Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa on November 7, 1967 · Page 8
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Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa · Page 8

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Carroll, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, November 7, 1967
Page:
Page 8
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Opera Star a Believer in Astrology By HAL BOYLE NEW YORK (AP) - Tom Krause is an opera star who looks to the heavenly stars for career guidance. The brilliant young Finnish baritone, who received an ovation at his Metropolitan Opera debut, this season, is a firm believer in the occult sciences, particularly astrology. "Both my wife and I have studied it for years." he said, "lit may be psychological, it may be hogwash. but I have found that for me it works. It works positively, and it works negatively." Kraute, who said astrology had helped him to give up smoking, tries to arrange his concerts and recordings — he's recognized as possibly the world's finest interpreter of the songs of Sibelius, the Finnish composer — when his horoscope is most favorable. "If that cant be done"-he shrugged — "I go ahead and make the engagement anyhow, but it's likely to be much harder to do it at all." Tom, 33, brown-haired and green-eyed, studied to be a psychiatrist, but gave up a medical career after spending a year taking voice lessons in Vienna. "To find a road to my own essential being, I found I had to become a singer," he said. "It is a good life, but a demanding one. You can't let your voice go to seed, and in the end you become a servant of it. "It is a capricious instrument, affected by humidity, th« psyche, an upset stomach, the people around you. It is affected by everything. You have to do vocal pushups •very day to keep it in condition." An intense, mobile-featured handsome man with an easy sense of humor, Tom speaks six languages, and his expressive hands, busy in gesture as he talks, make up a seventh one. Krause believes his interest in the occult is only an expression of a preoccupation with fantasy and the mystic which is typical among Finns because of their closeness to the wide spaces of nature in their uncrowded homeland. Snow Boat... offers a new twist on the old-fashioned sled this winter. Equipped with two drag brakes for steering and braking, the polyethylene craft is tough enough to withstand a truck being driven over it, according to its manufacturer. Churchwomen Hear Recordings (Tlmnn ITrrnld Ncnvn Service) AUBURN — The lesson at the monthly meetings of the four circles of the United Presbyterian Women was three re- c o r d i n g s. The records and Scripture text of each were: "Getting Christians Beyond the Pew" (I John 12:7-12 and 12:21); "The Aged" (Psalm 71:9-18); and "Idealogical Extremes" (I Corinthians 13:1113). Refreshments were served at the close of each meeting. Circle I, with 14 members and one guest, met with Mrs. Everett Garnatz following the lesson period held at the church Fellowship Hall with Mrs. John Clapper, Mrs. Floyd Finley and Mrs. James Fyfe leading in the discussion. Plans were made for the year's last meeting, at the home of Mrs. Carl Bruns, with a potluck dinner at 12:30. Nine members and one guest of Circle II met at the Fellowship Hall for their business meeting. Mrs. Forrest Presley read from "The Mission Yearbook of Prayer", and presided over the business. The last meeting for 1967 will be in the church hall Nov. 30 with a pot- luck dinner. Sixteen members and one guest attended Circle III at the home of Mrs. F. L. Barto. Mrs. John Menck, Mrs. Mae Van Scay and Mrs. Jessie Wolford were hostesses. Devotions were led by Mrs. Bernice Kent. Mrs. J. L. Hanks led in the lesson discussion and closed with a "Thought for Thanksgiving" and prayer. The last meeting will be Nov. 29 at Mrs. Carrie Hungate's, starting with a 6:30 potluck dinner. Ten members and one guest met at Mrs. Keith Kent's home following the lesson at the church. Mrs. Clarence Hospelhorn presided at the business meeting and Mrs. Floyd Finley was lesson leader. Mrs. L. J. Timmerman, Mrs. James O'Tool, Mrs. Catherine Reiling, Mrs. Gerald Nieland, Mrs. N o r b e r t Ludwig, Mrs. Conrad Stork and Mrs. J. R. Rauch, attended the fall workshop for the Central Deanery, D.C.C.W., held recently at Laurens. Mrs. J. R. Rauch spent a few days with her mother, Mrs. J. W. Maun, at Waterbury, Neb. Mrs. Maun has gone to Grand Prairie, Tex., to spend the winter with another daughter and family. Grandmother Sculpts Art From Glass By DICK KLEINER (NBA Wnst Count Cnrrexpondent) BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. Hitting glass with a hammer and chisel sounds like a fairly destructive occupation, but a pretty, blonde, 53-year-old grandmother is creating lovely works of sculpture 'with those tools. Pascal—she has abandoned her first name and her married name and just uses her maiden name — is the world's only glass sculptor. Some others may work with molten glass, but nobody •Ise, as far as sht knows, goes at it with her tools. There's a good reason for her uniqueness. It isn't easy. In fact, it took Pascal 10 years to figure out a way to do it. She was a fairly successful painter when, 17 years ago, she visited Crete and saw a 14th- century glass sculpture. She determined to see if she could do something like it. The main problem was finding raw material — , a type of glass sturdy enough to be sculpted without cracking, smashing, chipping or shattering. She tried every kind of glass she could get her chisel on. No luck. Often sht would be almost finished with a piece when it would shatter. Once she was putting the finishing touches on a shoulder, tapped it one more time •—and the foot broke off. Then she went to Pittsburgh, a glass center. Someone told her "about an abandoned glass factory in Dunbar, Pa., where the cullet — the waste glass — was still in the furnaces. She got hold of some chunks of this cullet, set up a table in a nearby motel and set to work. Eureka — success. The glass let itself be sculpted. At her Severely Hills studio, her garage is full of this raw cullet from the same Dunbar factory. They are jagged basketball-sized chunks, all a dark dollar-bill-green in color. As they are made smaller, the green lightens. The finished pieces are pale green, the smallest ones almost translucent. 'Copters Comin' ... for Vietnam, as shown at this assembly plant for the Army's OH-6A "Cayuse" light observation helicopter. The jet-powered Hughes craft can carry five fully equipped troops in addition to the pilot and holds 23 world records for speed, climb, distance and sustained altitude for helicopters. Two are now in Vietnam for training purposes, with 1,069 more slated for duty there. When she works, she puts on a heavy coat, leather gloves, a plastic, unbreakable mask and her "lucky shoes" —blue sneakers with holes in Hit toes. She chip* away with rawhide or rubber hammer and chisels, then polishes with grinding wheels or dentists' polishers. When she polishes, she wears a mask to guard against silicosis. She was cut only once. That was when a visitor tipped over a piece and she grabbed for it, but it fell and shattered. She had a cut which required seven stitches. The visitor fainted and she tourniqueted herself. At first, the art world was reluctant to accept glass sculpture. But a showing in Zurich, Switzerland, opened the doors. Today, PasdaPs works are in many museums and are bought by such collectors as Winthrop Rockefeller. PRINTING PROBLEM? We specialize in production of commercial stationery and envelopes, direct mail advertising, office forms, form letters, pamphlets, programs. Tell us your printing needs— get our prices before you buy! WHAT AN OFFER! 2<«25 PLUS 37c to 57C ppr tire Fed. Excise Tax, sales tax, and 2 trade- ANY SIZE LISTED ln tlres «"""' size off your ear. YES YOU CAN WINTER TREADS RETREADS ON SOUND TIRE BODIES OR ON YOUR OWN TIRES Built with the same tread design and same high quality tread rubber as new Firestone Town & Country tiresl ANY SIZE LISTED WHITEWALLS Buy These With I BLACKWALLS 7.75-14 7.15-14 7.35-14 7.00-14 6.95-14 6.50-14 6.70-15 7.75-15 7.35-15 6.50-15 6.40-15 7.00-13 6.50-13 6.00-13 ICE GRIP STUDS BLISS TIRE AND SERVICE At The West Edge of Carroll on Hi-way 30 6 Yr. Size CRIB MATTRESS Mat-tress or Box Spring Reg. $69.50-NOW 3888 Recliners Choice of Colors Heavy Vinelle Cover Was $89.95 Bedroom Suites MANY SETS IN STOCK ALL MUST GO Brand Names Such As PULASK, COLEMAN, WARD, BASSETT and others. All Styles and Choice of fine woods Starting as low as $9800 Reg. $179.95 FOR 3 PC. SUITE - BOOKCASE - BED MUST GO NOW! We're Selling Out to the Bare Walls :=r. SAVINGS OF 30-40-50 up to 70°/o SAVE AS NEVER BEFORE SWIVEL ROCKERS By Kroehler Choice of Colors Reg. $49.50 Value FINAL PRICE SPECIAL ALL HASSOCKS '/2 Price VINYL COVERED STUDIOS Were $99.95 1 I/L 5000 WHILE THEY LAST Bucket Plastic CHAIRS $7.95 Value 288 While They Last i HEITHOFF FURNITURE East on Highway 30 CARROLL, IOWA Twin Size Hollywood Bed Complete With Steel Frame, Headboard, Box Spring, Foam Matt. 5488 LARGE SELECTION DINETTES Over 45 Sets To Pick From As Low As $3888 For 5-Piecc Set

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