St. Louis Globe-Democrat from St. Louis, Missouri on April 11, 1963 · 10
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St. Louis Globe-Democrat from St. Louis, Missouri · 10

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St. Louis, Missouri
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Thursday, April 11, 1963
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10
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,-. Coutg ISInhr-tirmnant GLOBE-DEMOCRAT PUBLISIIING CO. rwerth Ft at Delmar (I) Published Daily, Monday through Friday, and Week-End CtArfleld 1-1212 RICHARD H. AMBERG, Publisher - IIAMILTON THORNTON, Editor of the Editorial Pao ' - CHARLES E. PIERSON, Executive Editor - BEN mAcDovra, Advertising Director IIMMBER CF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the ttse for publication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise credited to this paper and itlso the local news published herein. Al! rights of publi cake of special dispatches herein alio are reserved. The Globe-Democrat is ars independent newspaper printing the news impartially, supporting what it believes to be right ,and opposing what it believes to be wrong without regard to party. politics. - lb U.S. PROTECTS RED CUBA It was hard enough to stomach Washington policy flat pledged the United States to preserve Cuba against invisionby us or any other state. Now, regardless of party politics and every-One's concern for peace, a national nausea arises over the Administration's smothering of Cuban exile-raids upon Castro ports and docked Soviet shipping. Despite the reasons given for such policy, the historic fact remains that America is using Its power and arms as a shield to protect Castro Cuba, now a Russian base.. The presence- of thousands of Soviet troops and munitions, MIGs and missiles In Cuba is In flagrant violation of the Monroe Doctrtne, which Washington has apparently scrapped for fear of angering Russia. - The United States in effect has become an - ally of the Red Soviets, guarding Moscow's fort in the Caribbean, set up by Khrushchev in a daring challenge, for Castro's avowed purpose of funneling Communist revolt cadres into countries throughout Central and South America. Few question the good intent of tfrie President, who seeks to avoid war and do nothing to rile the Kremlin adventurers into an accidental holocaust. But the perspective of all power history, the perspective especially of world-hungry Communism negate a policy of appeasement. And appeasement is the word for our conduct at Cuba. Senator Barry Goldwater declared this week the President is "doing everything in his power" to keep the flag of Cuban Independence from ever flying again. He indorsed the Cuban exile raids and discounted "crybabies" who fear anything done against Cuba will result In nuclear world war. A vast sentiment in America agrees with him. The hit-and-run Cuban commandos are patriots, who have committed their lives and fortunes to free their homeland from the Soviet. Castro yoke. For their courage and daring they face United States air and sea arms. Some have been taken by the British, co-operating with Washington, and thrown into Bahama prisons. Is this America's answer to the struggle for Independence of a people for whom we once fought a bitter war with Spain? - The Administration argues anti-Castro raids on Soviet installations of Cuba,will make it difficult to obtain Moscow withdrawal of 13,000 or more Russian troops from Abe island. Yet the several thousand Mr. Kennedy said have been evacuated were shipped i)ut during March. The exile raids were in March. The Administration also contends such raids cause risk of a war with Russia. Of course, there won't be a hint of shooting, as long as the United Stites provides an AmerIcan-garrisoned haven for the Soviet In Cuba. The war risk was catapulted by Khrushchev when he turned Cuba into a bristling missile threat, with devastating weapons targeted on American cities. 1 , The risk has been thrust upon us. It won't go away simply because we look aside. As long as Soviet forces and weapons remain in Cuba, under American sanctuary, the peril will grow. True, these raids have accomplished little. How much they could accomplish in time cannot be gauged. Fidel Castro started his Red career of dictatorship with less.' During his campaign in 1960, Mr.- Kennedy declared: "We must end the harassment, which government has carried on, of liberty-loving, anti-Castro forces in Cuba and other lands we must recognize flat the exiles and rebels represent the real voice of Cuba and should not be constantly handicapped by our Immigration and Justice Departmedt authorities." After the Alpha 66 raiders started operating, President Kennedy ordered Attorney General Kennedy to probe the exile group. Brother Babby turned loose 30 FBI agents to investigate the attacks and determine how future raids could be halted. 1 Mr. Kennedy does not want a Communist armed camp in the Caribbean. He doesn't want war with Russia. No one in the nation But killing off exile raids and the unprecedented guarantee for an enemy bastion off the American coast is a desperately wrong way to achieve peace. Appeasing aggressive power has always been the path to subjugation or war. i Recognition for Moulder and Scherer The Armual Report of the House Committee on Un-American Activities just published contains a resolution of commendation for Congressman Gordon H. Scherer Of Ohio and Congressman MorganM. Moulder of Missouri, both of whom retired at the end of the Eighty-seventh Congress. Both COngressmen served this committee faithfully and well over a period of many years. Congressman Scherer is a particularly able Representative, who "tirelessly promoted those characteristics of freedom which have given this nation the most cherished and lasting Independence the world has ever known," and,who was a tower of strength on the commitiee. He will be greatly missed on the committee and elsewhere In the Congress. The Globe-Democrat did not unreservedly favor Congressman Moulder for reasons en Better Pay for Better Police In the dispute between the St. Louis Police Board and Mayor Tucker as to wraether police pay should be raised in the lower grades, we suspect merit is on both sides. The argument presented to a Legislative committee by H. Sam Priest, chairman of the board, is very persuasive. When he says better pay will attract better officers and better officers can more effectively combat crime, that is certainly what the people of St. Louis want. - Mr. Priest's statement that the Police Department now puts its emphasis on quality and not quantity has us somewhat puzzled. though, - When he launched a recruitment drive not longagogiving present officers incentives to bring In new recruitswe understood that he was Four state Senators have asked Illinois to ban all strikes which shut down services vital to the public ftlealth and safety. an age where the strike .weapon is being turnjd against the people at will and such things as public welfare have been ignored in a death struggle for 10 cents an hour, some such move is imperative. The two bills in the state Legislature calling for-the ban were proposed by Senator Arthur R. Gottsdhalk. They were jointly sponsored by Senator Gottschalk and Senators John A. Graham, Joseph R. Peterson and W. Russell Arrington. WASHLNGTON. ID. C.A steel company raises prices. It's that time of year again. JFK has tossed out the first pitch, so he's all warmed up to throw a beanball at the first .----- -----, industrialist of the season. , . Rockefeller, meeting Repub. --'- ''..-N: 1 lican House members, pleads for party unity. He's tl s lea! 1 ,---.. rr- . presidential candidate: Not 1. even electedand already hay- V-- '---- '1--- , ing trouble with his party in ' 'tltt Congress. - - , An exile leader demands the U. S. either invade Cuba or give him $50,000,000. He's an up tx line Des Potomac Fever By Fletcher Knebel Thurs.. April U, 1963 tirely unrelated to his work on this committee. We have always felt, and said, as a member of the Committee on Un-American Activities, Morgan Moulder served his country well, and we are delighted that the resolution was passed in his honor. The members of the Un-American Activities Committee received a tremendous vote of confidence last month when their, full budget request for the current Congress was overwhelmingly approved by their colleagues. Members of this committee often take unprecedented abuse from tie left-wing press, and from some of the appeasement-minded and accommodation-seekers in and out of government. For these reasons, we are particularly pleased that Mr. Scherer and Mr. Moulder have been recognized for their great contributions to the strength and continued well-being of America. trying to -give St. Louis quality in quantity on its police force. That is certainly what the city needs if its citizens are to be free to walk the strcets without being in constant fear of rife or limb. 'Vlayor Tucker's argument against the pay raise has justification, too. Wjth the city facing a $5,000,000 deficit in the current fiscal year and a cut-back in other municipal services, is the Legislature justified in adding $1,200,000 to yearly costs of its police force? Instead of fighting over this increased pay for St. Louis police in Jeff City, members of the Police Board and city off-cials should sit down together in St. Louis and try to figure out how to stretch the funds available for best interests of the Police Departmentand of our taxpaying citizens. To Outlaw Strikes Against Public tional, who have shunted aside the needs of a city for a big victory for the "boys." Affected by the bill would be firemen, water. works and sewage plant workers, health department employes and other public employes concerned with maintaining health and safety. The employe who struck would be fired. Ten states and the Federal government already have similar laws on the books. An incident in Illinois last year showed the Immediate need. Electricians at the Chicago Metropolitan Sanitary District struck and, while they haggled over demands, an estimated 300,- 000,000 gallons of raw sewage was sent down the Chicago and Little Calumet Rivers. Responsible workers holding such posts wouH hardly Arlie. The only ones restrained by this bill wotdd be the irresponsible, and that is good. ,0.0 to-date Patrick Henry: "Give me libertyor give me foreign aid!" Missouri Republicans censure a party official for refusing campaign contributions. , It's fine to preach economy In governmentbut they like to practice spending on their way in. , The Kennedy Administration has got the country moving againevery six months when you can't pay. the rent. , Absent-mhuledneli is perilous In today's motorized home. One fellow combed his beard with an electric toothbrush and left for work after grinding his teed with the electric razor. I . I .. PP.-P h pvg N Had That Energy Back in the:Thirties' , -,1"MMr......i.W111 ":7 c:.".. ..;0., - THE MAIL BAG Says Unilateral Disarmament Is Weakening U.S. To the Editor: The official United States State Department Publication 7277 entitled "Freedom From War: The United States Program for General and Com.' plete Disarmament in a Peaceful World," which is essentially the same as Khrushchev's own disarmament proposal of 1959, proposes to abolish United States armed forces and nuclear weapons in three stages and subject us to a UN Peace Force. While Americans are lulled Into a false sense of security by the largest peacetime military budget in history and the calling up of the reserves, unilateral disarmament is actually already being carried out: , - By the cancellation of the Skybolt missile, which would enable ou planes to bomb enemy territory without fly)- lug over enemy soil; By the cancellation of the RS-70 reconnaissance strike bomber. By the halting of production of the B-58 supersonic medium bomber. By our failure to conduct nuclear tests which are ade- co - cAwilai pcmao,. I I "di.toL'093 I 6.- I 1 1 043 1 1 - , If v PliNAMAR4 61' - quate to keep us first in the nuclear missile race. ' By the dismantlirig of our missile bases in Turkey and Italy. By the failure to put the successfully-tested Nike-Zeus 4 t t'a 3',"tt 4 , ' anti-missile system into production. I ; By the cutback in the attark submarine program. . By our. failure ',to rnah Soviet capability in chemical and biological weapons. By our unilateral rentmo.a. tion of any effort to use outer space for military purposes. By the,reduction in striking power of the United States Strategic Air Command. Today for the first time in more than 25 years, the United States does not have a single : bomber plane under construe1 - PHYLLIS SCHLAFLY Alton. EL I Rep. Gralike's-I'letes To the Editor: This letter is in -reply to , your editorial pertaining to the resolution , I introduced , providing for a legislative in-, .vestigation of the Metropoti" tan Sewer District which was passed by the Missouri House of Representatives. , You state, ( and I quote, 'Which way does Mr. Gralike want ii---trustees who are not responsive because they hare not elected by the voters, or public officials who can't be 'trusted because they are?" First, I would like to say that the-residents ofthe Four. teenth District of St. Louis County urged me to exert every effort to have the MSD investigated by the State Leg, islature. I believe that their reascpns are sound, and it is apparent that the people of - St. Louis and ,St. Louis County deserve more consideration :than they have been receiving 'from MSD. , At the present time, the trastees are not responsive to the people because of the simple fact that they are appointed :to their positions and have the right to levy property tax in' creases without voter approval. Voters' in my district feel that they should have the right 11 II Through. The Years Front the Files of The Globe-Democrat 10 Years AgoSaturday, April 11, 1953 Dr. Arthur E. Compton, noted atomic Scientist and educator, submitted his resignation as Chancellor of Washington University to devote the next 10 years to research in the field of "science and its relation to human affairs." and its relation to human affairs." In Musan, Korea, the United Nations and Communist negotiators agreed to begin the pre-armistice exchange of sick and wounded prisoners of war at Panmunjom on April 20. 25 Years AgoMonday, April 11, 1938 Jackie Coogan, 23, the "kid" of the silent Movies, and husband of Betty Grable, asserting he was "broke," filed.suit against his mother and step-father. for $4,000,000 he earned as a child film star. Declaring he was allowed only $6.25 a week for spending money, and that even this was stopped alter he became of age, Coogan charged he was refused inspection of the books and -records of Jackie Coogan Productions, Inc., and the Coogan Finance Corporation. 1 50 Years AgoFriday, April 11, 1913 "The 'blue laws' of Missouri were put on the books in 1825," recalled The Globe-Democrat, "but until the last 23 years, they plagued no one because no attention was paid to them. Hoss races were held by boys at the forks of the cricks, town dram shops kept their side doors open for the bibulous, and barber shops bowed to the popular will, at least until 1 p.m. tNow these torpid 'blue laws' come to life again, chiefly in the name of health and sanitation," the editorial concluded. 75 Years Ago.-Wednesday, April 11, 1888 "A beer.farnine in the City of New York," WEtS threatened by members of the Brewers Associaton In retaliation for the picketing of one brewery by the Knights of Labor. "An injury to one is an injury to all,' said a spokesman for the firms, which were expected to dose down production in three days. Broold3rn, Newark, Elizabeth and Hoboken were also expected to be "suds-less". 100 Years AgoSaturday, April 11, 1883 The anniversary oi the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter was marked with a mass meeting in Union Square. New York City, at which principal speakers were Gen. Fremont and Gen. Franz Sigel. , A Confederate deserter entering- Union lines revealed the Instigators ct the Richmond bread riots were women trying to support their families by begging on the streets. Confederate soldiers were demoralized by the outbreak and insisted the Con. federacy feed their families. . , I . - 7 e-Te -1,7) .; 4''A 'ON PN p,.. -ge tt 1.4 If ,-, , 4;.1 s . ..:C1.4 - - - , toc r, . 11 t r -17 k t4t944741 "":1:--;6.;1;:1'.:::L;445"...:777,i;:';E:''''.''':":'''4??7,1..;:..'-:'''.!:,:::-...-1,7f.i'l!.:4.t:1,,7,4?;;It1:474.9t"11'' .' 7 - 1 likr.'-; .... 47ut4:-;:i:i';,'-'':Tslk.:77"..7::;'';';9..,t7"7-7.'');;;:-...i'.tk;., ,(4'.',..Nr,-,,ve,k,,:7',',;;s4 , 0'',,.,,..-; .,,, i:-'4' ,''''' 7A,' , .0, ,-!!1.7- -..,:',,,,',.,u.., s, ,:,.5,1.W, ;,! ,' .. '7; ac s. ;',;. -e04.1,,,,". Th, .tr.4 y-s. ... .4, 'r!, 4-'44,6; ' ,-'' ' ' ' ''' " '. r ,.. - -- A i .t. r.. .".". oil,. 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M,-,- , , - t..!:-:,!,,'-r::--7,", Y' i;i1,'......'X.", ,f,,,,',f.,--44.". ...7.--, y 14.0.-:',44"i,!',,t,:',,,t,:,,,,-.-.-,,;!-,-;- ,i;,t,-ks-:",-,., i,,-,-,--',,-,,,,?-i',,;-,,i.,.,A,,,o,..--1-..--;,-,- ,,;:-44,eit' e-,,-,.--A-7;i,';:4-Zt.:11'Fii-'1,i,'-:,tz:'''''''T .6',.,...i,,i. ---'-',;'4:"-!--...- , 41 ,-'.'-i-i.1.1q- i'ikli-4:;&71isic.:--3.-;;:i--V''''';4.'f:'.''''''''.:-Q-- '.--.4...r.....,.4....-.,.. to elect the trustee's or have the right to vote on any property tax increases the MSD wishes to impose. Unfortunately, this right in either case does not exist. I have never said that the 'St. Louis County Supervisor or the Mayor of St. Louis could not be trusted. This is your terminology! It is the opinion of the people that I represent in the State Assembly that by placing the investigation in The hands of those who are directly responsible for the appointment of the trustees is simply not an example of good government. ment. An Investi-gation conducted by a committee that could approach the ',problem with an unbiased vieloint is what the citizens wart need; and deserve. e DONALD I. GRALIKE Stitt Representative , I4th District St. Lodis County Z t :4., Pool Table Therapy To the Editor: An eminent psychiatrist recently remarked that.the basic assumption for everybody who-is trying to help the mentally. I 1 "' . .11 IPA ..7... .11......UMMIIII911111.,, ill person is this: "Patients get well through people, through daily association with other people who are concerned about them." Starting several years ago with volunteer help from generous employees working on their own time, State Hospital No. 4 at Farmington now has a recreation program, second to none anywhere, and one that is reaching over 95 per cent of the average daily population of MO patients. A recreation center is now being completed and contains, among other things. a miniature golf course, ping-pong tables, a pool table, a shuffleboard, Card tables and punching bags. However, there is a dire need for one more pool table. The St. Francois County Mental Health Association would appreciate hearing from any of your readers who know bow one may be secured for the recreation department at State Hospital No. 4. MARY A.' SCHWARTZ, Secretary, Board of Directors St. Francois County Mental Health Association, Farmington, Mo. ; i7(M Olt 06Wa WHA:r GOOD DCES rr DO 70 )NA-TeR LAST' YEARS CROP? 1 I 000 tff Mb INCOME TAX BUREAU -7 -'?,f LAbORITE HAROLD:WILS011 By WILLIAM S. WHIM WHAT WOULD Laborite Harold Wilson really do with Britain it as now seems dis- tinctly prob. - able, be should defeat e 0 esservative Prime Minister Harold Macmillan in an election to be held no later than August of '1 1964? This cot. WHITE umnists's . pressions, in the afterlight of a visit here by Wilson which also gave an opportunity to get some notion of him from close-up conversation, are far less reassuring, if not necessarily somber to the point of hopelessness. THESE IMPRESSIONS are about as follows:, Wilson is no longer a one, way disarmer, a ban-the. bomb howler, or an international demagogue, if be ever was. He is, however, a man whose true views of the. prolSer policy in the cold war are remarkably difficult to pierce and fix through the clouds of bookish rhetoric which seem to hover over the heads of so many British politicians of the leftas, indeed, they do hover over so many, of our leftist politicians at home. ."1, He could hardly have been expected to lay down an actual blue-print here, to be sure. Still, much of what he really thinks on this great and mortal matter -is either held in reserve orand more likelyis really not firmed up yet. In any case, such gleams as come through are disturbing to those who value the gallant effort of Macmillan to hold a weary Britain to a steadfastly rational course. WILSON is surely not an irresponsible man; and surely he is devoted to Western interests. His idea that Britain should not try for the unattainable, an independent nuclear force, is sound. And on, this point his explanations are clear. B u t his accompanying promises to provide greater British contributions to the conventional, defenses of Western Europe have, unhappily, a certain hollow -sound. 4 Rail Strike Likely ICANSAS CITY, MO. This is being written in the dome car of the Santa Fe's crack train, the Chief. In harmony with whirling wheels as I roll westward, ' , I there- is t h e steady h u 111, 'kt ; 4640, i., like an old 'y .AI Z. tune, of t h e ,.," questions: .2-. Will there be 1 L t.., a crippling at national rail strike; will t there be par- ,pv alyzing sec- ' kar...;t1.. tional strikes next June? After discussions in the nation's railroad capitals the report here must beyes, if the lines gD through with what is their absolute right under the Supreme Court decision and gradually end all 40,000 locomotive firemen jobs on freight trains and in railroad yard service. i IF MERE IS compromise there will be no strike. President.K ennedy's three-man emergency board is supposed to be a fact-finding commission. But everybody knows the facts. Privately Mr. Kennedy has asked the board to mediate a compromise. Where Is it possible? specialists on the side of the five operating unions point to freight trains which are pulled by more than one oil-burning Diesel locomotive. Further west, w hen the big, fast through-freights reach the mountain grades, -I was told there are sometimes as many as 14 such locomotives pulling a long train. Across the United States the average is three locoznotivs. Many times four are hooked up. Single units are used in yards and for local freight runs. - These union experts will argue that the fireman Is needed to check such hookups of three to 14 locomo tives if there Is difficulty. The engineer cannot .leave, his cab, they say. Thus, though there is no longer any old-fashioned openmouthed furnace to stoke, the fireman's spot itself should be a permanent one on such runs. This would mean that thou. .sands would keep their jobs and be replaced when they retire, or quit, or die, or are discharged for cause. UN'DER THE PRESENT ruling the railroads have the right to lay off some 13,000 younger firemen and then wipe the job itself out. As for the other 27,000 firemen, they have a guarantee of lifetime Jobs but not necessarily as firemen. The railroads do not have to replace then as they retire or pass on. The issue then Is whether or not there actually will be a permanent category of freight train firemen or whether It will disappear. , By VICTOR RIESEL .: One feels that while ths'' spirit of Labor may be strong here, the flesh of Lae-- bor b very weak. If Wilion.,, ...- does come' to power, we should be unwise to hold the phone while awaiting wortr-- Sr those fresh British int contributions. - What really seems to emerge ts that While Labor actually thinks it wants to make the alliance stronger, Labor hi fact would quite easily fall Into the habit of letting Uncle Sam do it for more than Macmillan has done INDEED, a not unreasonable forecast of Labor's foreign policy in general would take these lines: I. A compulsive withdrawal in spirit from British military responsibilities - in favor of an almost total concentration on domestic reforms In the economic and social fields. 2. A policy incomparably more attuned to the United Nations, and especially to the holy Afro-Asian bloc therein, than to Britain's old allies in the West. , 3. - An unwillingness to make in any foreseeable future any real effort to enter, the European Common Mar. ketbecause the other na- tions in It are not too keen on letting the UN run the world altogether. In short, in American terms Macmillan is meeting in Wilson a kind of young-fogey Henry Wallace of the , '60san earnest, able, dull, decent but perhaps - ,rather evasive disciple of the quartof-milk-for-e very- Hottentot school. HIS COMPASSION for abstract "common man" is far higher than his probable con- crete capacity to help England meet the brutal challenges of an era whose problems are riot so much defined by bread -And-butter aspirations as by the higher aspiration to sustain that freedom for which Britain has stood so' long. If Wilson Is elected, there wal be two sloganeers in every car in England. Still, this is the present Wilson the Wilson yet not in power and not yet under responsibility. It might well be that the harsh realities of power and responsibility would make quite another man of him. 1 1-? Listening to a discussion of railroad laws h like breaking in on conversation-. alists using the jargon of ab, s tract astralmathematics. But in essence the unions of on-train workers say there are still other areas of compromise. , These unions want some work rules changes themselves. They warrt a six; -in- --' stead of an eight-hour day at no reduction in pay. On a six. day week-schedule this would give them a 36-hour week. The railroads says that if a .man finishes his day's run in. six hours, he should put the other two hours in at straight time in the yards. UNIONS want overtime for the extra two hours. They also want time-and-ahalf pay for holidays, which they do mit get nowThey., want -special pay for the seventh day. They want reimbursement for food and lodgings if they are forced to stay overnight at the end 01 a -run.,, They want additional .p,ai for, split shifts on short tttrz-; aroundsnot only on corn-muter runs but if they take a' train out in the-Inorning and then return with 'another late - in the day. On all these Issues there will be behind-the-scenes bargaining in Chicago and Washington. The railroads, with the weight of a presidential board's finding behind them, will try to stand firm. They know there wilt 7-be; mergers and more technolo: gloat improvements. But they' point to something known in the business as the 1936 Wash- ington Agreement. This was signed by the carriers and ' unions ranging from locimno-, tive engineers to masters, mates and pilots (rail tug men). - - UNDER THIS PACT, which - Is to be used as a guideline, the roads can shift men but, - for example if a railroad - worker has to sell his .home suddenly under a loss, the company must reimburse him ,: for the difference. The lines pay for shifting the worker, his family and his furniture. This includes living - expenses for -him and his - family and actual wages lost. -, The carriers even protect the shifting worker from all .;. loss and cost Involved in breaking an unexpired lease on a home. These are just a - few of what the railroads can financial burdens unique Jo their field. The rails feel they've given all they can. The unions say there must be compromise. The President will pressure. The emergency board will - argue and cajole. If there is give and take. r. there will be no strike. If not ; . . to devotth e e next h 10 years 'to research in the field of "scien freights r e a c h ce bles, a pool table, a shuffle- west, w hen the iyig, f a s t Four state Senators have asked Illinois to tional, who have shunted aside the needs of . hind them, will try tostand - and its relation to an affairs." I board, card tables and punch- - the ban all strikes which shut down services vital a city for a big victory for the "boys." In Musan, Korea, the United Nations and Communist negotia- ing bags. However, there is a mounthrough tain grades firm. , -I was told , . - to the public ftealth and safety. Affected by the bill would be firemen, water. tors agreed to begin the pre-armistice exchange of sick and dire need for one more pool there are sometimes as many They know there wilt ,--be; works and sewage plant workers, health de- wounded prisoners of war at Panmunjom on April 20. table. as 14 such locomotives pulling mergers and more tectinolo;; . Ii an age where the strike is being . . i The St. Francois County Men- a long train. Across the United gloat improvements. But they turned against the people at will and such partment employes and other public employes 25 Years AgoMonday, April 11, 1938 Hlth , point to something known in, concerned with maintaining health and safety. things as public welfare have been ignored in . tal Association would States the average is three the business as the 1936 Wash a The employe who struck would be fired. Ten Jackie Coogan, 23, the "kid" of the silent movies, and hus- appreciate hearing from any of locomotives. Many times four death struggle for 10 cents an hour, some band of Betty Grable, asserting he was "broke," filed against ington Agreement This was ' states and the Federal government already your readers who know how are hooked up. Single units . such move is imperative. his. have similar laws on the books mother and step-father. for $4,000,000 he earned as a child one may be secured for the are used in yards and for local signed by the carriers and t - .. The two bills In the state Legislature calling film star. Declaring he was allowed only $6.25 a week for spend- recreation department at State freight runs. unions ranging from locimno.- .. An incident in Illinois last year showed the -, tive engineers to masters, for-the ban were proposed by Senator Arthur ing motley, and that even this was stopped alter he became of Hospital No. 4. These union experts will ar R Gottschalk They were jointly sponsored by C immediate need. Electrician the gue that the fireman is s at e Chicago age, oogan charg e was refused inspection of the books and sec, argue h mates and pilots (rail tug Senator Gottschalk and Senators John A . . mARy A; scHwARTz Metropolitan Sanitary District struck and, while records of Jackie Coogan Productions, Inc., and Coogan men). . . , retary, Board of Graham Joseph R Peterso and W Russell , Directors needed to check such hook. of three to 14 locomo. UNDER THI PACT which Arrington. . n . - . ons, the , they haggled over demands, an estimated 300,- Finance Corporation. , - , 1 ups 'S , , 000,000 gallons of raw sewage was sent down Years AgoFriday, April 11, 1913 St. Francois County Mental tives if there is difficulty. 50 e Chicago and Little Calumet Rivers. Health Association, The engineer cannot leave, :7 be ud a i inz "The 'blue laws' of Missouri were put on the books in 1825, this .0ads scanesh bu asiftmengudel the , -....,. ' The very proposal of these bills underlines Responsible workers holding such posts wouH recalled The Globe-Democrat, "but tit the last 23 years, they Farmington, Mo. , his cab, they say. Thus, though there is no for example if a railroad - the callous neglect of several Irresponsible hardly Artie. The only ones restrained by this plagued no one because no attention was paid to them. 1-loss ' - longer any old-fashioned open- worker has to sell his . home labor leaders in the past, both local and na- bill would be the irresponsible, and that is good . races were held by boys at the forks of the cricks, town dram , ''''''''''IUM17-17..1;'''''.7-a. mouthed furnace to stoke, the suddenly . under a loss, the . shops kept their side doors open for the bibulous, and barber mpany must reimburse him ,'.- fireman spot itself should be co for th difference .. shcce bowed to the popular will, at least tmtil 1 p.m. tNow these W a perm This would mean anent one on such nms. , e Lerence. .- Pofomac Fever---------------- torpid 'blue laws' come to life agn ce - ai, hifly in the name of ------------ kiliskG RO .--,, , that thou- The lines pay for shifting , the worker, his family and his - , , health and sanitation," the editorial concluded. .7 By Fletcher Knebel . - sands would keen their lobs 75 Years AgoWednesday, April, 11,' 1888 r r:),I0H70A-7- y46000A.TERDoEstAsrIT, 'and be replaced. when th- ey him and his . furniture. This includes living expenses for - retire, or quit, or die, or are WASHLNGTON, ID. C.A steel company raises to-date Patrick Henry: "Give me libertyor "A beer famine in the City of New York," was threatened by YEARS CROP? family and actual wages lost -, dischged f c. prices. It's that time of year again. JFK has give me foreign aid!" members of the Brewers As th sociaton In retaliation for e picket- - ar or ause The carriers even protect -' , tossed out the first pitch, so he's all warmed up , . . ing of one brewery by the Knights of lAthor. "An injury to one .,...-----------; . UNDER THE P R E S E N T the shifting worker from all throw ...," to row a beanball at the first .- ---- n Missouri Republicans censure a party official is an injury to all," th said a spokesman for e firms, which were IA COM E Ming the railroads have the loss and cost involved in expected to close down production in three days. rulright to lay off some 13,000 brealdng an unexpired lease , industrialist of the season. , .- for refusing campaign contributions. , Its fine Broold3rn, ty7 IN , - Newark, Elizabeth and Hoboicen were also expected to be "suds- . TAX , , younger-firemen and then wipe on a home. These are just a - . to preach economy in governmentbut they . p,, th , less". e job itself out. As for the few of what the railroads call , Rockefeller, meeting Repub. '-' ''' " 1 4 like to practice spending on their way in. , oly - !.. s --,---, , suREAu. other, 27,000 firemen, they have financial burdens unique to - . lican House members, pleads t , - , . 100 Years AgoSaturday, April 11, 1883 - -,, '..-.-------. a guarantee of lifetime jobs their field. , for party unity. He's tl s teal 1 v,.. lotr- - The Kennedy Administration has got the coun- The anniversary oi the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter .4 . ' but not necessarily as firemen The rails feel they ve given . , presidential candidate: Not ;,,,.. I try moving againevery six months when you i th was marked with a mass meeting in Union Square, New York ',- , " , The railroads do not have all they can. The unions say r even electedand already hay- "lt'' '--- 1-- , , , can't pay . the rent , City, at which principal speakers were Gen . Frem . nt and Gthem o. to replace the as they re- there must be compromise. - ing trouble with his party in 'tltt . -, Franz Sigel. ,c tire or pass en. e issue The President will pressure Congress -N Absent-minednes is perilous In today's mo- . ' ,' , ' ' , , 011111.1P 'N.7---- - ,,-- s ' Th , ,. A Confederate deserter entering- Union lines revealed the then Is whether or not there The emergency board will - - . - di tineeet ombed his tori d h On fellow bet Instigators cl the Richmond bread riots were women trying to casfk.. , ..e.,,,,se actually will be a permanent argue and cajole. . eeome. e c' rd support their streets. Coofederate . category An exile leader demands the U. S. either in- with an electric toothbrush and left for work families by begging on the of freight train If there is give and take soldiers were demoralized by the outbreak and insisted the Con. , firemen or whether It will there will be no strike. If Veda Cuba or give him $50,000,000. He's an up. after grinding his teeth with the electric razor federacy feed their families. , disappear. not ; , , , , . A ' - k , , , , . . .. , i t t-' . 4 t . 1 . - , i , it ' . . . Ir'-'1 , 1 ' r ' . . . . ,.. , . , , . t . . . , ,...,,,. , , i 1 . I - I 0 , INIEN r. , , ' CE a ttse . - to I the, tat s. It poll ser stai N one aris Ca Soy I the its , tro . 'I an( in wh lea , 1 - ally in t dari , Pose cour - Fe ,. who the hal() B,, per: - - 111111 , And at I Se the I - to ki ever raids thing worl( - with - Tht triots tunes Castr they : have with prisce Is The Un-A a res Gord Marg retire gress Bot faith! Co Rep thos give: ing I and, mitt corn: Th fay() In Boar( - pay 0 suspe Th . com boar ter I ollic that wani Mr. ment quant When ago in ne , , Fol. ban I to th0 turnj, a de! such The for -t1 R. G Senat Grah Arrin Th the labol , .7 WA price tossec to thr Indusi . ' Roc ' lican ' - far p; presid even 1 ing ti Congr An vade , , . ,., . - ' willinS011;.; kt s that while the'''' Labor may be 6 the flesh of Las-- r weak. If Willow..., - o to power, we mwise to hold the 1 I. awaiting wirtr:' . esh BrItists trOolt .- I , Is. - I y seems to emerge le Labor actually -I' ants to make the ..emger, Labor hi quite easily fall lit of letting Uncle , for more than as done a not unreason. ;t of Labor's for- -, in general would ines: - :ompulsive with-spirit from Brit- y responsibilities - l an almost total NI On domestic the economic and S. , ey Incomparably -. ed to the United ' nd especially to Afro-Asian bloc us to Britain's old . e West. unwillirtness to ' ty foreseeable fu- . lil effort to enter. an Common Mar. ;e the other naare not too keen. the UN run the ' 14 ether. in American nillan is meeting I kind of youngr Wallace of the , rnest, able, dull. . perhaps -,rather iple of the quart-very - Hottentot . . s PASSION for ab- .. mon man" is far his probable con- ' , ity to help Eng-, the brutal chal- 1 era whose prob- t so much defined it md-butter aspira- - the higher aspira- , Lain that freedom ritain has stood so' s Is elected, there vo sloganeers in in England. 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