The Birmingham News from Birmingham, Alabama on August 4, 1929 · 58
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The Birmingham News from Birmingham, Alabama · 58

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Birmingham, Alabama
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Sunday, August 4, 1929
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58
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i I 1:1 I I . I 1; It -4 , 4 i I c i I 4 1 : OM P.0 LI R t What Is Your Birth Stotie? JanuatyOarnet. YobruaryAtnothyol. )dsreblitoodstone. Jasper. A prilMtappliks. diamond. MaYEmaraid. oasts. JuneEmerahl. agate, chalesdony. moonstone, posit JulyOnyx. carnelian. sardonyx. AugustCarnelian. sardonyx. alroxandrite, amethyst. deptemberChrysolyte, borYl. OctoberAquomartne, boryl. NovemberTopas. DecemberTun:moist,. ruby. DT GLADYS DM Spewed Derreepeediest The threilhebeee Neve SINCE the dawn of civilization the legendary lore of precious stones ae shociattell with lives of con. picuous individuals has been closely woven Into the history of the world. The decorative value of temp and their esoteric significance played a very real part in the religious and civic lite of the ancients. Precious atones were at once their gods, their rulers, their faith and their physicians. In all the countries of the East you will find traditions of the IMISIC properties of gems handed down through the centuries and even in these latter days of harsh material-lam to those who look for subtle Meanings behind the world of the physical benne. these time-honored fables am still held, for one reason Cl. another, as worthy of consideration. That precious stones have qualities II subtle as the affinity retognized between certatin minerals. such as the attraction of the magnet over iron. or as inexplicable as the influence of one personality over another, Is sccepted by a great many people. If only for the reasen that such a belief intrigues mans fancy. To the artist the hidden Of stones is eeixed upon as an important escape for the inusgination. The collector embraces; these legends; because they sidd definite glamour to the lustrous; donee which he lets slip. in their Melling and brilliant colors. through caressing fingers. There are men. too. whose geneses are aware of uneeen mysteries which lie about us. ouch are they who feel something deeper yet behind a Beethoven symphony or behind the brush work of an artist. For them it is not difficult to believe that precious stones are more than bright baubles to be exhibited in Jewel-box or shop-window or to enhance the loveliness of women. TN e layman has come to E th take for granted that certain gems should be worn for birth etonee. The list of stones to be worn for certain months of the year is only a part of the legacy handed down to us through the ages. Nor, can it be logically disassociated from other legends revolving around the beautiful gems offered to us from the largess of Mother Earth as the highest form of development of her great mineral kingdom. So fascinating is the subject of Precious etones that there are men end women who have devoted their Jives to them, searching out old records. going to original sources. traveling far trails to hear stories1 repeated by word of mouth from people whose reverence for the traditions of stones is as profound as is the orthodox Christian's belief in his creed. Such a man is Count Stefan Colonna Walewski. Born into the nobility of Russia, the son of one of Europe's most aristocratic families. young Stefan had many advantages. Mis parents. from a long line of distinguished ancestry, were people who passed their time in embracing the fine arts. in pursuing knowledge, in discovering new sources of beauty. From his father the young nobleman Inherited an inner necessity for knowledge. The Walewski library. one of the finest in Petrograd, held volumes of occult teachings. It was here that the child spent most of his time with his father as he pored over musty parchments transcribed In Sanscrit or Latin. His mother, as did many of the sensitive, highly-cultured women of her era. had an absorbing interest in religions and was vastly concerned with mysticism. INTO such an environment came Stefan Walewski. He was a grave lad. At the age of 10 he spoke several languages. When other children romped and played he preferred to sit with his father. Early he was drawn to the ivoried parchments, some of which were written in neat but laborious long hand of Tibetan monks and Egyptian symbologists. Ilia father was intensely interested in the Eastern system of yoga. Magic was his hobby. At nightfall young Stefan would listen for hours while his mother told him enchanting legends associated with her collection of rare jewels which had been handed down through generations of the Walewski family. And so the mystery of life was ever with him. Into the very texture of his mind and heart had been woven the eternal questioning and avid desire for knowledge which had so absorbed his parents before him. When he became older be was sent to Warsaw to study architecture and painting. To him both subjects were pleasing but always his mind chimed back to the fascinating stories sills mother had told him about precious stones and his imagination quickened whenever he saw a collection of gems lying in their velvet cases in a jeweler's shop window. What was the history of these stones? By whom bad they been worn? What gay courtesan's throat or wrist had it adorned and through it what intrigues of court or state had been Instigated? His fingers yearned for the touch of his mother's Jewels and for the old parchments in his father's library dealing with stones and their oecul. dr:Sr WIC a n ce. IT WAS while Stefan was pursuing his studies to fit himself to become an architect that a famous yoga came to Warsaw from Persia to collect herbs which could be found nowhere else except in the Ural idountains. The man was a lapidary with a comprehensive knowledge of gems and metals. Stefan became his pupil. He learned all the picturesque and scholarly patriarch knew of precious gems and was instructed in the magic preparation of tallsmen and jewels. He watched the old man as he prepared his pungent herbs. He saw him wait. with the conscientiousneSS of a priest preparing to celebrate a feast day. for the processes of the moon before he would mutter his weird incantations or engrave his graceful inscriptions. An order for a ring or bracelet supposed to work definite results. was executed with the exactness of a pharmacist filling a prescription. To the yoga the working with stones was a science as rigidly defined as mathematics. He was insistent on details. The right mantrum must be chanted, the right quarter of the moon must be in evidence, the right herbs must be used in preparation of the metals. the clock must have brought around the right hour of night or morning. One error, he explained to his pupil. and not only his life. but that of his client might be endangered. The young architect learned many things. In order to work with magic jewels the mechanic must know the sabot hour of that person'a birth for shorn the stone was ordered. He must know his weaknessies, his desires, his strength and just what it was he hoped to attain by possessing the magic gem. The whole process fascinated the Imaginative youth. Here was what ha wanted. He would become a lapidary and know all there was to be known on the subject. HIS decision gained the approval of his parents and so he was encouraged to go to original sources to read tho whole worlds U. brary on pecious stones: to see them as they came, in their crude state. from the bowels of the earth: to visit museums ahem famous mono lay behind guarded showcases He spent months with gem collie-tors, happy in the companionship of 1 men with whom he shared an absorbing and mutual interest. Then came the unrest of war to his country. He enlisted with the Russian army at the beginning of hostilities and after several months at the front was wounded. H. was sent then by the Imperial Russian Artillery to America to negotiate with this country for arms and ammunition. In 1916 he was transferred to the Polish consulate. For a while the art of jeuels must be laid aside for more pressing matters of country. 3ut once the armistice was signed he returned to his chotien profession. H. began to bulwark his store of knowledge by the pursuit of allied subjects. He became a ,pupil of Serge Soudelkin, master of theatrical decoration. He studied psychology, religions. astronomy, astrology and took practical courses in medicine, mental therapeutics, chemistry and metalloaraphy. In the meantime he made many friends in his newly-adopted country. He spoke several languages fluently. He had poise, tact and innate good taste. A few years ago he was made vice president of the Society of Nobility, with Grand Duke Alexander at the head of it. an organization made necessary by the influx of phony noblemen who poured into America following the war in Europe. AT COVNT AvALEwslcrs tea parties in his very artistic studio in West Twelfth Street. one shakes hands with financiers. artists, "grand. dames" of Newport and Park Avenue, princesses, counts, grand dukes, sculptors and poets. His wails are lined with books on jewels. There are 600 treating with a single magic. He is tall. well poised and 1 a pike by the revolutionists and ex- with a dignity of mien which often hibited before the king and queen makes him pass for a man 20 years , as a threatening omen. his senior. Though his actual age I Later the Hope gem was found in g shows only SO years chalked up 1 possession of a em merchant in against him one knows that behind Amsterdam who died in dire poverty. his prosperity diminishing from the his steel-gray eyes are memories of his war-torn country. horrors ofa i day he took the tragic Jewel into his revolution in which his friends and keeping. The gem was stolen by his relatives suffered extreme humilia son who was pursued by such ill for- t tion and always and always the will tune that be was glad to give it to a to conquer the obscure realm of un- Frenchman and immediately corn- mitted seen forces. The only time his face, suicide. The Frenchman. in loses its earnestness of expression turn. brought it to London. sold it i and his eyes brighten is when he di.- to a dealer and died the following cusses his hobby. day. Henry Hope then bought it for "Here." he will say. while relat- something like 350.000. ing a legend of a certain stone. this is not a good, but a fair example. T REMAINED in the Hope family The finest one is in the Louvre." Or, until 1901 when Sir Francis Hope again. his voice sounds a happier was divorced from the actress to note when he lets a shower of bright whom he bad been happily married. gems. blue. red. purple and yellow. Later it fell into the hands of Jacques fall through his fingers. Colot who sold it to a Russian prince who was stabbed after he acquired IT TS impossible to hold the count to a regulation interview, and so the facts I have been able to glean from his fund of information concerning precious stones have been obtained upon various occasions. Often when a few persons have lingered over the tea cups and when prompted by questions the count grows expansive and then it is that he talks as does any collector. given the opportunity to discuss his hobby with kindred spirita. After a dinner party a few nights ago we sat on around a beautiful hand carved refectory table in high-backed chairs upholstered in wine-red velvet The glow of gigantic white candles In Renaissance candlesticks and a flickering red vigil light burning before a sixteenth century icon made a perfect environment for leisured conversation. Then It that we induced the gem expert to tell us some of the most famoug legends associated with jewels and their esoteric significance. He told us of how Cleopatra bad dissolved a pearl of fabulous value in a cup of wine and had drunk of it to make her more lovely. He told us why sapphires were used as the ring of bishops of the early church: how a similar stone had been used by King Solomon as a seal for important documents; how Nero at his bacchanalian feasts had dissolved pearls in a Die and offered the drink to the famous beauties of the day who came to sit at his royal banquets; how the pearl necklace of Marie Antoinette. on exhibition at the Louvre.. is beginning to lose its lustre. due to the fact that pearls turn as white as chalk when not worn by a human being, and ..bow a widely known actress is commissioned by the French government to come each day and sit for hours under heavy guard with the pecklace of the ill-fated queen word on her person. WE QUESTIONED Count Wa- lewski about the superstition of opals. According to him, the story originated through a whim of Cleopatra's. who. having quarrelled with Antony. cursed the beautiful gem and laid her misfortune entirely to its sinister influence. Other people believe that the stone became an omen of misfortune from the tragedies of Anne of Geierstein, set forth in Sir Walter Scotts famous novel. There were other fables. The connoisseur told us that: Nero inscribed A'erses to his wife's hair and wrote of her "amber colored treaties" and how all the women of the court tried to turn their own tresses into the alluring bronze-gold shade which then became the fashion. That Queen Elizabeth was given a large oval agate by Archbishop Parker which was accompanied by a parchment giving its magical properties and with the statement that as long as her majesty wore this jewel she would have a trustworthy friend. He said that the sapphire had gained Its reputation as a pledge of faithfulness between husband and wife because the wife of the Emperor Charlemagne wore a talisman mild. of two sapphires and a portion of the holy cross which had gained for her the consume", et keg him. " THE BIRMINGHAM NEWSAGEHERALD The South's Created Newspopor USSI REL A TES LO E F GEMS At the left is shown Count Stefan Colony'. Walewski seated on an antique Tibotan chest, one of his prized treasures of a large collection of antiques. At right he is shown with some of his collection of antique Budd hos. band's affection which endured until after her death. Indeed so intense was his devotion that be would not allow the body,of his royal consort to be buried until the spell was broken by the emperor's confessor-who removed the magic talisman from the body. ?deny interesting tales are attributed to the diamond. Queen Elizabeth wore one of the most brilliant of diamonds of all times in her bosom to protect her from the plague. ALARGE diamond in the girdle of Queen Donna Isabella laved her lite when the dagger of a would-be assassin struck the stone and glanced off. thus averting mortal injury. Napoleon. notoriously superstitiotts, found a rare carnelian during his campaign in Egypt and wore it on his watch chain as a mascot. The Corsician general also attached great significance to the diamond and the famous Regent stone glittored from the hilt of his sword. It weighod 137 carats. was perfectly white. without spot or flaw and the size of a large apricot. Diamonds should be given and not bought and the ancients believed that large diamonds should never be worn as adornment This superstitition is aptly illustrited by the misfortune attached to the Hope diamond. This beautiful blue gem was bought in 16titi by Henry VI!!. Ms favorite, the Duchess. de 3Iontespan, persuaded the king to lether wear it to a keeping. The gem was stolen by his son who was pursued by such ill fortune that be was glad to give it to a Frenchman an4 immediately committed suicide. The Frenchman. in turn. brought it to London. sold it to a dealer and died the following day. Henry Hope then bought it for something like 350.000. see IT REMAINED in the Hope family until 1901 when Sir Francis Hope was divorced from the actress to whom he bad been happily married. Later it fell into the hands of Jacques Co lot who sold it to a Russian prince who was stabbed after he acquired the jewel. Not only that. but the gem merchant in Paris from whom he had purchased the stone, committed suicide just after the prince was assassinated. Its next owner was Abdul Hamid, who bought It from a Greek jeweler who met with violent death. Everyone knows how Abdul, himself. narrowly escaped death after losing his throne. Later. the stone is said to have remained for a little while in the gem collection of a man who went down on the Titanic. It is now owned by the McLean family of America. Emperor Hadrian. whose reign was one of the most brilliant in Roman history and who did much toward spreading Christianity. wore a ring set with a topaz tinged with orange. which he believed increased his spiritual understanding. Catherine of Aragon wore a ruby ring which was said to become clouded at the approach of personal danger. So convinced was she of the power of the stone that she acted Implicitly upon its warning. "Is it true." I asked Count Walewski. "that one should always wear his birth stone for fortune?" He answered :n the affirmative, adding: "But one should also wear certain stones for every day in the week." He gave the following list of stones, the wearing of which is still etrictly observed in many countries of the East: Monday, pearls and crystal. Tuesday, lodestone and amethyst. I Friday. turquoise and lapis lazuli. Saturday. onyx. Sunday, opal or diamond. ON ANOTHER occasion I was present when Count Walewski discuseed the more familiar stones and their occult meanings. He told us that jade. associated with all the religious ceremonies of the orientate, means life everlasting. No Chinese emperor ever went to his final place of resting without a piece of Jade in his mouth to insure his entrance into the celestial kingdom. Real jade varies in color from white to deep green. some is transparent and some opaque. 'When it is sounded it gives forth a sweet note which Mate sharply and clearly to some distance. It is used in Chinese temples. The best variety comes from Mexico. China. Turkestan and New Zealand. Modern sportsmen use Jade in America as a mascot for success In racing. According to Count Walewski. the diamond set in steel is supposed to be a protection against insanity. It should be worn on the left side. The Hindu believes that a diamond cut triangularly causes quarrels. Square stones were said to bring unnamable terrors to the wearer, their highest hopes being fastened on the six-cor, nered stone, which is imbued with the power of banishing melancholy and of bringing renewed strength in old age. This was the original shape of the diamond. Among precious stones, the ruby ranks high in value. the true ruby grand dukes, sculptors and poets, His 1005 DY nenrY 1 Lii. 1111 lalrurlic, tam 1 . or pigeon-blood color being more 1 '7.:''''" '"'" . -'' Li ''''. --- ---- -- expensive in l vision. " walls are n with Lined wi books On Jeweis. Duche , the gem market than ss. de Montespan, persuaded Nero. WOO WS short-sighted, There are 600 treating with a single the king to let,..her wear it to a a similar-sized diamend. Rubies i I used an emerald eyeglass to witness phase of the eubject His collection function at court- From that mom range in color from shell pink to moment, range gladiatorial contests. of antique Buddhas. icons and amu- isaid that de Montespan lost , de,,p carmine. The fineet Stone are! Throughout the East one finds the her hold over the monarch and thus I found in Burmah, Ceylon and Siam. i lets attracts attention of those who; belief that the dazzling green stone from his favor. fall f f her a r . appreciate workmanship of artistic began The Spinel or Batas ruby, -which t increases one's chances for immortal-merit. It Is not a new story to many of I flashes in colors of red. orange, green. 'Iv, especially if it is engraved with He Is a grave. Person, I. Count us bow the famous blue diamond , blue and violet was formerly classed 1 verses from the Koran. In India the an Walewskl. As grave, I think. as W worn by Marie Antoinette who I with the pigeon-blood ruby, but emerald is suppoeed to revivify the the little chap who distressed his met with the most tragic death in i these stones in recent years have memory. The Romans attributed such aunt so much because he bent over history. The queen of France per- greatly decreased in value. power to the emerald that they be-the books in his father's library. that mitted her closest friend, the Prin- The orientais believe that any ruby lieved nothing unpleasant could exist at one time she burned many of the cess de tamballe. to wear it and the guards its wearer against his elle- in its presence. By turning pale it most preoious volumes on Egyptian head of the princess was paraded on I mies; also that a ruby plunged into a pike by the revolutionists and ex- poisoned liquid will reveal the foreign 1 warns against encroaching misfor- magic. He is tall. well poised and 'tune and when an emerald falls from with a dignity of mien which often hibited before the king and queen I substance by changing color. It is ; its setting, woe betide the wearer ! makes him pass for a man 20 years ' , as a threatening omen. i said to become less brilliant in times i The ancients believed that the rich his senior. Though his actual ate' Later. the 1,-lope gem was found in I of danger. It is also supposed to i green stone svas of great assistance guards its wearer against his ene- I in its presence. Isy turning pale a mies: also that a ruby plunged into warns against encroaching misfor- poisoned liquid will reveal the foreign ! 'tune and when an emerald falls from substance by changing color. It is; its setting, woe betide the wearer ! said to become less brilliant in times The ancients believed that the rich of danger. It is also supposed to ;green stone was of great assistance give its owner control over the pas- to women in childbirth; also that if alone. to protect from evil thoughts worn in a ring it strengthens the and dreams and is used for regain- marriage vows. ing lost articles. Count Walewski is not only ably 1 s informed on the value of precious 1E gem expert told us many en- stones and their occult meaning but 1-1 tertaining superstitions evolving once launched upon a discussion of around the amethyst. The beau- the subject nearest his heart. he iltiful deep purple stone is worn as a lustrates certain stones with quota-guard against evil habits and espe- tions from literature. often repeating Many to prevent over-indulgence In i fragments of poetry. For instance Intoxicating liquors. The name I when he spoke of the emerald he re--amethyst" Is from the Greek. which I called lines from a certain English is interpreted "without intoxication . "!poet, to illustrate the strange proph- 1 In relating legends of the amethyst ecy given the stone to detect con. the count recalled the myth of Arts- I stancy or infidelity: totle, who tells us that Amethyst "It is a gem which bath the power was the name of a beautiful nymph to show, who begged Diana to shield her from I If plighted lovers keep their faith of danger. It is also supposed to i green stone was of great assistance give its owner control over the pas- to women in childbirth; also that if liens. to protect from evil thoughts worn in a ring it strengthens the and dreams and is used for regain- marriage vows. ing lost articles. Count Walewski is not only ably a a a informed on the value of precious rri 1E gem expert told us many en- stones and their occult meaning but tertaining superstitions evolving' once launched upon a discussion of around the amethyst. The beau- the subject nearest his heart. he iltiful deep purple stone is worn as a lustrates certain stones with quota-guard against evil habits and espe- ilone from literature. often repeating daily to prevent over-indulgence in i fragments of poetry. For instance Intoxicating liquors. The name I when he spoke of the emerald he re--amethyst" is from the Greek. which , called lines from a certain English Is interpreted "without intoxication." ! poet, to illustrate the strange proph- 1 In relating legends of the amethyst ecy given the stone to detect con the count recalled the myth of Aria- I stoney or infidelity: totle, who tells us that Amethyst "It is a gem which bath the power I was the name of a beautiful nymph to show, 1 who begged Diana to shield her from I If plighted lovers keep their faith' the marked attentions of Bacchus. or no; Forthwith Diana transformed her into I If faithful, it is like the leaves of a precious gem. Bacchus, remember- Spring; ing his devotion, gave the stone its If faithless like those leaves when brilliant hue, the color of ripe grapes. withering." and endowed it with power to prevent a its wearer from overindulgence in ENTIONING the garnet. the wine. connoisseur declared that the Much ecclesiastic YmbologY Cling, garnet is another stone which about the amethyst. It has been is P sup osed to change color as a serv- known as the bishop's ring. and in ice of warning to Its wearer. The, brilliant hue. the color of ripe grapes. and endowed it with power to prevent Its wearer from overindulgence in wine. Much ecclesiastic ymbology clings about the amethyst. It has been known as the bishops ring. and in all times it has been made into rosa an times it nas neen mane into rosa- 1 1 true or Bohemian garnets, are deep. of prophecy. ries due to a soothing influence it is i I lustrous red. Others are found One of the less expensive stones said to exert over its wearer. Like t ! .,.,, .u,........... , ,,, ..... i ng ed with orange and atillother is the moonstone. Because of its 1- the ruby. the amethyst is said to go i are violet in putt. Bright strange SY DAVID P. SENTNER throtleh tho hPflimrninar nrneAmil lorhavl I - is tne snounene. blue wcolor the Indians be- - ; and neuralgia rosy be banished by f MIy ' The count continued tracing the stroking the temples , with a .. s'o'r gently eLer:JiTa.rii-ti-ii soid-ai the association of precious stones and the I piece of amethyst. Count Walewski e - -I f : aoe ruby.' However, the true of persons of importance. He told us explaining that It works through the influence they had played in the lives I , s principle that violet rays are ter smteanrcke.et value than that a chrysoprase was used as an I ame used by modern science. In late ruby Is onetgreain The Greeks and Romans used the amulet by Alexander the Great who ! had profound faith in the magic times the brilliant purple stone has decreased in value because of the 1 Igarnet on which to engrave imperial properties of the stone. The losing of aring when given as large quantities of stones produced hpoor:oraig.runSginocroe onood stinhiestegor Atootrietst a pledge of affection is considered in Brazil. The stone may be had in is still used for preserving marital 1 an omen of mishap. The widow of varying shades of purple, many fine felicity and is said to bring corn- Viscount Dundee. the famous Clever- specimens being mined in Ceylon and " fort to widows in bereavement. house. was betrothed to William Liv- Persia. If thou wear a piece of true agate ingstone. As an engagement gift he a . upon thine hand the gods will be well gave her a very beautiful ring. She ERHAPS the most venerated pleased with thee." "If lost the ornament while walking next gem in the East is the sapphire. the same be tied to the harness day in her garden. Almost immedi- The preciousness of this stone of thy oxen when ploughing or about e was part of the house in which she lived wear the sapphire is to aid its owner. crowned Ceres shall descend from ately afterwards eh killed when is gauged by its clear blue color. To the ploughman's sturdy arm. wheat-fell upon her. The ring was found in the search for spirituality. It is i heaven with full lap upon thy fur- sometime later in the garden. supposed to bring peace and happii rows."Orpheus. a a fleas. but only so long as its possessor! Count Walewski has discovered leads a moral life. In the East the! that the agate to this day plays an AMONG curious relic rings with i i d t r hire is con important role in the lives of the sapphire to deities. In which Count Walewski is fa- Easterners. The agate comes forth the middle ages it was said to pre- miller is one in which a tooth from the earth in many enchanting Is a ring in France today set with pete or sensuous person the an- serve chastity. If worn by an intern- of Sir Isaac Newton was set. There There is the ra cients have handed down the belief states of development. ribbon-agate with its weird strips of the tooth of Voltaire. white running through its surface. that the stone will lose its luster. It was also ceoreatsoe "Cramp" rings were at one time and to tgoivte the po.wher 1 There is the moss agate on which and queens of England. The ring held in deep reverence by the kings of concentration will power. star sapphinr is imprinted various scenes from was placed In a bowl and a cere- Ler I nature, such as clouds, trees. ferns and insects. In the British Museum more modern times have become mony which consisted of reading a fashionable among the more expe - n there is a moss agate with an un- psalm and a prayer for spiritua) sire Jewels. The perfect ones must canny likeness of the poet Chaucer. healing preceded the blessing of the have six rays of light runnin g from There is another with the features ring and the sprinkling of holy wa- the top of the stone and closely l re- ., of Voltaire outlined upon its stir-ter. If blessed on Friday. such rings sembling a perfect six-pointed star. race were supposed to be a cure for epi- Because it was worn in olden times! lepsy. One such ring has been on as a token of love it is widely used, ; ERTAIN Orientals believe that exhibit at Westminster Abbey. It whenever the perfect star formation i the agate confers eloquence. was brought from Jerusalem by Ed- is obtainable. for engagement rings. t and it is quite the custom for its owner is in danger. It is still through the bedimming process when l''''"" - - the Ural I strange UlUC UVIV. 4,i, asau.asco w.,, green ones are taken from tn C 1, lieve that the moonlight gives this Mountains, but the most precious believed by many that sleeplessness stone something of its own ephemeral garnet closely resembles the ruby and neuralgia may be banished by shading. They say in the East that and by some merchants is sold as the gently stroking; the temples with a the moonstone is washed up by the cape ruby." However, the true piece of amethyst. Count Walewski .. tides every 21 years and hence the 1 ruby is of greater market value than explaining that it works through the expression, "Once in a blue moon."I any garnet in existence. same principle that violet rays are It is used to reconcile lovers. to give s used by modern science. In late The Greeks and Romans used the I clairvoyant power -and, if held in the times the brilliant purple stone ha I mouth. ton assist in moments of in- decreased in value because of the large quantities of stones produced garnet on which to engrave imperiall portraits. Since no sinister stories decision. in Brazil. The stone may be had in have sprung around the garnet it is still used for preserving marital Among the wine-red stones is the varying shades of purple, many fine 1 felicity and is said to bring Corn- specimens being mined in Ceylon and fort to widows in bereavement. carnelian. which in Arabia and Tur- key is considered the most powerful Persia. , "If thou wear a piece of true agate , Upon thine hand the gods will be well of all gems in. the making of amulets pERHAPS the most venerated . The 3loslems had an incongruous pleased with thee." habit of taking their carnellans to The preciousness of this stone of thy oxen when ploughing or about parting would pave the stones im- gem in the East is the sapphire. "If the same be tied to the harness i the Christian priests and upon de- is gauged by its clear blue color. To wear the sapphire is to aid its owner mediately engraved with verses from the ploughman's sturdy arm. wheat- . crowned Ceres shall descend from their own Bible! It was used to still 1 In the search for spirituality. It is i heaven with full lap upon thy fur- supposed to bring peace and happi- i rows."Orpheus. angry passions, to dispel envy and to drive away evil thoughts. It was ! leads a moral life. In the East the nese, but only so long as its possessor' Count Waiewski has discovered especially useful in controlling high! sapphire is consecrated to deities. In' that the agate to this day plays an I important role in the lives of the carried about for the gfft of fluency perate or sensuous person the an- were on by fashionable; serve chastity. If worn by an intern- Easterners. The agate comes forth in public speech making. White car-1 from the earth in many enchanting nelians w; ciente have handed down the belief states of development. There is the women of ancient Greece aa hair temper. In Spain the carnelian is still the middle ages it was said to pre- I ribbon-agate with its weird strips of ornaments. The stone also comes In that the stone will lose its luster. white running through its surface. ,-- tone of clear yell ow and often twol of concentration and to increase the There is the moss agate on which '' '- - 'It was also worn to give the power colors are combined. Exposed to the more modern times have become will power. Star sapphires in our is imprinted various scenes from rays of the sun the carnelian be- nature, such as clouds, trees, ferns comes more luminous but is not l- and insects. In the British Museum ected by artificial heat. lure jewels. The perfect ones must fashionable among the more expen- there is a moss agate with an Un- T of the etones which Count canny likeness of the poet Chaucer. Walewski has In his collection and the top of the stone and closely re- of Voltaire outlined upon Its cur- have six rays of light running from There is another with the features hich are very much alike are the se a token of love it is widely used, w sembling a perfect six-pointed star. I face. only in color. the beryl ranging from . ; C Because it was worn in olden times' beryl and the aquamarine. They vary ERTAIN Orientals believe that i i bright blue to white, while the lat. i s sometimes as viv dly whenever the perfect star formation 1 the agate confers eloquence. ter stone i green as , Is obtainable. for engagement rings. i and it is quite the custom for the emerald. Because both mounted in modern platinum settings. i orators to wear one of the stones for th used said to be able to detect perfidy in i stones are saM to be very seneitivei A. person who wears the sapphire is I public speaking. The Mohammedans to personal influence ey were se . Pver, unless this beautiful blue gem are still of the opinion that the agate, by brides at the wedding ceremony.; r is said that the sto mends or in business relations. How. powdered and taken in apple juice. It nes permit the ; will relieve insanity. Pliny records auras of the newly wedded to blend is your birth stone, its wearer will that storms and lightning were avert- and thus increase their fidelity. The I never win in games of chance. It is ed by burning these stones. and that round in torrents and river beds. the Greeks had great eryl and the aquamarine are said at faith in the to shield the wearer from slander. to I Count Walewski believes that !more mysterious properties of the lesser brighten the mental equipment and to . , . . e'ne. 4. nene."1 by an old verse banish idleness. I . Ana neuralgia may oe oanisnett DY't- y some merchants gently stroking the temples with a -n a d b - chants is sold as the "pe " piece of amethyst. Count Walewski ca ruby. However. the true ruby is of greater market value than explaining that it works through the same principle that violet rays are any garnet in existence. used by modern science. In late times the brilliant purple stone has garnet on which to engrave imperial The Greeks and Romans used the decreased in value because of the large quantities of stones produced have ePrung portraits. Since no sinister stories in Brazil. The stone may be had In is still used for preserving marital felicity and is said to bring corn- varying shades of purple. many fine around the garnet it specimens being mined in Ceylon and fort to widows in bereavement. Persia. "If thou wear a piece of true agate a a a upon thine hand the gods will be well pERHAPS the most venerated i,... pleased with thee." i.. h. t,.. I. h.. ......,,.. 'If the same be tied to the harness stance which penetrates the shell and which the oyster for protection. covers with a secretion, and which after years of endeavor developes Into the lovely white gem which serves as the most flattering of all feminine adornment. It is due to the years of painful effort required to fashion the pearl that a string of pearls has been likened to teardrops. The pearl is considered most disastrous in affairs of the heart and this la the reason why even in our own times, the greally admired pearl la rarely used for ries, of betrothal. Pearls are found in both sweet and salt water. the sweet water variety being found in India and the Orient. At the famous fisheries In the Ray of Ago, Japan. the bivalve is taken from the water. a glassy substance introduced within the shell. is replaced in water and in eight years the pearl is thus manufactured by a synthetic process which by no means equals the gem produced by nature. Divers in Japan wear pearls at; a protection against sharks. IN COUNT WALEWSKTS collection there are several examples of very fine emeralds. It is the stone which more than any other engages his in. terest and admiration. It holds a high place among Easterners for its traditions and esoteric proprieties. The ancients believed that the emerald had power to sharpen the eyesight. Pliny says: "If the eyes have been dimmed by wearied poring over anything the beholdering of the emerald doth refresh and restore the ring and the sprineting or now wa- the top of the stone and closely re- 14"1 '"I'll"' "" "I''.. ter. If blessed on Friday, such rings sembling a perfect six-pointed star. race. were supposed to be a cure for epi- Because it was worn in olden times i lepsy. One such ring has been on as a token of love it is widely used, ERTAIN Orientals believe that exhibit at 'Westminster Abbey. It whenever the perfect star formation 1 the agate confers eloquence, was brought from Jerusalem by Ed- is obtainable. for engagement rings, i and it is quite the custom for ward the Conqueror. and. touched to I mounted in modern platinum settings. orators to wear one of the stones for the person suffering with epilepsy. A person who wears the sapphire is I public speaking. The Mohammedans : was said to work an instantaneous 1 eaid to be able to detect perfidy in the opinion that the agate, cure. are still of !friends or in business relations. How. Powdered and taken in apple juice. Emperor Hadrian. whose reign was ever, unless this beautiful blue gem w relieve insanity. Pliny records one of the most brilliant in Roman is your birth Mona, its wearer will that etorma and lightning were avert- ill history and who did much toward never win in games of chance. It i by burning these stones. and that s spreading Christianity. wore a ring found in torrents and river beds. the Greeks had great faith in the ed set with a topaz tinged with orange. Count Walewski believes that more which he believed increased his spir- mystery surrounds the pearl than stone is proved by an old verde itual understanding. any other jewel and certain it is that mysterious properties of the leeser quoted by Count Walewski: Catherine of Aragon wore a ruby when one becomes a lover of pearls "'Who comes with Summer to this ring which was said to become cloud- the fervent desire to add more of the earth ed at the approach of personal dan- peculiarly fascinating gems to one's ger. So convinced was she of the collection transcends all other ambi- . hand power of the stone that she acted tions. And owe; to June her day of birth, IA ith ring of agate on h er an . Can health, wealth and long life corn-implicitly upon its warning. mand." "Is it true." I asked Count Walew- I ASKED the count to explain the ski. "that one should always wear subtle process which goes on in 3fost of us are accustomed to his birth stone for ii,-,nd fortune" nature's manufacture of the pearl. thinking of the topaz as a stone of He answered :n the affirmative, Every school boy knows that this yellow coloring. But according to the adding: "But one should also wear dazzlingly radiant gem is produced gent expert the topaz is also found certain stones for every day in the i within the dark recesses of the home. in distinct colors of white, pink, green week." 13, oyster. Just what is this incongru- and black. the most valuable and the He gave the following list of ous method. by which nature, the I rareet being the pink topaz. which 'donee, the wearing of which is still arch trickster. seeks perhaps to corn- comes from Brazil, as does the white edrictly observed in many countries pensate the insignificant bivalve for stone which is found in pebble forma-of the East: I I its lowly existence? I Om If the latter is highly poi-Monday, pearls and crystal. I In the counts detailed explanation ished the amateur is easily persuaded Tuesday, lodestone and amethyst. I learned that pearls are formed by i that he is buying a diamond. Wednesday. & ring set with agate. the effort of certain bivalves to ob- The yellow topaz, with which we Thursday. emerald or sapphire. fain relief froin some Irritating sub- are all on speaking terms, is mined In Ceylon. but around all varieties of topes there ars similar virtues shared in common by those who at. tech significance to the hidden side of Jewels. The topes la Reid to brighten the wit, to produce content. merit and to bring relief In cases of aethnut and Insomnia. For the lat. ter ailment it is will taken In pow. derail form in some ot the older countries. ass THOUGH tho turquolge Is my own birth stone It is ono of the genii-precious stones which I have never particularly adntired. There ore onie legends surrounding the stone. however. as related by Celina Wa lewski. which have made the December stone leas uninteresting. The turquoise in most highly esteemed by the Persians, who believe It to be the gem of Venus and, there. fore . is capable of bringing strong love ties to its wearer. But the turquoise la only valuable, intrinsically or esoterically, when it retains its clear blue color. The Pe littlitIS hove a way of testing tho pure stone. They say: "Look at the turquoise, then look at tho sky at midday. If the two match the turquoise is perfeet." Even the best atones, according to the count. are apt to turn green and great care should be token not to allow grease or oil to touch them. If mlindy is not careful a few drops of hand lotion will take the "life" from the stone and then it is no longer of any market value. and is also a non-conductor of the occult laws with which the stone has become associated. To restore it to its original perfection the Persians feed the "dead" turquoise to a goone and after a skilful operation remove it. when it is found to be like the "sky at midday." More amulets are made from the turquoise than from any other atone. The most powerful are engraved with verses from the Eastern Bible., the characters gilded. The Easterner is convinced that the turquolee warns of treachery in love by becoming moist and changing color. When the f the turquoise le in health the stone becomes less luetroos buts resumes Bo natural state whvn the physical condition returns to normal. Today it is worn by sportsmen, even in the West, against accident on horseback. In the middle ages it guarded against hatred and quarrels. e IASKED Count Ws lewski if the opal. beyond the superstition that It is a "bad-luck" gem, had any esoteric significance. Ile replied that in India it is still paseed over the brow as an aid to sharpening one's memory. It ta not tinCOMMOn when an Indian tries to retaill a name or date to see him pass a ring or amulet set with an opal across his brow. Sonie occultists use the opal in trying to recall past incarnations'. Except in Occidental countries the opal, with all its pastel tints of the rainbow. is not considered a stone of misfortune. However, because in the East the opal is fo.sociated with religion, the person who wears it must be honorable in all his dealings with human relationships. Its misuse is paid to be fraught with dire consequences. This stone. according to the count. is most sensitive to atmospheric condition's and retains its perfection best when it 114 kept warm and dry. The Hindus believe that the opal loses its magic properties when its wearer Partakes of flesh foods. The finest is the Mazlequin opal. which has small flecks of color in it. Mexican opals are more common and may be "spotted" by the larger formation of colors. From Mexico comes the fire opal. the deep red stone fetching a tidy sum for the gem merchant. Some fire opals are found in. a solid tone of yellow. I learned that the onyx, which we are accustomed to think of as a stone of solid black surface is often found with white stripes running through it or with a snow white circle in its center. Because the onyx is supposed to put a restraint on the passions it is used in India for rosaries. Taken with wine it is supposed to prevent nightmares. BECAUSE the Indian believes that aceticism leads to spiritual development he is always partial to the stone which he believes has power to check dissipation. Such a gem to them is the sardonyx. a rich-brown stone which comes from Arabia, Germany and the Tyrol. From meteorites and from the lava of. Vesuvius comes the chrysolite. the birth stone of those born in September. It is a stone with yellow-green coloring and at one time was considered more valuable than the diamond. Set in gold it is supposed to be a protection against melancholy and to endow its wearer with the gift of prophecy. One of the less expensive stones is the moonstone. because of its The Easterners attach strange meaning's to stones which are seldom admitted to the casual visitor. In many countrieti the pure white chalcedony is used as an amulet by mothers in order to Increase the milk supply for new-born Infanta. The famous Egyptian beauties wore It as a bust developer. One of the birth stones for March is the jasper. It As one of the oldest stones on record, having been worn in the breastplates of the high priests in the Old Testament The blood jasper has perhaps the most uncanny power of all the magic Jewels. It is supposed to cloak its wearer In invisibility and is worn by persons Intent on thievery. This is explained by the stone having hypnotic power so that at the time its wearer commits his thievery Won it it is in I I a crowded subway) the onlookers be, come diverted until the thief helps himself and goes bin "Y. , The bloodstone is really a green Jasper, containing red poets. Because of its peculiar ColOring St ill not at. tractive to many, but if worn as the Win atone for the Marchborn it is amid to atop none-bleeding and to be of great aid if preseed to the Surface of a wound. These then, are the stones moat commonly known because they are used as birth atones. Because of the couns fund of knowledge on the aubIect of precious gems. I asked him to tell Die corns of the legends age. elated with alone. with which we are not familiar. Ile began with the carbuncle. It is a stone with & rounded surface resembling the garnet. It shines in the dark. and because of this peculiar radiancy. is said to have aerved Noah aa a lamp during the time of the flood. Shiliteepeare also refers to the weird glow which surrounds the carbuncle. . IT IS mid that a person with pity- chic powers is able to sea a halo of light around the atone even in the glare of midday. In the middle ages it was used to increase its wear. Ws popularity and to bring about reconciliation among those who had quarreled. I'llny tells us that there are masculine and feminine stones and that this fact in strikingly demonstrated in the carbuncle. the dark stone being maseuline and the lighter one of the feminine gender. Count Walewski is eepecially tn. terested In stones which have magnetic power. The lodestone has electrical force. In one of the Roman temples there was once a statue of Venus fashioned of lodestone and one of Mars in iron. At nuptials of eel. twisted personages the statues were placed apart and while the service was being performed. drew together as a symbol of marital constancy. The lodestone is one of the least attractive stones in the counts collection. The tourmaline is a more comely stone which also possesses magnetic properties. When 'heated. one end be- comes positive. the other negative. The positive end will attract straw and ashes. This atone is found in Siberia. India and Brazil and comes in solid colors of pink, red and yellow. Often two shades will be combined in a single stone. It is supposed to conquer all fear and to serve as inspiration in the creative arts. In Christian religions - the lapis lazuli is supposed to be the stone of the Virgin. It is of a dark blue color I and if worn as a necklace is said to counteract timidity, to banish de- preasion and to bring success in affairs of the heart CRTSTAL. so much in vogue at I present, was worn by the ancient. as a preservation for the eyes. Roman physicians used the crystal ball for cauterizing, heating it against the rays of the sun. It is I also widely used for fortune-telling purposes. 1 Haematite, which looks like dull lead. is suppoeed to reveal treachery. It is founA in meteorites and is used as a protection against law- 1 suits. i Another stone, not generally known 1 by the amateur, is the chrysoprase. 4 an opaque stone which varies in shading from yellowish green to ,. white. It fades when exposed for a long time to the sun. The Egyptians mounted it in lapis lazuli against evil dreams and for success in new 1 enterprises. The green Russian stone, mala- I chite. is the only stone used as a I protection for infants. The red 1. ammonite is worn by persons in ill health and is said to be of particular 1. benefit to victims of tuberculosis. However, the atone soon loses its ,11 color, if worn by an unhealthy per- t son. and must be replaced by new I stones if its power is to be con- c tinued. It is also said to give its wearer the prophecy of dreams. I Although it is not classed with the I precious stones, amber, a fossil of t the vegetable kingdom, is greatly r admired by the peoples of the Orient. r In the West we see little real am- a bet-, many imitations being palmed ,o off by unscrupulous merchants who i t trade on the amateurs ignorance of v the genuine product. If you are pur- f I chasing a string of amber beads teat In the a u t h ecip.n: cet ci ctRrti teci yra is 1 tests given a. tgmAhi ell, epos nct ao mnbbeyyab c bfc friction Count deui ov- n net ccek b;teral'eaolemose'issmk I are very light in weight. If the a beads are made of celluloid when ' a I NEW YORK. Aug. 3(INS)"It's not the women Its the kids." 1 The casting director of Paramount studios in Long Island so sums up 'his troubleskid troubles. Ever since Davy Lee caught the maternal and paternal heart of America In "The Singing Fool" the moving picture studios have beer. besieged with mothers bringire their tender-aged offsprings to offer MI the altar of fame, fortune and ra r k - I erdom. a I vraa having lunch during a tour of the Paramount studio when a proud, maternal voice boomed forth "quiet!" Merely from the habit of working around talking pictures, the crowd automatically quieted. A woman (only a visitor with SIM. bitions) perched her little boy on the top of a table. The lac with all the self-confidence of a wealioned ham actor. burst into "Sonny Boy." With all due respect to the arPew.l of childhood. I must report that the youngster sante like a miniature fog horn rusty from the 'milt air. However. at the finish. the proud mother applauded furiously. She wa quite alone In the procedure. "Whitt a business to be in." sighed the director at my table. You can't get away from things like that a is A long line of applicants file peat the castitlg ,director every day In New York, "Little Hollywood?4 And here's bad news for girls trying to break into the taleties. "The talkies do not affect the picking of extras." said Frank Heath, Paramount casting director. "The stars are featured in the talkies even more than they were in the silent films. Extras don't do any talking. However. some very rand I t " play. era are developed occasionally." ass They were ehooting a di-easing room scene of "Glorifying the American Girl." The charming. blonde Mary Eaton. In a dancer's costume, wets weeping beltare her make-up mirror. "It doesn't mean anythin g... fal. tered Miss Eaton. She had lust won -- fame and lost her true love. I was much interested in this romantic expression inasmuch as her off-stage fiancee. Millard Webb. was directing the picture. He was standing 10 feet away from the camera box. nodding approvingly. "Since the coming in of the talkies. brains have become more essential in the star than in the days of the voiceless film," said Webb. "As soon as the camera begins shonting. the director cannot do more than StaTIFII directions. and the result depends more than ever upon the stars technique. Another atop wag at a scene where Gertrude Lawrence was filming for , ;UNDAT, AUGUST, 49,1939 rubbed they give oft a petullar clot unlike the very pleasing eent of genuine amber. a a Am. Is the tonsil resin of a now extinct species et tHrift and is yearly becoming' more On ths Wink) Coital. It II Vt IlisheI tip ti after storms. Here the ertnin rnment holds supreme tnonoto1y over a very profitable trade. It is also found on the coasts of ben., mark. Norway, ftweden and in Ease Suffolk and Norfolk. That it formerly existed in a liquid state is ohtin by the extinct insect often imbedthd la It. Interior. In the Orient amber Is mood pg Incense and many of the most sx elusive partumiers on the nue lie la 141X offer timber perfume anonts their most expenolve odors. la, tve smokers enjoy clarets which h-olo been plated in an air-tight ee,epta,ls in contact with a pier of amber. The Easterners helisvg v,,,1 amber Is a protection against lots. tion and that is the reason 'natty cigairet holders and pipe sterns Itra made of this substance. mach legendary lore hal firioan around the origin of this love:v vs!. low product of the tertiary portod The Greeks have it that the of rhaeton were so unhappy ttY,o Mt death that the gods turned them !,,t,, poplar trees and that limo- t..ro,ri ual flow of tears congealed into ,tons of amber. An amber nOt k!aco, b.. rause of its warm electrical current, II supposed to be excellent for t1r.41 ailments. being especially officooma In eases of goiter and catarrh. la THOUGH the legend of pre,ieue stones has the power to lilt the imagination. Pat Sc certain fairs tales or fables of mythologv an!' move us to definite enchantment. I was interested to know ju,t tv,w fss the gem expert. himself he!ieved in the eo-call magic properties of .isweig : His answer was: "I am c,nvInced that certain toneo, when c,Imlotol by an expert mechanic under loopsr conditions of the planetary system. have some Influen ce over ti thoughts. and therefore the !Ives of 'those who wear them." "Is it then a question of faith'" He shook his head slowly: 'Yea, I suppose you might call it that. pit that is not the whole of it. For in. stance, if a ring is made espe,my for you. carrying out the itaet daecOnus which have been handed eown through the ages. and you have cwt. fidence that the ring will brita )ti that which you most desire it sr' help to bring about just such a von iition. In other words. he sfarood about for a further illustration. ,et us say that the ring is a th,-,;t-t made concrete for some stoo-;fie ned. Thus it becomes to you a c,n stant reminder of the purpose for which it was made. As a retninelr It serves to strengthen your , rmft. dence in things turning out .11Ft as you would have them." "Then the occult powers can rea:v be explained by practical poychogv." THis time hie answer cams !Ass promptly. "Not altogether" hs : admitted, and then added: -I am convinced that there is some 1-1:l,l,n power in stones comparable to attraction of the magnet over In it not possible that other pr1,2 of the mineral kingdom may he endowed with similar qualities la h we are not yet able to bring P to Ina realm of the physical senses?" "Is that the whole explanation?' I insisted. He smiled knowingly with Irilom an old as the Nilo and as baffling ol the secret of the Sphinx. "No." he finally admitted. "there are other things. Many other things. with a we of his hand. "these a,e those things which must not IA spoken of until that time comes c hen the occult secrets of the UnivrFe will become the common knowle1; of all." He referred. think. to the strange incantations which the workers :n magic jewels use as they mou:d their bright ornaments in the fumes of pungent herbs. or perhaps of t ho,o mysterious formulas which, d...0 to astrological reasons, can be Med only at the waxing or the wanirg of the moon. But only for brief :ntervale does the man who has Jon-re ed far in the realm of the eenter:. mit the beclouded vigion of 11.. unknowing" to peer behind the veil After his infrequent excursions into occult territory he smiles. lights a cigaret. drinks his tea and IA once again Count Stefan Coloring', Waletx - ski. Film-Struck Youngsters Principal Trouble In Picture Studios Now The Gay Lady, her first talkie sp i pears nCe. She sang a catchy one, "Without You. hy Cole Porter. The English musical comedy star said that she "loved singing' for the ta!,etes" and appeared to enjoy her work. , There is an engineering room off .ch pet in which the talking scone regi.tsiertd. A wax record is "run nark" for the players. director and 'sound engineers to hear. After each scene. the "nionit,,r man" comes &Mil from his sound box. ie is bad news" in person. a n,1 muNt be k man a courage in i Lion to being an expert. ! t ie either "okay" or "terrible' ion-1 I the swims and actor hang kn curt diagnoe.s Lete a Matt ,n i tOr kia ht.,. I The technician has rtc--!! !importance in the mo,,. I.. ,70 'studio since the advent lies. He has ten mucli to-I mance out of the indur,:y 4r1,1 re-I piluotqi ti 1411,11 iwaenc-e. KING UNKNOWN? Alphonse Of Spain Wakes Scc,cP'1-1 Tour In Paris Unreoested PARIS, Aug. 3----(INS1---14:::,i: .1- fonso of Spain is just a It.,,r t-: t,,o Istreet In Paris. when he ;-i f,-,4 !ii.s lanonymity. Crowds may fight in .P0 a atlantiO stowaway U:t Ihe ,:: g 1 Palk.el by unnoticed unl,ss he lin the proper settim 'Fry.. r--4 I all right with the stowaNay. 71 ' ;::1 1 the king too. On his It visit to Paris X:!,;., Alfonso did not exactly tra41 11,,.,:-.-o. iAs a matter of fact he called ,r. dr ,-I-!dent Dornergue. No one kne. ..: -,;i. Ithe official visit aril no ore r''' '''' that following the vi,,it King ,k'. roamed about the bo'Jlevard and .!,,4 a Ihit of shopping. The story of the sovereign's .,' 5. i tentatious visit to Paris came !after he had been recognized tr. -a 'public restaurant of his hotel ;4 '74 he gave a dinner for some fro-14 Even there he might have ren;:,-t I unperceived. Attention Was rected to his ta1,10.4 because et : s presence of Ambassador Quin.t, 4 tl" Leon. After spotting the arni,:, .'. r diners recognized Xing Alton, SING SING POPULAR OSSINING, N. Y., Aug. 3.--GN::;-:- Ninety-three more prisoners , ' 4 'committed to Sing Sing Prison ,,,:, rz the past fiscal year than durir4; i previous year. according to the r-, -''4 1 of Warderewis E. Laws. I The number of prisoners irc... ,- ,ratedclitring the last year Wa!' I and prison officials say this tr.,; Ile steadily increasing despite 1,, Baumes Law. which hes now been in 'effect throe yowl. r . , ... . . , 44, ,f . . i . V , , - , . , , , , , , , . , . , - , , . , , . . , . , , . , j 'ft, , . , ' ' ft L 111 0 4, 1 , 1 t .. tA , I te , - 7 r r , ' ( NI I , ., ) " I ? , , , - ,--- . , ' h It It , . , .. ,,,, p,.. , A ,. , , ,,''' 440' r-b b ' ' 'yh. -4,, , , 0 r ,..406,.. ral ' ' I j '' ' , ' 't..df ., -? ,, '', ''' .. ? ' 1 rs A,, ' ' 4 .. " ,4 t Pr t- ' ( 0 ,IL I . -11 ' " t s': , tIv. y,,t--, .,, ,,,. , ,: t:fileo;V,IP04I , ), , . " ,.... IP '-'''' , F t 't A .-,z,..:...f1,),-..,a,.?,zt. '',, , 1' --' ' l' ..-- ' ,..oure.."-::- , ,- , .,,- 44, - . , . - f ' i , I II ,, . ..,.., fik, ''''.;''.'7 't- - ,. ,,, ii ,,,,,, -,,,,,,,., ,,,I,70,, ,44- , ' ,),,, -t 4 AT itilikb. 'Tt: :1., CV" P ..... , , .4r0 -,-i v .-.011 6 Id litm.- . , r Lew SCao.046 I 1 Ated,o, ..- AN 0 D D

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