Longview Daily News from Longview, Washington on November 13, 1971 · 4
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Longview Daily News from Longview, Washington · 4

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Longview, Washington
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Saturday, November 13, 1971
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4
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BLEAK LOOK FOR With tuition coasts soaring in private colleges, only the wealthy will be able to go to higher institutions of learning in the near future. With fisca problems mounting steadily, it is no longer a question of whether Federal authorities should help but of how much they ( should give COLLEGE IS FOR UPPER l927-192 $$$$267 1939-1940 $$$ $332 1955-1956 $$$$$ $$; $712 19701971 $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$,, Trying to get women to watch football on TV: Most just won't do it By JACK SMITH The Times-Post Service There was a story in the sports section the other day about a psychiatrist who says American men need to watch football on TV to "let their feelings out." And further, says Dr. William Garland Tompkins, a psychiatrist on the faculty at George Washington University, women ought to watch it with them. .' . .' He says women need emotional release as much as men in this age of technology, and might as well enjoy the game with their husbands instead of sulking into football widowhood. . "When they were in high school or college," says Dr. Tompkins, "the women most likely were football fans." Evidently Dr. Tompkins imagines that because a woman used to go to football games as a schoolgirl and scream and jump up and down and wave a pompon she could easily recapture that old enthusiasm if she sat down in front of the tube with her balding mate on a football weekend. As a psychiatrist, Dr. Tompkins ought to know that a college girl's love of football and a middle-aged man's love of football on TV are two quite different kinds of emotional experience. A BIG COLLEGE FOOTBALL game used to be one of the richest experiences a girl could have. It wasn't just the game, but the whole environment; the fall clothes; the warmth of body contact with her date under the old school blanket; the espirit; the crowd and noise and color; the wild joy of the 80-yard run ; the sweet sorrow of defeat, a sorrow that would last forever and was over by Tuesday; the party after the game with hot toddies in front of the fireplace, and the knowledge that one was young and life was beautiful. It's a rare woman who in later life can think of football in any other way. If for a moment she sits down in front of the TV set with her husband, it is with some vague expectation that the ecstasy of a November afternoon of long ago will come back, quickening her pulse, reddening her cheek, making her wild and young again. Instead, she finds herself staring at the tube where men who are plainly monsters, not nice boys, are smashing into each other in an orgy of mutual destruction. It isn't a game at all and it isn't a matter of life or death which team wins, at least until Tuesday. She hopes they both lose. And afterwards there isn't going to be a cozy Comment Cancer begins to yield secrets 'Within the past year or so, the long, frustrating, and at times seemingly hopeless search for the casual mechanism of cancer has taken a new and promising turn. In three separate laboratories, scientists have succeeded in demonstrating that a protein continuously generated by a virus turns a normal cell into a cancerous cell and keeps it that way. Even more significant, they showed that it is possible to reverse the course of cancerous transformation by inactivating, or damaging the cancer-causing substance. "These discoveries at the University of Washington, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Salk Institute at La Jolla are immensely important steps in our understanding of cancer. The finding that cancer cells can be made normal again shews that cancer is not an inexorably progressive disease that caa be stopped only through eradication of every malignant cell. '"In view of some scientists, the discoveries open 'he door to truly effective control of cancer, at least some cancers, by means of interference with the disease at its core in the complex process of cancerous transformation cells." Ge Blisky. writing im FORTUNE, .Vavrmber, 1971. ' ; ; j f; it & Family Income . , K-w-v-v-v.---.Tq , Percentages of 10- 3,000 J students from ttooo. 4,000 ,;::,;, ,U families of J4.000- 6,000 i j various incomes $6,ooo- 7,500 ""y".7rrri i wn 8 n - $7,500- 10,000 .": j colle2e (1966-67) $10,000-15,000 'Z.'f...... I $15,000 ond over ',,,,, ,'. . j, , . . . , .V" ... .... '.V.'"" '' 0 25 507. 75 100 INCOME GROUP (Annuaf average of 14 large colleges) Each $ $100 tuition (annually) AP Newsfeatures ride home and a rosy hour on the bearskin rug in front of a fire. All she can look forward to is playing catchup with the housework. Dr. Tompkins also says that because of the instant replay, television gives a man and a woman a second chance to let their emotions out during a TV game. Watching the replay, he believes, provides a renewal of the first experience. THAT'S WHAT I USED TO THINK. When there had been an exciting play, and I knew it would be on the instant replay, I'd shout at my wife to drop whatever she was doing and watch it. In this way 1 hoped to stimulate her interest and help her to share in my emotional release. A dele Ferguson Women and the Worshippers of Gov. Dan Evans, and there are many despite his reported decline in popularity, will say he created the State Women's Council the other day because he has a sincere desire to upgrade the status of women. Evans' Watchers, however, look upon it as one more step in the direction of a try for a third term. No one could ever say Dan Evans isn't smart, and certainly he's smart enough to recognize the value of having the ladies on his side. Women are a great force at the polls, and even more than that, are the best campaign workers there are ask any present or past party chairman. The governor has been under criticism for his failure to appoint women to high positions in state government. Actually, there are some women in the upper echelons but few of them through gubernatorial appointment. STATE LIBRARIAN Maryann Reynolds was named by Gov. Al Rosellini and has Evans' support. Evans named Mrs. Maxine Daly employment security commissioner, put Nancy Holman on the King County Superior Court bench, has women in important jobs in his office Esther Seering is his executive assistant, a Richard Spiro Feeding the neighborhood: Dogs, cats & opossum I don't know where people get the notion that some species of animals are facing extinction. They purely well aren't around our house, at anv rate. We are at present feeding six cats. One of them is ours. The others arrived from the outside world by motor car. Our nights are made hideous by the sounds of a car slowing up. the door opening and closing, and then the car speeding away. And we turn over in bed and sigh. Someone has just made a deposit of another cat. Or cats. Or cats and dogs. To step outside our front door is to be plunged knee-deep into a miscellany of felines. And because I am not as agile as I once was ( in rare moments of utter frankness I'll admit I never really was anyhow) I am hard put to keep from stepping on a tail here or a pair of hind feet there. Whoever it was suggested that cats and dogs need only be fed once or twice a day must have lived out his full span of years on an island completely lacking in animal life. Just step outside and ai once these animals set up a howling demand for food. HONESTLY, I HAVE PEERED out the window at a porch that harbored not so much as Private colleges in financial trouble turn to government By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS With more and more centers of higher learning facing financial disaster, it is no longer a question whether federal authorities should help, but how much they should give. A recent survey of private college finances released by the Association of American Colleges showed that 200 institutions will run through their liquid assets within a year and if the downhill pace continues, 365 schools could be bankrupt within a decade. Prepared by AAC research director William W. Jellema, the report was a follow-up study of 507 of 554 schools examined in an earlier probe, "the gloom deepens," the report said, by the discovery that their financial future is more grim than our earlier data indicated; their projections for 1970-71 are far more dismal than they were a year earlier." Jellema told a news conference that the 507 schools had projected an average deficit of $104,000 a school, but he said the actual deficit amounted to $131,000. ' JELLEMA SAID 316 SCHOOLS had operating deficits ranging from $2,000 all the way to $4 million. The research director said he had no figures on how many accredited four-year institutions had actually closed down in the past year. He added that deficits were only part of the impact on the private schools. Institutes of higher learning, he said, have curtailed operations, abbreviated departments, abandoned innovation and curbed creativity. Another recent survey of schools showed that tuition in private colleges had risen from $267 in 1928 to $2,080 in 1971. As a result, the percentage of those attending college is swinging more and more toward those in the upper income bracket. The Nixon administration had maintained that direct government aid to colleges was impossible as long as an anti-inflationary lid had to be kept on its budget. The President had insisted that major federal aid should be postponed until higher education had taken stock of its operations and implemented reforms, including possible economies. Last June, however, the administration announced that it was re-examining its "no money now" policy. The President offered expenditure of $100 million toward setting up a National Foundation for Higher Education which would oversee major research on problems of the universities. Three months later, the House Education and Labor Committee approved a bill that would provide $1 billion in federal grants to help colleges meet rising costs of instruction. The provision, adopted against the administration's recommendation, was included in a bill extending for five years a wide range of federal programs for higher education. I remember that time when Bart Starr of the Green Bay Packers went in from the one-yard line on a quarterback keeper to beat the Dallas Cowboys in the last minute of the awesome game where they played on ice at 16 below zero. Everything depended on that play not only the game, but also the divisional championship and the super bowl, and Starr's breath was steam as he called the fateful signals and the green line in front of him was steaming like a dragon, and then it heaved forward and Starr went into the end zone behind Jerry Kramer's block and won the money. "Come in here!" I shouted to my wife. "You've got to see this." She was in the sewing room, as I remember. governor: Dan decides to woo votes C? position usually filled by a man, and Jo Garceau is in charge of checking out the qualifications of his prospective appointees. And he did something no' other governor has done in this state in naming a woman, Mrs. Joel Ream, to the State Highway Commission. Other women in high positions are Mary Loe Everson, assistant secretary of social and health services; Roberta Kaiser, assistant director in the department of revenue; Evelyn Hylton, supervisor of women in industries; Audrey Holliday, public service career projects director in personnel; Superintendent Edna Goodrich of the Purdy Treatment Center; Assistant State Treasurer Estelle Harder and Deputy Insurance Commissioner Helena Shedly; Jeannette Poore, president of Everett Community College; F. Marianne Andrews, program director in the department of vocational education, and four women assistant attorneys general. All these were named by department heads, although those in departments controlled by Evans presumably got his approval first. Evans' predecessor named the first Commission on the Status of Women in 1963 (note that year just before Rosellini tried for the third term). a bug. and the adjacent yard was just as barren. No life apparently, within a good quarter-mile. Until I slipped stealthily through the door, whereupon the entire area exploded into a seething mass of cats. I can say with some assurance that they sprout up from the ground, complete with appetites. You could walk through that door every minute of the day and they would appear instantaneously, tucking in their napkins. This is not an abstruse theory. I tested it. opening the door, stepping outside, back in, back out. For five minutes. I would have experimented longer only I collapsed from the unaccustomed exertion and. ashen-faced, had to be led away for a long rest. Our fence keeps out most of the dogs. It doesn't do a thing for the cats they just ooze through, whiskers quivering, tails twitching, all set to fall upon the groceries. And there are some little dogs that infiltrate the fence. Little in size, that is. but equipped with the appetites of St. Bernards that had lost their kegs and been marooned over a long winter. The larger dogs cause no disturbance, until bedtime. Then they all pack up and leave home to station themselves outside our windows. And they commence to bark. Although not for long they quit 15 minutes before it i3 time for us to get up in the morning. ONE NIGHT when mv choler runneth over I She came out with her sewing in her hands and some pins in her mouth and stood in the middle of the room staring dubiously at the tube. "Watch this," 1 said. The instant replay came and the Green Bay Packers and Bart Starr did it all over again. She took the pins out of her mouth. "Is that all?" Since then we go our own ways. I don't make her watch replays, she doesn't walk between me and the screen from the time the offensive team huddles until the play is over. We are very happy, and sometimes afterward we have a hot toddy together. The trouble with psychiatrists is that, like Freud, they don't understand women. WHEN EVANS GOT IN, he didn't do much with the commission until 1968 when he reconstituted it (note that year, his try for a second term). Last year he created the Interagency Advisory Committee on the Status of Women with instructions to find out how many of the recommendations of the previous commission had been carried out. As a result, two bills were offered to the 1971 Legislature. Passed was one which outlaws discrimination in employment on the basis of sex. Killed in committee was one dealing with legal rights of women. His committee also recommended that a smaller group be organized to coordinate efforts for women's rights, hence the new women's council. Now, if this council is only going to meet once a month and has been charged with the duty of reviewing and identifying needs for legislation affecting women, it's going to have to go some between now and January. Unless women's rights upgrading can be postponed until the 1973 session, that is. Maybe that's what Evans has in mind, but anyway, he has pacified a lot of the women's libbers, especially the ones he named to the council, and it gives him one more forum from which to preach the gospel according to St. Dan. ran out into the street with the stern intention of chasing away the dogs. I still think my plan was sound, but the dogs played their roles badly. They refused to run away. I had expected them to, preferably with their tails between their legs. What does one do when the cast departs from the script? Too, these were rather formidable animals, well-equipped with pointy teeth and so stupid that they ran towards me instead of slinking away. And I suspect they had intentions to do mischief upon my person. By golly. I never would have believed I could have leaped over that fence without even touching it. Sometimes we find homes for these animals, but as Abe Lincoln once commented on another matter, it's like shoveling flies across a room. Get rid of two and the next day three more have enrolled for the semester. The other night I opened the door and bumped into an opossum helping himself to the cat food. He left unhurriedly, glaring at me austerely as though expecting a written explanation for the intrusion. Cats, dogs, and now an opossum. Tell me. have you heard of any wolf packs roaming these parts? If there are. and anyone wants to capture them, just hang around our premises for a bit. Bring a big net. because that flimsy little thing will never bold an elephant. The way-things are going it s oclv a matter of time t,r ,.-.s, -oIls up or.,yc :ch Franklv, it will never sustain the weight. Bunk It's time to think about Thanksgiving Day This year we're having a wage-price turkey. It's frozen. My wife says it's a Tom Turkey but I'm not so sure. We can't get the wing off its hip! I'm not going to my brother-in-law's anymore. Cheap? Last Thanksgiving he served a margarineball turkey. We had a wild Thanksgiving last year. I won the wishbone pull and my mother-in-law came down with food poisoning. I never knew those things worked. Show me a man who throws Thanksgiving leftovers into the garbage and I'll show you a fella who quits cold turkey. Col. Coweeman says those big balloons in the Thanksgiving Day parade reminds him of one of the candidates. Hot air entirely surrounded by a very thin skin. Seein' folks ... Ed Dahlquist visiting from California . . . Harry Hanly announcing meetings . . . Glenn Andrew visiting Home Comfort and Advertiser's Delight office . '. . Allen Johnson being introduced ... Skamokawa Pete asks: Did you ever stop to think that Weight Watchers and Women's Lib have the same objective to cut men down to size? ITEMS SOUGHT Dear Bunk: I am a handicapped veteran, living on a small pension. My vision and hearing are slowly leaving me. The doctors say they can do nothing, so I have made hobbies to keep busy and fight off periods Of mental depression and despondency, which seem to plague me most of the time. While I am collecting antique Valentines and old post cards, I am also collecting rare old calendars and advertising cards, in hopes of writing a book about the items I collect and earn enough from it to get off this small VA pension and have medical care, which the VA is unable to afford me, so my hobbies have a dual purpose. Living on limited funds, I depend on friends and others for the items I collect and was wondering if any of your readers had any antique Valentines, old post cards or rare old calendars they do not want, because I would be happy to have any they may care to send me and be glad to get them. -LEON THOMPSON 623 Federal East Seattle, Wash. 98102 Letters Thanks for clinic help To the Editor: I would like to say "thanks" to all the people who gave so much time and did such a wonderful job on the "Stop Smoking Clinic." I can't think of how it could be improved and think it was a great success. I hope we can have one again to help others "kick the habit." -MOLLY MADISON Longview rary Corner By STEWARD ROBBINS Longview City Librarian There are several important library services for the blind and physically handicapped available through the Longview Public Library. The new program of taking library materials to the homes of those who are unable to use the library will begin this month. For the partially sighted, the library maintains a collection of over 200 books in large print, including a wide variety of titles from mystery stories to the Bible. The Longview library can also arrange for reading materials through the Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped in Seattle. These services include thousands of talking books, books in braille, books on tape, and a large collection of books in large print. Talking ' book machines can be borrowed as well. All of these services are without charge, and for more information, contact the Longview Public Library at 423-2340. Looking back 40 YEARS AGO NOV. 13, 1931 The Longview Lumberjacks defeated the Vancouver Trappers 12-0 in their annual football game. F. W. Clearman has been awarded a contract to rebuild the Longview City Laundry building. The structure was badly damaged by fire several weeks ago. 25 YEARS AGO NOV. 13, 1946 - Earl J. Cole of Ostrander defeated James A. Doyle for a position on the Cowlitz PUD board of commissioners. Fred Cramer has been re-elected mayor of Kalama. EOlTOfiiAl PAGE OF The Daily News Longview Washington J. M McClelland J M McClelland Jr VV I Bngman TedM Natt Mngmg ElMor Stanley E Fagerstrom AJtig ck Carlton Moore Jerry Engebo Eecutx Eotor Ovoi Mtntgc Leo Wastead .'.-...wjfc-. Saturday. November 13. 1971 1

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