The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 15, 1930 · Page 4
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January 15, 1930

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, January 15, 1930
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PACE FOUR THE I1LYTHEVILLK COURIER 'NEWS . THE COUJUW NEWS CO.," PUBLISHERS O. R; BABCOCK, Editor H. W. HAINES, Advertising Manager . Sole; Nilkmal Advertising Representatives: The B«ckw|Uv Sj*c!«l Agency, Inc.. New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Detroit. Kniuas City, Atlanta, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Los Angeles. Published Every Afternoon Except. Sunday. ' • Entered &s • second class matter at the post office it Blythevillt, Arkansas, under act of October 9, 1917. Served by (lie United Press. SUBSCRIPTION KATES By carrier in the city of Blylhcvllle. 15c per ureek or *S.M per year In advance. By mat! within a radius of 50 miles, $3.00 per 'year, $1.60 for six monllis, 85« fo r time monllis; by mall In postal zones two to six. Inclusive, $6.50 per year, In rones seven and clglit. $10.00 per year, payable In advance. Sinking the Battleship The battleship is apparently just about ; ready to embark on its final cruis?. A queer combination of idealism, . changing strategy, economy ami plain common sense seems to be on the verge of scuttling; the so-called "capital ship" forever; and no one need mourn very greatly over the loss. Taking one thing with another, the battleship has been the object of about as much inventive genius and scientific study as any other institution in all . history. More money has been spent to psr- fcct it than has been .spent in the war on cancer. Some of the best minds the world has produced have been devoted to solving the battleship's problems. Great laboratories, as expensive as anything the Rockefeller Foundation ever 'built, have been established for it. . And yet, all in all, the battleship lias advanced human happiness very little. It has been a weapon for destruction. From start to finish it has been a necessary evil; and now thnt \ve arc learning that_it is not quite as necessary as we had supposed, we can give it up \yithout a tear. But no friend of peace has any reason to relax and think that, the abolition of battleships, spefdy or gradual, is going to bring naval warfare to an ' end. It will save everybody a lot of . money—a modern battleship, coats around 335,000,000 and the United • States fleet has 18 of them at this writing—but it will still be quite easy for any Yiation to go sailing gaily into war with 'submarines and cruisers. . The battleship, to be sure, can hit harder than anything else afloat. But an eight-inch shell can do a goodish bit of damage, and a cruisci* that can fling ten of them at a time can break a lot of crockery in the course of an hour's engagement. And you might remember that tho most horrible aspect of the sea fighting in the last war was caused, not by battleships, but by submarines. If battleships arc eliminated it will not be because tli3 rulers of the world have had a great change of heart. It will simply mean that thev have dccid- JMTHEVILLE, (ARK.) COURIER-NEWS OUT OUR WAY cd that I he battleship has grown too expensive to be put up with any longer —and, also, that naval strategists have decided that fleets can fight just about us well without battleship:.. The danger of loinpetitive armament races will remain just as strong as over, if the United SUlos and England, for instance, continue to scan one another's building progruim anxiously, and lay down new auisorn frantically in order to keep from being outbuilt, we shall have another race identical with the Gernian-Knglisii race that led up to 1914, even il' lli-j ships involved are lighter and less cnslly. It will l)i> K<K>I| In sec Ihu battleship go; but we needn't kid ourselves that its abolition, if and when it comes, is any very groat step forward. A Lesson In Civics The sad financial mess in which the city of Chicago Minis itself today is traceable diivclly lo the dismal political entanglements in which the city lias permitted itself to become bound. Kotten politics is not only an offensa to public morality, it is, in the long run, fearfully expensive. Padded payrolls, inefficient management, favoritism and graft arc chickens that eventually come home lo roost. In the last two elections Chicago took steps to restore decent government. Unfortunately, the process is a long a:\fl painful one. Driving out a political gang that is once firmly entrenched takes lime. So does tin; process of recovering from the ills that such a gang always breeds. For the moment there is little that Chicago can do except stew in its own juice. H is paying a high price for an elementary lesson in civics. SIDE GLANCES By George Clark] 3ommlltec. He Is as high a pro- ectlve tariff man as Joe Grmidy rilmself.'He didn't seek Ills scna- :orlal appointment In the place of :h» late Senator Warren, but he likely to run for election now that he h here. Ills fast Irish wit ought to make him \laluabie In Senate debate. "You've got 20,000 sheep," Floor Leader Jim Watson told him tho other day, "so you can't vote on the wool schedules," 'If I had 20.000 more," returned Pat Sullivan, "I wouldn't have been able to buy a ticket to come here." "This stunt doesn't get the hand any more, Joe; we've got to think of a good Scotch joke that will panic 'em." WASHINGTON LETTER By ,RODNEY UUTCHKK NBA Sen-Ice Writer WASHINGTON—Mr. Patrick Sullivan, the new senator from Wyoming, first entered politics in County Cork, centering his activities on the cause of Irish freedom. The last of these activities was the strong for law enforcement. He retains his rich brogue, however, and a fine old Iris3i face which has been described as the answer to a cartoonist's prayer. ,He owns 15,000 of 20,0(10 sheep—once he had 40,000—and is said, to live In (he biggest ALONG MAIN STREET By E. L. H. • January Is about half shot, H wont be long until Valentine day. A Chlckasawba street man acts as if he fell out of a high chair when he was very young. What has become of the old- fashioned boy who wore Ills Dad's discarded trousers? The new 1930 automobiles are mostly long. low. brilliantly colored and handsomely mortgaged. One Blytheville man declares that -lie hasn't heard a good joke In ten years. Just be patient, old boy, and keep reading thLj column. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15.1930 hash Is the connecting link .uclwccn the /animal and vegetable kingdoms. Some girls seem to be quite "kittenish" during courtship then turn out to be regular wildcats afte^ marriage. A celebrated chiropodist In Memphis says that 80 per cent, of the people of Aikansas have flat feet and Buck Unchurch of Possum Creek declares that (he other 20 per cent have flat heads. fact ho recently married, j s chain- 1 picned by his child-wife, 25. i»lio says that lie Is the sweetest niah she ever met and avows she ] him. Skcels is thought to be the oldest bridegroom In the country. He Is a retired railroad man. If you want to know what a woman was wearing at a party Just ask another woman who was there. But always ask a man what she didn't wear. Senator Heflln of Alabama has demanded a probe of the peanut trade. Just suppose Hit investigation .should lead to a probe of the other nuts In the great state of Alabama? It is said that there are 212 different kinds of cheese In the world. And ' some men act like a combination of them all. MANY VEAKS APART LONDON-C.ecrgc Skect. 102, who won't stop working despite the Tiny Wafer, Thin As 1'aper, Stick It On—Shoes . Don't Hurl. OUT COMES CALLOUS !| RESULTS GUARANTEED' The newest In callous removers is a tliln as paper water you press oil the spot with fingers and it sticks there. No dangerous ra/or. burning acid or doughnut parts to add pressure when shoes go "on. Pain stops immediately. Slip on shoes. O-Joy Callous Wafers never fall. Later yo'.i peel otf wafer and ' out comes callous down to -tho 1 healthy skin. 3 O-Joy Callous or ' Bunion Wafers for a quarter at ", druggists. - Adv.—? Adv.-' It is reported that on West Main street woman trusts her husband so implicitly that she thinks .his red nose is caused from the heat from Ills cigars. Some of the pointed dresses the women are now wearing look to me as though a couple of dogs had been chasing them. It is said, that one of Blytheville's most popular young society girls dips her bread in coffee and milk when eating privately at home. Thoughts On Prohibition Shitting the dry unit from the Treasury ile- |iaiUncut to the department of justice will not solve tlic prohibition question. Passing responsibility..Irom one department to another Is merely a demonstration of the familiar practice of passing the buck, Tho law enforcement commission report has been followed by a propos.il tor -the enactment of additional enforcement iiuvs. The general disregard of existing prohibition laws makes the observance of additional laws doubtful. There is no ilcnying that prohibition as n governmental policy Is in n precarious situation. It Is more discussed toduy than it was prior to the adoption of the eighteenth amendment. The public's attitude toward prohibition has no relation to the public's attitude toward other laws. For example, it a man steals an automobile lie may steal money. If lie forges a check, he Is likely to commit some other crime. Many persons who transport or possess liquor would not violate any other law. would not take advantage of another person in business, would not lie or cheat. The violation of prohibition Is no indication that the violator would disregard any oilier law. This dees no; mean that many violators of prohibition laws are no!, also violators of oilier Iaws j but prohibition violation apparently does not lend to disrespect and contempt for other : laws.— Memphis Commercial Appeal. beating up o! a couple of British 118 years he has been one oi ofllcers, after which PatrlBk 'Snlli- most famous and picturesque n van, ry. then 23, left. Ireland in a hur- SPECIAL Cash and Carry Prices January 17-18 Friday and Saturday Only PURINA COW CHOW 24'* Protein $2.55 20'^ Protein 82.45 Feed From Checkerboard Bag "" o . Browne & liillings, Inc. I'hone 76 —and— New Blytheville Coal and Feed Phone 19G Blytheviile, Avk. By Williams Ho landed in New York with $5, worked on the docks until he had saved n little, decided to go to I Butlc, Mom., where he had friends, ound that " he had only enough loncy to reach Rawlings, Wyo., and. a got.on* live train at. Rawlings and titled down. He went to work on a licep ranch, became foreman of no outfit after one year and a mrtner in that sheep business af- er two years. Later the sheep bnsi- less centered in Utah but then "atrlck Sullivan and his partner railed their sheep across the line o Caspar, Wyo.. and that has been its home ever since. Saw Kxciting Kvcnls Those were wide open days in tVyoming and Sullivan sometimes ind to do witli Indians and bail nen, In 18D2 Sullivan ran for the leg- .slature and, once in. stayed 2i years. Once, when he tried for thr state .senate, he hurt a strong opponent. Previously he had never done any campaigning because he everyone and everyone knew- liim. Rut" he got into a good-sired town one night and met a politically important friend, who Invited him to have a drink of whisky out of a bottle. Patrick's eyes observed his opponent's name on a -special on tile bottle. He realized that the passing out of these pints by the opponent late in the campaign might well tip the balance"against him. He smelted the open bottle. "Have you drank any ol this?" lie demanded, and as the friend said he had. asked: "How do you feel?" "Not so good," the man "replied, whereupon Pat grabbed (he bottle nnd smashed it In the street. "Rankest poison" he exclaimed. Thank heaven I found you in time! "That pintfiil would kill a horse You need some good whisky at once. Conic on!" So they went down lo tho best bar in town and Pat bought two drinks of real 25-cent, whisky. "Do you fed better?" he demanded. "Much bolter!" was the reply "Do yon know who gave me that. vile stuff? It was —." "I don't believe it." said Pat "A man like him would never do such n'thlng. Did he lake a drink ot it himself? No? Well, nov Hint's strange." And so the other gent, savei from an imaginary horrible dcall in the nick of time, dashed abou getting others to smash their pint: of perfectly good whisky and per suadtng Ihem that Pat Sullivan wn the right candidate aftrr nil. Si small was his majority that tlv importance of those two drinks o '-5-ccnt whisky was obvious. Pat was a wet in Ihc legislatlv prohibition light;. O:icr, when bone dry banker was s;>cakin(; fron the floor on the evils ot liquor h asked him whether ho had eve taken a drink .and tho banker re plied thnt he had never tastd whisky in his life. "Yon lake my advice; said Pa in n brief speech stiil lamous In Wyoming. "Mid go ov.i en a col< bleak, winter evening .ind drin 15 or 20 Scotch lilghbulK You wi! see the sunny side of life. It wi: take the cobwebs from your brail ! And In all probability v 0:1 will able to see your way'clc.ir so tha you can loan money at less tha 12 per cent." Inasmuch as the t,i;:kcr was th only man in the stato « K o chart? 12 per cent this v,hack was "re imarkably eftective. But today Senator s-.iliivan What has become of the old- fashioned boy who told about all the girls he had kissed? mm CHOWS Calling; attention to the mistakes Watch This Space for WEEKLY SPECIALS Fourth street man says ' Say, what's the matter with my -battery these cold mornings-'-always slow to start or going dead on me?" 'Of course.: re-charging batteries Js my business, but I hate to see them run down so often because ? of motorists standing on their starters instead of using Esso and simply stepping on them." ma [Je by the S<anda rd Oil 0 * cf Icufclwi am! everywhere by dealt [i who dit« ptay Iht "SilndiTd" Karund- Qtck trade.raid. Dbpenxd fro™ the jilvtr pump nich the Cuo ctobe. FOAD MAPS AND INFORMATION FREE Qcfart surti*t [Koi rri?. tdl of At t*x Tcuf [7 Tcwrinj Smvce, SL CJwnfcj AICT**, Now La., for rwjy end txa; Tin 1 i»/of* «**• THE GIANT POWER FUEL

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