsibilities. The House had the bill— which would allow 18-to 21- year-olds full rights to marry without parents consent, sign contracts and enter certain professions— on its calendar only a few days before it took the measure up. But the delay in the Senate has given opponents of various portions of the bill time to group their forces and make their feelings known to the senators. The latest group to begin pressuring the Senate is the United Methodist Church. "We are in full accord with legislation granting voting rights to 18-year-old citizens," are dangers in allowing 18- year-olds to make sales contracts and allowing them the free use of alcoholic beverages. The Methodists also fear there would be a possible loss of support for children receiving Aid to Dependent Children under the bill. "We are very concerned for the well-being of those young persons who, because of their lack of business experience, could be victimized by unscrupulous business practices and having no recourse," the statement says. The Methodists favor retaining 21 as the legal drinking age. Sen. Lee Gaudineer, D-Des Moines, a member of the Senate State government Committee and author of a number of the committee's amendments to the House-passed bill, says the bill does not mention ADC and would not make changes in those support payments. But Gaudineer says he fears the bill would make similar "undesirable" changes. Many of the amendments to the bill recommended by the Senate State Government Committee are designed to protect wards of the state who have not yet completed high school. Those amendments are drawn up to allow youths in state childrens homes or who are placed with foster families by the state to continue to receive state aid until they have completed high school or similar vocational training. WASHINGTON (AP) - Today's draft lottery, for men who reach their 19th birthday this year, may be the last of the Vietnam war era. Coming at least 11 months before most of those selected could be drafted, the drawing will give some idea of their chances. The callup is expected to be far under the lottery no. 125 reached this year. The Nixon administration is aiming for an all-volunteer army by June 30, 1973, when current draft authority expires. this fourth draft lottery, per- GOVERNOR RAY Governor Ray To Attend Sports Fest Governor Robert Ray will be on hand for a number of the Estherville Winter Sports Festival activities, according to Bob Knox, executive vice president of the Chamber of Commerce. The governor will arrive at the Estherville airport at 11 a.m. Saturday and will leave at 4 p.m. It is hoped he will be on hand to present the Governor's Cup to the top college ski team that afternoon. An itinerary for the governor is being planned today. haps the last in the Vietnam war era that will actually draft men, mated No. 319 to men born Oct. 11, 1953. Nov. 24 was drawn from a red capsule and No. 180 from a blue capsule on the third match of a ceremony in the Commerce Department auditorium that is expected to last about two hours. The lottery decides the sequence of the call to military service in 1973, at least until July 1 of the year when the current draft authority expires, esident Nixon has pledged to Hre -a aero draft "by then and make another extension of the draft unnecessary. For today's drawing the birthdates were placed in big red capsules and the numbers in blue ones. Each color group then went into giant plexiglass drums in a scrambled sequence. The drums were rotated to mix the capsules even further. The selection plan called for a red and blue capsule to be pulled from the drums simultaneously and handed to two announcers to open them and read the papers— first the birth- date, then the number of call. Every eligible man will keep the number assigned to his birthdate for as long as he is exposed to possible selection. Those in previous lotteries will retain their numbers until they pass from the ranks of the eligible. Following are the birth dates and matching numbers in today's draft lottery in the order in which they were picked: Sept. 23: 296 April 12: 23 Oct. 28: 327 May 22: 333 Jan. 31: 240 April 9: 234 Aug. 10: 249 Aug. 3: 3 Feb. 6: 271 Oct. 2: 128 Aug. 15: 241 March 29: 21 Feb. 5: 96 May 5: 292 Nov. 18: 160 March 27: 181 March 19: 358 Jan. 23: 258 March 15: 152 Dec. 5: 31 Jan. 19: 303 Dec. 18: 13 Aug. 28: 40 Nov. 29: 147 March 28: 45 Jan. 9: 197 April 1: 12 Oct. 23: 193 July 13: 306 April 7: 163 July 9: 179 Sept. 19: 228 July 12: 340 Feb. 4: 68 Jan. 10: 37 Nov. 19: 270 June 6: 87 Feb. 18: 11 July 18: 121 Aug. 24: 138 April 25: 255 Jan. 1: 150 April 15: 343 June 22: 146 Sept. 18: 289 Sept. 8: 97 Jan. 13: 298 March 2: 322 June 3: 245 Jan. 17: 231 Feb. 14: 348 March 24: 71 Feb. 26: 51 Jan. 25: 243 Sept. 2: 17 July 19: 332 Sept. 2004^ March 23: 22 Feb. 8: 347 July 3: 109 Sept. 22: 268 July 2: 297 Dec. 8: 210 July 7: 285 Aug. 29: 84 Jan. 6: 36 March 22: 317 May 12: 115 July 4: 92 Sept. 10: 217 Jan. 26: 311 June 2: 360 Dec. 23: 252 June 4: 207 April 2: 108 May 20: 274 Oct. 26: 78 May 1: 58 July 23: 365 Feb. 28: 295 Dec. 27: 194 Aug. 18: 113 May 17: 273 May 19: 148 Dec. 10: 73 March 25: 65 June 24: 61 Sept. 9: 364 April 18: 242 Nov. 2: 214 July 31: 253 July 10: 89 July 14: 305 Jan. 14: 341 Aug. 9: 7 .July 2&; 35 June 21: 315 Nov. 6: 211 June 9: 83 Jan. 12: 126 April 20: 314 Jan. 20: 161 Dec. 24: 155 March 4: 47 Aug. 21: 30 March 13: 244 Nov. 14: 237 July 29: 222 Dec. 12: 85 March 18: 357 Oct. 7: 129 May 21: 310 April 13: 169 March 14; 117 Feb. 17: 46 Jan. 5: 338 Nov. 13: 124 March 8: 153 Nov. 10: 257 Jan. 28: 304 Aug. 14: 205 June 28: 53 April 14: 81 Feb. 7: 154 May 23: 216 Aug. 27: 34 Aug. 22: 140 July 27: 60 Aug. 11: 125 Aug. 5: 63 Oct. 22: 191 Aug. 2: 27 May 28: 18 Feb. 9: 136 Nov. 7: 299 March 21: 300 June 8: 282 Oct. 12: 171 June 20: 77 Aug. 19: 105 June 12: 190 Feb. 12: 195 Oct. 9: 116 July 11: 202 Nov. 23: 320 May 10: 100 April 23: 279 Aug. 8: 131 June 7: 251 Dec. 4: 250 Sept. 21: 123 Dec. 15: 137 Nov. 16: 209 Dec. 3: 56 Dec. 25: 6 Dec. 2: 90 Jan. 27; 110 May 31: 67 July 5: 139 Dec. 21: 80 May 30: 48 Aug. 16: 19 May 13: 49 Sept. 12: 43 June 30: 142 May 11: 307 Nov. 15: 176 April 28: 55 Sept. 4: 356 Oct. 31: 10 July 26; 204 June 18: 238 Dec. 7: 267 June 10: 178 Jan. 2: 328 July 28: 185 Feb. 3: 54 Sept. 30: 184 March 7: 2 Sept. 14: 353 April 21: 4 Sept. 27: 248 July 20: 33 Oct. 1: 215 Feb. 11: 26 Oct. 3: 103 April 11: 350 Feb. 27: 186 Dec. 28: 156 Feb. 19: 127 Jan. 4: 28 May 18: 98 March 30: 213 Nov. 8: 312 (Please turn March 6: 1 Sept. 25: 291 Jan. 11: 174 Sept. 29: 196 June 1: 15 Dec. 20: 149 Dec. 14: 38 June 14: 95 May 24: 246 May 6: 337 Feb. 13: 263 Nov. 4: 339 July 22: 286 April 4: 280 April 24: 362 July 15: 359 Jan. 29: 283 Aug. 30:182 May 27: 293 Oct. 30: 346 Oct. 13: 269 May 8: 201 March 17: 363 Nov. 3: 232 Sept. 11: 334 Aug. 4: 313 Aug. 20: 162 Sept. 6: 173 Jan. 21: 99 July 24: 324 May 2: 275 Dec. 11: 82 Dec. 29: 175 March 31: 326 Aug. 23: 302 Aug. 31: 218 June 19: 52 July 21: 5 to Page 3) Install Pastor at Trinity Predicts Early Spring This is Groundhog Day when the friendly woodchuck emerges from his burrow and tells about things to come, weatherwise. Not seeing his shadow this morning, he decided there would be an early spring, a point disputed by some forecasters. The above picture shows, not a friendly woodchuck, but a standin who arrived Groundhog Day Eve to discuss the matter with the News editor. The envoy is real'y a badger that was apparently trapped in the area and mysteriously found his way to the news desk. He predicted the heavy snow that fell Tuesday night and this morning. (Daily News photo by Woodchuck Ostheimer) The Rev. Paul L. Wiegman will be installed as the pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church Sunday, Feb. 6, at the 9:30 a.m. worship service. Dr. Raynold J. Lingwall, president of the Iowa Synod of the Lutheran Church in America, will deliver the sermon and conduct the Service of Installation. The Rev. Mr. Wiegman and his wife, Linda, come from North Platte, Neb., where he has served as assistant pastor of the First Lutheran Church since July 1, 1969. Pastor Wiegman received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Midland Lutheran College in Fremont, Neb., and his Master of Divinity degree from Northwestern Lutheran Seminary in St. Paul. While in North Platte, he was active in the Ministerial Union, Rotary International, and served as Dean of the North Platte Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. A coffee hour will follow the service. PAUL WIEGMAN Sept. 26: 29 Oct. 11: 319 Nov. 24: 180 Aug. 12: 198 Jan. 3: 42 Oct. 14: 14 Sept. 15: 235 Feb. 1: 112 Nov. 17: 284 April 30: 69 Sept. 16: 225 Sept. 24: 236 April 5: 254 Oct. 10: 342 April 6: 88 May 29: 133 Feb. 21: 316 Oct. 8: 157 Jan. 8: 206 Feb. 16: 227 Nov. 21: 287 June 17: 91 Dec. 31: 164 June 11; 64 Nov. 22: 102 Nov. 27: 135 Feb. 20: 106 Feb. 2: 278 May 4: 172 June 27: 330 July 30: 200 March 3: 220 July 17: 199 March 12: 44 Sept. 3: 226 Nov. 20: 301 May 16: 101 Jan. 30: 114 April 22: 264 Nov. 26: 344 March 16: 94 Jan. 16: 309 Aug. 13: 329 Oct. 4: 79 Sept. 28: 70 Jan. 24: 62 May 25: 122 Aug. 25: 290 June 23: 212 Nov. 9: 151 Feb. 24: 261 Nov. 25: 25 Sept. 1: 219 April 27: 265 April 3: 104 June 29: 75 May 9: 276 Nov. 1: 107 Sept. 13: 229 March 10: 331 Jan. 18: 72 Feb. 22: 20 Oct. 29: 349 Dec. 19: 168 June 25: 143 Sept. 17: 189 Feb. 23: 247 Nov. 12: 66 April 10: 272 Oct. 18: 192 June 16: 32 Oct. 20: 352 Dec. 26: 351 Oct. 16: 59 Oct. 27: 325 July 1: 39 Oct. 6: 41 Oct. 5: 86 Dec. 17: 294 Feb. 15: 308 March 9: 321 Nov. 30: 134 April 8: 50 Nov. 5: 223 Feb. 25: 260 July 8: 355 Oct. 25: 9 June 13: 318 Dec. 6: 336 March 5: 266 Sept. ?: 144 Jan. 15: 221 In Appreciation Members of the Estherville F.F.A. and Estherville National Guard Unit were presented certificates of appreciation Monday from the Estherville Chamber of Commerce. The National guard assisted the city with 'Keep the Scene Green* week, donating trucks and manpower to assist with the Christmas mail rush, and volunteered to help with other civic or community projects. The F. F. A. operated the car safety check each summer and is assisting with staging for the Concerts of the Estherville Winter Sports Festival. Pictured from left are Doug Pals, High School Vocational Ag Instructor, Mike Evans, F.F.A. President; Bob Knox, Estherville Chamber of Commerce Executive secretary, and SSG Donald Duke, Estherville National Guard. (Daily News Photo by Chuck Ostheimer)

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