Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California on January 12, 1978 · Page 7
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Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California · Page 7

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Ukiah, California
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Thursday, January 12, 1978
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Page 7
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Thursday; January 12, 1978 Uklah Daily Journal, Uklah, Calif.—7 ' i i 'telling ag sforY' CFB throws support to AA movement California's largest farm organization has thrown its moral support behind American Agriculture, the group that has been demonstrating nationwide. "The American Agriculture movement has provided a service to farmers everywl^ere by attracting public attention to the problems of agriculture," the California Farm Bureau Federation saidin a resolution adopted by its board of directors. . "Many Farm Bureau members have participated in the American Agriculture movement because they feel there is a need to tell agriculture's story."* The Farm Bureau, composed of 79,000-niember families, has. not supported American Agriculture's call for a strike by farmers. The organization did not change its strike position but emphasized areas of agreement with the demonstrators. "We call on the leaders of the American Agriculture movement to join with the leaders of Farm Bureau in expressing themselves on matters of importance Co agriculture' on which we agree," the resolution states. "Congress and thp general public must take notice of the economic hardships being faced by many farmers, particularly those growing basic commodities, and must pressed by recognize that a healthy Agriculture agricultural economy is necessary to' a prosperous nation." The resolution also states: "Continuation of low prices will force many farmers out of business and result in chaos in the future for farmer and consumers alike." • The CFBF directors did not withdraw previously stated differences with parts of the AA program. American - Agriculture movement and supports a determination to place agriculture on a sound footing in the national economy," the resolution continues. "However, there are areas where the Farm Bureau, as an organization, cannot support many of the objectives and programs of the A AM. "The California Farm Bureau Federation will not call on its members to strike for legal and philosophical reasons. We feel the American Agriculture movement's call for a ban on all imports of agricultural commodities would escalate similar acts by other nations, thus lowering American agricultural exports. The Farm Bureau believes that increasing exports, rather than decreasing imports, is the long-run splution to moving commodities at prices-favorable to farmers." The resolution follows: "Thegeneral farm econopiy in the U.S. is depressed and the outlook for the near future, while brighter than in the past several years, is for continued low prices for many commodities. "Farmers deserve a fair return for their labor and should not bear the full brunt of depressed commodity prices. Continuation of low prices will force many farmers out of business and result in chaos in the future for farmers and consumers alike. "Ihe American Agriculture movement has provided a service to farmers everywhere by attracting public —attention to the problems of agriculture. "Many Farm Bureau members have participated ih the American Agriculture movement demonstrations Parley Jail 18 on rural energy A RAR,E SIGHT — Two woodburning steamers are shown in action. The first is a Ga^r Scott 2 cylinder engine and the second 9 Case single cylinder engine. Each is ratied at 20 HP on the drawbar. Both are pulling 5 bottom plows set to a depth of ten inches. Both steamers are of 1912 vintage. This scene was taken during a South Shasta Steam Threshing Bee. 'So You Want a Farm' publication available BERKELEY — Answers to questions about what farming is like in California are available in a new University because they ieel there is a of California Cooperative need to tell agriculture's E;xtensi9n publication, "So story. "•rhe California Farm Bureau Federation shares many of the concerns ex- the American movement and supports a determination to place agriculture on a sound footing in the national economy. However, there are areas where the Farm Bureau, as an organization, cannot support many of the objectives and programs of the AAM. ""The Califo'rnia Farm Bureau Federation will not caU on its members to strike for legal andi philosophical reasons. "We feel the American' Agriculture movement's call for a ban on all imports of agricultural commodities would escalate similar acts by other nations, thus lowering American agricultural exports. The Farm Bureau believes that increasing exports, rather than decreasing imports, is the long-run solution to moving farm commodities at prices favorable to farmers. "The theory of farmers You Want a California Farm.'' "This is for people from other states, mostly the ones who are tired of Uieir snow shovels and' think fondly of a nice little farm in sunny California," says author Ed Yeary. "It should also be helpful to urban people in California who are interested in farnrting, but have little experience or information on which to base decisions." Yeary is a specialist in farm management, stationed at the San Joaquin Valley Agricliltural Research and Extension Center. The publication, leaflet 2291, is available free at county offices of Utiiversity of California Cooperative (Agricultural) Extension,' or by sending a postcard request to Leaflet 2291, Division of Agricultural Science^ PublicaUons, P O. Box 1629, Richmond, Cal. It explains the diversity of crops and commodities produced in California and describes the major geographic areas of the state. Yeary emphasizes that agriculture in California is quite different from what it is in most other states. "People thinking about farming. for a living here would do well to get as, many facts as possible before making any commitments," Yeary says. He emphasizes that no one publication can give all the necessary facts. He alsb says that the situation changes rapidly with regard to costs, expected returns, interest rates, and other factors involving money. < "Tliose who are seriously ^interested in California farms should talk with people who have knowledge and experience in the localized areas or specialized phases of farming in which they are- interested," he says. Newapproach to Bonsai Gardener's checklist 1. Roses, flowering trees and shrubs, shade trees, berry vines, grape vihes, and strawberries can ail be planted now. Major landscape irriprovements can be made easily at this time. 2. Start making plans for your cool season vegetable garden now. Begin amending the soil with compost and organic fertilizers. 3. Time to prune fruit trees. Remove diseased, dead and cross-over branches. Prune to maximize light penetration and build a strong branching structure or scaffold. 4. When pruning roses, don't leave any of the old foliage on the plant. look. Bohsai the look, effect in Bonsai treatment of houseplants? It's an idea indoor gardeners have toyed with ever since the start of the big hou^eplant craze, but now houseplant bonsai is available to the beginner- as well as the hobbyist. Instead of being pines, maples and cypress which can only be grown outdoors, the indoor bonsai specimens are Ming Aralitias, Schj^eras, and Ti plants to narnt'a few, To create the bonsai effect, the plants show receiving parity for com- gnarled surface roots and .modities they produce may *««vy trunks just as the sound good on the surface, but outdoor bonsai do to simulate we cannot support the im- ^ ancient plementatibn of such a Panters complete program since passing laws to enforcesuch returns could be >^"«gP^«"^ ve^y desirable very far-reaching and perhaps in the long-run be detrimental to farmers and consumers. "We call on the leaders of the An>erican Agriculture movemertt to join with the leaders of the Farm Bureau in expressing themselves on matters of importance to agriculture on which we agree. Congress and the general public must take notice of the economic hardships being faced by many farmers, particularly those growing basic commodities, and must recognize that a healthy agricultural economy is necessary to a prosperous nation." where space for your plants has become limited. One small specimen gives the visual impact of a much more impressively sized plant, llieir small size makes them easy to move from room to room and from table top to table top for special displays. Houseplant Bonsai can be purchased growing in porous lava rock. The rock Bonsai are imported fi-om the Hawaiian Islands and are real con- maintained without any on a saucer additional soil! To develop the thick trunks and interesting surface roots the Bonsai from Hawaii are grown to a large size first and are then cut back to within 4 to 5 inches of soil level. The new leaves that emerge are small for the age of the plant but are in perfect balance with the limitied root system. The smaller leaves complete the miniaturized tree look. FOR ALLYOURREAL ESTATE NEEDSCALU BEitW- WespecfaJize in all types of Farm Land and Mountain Property 743-mi ' , .10751 Main St. Potter Valley yersation pieces. The roots of Scheffleras and Aralias wrap Try . growing your own around the rock lending the houseplant Bonsai from your effect of a windswept favorit&specimen or purchase mountain side. The rock that the ready to display indoor holds theplajitmay be planted" Bohsai. It's a fascinating new in a shallow 'or tall style twist to the world of gardening Bonsai planter, or it can be well worth trying. O/Coiocyjsti: VERV OFTEN WHEN WE COOK bPEfCCuses we HAVE -TO EAT OUR WORDS < IRRIGATION & EQUIPMENT T:** M.mntltr' COMPANY (B»n Rl««l»nd . Orchard, row crop farming COLUSA — Pumps, irrigation systems and irrigation scheduling will highlight a University of California educational program each day during the Orchard and Row Crop Equipment Show at Colusa Feb. 7-9. The 13th annual show, featuring commercial equipment, services and materials for orchard dhd row crop farming, will be held on ' the Colusa County fairgrounds.' The UC educational program on irrigation will be repeated each day, from 10 a.m. until noon, wi^h an additional presentation on agricultural accident prevention and farm worker safety training at 1 p.m. The UC programs will include : 10 a.m. —"Scheduling* Irrigation Based , on Evaporative Measurements," by Elias Fereres, UC Extension irrigation specialist. 10:30 a.m. —"Evaluation of Pumping Systems for Maximum Efficiency," by Blaine Hanson, UC Extension ground water and drainage specialist. 11 a.m. —"Alternatives and Costs of Flood and Sprinkler Systems," by Fereres. 11:30 a.m. —"Drip Irrigation," by Herbert Schulbach, UC lExtension soil and water specialist in the Sacramento Valley. DAVIS — New developments in agricultural energy, farm machinery and the issue of mechanization and farm labor are on the programs of the annual Rural Energy Conference and Farm Machinery Conference Jan. 18-19 at the University of California, Davis. Speakers at the 50th annaul Rural Energy Conference on Jan. 18 will discuss the agricultural energy crisis, research on alternate energy, sources,' energy analysis, ot fodd processing operations; use of natural gas in ''agriculture, agricultural uses of energy in warmed watfer, and varibus aspects of irrigation energy use and conservation including "time-of-day" metering. Topics at the 48th annual Agricultural Engineering Farm Machinery Conference on the following day will include research developments in clover seed harvesting, mechanical harvesting of ' fresh market onions and fresh niarket tomatoes, effects -of reduced wheel traffic on alfalfa income, energy from residues, methane generation, the Pacer Multi-Till system ' and the Hesston lafge square bale system. At mid-afternoon, a panel discussion on mechanization and farm labor will include spokesmen for the state employment agency, the POIVi4st geared for efficient growth PCA financing, like efficient machinery, Is precisely luned (or all ihc work at hand: cash advances are timed for minimum Interest periods; there's proven dependability and nationwide reserve power. You have nice options, too: prepayment without penalty; credit life and disalDility insurance. So mal<e things move with efficient money power; talk to your PCA. Redwood Empire PCA SO] Sovth SUt* St., UWah Ui M«in SI. L»k»port The Co Ahead People will be held in the Veterans Memorial building at 14th and B Streets in Davis, starting with registration at 8:30 a.m. Detailed programs are available from Agricultural Engineering Department, UC, Davis, 95616. Flu-like ills not traceable to pesticides Assistant Agri'cultural- Commissioner Roberto A. deGrassi of the Mendocino County Department of Agriculture stated today that the results just released on a recent investigation conducted by the California Department of Food and Agriculture, worker health and safety unit of the division of pesticide enforcement and the Mendocino- County Department of Environmental Health, indicates there was no basis in fact that the unidentified (flu -like) illnesses .which occurred during October 1977 around the Gualala community, originally reported as attributed to the use of phenoxy herbicides (2, 4-D or 2,4,5-T), were in no way pesticide connected. No aerial or extensive ground sprayirjg of any pesticide was conducted in the Gualala atea. No residues of the herbicides or bacterial contamination were found in University, farm workers and the drinking water samples farmers. ' tested: The Rural Energy Con- DeGrassi further said thai ference will be held in the this incident is not to be Orchard Room of the UCD confused with the earlier Mini-Center, with registration' Department of Food arid starting at 8:15 a.m. The Agriculture's phenoxy her- Farm Machinery Conference bicide team hearings . . m l*'^ X Fl AT Give Your Walls The Very Best Easy Stain Removal One Coat Hiding • For Walls. iVoodwork and Trim » • • Outstanding Scrubabillty Dirt Fighter The Paint That Fights Dirt and WINS Repels Airborne Dirt • Outperforms Competition • One Coat Hiding ••- VVater Cieanup SAVE SALE 00 per gal. 9 per gal. CI IFF MUSICS UKIAH COLOR CENTER Of'IINjrVION IMHUSAr !! 1 (1 .!() /{)•, N sfAirsi I A^;Y PARi<ii\jG w/ mw

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