The Spokesman-Review from Spokane, Washington on April 21, 1988 · 37
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review from Spokane, Washington · 37

Publication:
Location:
Spokane, Washington
Issue Date:
Thursday, April 21, 1988
Page:
37
Start Free Trial
Cancel

7. I 1 od Pgioranfitms. Warhol collection on auction block Anociated Press NEW YORK Andy Warhol's huge and varied personal collection goes on sale this week, offering a chance to see and buy the paintings and pottery owned by the man who brought Campbell's Soup to fine art. Some say the sale provides a prime opportunity to learn what made the artist tick. If so, the lesson won't be easy. Confronted with the 10,000 items on the block, ranging from Navajo blankets to Edgar Degas sculpture to 134 cookie jars to a Rolls Royce to a Superman touch-tone telephone, a student of the world according to Warhol could be forgiven for resorting to Cliff Notes. Warhol "went shopping six days a week, bless his heart," said John L. Marion, chairman of Sotheby's North America and its chief auctioneer. "He was interested in form, and shape, and various things that fascinated him," Marion said. "And, apparently, it fascinated him more to search out and acquire than it did ever to admire." Warhol, who died at 58 in February 1987, was not known as a spendthrift. So there must have been some method that led him to accumulate thousands of objects from a Federal four-poster bed to a cache of Bakelite baubles, and to horde silver and plastic in equal measure.' Marion knew Warhol for 25 years, yet he had no Idea the artist had such an impressive collection of American Classical 19th-century furniture. Or Art Deco furniture. Or silver of such quality, the auctioneer says, that its like has never appeared at auction before. When Marion lifts his gavel Saturday, he will open one of Sotheby's longest sales ever for a single collection 10 days. In Idaho: Coeur d'Alene hotel executive admits lie about car wreck. B1 Iran-Contra judge is accused of making a mockery of defendants' rights. A2 Michael Dukakis says a nomination victory is visible, 'but not inevitable.' A3 4 Painting will be one of collection on sale this week. t -,-447 4--1114' 1;4 '''4 Iii';,1 top,,,. lti , ,,,!-0100 11 v 1 1,,.. ( ,, p xdAil . i ') I ! ', 1 16,, ril , , ,, ,411, ' t ' ' ' -4,' , - .- , ' V ' A '''I, i, t',i'', t t ,71, '',3 ,,,-rt , .;'.,1:t,,A. , . , !, , 14 , .,-,9 f , p.,4 ,,,,,,,r, , ,!,,,,, ..-.0----t 9 , ,- , i, i -'. 'N I , l '' ' ' lios , i i-,.! ,, 4r4 r -,,,,:f. , i r77-7777r-71TroPir."77. ,f', MrtIrl . '!"':ig,. . . L. . . jos,' Lz- 1111:::lusti, I. 1 ,,,q, ,tim, k ; 4 ,10:t -- Ex-officer says attack was revenge He's sure testimony made him a target - Copyright 1988, The Spokesman-Review By Mike Prager and Bill Morlin Staff writers Retired San Diego Police Lt. Doyle Wheeler, wounded Tuesday in his home northwest of Spokane, says he believes his assailants may have been hired by his former fellow police officers. "I think officers are involved in this," Wheeler said in interviews with The Spokesman-Review. His assailants, who remain at large, said "they were receiving a lot of cocaine for doing this," Wheeler said. He was forced at gunpoint, he said, to write a note apologizing for testifying last year against former police officer Donovan Jacobs, who was involved in a fatal shooting with racial overtones. "In my mind, it was clear retribution because I testified against Jacobs and the San Diego Police Department," Wheeler said. But he said the incident may be unrelated to that case, which involved a white policeman killed by a young black man who claimed he shot in self-defense. "It might be a message to other cops on the department that you never testify against a cop," Wheeler said. - - He said he was tied and tortured by two of three men who entered his home through an unlocked garage. Then, he said, he was shot in the ear, Wheeler said he tentatively identified one of his assailants as an informant, whose name he didn't know, who may have worked for the San Diego police drug unit. "If cops are behind this, those guys are dead," Wheeler said. "They're not going to let dopers run around with that kind of information." "They'd kill them even if they didn't bungle" the shooting, said the former officer, who was retired on a stress disability after witnessing a mass murder at a McDonald's restaruant in a San Diego suburb. Wheeler said he was working on a leak in his refrigerator's ice machine Tuesday when two intruders came at him, guns drawn. "They tied my wrists behind my back," he said. "They tied my ankles, and then they tied my wrists to my ankles so I was hogtied." When he refused to write the note, Wheeler said, his assailants said, "Fine, if you don't write the note, we'll stick around until your kids get home. We'll kill your kids." "1 wrote the note," Wheeler said. He said the attackers said they intended to kill him and "make it look like a drug ripoff." Wheeler said he escaped death when he turned his head at the in-(See Interview on page 10) Doyle Wheeler describes his ordeal in an interview at his home Wednesday. Staff photo by SHAWN JACOBSON No more swirling chips is Luster Glaze demand By D.F. Oliveria Staff writer POST FALLS A new car with glistening chrome and immaculate upholstery epitomizes beauty for Post Falls chemist John Engel. On the other hand, an uncovered chip truck roaring past his Seltice Way plant belching a whirlwind of sawdust in its wake infuriates him. The tiny particles could spell disaster if they find their way into his long line of locally produced Luster Glaze Corp. car-care products. As a result, many of the chip-truck drivers have 30 days to correct their ways or face a series of fines and possible jail sentences for violating the state's anti-littering law. County Commissioner Frank Henderson promised Engel a full-scale crackdown on the wayward truckers in a month if they refuse to comply with the law. "I 'in going to be a stickler," Engel said, looking out his office window at an eastbound covered chip truck going by. "The countdown begins today." The swirling debris already has forced Engel to, contract with a Klamath Falls, Ore., compa4. fly to produce the Clean Machine he invented for commercial upholstery cleaning. That cost jobs-hungry Kootenai County 10 jobs. He's also preparing to contract elsewhere for production of his ambler, a new product for cleaning and polishing mobile homes. If he does, Engel estimates the area will lose another 30 Jobs. "Things are bad enough economically in this area without running jobs away," he said. If he produced the ambler locally, Engel said, he would have to double the size of his plant. He has put those plans on hold until he determines the outcome of the county crackdown. Engel has developed a long line of car products under his Luster Glaze (nine) and Lustro (40) brands. His company sells more than $1 million worth of products for all facets of new and used automobile and mobile home cleaning. Dust or wood chips in a Luster Glaze product could scratch the surface of a new Mercedes or Cadillac, making him liable for a $3,000 repaint Job, he said. Engel conceived the idea for Luster Glaze products in 1972 and performed 12,000 labora (See Flying chips on page 3) Prosecutor outlines scheme for murder Associated Press SEATTLE A woman killed her husband and another woman by spiking pain-reliever capsules with cyanide to collect insurance money, but failed in an attempt to make the deaths look like random murders, a federal prosecutor said Wednesday. Stella Nickell, whose trial opened Wednesday in U.S. District Court, is the first person charged under a federal law against causing death by tampering with over-the-counter capsules. Her husband of 12 years, Bruce, 52, and another Auburn resident, Sue Snow, 40, were killed in June 1986 by cyanide placed in capsules of Extra-Strength Excedrin. "This case is about a woman who wanted more from life than her marriage could provide," assistant U.S. attorney Joanne Maida told a jury in opening arguments. Maida contended that Nickell had an "obsession of several years in duration" to kill her husband. In her plot, at least one other person would have to die, because the death of a randomly selected victim was "essential to make this appear the work of a ran-(See Tampering on page 8) Meese's pick won't take job Struggling to fill Justice positions, attorney general defends leadership Associated Press WASHINGTON Attorney General Edwin Meese III's choice for the No. 2 post at the Justice Department withdrew from consideration Wednesday as Meese struggled to fill top-level posts. "We've only had a very few" resignations, Meese defiantly told a Senate subcommittee on Capitol Hill, defending his leadership of the Justice Department and his personal ethics m the face of a nearly year-long criminal investigation. Sen. Ernest Hollings, D-S.C., told the attorney general that the Justice Department is "seemingly in disarray," and asked: "Can you continue on efficiently and effectively under these circumstances?" "The newspapers don't have it quite right," Meese responded. "There's been considerable exaggeration." John Shepherd, the 62-year-old former American Bar Association president who Meese hurriedly recommended to the White House April 5 to become deputy attorney general, pulled out in the face of mounting publicity about an alleged affair with his bookkeeper. It also was disclosed that long time Meese friend E. Robert Wallach, now under indictment in the Wedtech scandal, had recommended Shepherd to Meese for a Justice Department post in 1984 or 1985 and that Shepherd belongs to an all-white country club and an all-male social club. Meese told a Senate appropriations subcommittee that he would appoint an acting deputy while he searches for a replacement to fill the post. He subsequently told reporters that he did not rule out the possibility of appointing his counselor, William Bradford Reynolds. A Reynolds appointment would provoke a storm of criticism on : Capitol Hill, where the Senate three years ago rejected Meese's bid to : have Reynolds confirmed as associ- : ate attorney general, the No. 3 post in the department. Meese refined his remarks later Wednesday afternoon, with depart- ment spokesman Terry Eastland - saying that no decision has been made on whether to appoint an act- ing deputy. Meese told reporters he doesn't think he will have "any trouble at all" in filling the No. 2 post. But (See Meese on page 10) Senate favors cash, apology to those forced into camps Associated Press WASHINGTON The Senate voted Wednesday to give 120,000 tax-free payments to thousands of Japanese-Americans who were forced from their homes and sent to internment camps during World War Final passage came on a 69-27 vote after an emotional debate in which senators recalled the sometimes-harsh treatment and financial losses suffered by about 120,000 Japanese-Americans who were interned after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941. The bill would require the U.S. government to apologize for the mass roundups and would make each of the estimated 60,000 survivos eligible for 820,000 payments. (See Cash on page 8) REGION'S VOTES Associated Press WASHINGTON Eight of 10 Northwest and Alaska senators voted in favor of a $1.3 billion measure providing for an apology and $20,000 payment to each surviving Japanese-American who was interned during World War The roll call vote was 69-27 favorable. The Northwest votes: Adams, D-Wash., yes; Baucus, 0Mont., yes: Evans, R-Wash., yes: Hatfield, R-Ore., yes; McClure, R-Idaho, no: Melcher, 0-Mont., yes: Murhowski, A-Alaska, yes; Packwood, R-Ore., yes; Stevens, A-Alaska, yes; Symms, A-Idaho, no. Voting yes overall were 44 Democrats and 25 Republicans. Voting no were 7 Democrats and 20 Republicans. Answer to hepatitis outbreak: three more health inspectors By Jim Camden Staff writer Spokane County Health District will hire three more restaurant inspectors doubling the staff in response to the recent outbreak of hepatitis A. The district board Wednesday approved spending 850,000 from the district's reserve fund to hire the extra inspectors for the rest of this year. The salaries are to be added to the district's regular budget in 1989. Environmental Health Services Director Dennis Kroll said the additions will allow the staff to spend more time with managers and food handlers during visits to the county's 1,400 restaurants. Restaurant inspectors need time to observe how food Is prepared to be sure health rules are observed, Kroll said. They also should provide extra information on food-handling precautions, he said. "Apparently, people have gotten away from washing their hands," he said. City Councilman Rob Higgins, a health board member, questioned the need to double the staff. "Is that not overkill, to hire staff for incidents like this that happen periodically whether you have an army of staff out there or not?" Higgins asked. But Health Officer Mary Luther said the hepatitis outbreak is fresh In everyone's mind, which makes this an important time to add staff and step up information. "We feel very strongly about this," Luther said. "This is a known and recognized need." The board voted unanimously to hire the inspectors. During the recent hepatitis outbreak, food handlers at three restaurants and two nursing homes were found to be infected with the virus. Customers and others were given shots of gamma globulin to help build their defenses to the disease. Health officials have recorded 153 cases of hepatitis in Spokane County since January, but only four this week the lowest number reported since January. I sul Action Corner C2 Business 133-6 Clark column B1 Classified D7-14 Comics C3 Crosswords De Editorials - A4 Empire Life Cl Horoscope C2 Idaho Handle B1 Idaho records D7 Lottery numbers A2 Movies C4 Obituaries C7 & 07 Peopie C2 Sports 01-6 Television C5 Weather A2 For home delivery, call 7474422 .. . . ., ... . - ..-77:.,,--- , ,. ., . . : . . ,. ','', ,,' 1 .. ., . - , , .... .. , , .' , :r. 4 ....,,',1.;-' ,,-; ', 'sr ,1' ..i"I!''". '',-,.', ' '. : ' , , . ... . - :,:4.,...,44Ni iq., , , -,, .. .,,. : ,.,,, -,,,,,, , - , -.. . . .. , . .... . ...,:. . " ' - . . .....,,,,,0,-,,..,,,,-, .... ,,, .. .. ,... , ., .. . , .-,, , . ..., ,: .: ,", . " - - Al.,. i E....0-4 Alls... ., , , o6 . ' V :NO. .. . ... . i ... - , ..... . . . 44.,''' 4kr,.' ' ' . . .''''.'''''';';''' . : ,:' '. :'''" i. ''' - . , . '1'. , , ' ' ......',''':', ' '''.' : , . .- - ' ''' , .,,, ... . ,:.:,:,....' , 4 : .., .1, , . . :. , , , ., . . . : ,,,, . , . , . . .-.., :, "! ' 4 - ' ,,.4'':''''' , - , . , -.1., 4 , . ,. ,,,i,i' , ,-.............. , , ,,,,, . ... , ' .. X..,., i.'.?n 41:)14' . , .1,V . . ... ....: .,. , . ...... .. .. , . : . , . . . ,.,.., .:. '.:!'. ,,;,,,,o- .. N - , -' - ' , , -.0- , 0' - A,- , , . ,44,-.7.7 1 --- , k' ',O.' r, ,,, ' c 1."4'..",...: ......,, ,- . ,..... ,. . " 4 . . li. ,4.11,.......00;11.....""16'8"."'"I'.1"."1". '. '''!..1000). ' , ' ... : , .,.. .. I, t ;11'':,N. 7-'7,-,, -,,I , - - .::''''.:' ' ,;:T4':;.,.,-i,tC.Ik.., 1 - , f- ' f,4.,,', '',. :C.(',-,;,":.', , ;;',''.,. :',..'!'.-'; ,i'..''''',; ''. 1!: '.- ;. r .,'.,., , ''., ..,,,,, 'I, ' ',,'.....4,zor-, ... .. , . ..,. '' ... ,..: ','..,'",''.1..41.... '.' ' ' ' -1, " tV - .t ,,-., ., i .... :, , c:..,.... ;,v. t'1',"t:.,,,.-,,,,,;4,77: . ?''"'.,:',. :,.- ,4--,-- : , . .' , - ,i).'':;''-'-,i',,'4:t .", ' '''.: : .4 ''! '''''' ' '') ''lit';'1"71, ,,,,.:. ......,:..i:,:.!e.,,o , 1.1.,,..1:;.,:',;. ' .,..- ,:,. :-.::',:1,?:;:.,0,: A .,',.',',V.,, . ,,.::',. ;:; '')-:A4."'"'71 ..'....., '1. ''' I '. i;,...'"'. ! '1- ', '1 ' ' ' . '''''''''' :',45;i. .':i? '.?,;.:',' ' .;',. ' IZe'....4.:' .,:.:,f.' ' :. :":k. ' :, MAt':,1: K. K ii :1.'1: 7 .,'. ' !;,,;;: . ;;;'''!KiV'', "i'.;It',.,'';'.. ::'' ' ', 4;,;7;:.$'' ' 4 :401'..e4!' .:.:;!;',' i A...I .., it , ' 1.' ''': ' .' 7.41',N '-',;:'A,., ' -, , ' -, ;;i1;.''', '..,.'1:':, . p!... if,eiKii:;;Ci:,,',',.':. ' ''''' , ' .. -.'1-1 4:' 'N '. 4,N " '' - '., ' ' . 4,,, '''....,,1;',. f- ti-"-.4.,.4,,,:',.,-. ,,, , ,,, , :14P, ' i 4sx :3', .4: '., ,,,...,::---.,' ! ,,,,,. , ,1' tr' ,,,,,,,k, w,,i'..f4 , (':.,, - ,t'..,.Vt i' '7 ,,,, 4.., o ' - ,,-4, r- e, Y .,, , ,;. : . '....4, 0, 4,1.,,' ,, i-t' ,",), V , , '' , ;2.', -ON': 4,;:'', :t.; '',i,,,' ,,,, '1,',i', i . ,...,',1,4',.,: ,:,, ''', , '''.,'.T 4,,',4; i c . ,... , "',1-C,''',. ',',Z . if ,-;:,i'''N'16,!:s ' . , - ,!! 'r:',' ,si;. j!tIt4:1,' '' r,''''',.',.,:,'S''',',;,':',,,A.,p,,,:,i',:i. . . , ,, ,. '4, ; IT, It ",- ' ' , ,,,,,, ,,,t , , ,, . ' ' IN ,, ,,,, 7 rn!,,''''''' ' 2 ,' ,'' : , , ,,,,t' '02',,''''-';':,c' -' ,,, , , ,:: 0 , , ,,, ' ,.,,".4,Cr-4 , . : " , ., : ., ,,..'-'1;,,,-S '';',"2,', , ' .. .., " ' ' ' :' " .: ,. ',,?,';',:.:,;''2 ' , ,. ., , .. , --,,,t,:;'1,.4:L.,:::: : , , ,.., ,, , , : . "ON . . . 100111.1 : :Y:.';'...,,: ':.'' zri.r.4,::,-..;:: ....J ' ,3' '"..t; :,::;.''' ' ', . , , . ''.7. ' ...:,,,,, 0 , . ... .. . . ilio' . ". ....,,, 00'1 , ., . . I,,,..,,,....,' ( , . . , I , I ".. .00e000wooeIII.I.""'"ld- , . , i i.:.-:'" . . -I :-:','..-,,....,,,.; ..00000l.d . , . ., . ., . . , , ,;:,, . , , , , 4., " :.,..., , ,, . , 34k ''''''''44-417.171.1,1 ' k , , ,,... .. , ,. , . . -......,.y ,.. .:..!41., ., ,, .., ,,:,,...t.... . , ,I.,,, :';s1-. , . ., iz-- ., ,, . .- , , ' ,,,, ,. ,-- , r,7 ',..-. i . - , .nalao. 17111a1? ifiNve; 11) -9 ,A' ,,.) D.- ) vAlliffritie A btx , 00 toont --ars - . , tit4attikehteltallft ' . latto' a i 1p),-------,01 I f, -a,

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 21,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra® Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the The Spokesman-Review
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free