The Spokesman-Review from Spokane, Washington on March 17, 1968 · 21
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The Spokesman-Review from Spokane, Washington · 21

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Sunday, March 17, 1968
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NIP, I ( , Sports 85111 YEAR. NO. 308. SUNDAY, MORNING. MARCH 17, 1968. SPOKANE, WASH. Spoi t i-s 1 , EWr 1 --11171712. 71.71 , - Want Ads , , I I ti a , k tl d SI ti c c n o ti it , L a n p p ti ' MI ti S( ir p ' ,, V , y hi PI 11 li II f, II I ' it ' I It gi hi i n i i I gi I , is i PI 1 di of hi , , , in of al si , l PE , of , 1 P( al 1 1 i i , he te; ; : m, i at' i , lel m; I to St; NE gi( Di , thi ed , 13, de vil Di Te thi , 1 4 Cu 111( dr; Te Ilf:. teE lei on lux wt , f , i .. ' , , 6111;?? ZUWE , r. 16.!744: 13; IM ill it tit At First, a Definition For the purposes of this essay, a martyr must be defined as one who sacrifices his life, station, or what is of great value, for the sake of principle, or to sustain , I N , . . ,.: : :: , 1 r' - ' t t , , . . --,t,4-, -, A., , : : 1 ' ::4tv.,..4, ,:. ,: : : i ...,,,, ,. : .i t t ,, ,,,, : . ...!., ,,,,, , ,,-.: 7'i-,.....,,. . ,,,.''', K ' : 4 V--:- 1 s,,,r fs',,,,, , , ,. -, , ,s $ .. 1 r' , : , .. . I 1 . : , . j ..... '. : ( .:: , i:, ' 0)": IS 1 ,t ., -4 , ,4------ ,,, i k4 '"f '4'.' .:: ,, ' ,.. : k .,t- -,,,, ,,,,. , : , , ,,,,..0..,,,, ; : :, , :, ,t, A. .,. !,-- , , . ,.. .k ..,1 , e. 4 2 1 - , - i , : ', 3 rr 7"''r-- -- ----4 a cause. , ,.,, I Implicit in this dictionary 1'. ' definition e Ion must be the word s':!::, ( ' -'4,'',,,--,-- , I shall arbitrarily add it The martyr must believe in the k' I , ',., 4,, , , s, principle or cause to which 4 ,, ,,-,;. .,t, A he sacrifices. If he does not believe, he is not a proper ( P 1 ' ' I I martyr, he is something , i. e44 1, It . seems necessary to r-,t...,,t ,, si draw strongly the boun- V . L 1 . ' ' ,1 42 daries of this definition in ,, i ---,, ,,, dliscussing why some NeA 't , , 1 gro athletes consider ab s:' r A s --'' . 4 staining from oor boy- 5 2 5 2 cotting the United States r s ' t ' a Olympic teams. i ' --' LEW ALCINDOR Immediately, I should like Decision Complete to promise that no conclus- ions will be reached. I wish I had the space, the time, the background, the contacts, the understanding and the insights to make that attempt. I don't. ketballers have completed the decision to abstain from While Lew Alcindor of UCLA and other top-flight basthe Olympics, nothing so definite can be said of any decision has not yet come. So the discussion here will only attempt to illuminate some of the questions, to clarify some of the viewpoints. The 'Sabotage' Theory Is Wrong In the minds of some, or mahny, there seems to be the impression that if a Negro athlete decid3s to boy. cott, he does so primarily to strike a blow at the so-called white establishment, to weaken its chances at making a good showing in Mexico City. I cannot go along with that impression. The athlete of college age, if he feels strongly about issues, is at a time of his life when his idealism is at its peak, or near it. He is also at a time of his life when his desire to excel and to be recognized, jis ambition and his competitiveness also are near their peaks. , You and I may reason that since the highest of competitive athletics provide the best examples of integration in our society, the Negro athlete is choosing the wrong place. ' That reasoning is demonstrably apt. But returning to the definition of a martyr, he must sacrifice station, or something of great value. You can't be one by sacrific. mg something you haven't got much of in the first place, can you? , . IIe Knows the Cost; We Don't Therefore, do not criticize the young athlete of color for his reasons unless ou are quite sure they are not your reasons. His ambition and his abilities are high, or he wouldn't be involved in this decision. His ambiton and hs compettiveness must be at odds with his idealism. , Don't tell him he is hurting himself, his image, his fine chance for future prosperity, success and station. He already knows that better than you do. This young man is considering making a sacrifice. He isn't fundamentally trying to debase his nation or its image. He is sacrificing himself. Which Are Proper Questions? The proper questions might include these: What likely will be the effects of this martyrdom? It is noble and compassionate to say, "I have not forgotten you or that I am one of you, less fortunate brother." But what is the purpose of martyrdom? Is the purpose to intensify dis-integration? Is opting out of an integrated group, regardless of how imperfectly integrated, a good way to create better integration? Another question: Do you really feel this sacrifice is preeminently necessary or have you been proselyted? Should the answer come from a "majority decision," from a directed, orchestrated mass action, Or should it come from each man's soul, according to his own deep beliefs? Still another: Does fame, recognition, esteem for an Individual through his accomplishments hurt the cause or help it? Who can get more leverage for equality, an abstainer or a gold medal winner? Yet another: Have you been intimidated? By either side? , If you have read this far, and according to your own persuasions and prejudices, you may feel many or all of these questions are self-answering, rhetorical. Believe me, they are not. I only hope they are the important questions and that they do need analysis ana answers. Tournaments Associated Press The NCAA regional doubleheader at Albuquerque, N.M., featuring UCLA and two New Mexico teams, drew the largest attendance Friday night on college basketball's biggest tournament night of the season. A crowd of 15,345 turned out to see UCLA beat New Mexico State and Santa Clara upset New Mexico in the Far West regional of the NCAA's University Division tournament. That twin bill plus six others throughout the country attracted 85,377 fans. The second biggest crowd, 13,062, saw Kentucky Wesleyan defeat Indiana State at Evansville, Ind., for the NCAA College Divison championship. Trinity, Tex. beat Ashland, Ohio, in a third-place game. NIT Popular A first round doubleheader in the National Invitation Tournament at Madison Square Garden drew 13.041. Kansas knocked off Temple, and Villanova ousted Wyoming in the New York contests. At an NCAA twinbill in Raleigh, N.C., 12,400 saw Davidson and North Carolina get past'Columbia and St. Bonaventure while 11,500 were on hand for lumbia and St. Bonaventure Manchester while 11,500 were on hand for 2-0 defeat by , Draw Many victories by Ohio State and Kentucky over East Tennessee and Marquette in the NCAA Mideast regional at Lexington, Ky. In the other NCAA doubleheader, the Midwest regional at Wichita, Kan., topranked Houston defeated Louisville and Texas Christian upset Kansas State before 10,938. The smallest crop d of the night, 9,091, showed op for the NAIA semifinals at Kansas City, where Central State of Ohio defeated Westminster, Pa., and Fairmont, W. Va., State stopped Oshkosh, Wis., State. Soccer League Battle Close LONDON (AP) Niel Young scored two goals and Saturday sent Manchester City to the top of the English Soccer League standing over defending champion Manchester United in the torrid race for the English crown. Young's goals helped Manchester City to a 54 victory over Fulham. That victory came as Manchester United slumped to a 2-0 defeat by Coventry. t Great Falls Sentinel Se Consolation Victories in ti 7 ontan ' , . . , . t. ,, , J,, , ? , r.Nk. , s, it-,tt,,...o.,r1t4t.noottfotti' .t.,..f..s,...,,..,....,...,.... .tr ?:"..", ,,.. f: 'I . , h t, .'"-.-..0-,,noct.ttt,tott.t'itotA 'tot 1...,..., '' totott.g41."Aga. 0.k.edtit,,, i " ....jc.....4,ott",,.-..t1 s!,.. 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Jeff Nord (10) and Clint Rouse (33) are RYUN WINS SLOW MILE Villa ova Ca o tures DETROIT (AP) Villanova's talented Wildcats swept two relays and were second in a third baton event to capture its first NCAA indoor track and field crown Saturday as an ailing Jim Ryun completed a meet double with a slow 4:06.8 mile victory. The concluding day of action produced two new meet records while three were tied. For the entire 17-event program which started Friday night, two all-time indoor marks were set, five meet records fashioned and three meet marks equaled. Villanovas' winning total was 3512 points, the highest by far in the four-year history of the NCAA indoor held at Detroit since 1965. Trojans Dethroned Villanova, led by newly found 880 champion Dave Patrick and indoor world record holding 440 star Larry James, dethroned the favored defending champion Southern California by taking four firsts in the program at Rytm Outruns Lindgren; Two Indoor Marks Fall DETROIT (AP) Kansas' Jim Ryun turned on his world record mile speed in the final lap to hand Washington State's tiny Gerry Lindgren his first collegiate championship defeat ever in the two-mile feature of the NCAA Indoor Meet Friday night. Ryun, who decided at the last minute to pass the 880 and run the two-mile, timed a relatively unspectacular 8:38.9, 4.2 off Lindgren's meet record of last year. Lindgren ran 8:40.7, easily beating world indoor record-holder Kerry Pearce of Texas. El Paso and Australia, who was third in 8:44.9. The stirring two-mile duel capped a sensational evening that saw two world indoor records. The meet concludes this afternoon. Beamon's Foul 27-7 The world record-breakers were UTEP's Bob Beamon, who shattered his own indoor long jump record with a leap of 27 feet, 23,i and barely fouled at 27-714 and Villanova's sterling sophomore, Larry James, who zipped the 440 in a fantastic 47 seconds , flat, by eight-tenths the fastest time ever on a 180-yard, 11-laps-per-mile track. Beamon added another title and three other champions were crowned Friday night, one of them Washington State's South African giant John Van Reenen, who easily won the shot put in his first championship competition, at 62-1. f Picks Off Cobo Arena. A sellout crowd of 9,556 saw Ryun, the world's best 1,500 and 800-meter runner, put on a patented blazing finish to capture the mile despite an ailing left ankle. Rytm, who Friday night took the two-mile crown, said before Saturday's windup his feet bothered him and he hoped to be able just to finish much less crack his NCAA indoor record of 3:58.6. At that, Ryun finished only three yards ahead of fast dosing Sam Bair of Kent State, who was clocked in 4:07.2. Set Relay Record Villanova's relay surge in Saturday's closing 10-final session was sparked particularly by sophomore quartermiler James, whose anchor effort gave the Wildcat mile relay team a meet record of 3:14.4. The Wildcats also easily captured the distance medley relay with a sparkling mile anchor leg by Frank Murphy. In Satur. Villanova's Dave Patrick, who, beat a tired Ryun in the 880 here last year, won his specialty in a relatively slow 1:52.0, one-tenth ahead of teammate Frank Murphy. Rhode Island's Bob Narcessian took the 35-pound wight throw at a record 65-5. Beamon, a sophomore from Jamaica, Long Island, N.Y., won the triple jump at 52-314. Near Outdoor Mark ' His long jump bettered the mark of 27-1 he set several weeks ago. He followed the record jump with his fantastic foul leap. The record far surpasses the NCAA outdoor record and is just 214 short of the outdoor record. James surpassed the old, 160- yard track mark of 47.8 by Southern's Theron Lewis. The all-time indoor best is 46.2, posted on a 220-yard track by San Jose State's Tommie Smith, Van Reenen won by more than four feet over Utah State's Mike Mercer. The throw was one inch off his competitive best. The two-mile, despite the slow time, was a corker, keeping the 8,380 spectators on their feet mostly rooting for Lindgren. The little senior, holder of three American records at longer distances, had won two straight NCAA indoor two-miles as well as two outdoor three-miles and six-miles and the outdoor cross country. After an exceedingly slow 69- second first lap, the pace was picked up through a 2:12.5 half Low Pass I Anaconda players in Montana Class A Basketball Tournament at Bozeman. Missoula won 62-58. (AP) day's third baton event, a superb Harvard foursome set an NCAA two-mile relay record of 7:26.8. Villanova took second on Patrick's sizzling anchor 880 of 1:49.1. Ryun, along with Bob Beamon of Texas-El Paso, who set an indoor long jump record and won the triple jump Friday night, became the meet's first double winners. Flowers Triumphs In the closing session, three of the five returning individual champions were dethroned. In a battle of star football Bankers, Tennessee's Richmond Flowers unseated Southern California's Earl McCulloch in a record-matching 7.0 time. Another champion dethroned was Ted Downing of Miami of Ohio in the high jump, won by the unorthodox stylist, Dick Fosbury of Oregon State. Fos-bury, who goes over the bar in an awkward dive, matched the meet record of 7-0. Bob Seagren was dethroned and 4:20 mile. - Lindgren, who has been bothered for several weeks by a persistent stomach ailment, led into the final lap, but his finish, 62.7 quarter mile was well off his standard and Ryun breezed in 58.5. The final lap was not particularly outstanding for Ryun either, and he came away from the track limping noticeably on a tender ankle. Ryun earlier had run an easing 4:13.2 mile trial. 35-pound weight Mrow-1, Bob Narcesslan, Rhode Island, 65 feet, 534 inches (NCAA record: previous record, 64-734, Ed Bagdonis, Army, 1957; meet record: previous record 61-934, Andy Yuen, Con- necticut. 1967). 2, Jim Kavanagh, Boston College, 60-912. 3, Larry Hart, Army, 60- 234, 4, Charles AiPotian, Harvard, 59-1012. 5, Richard Sherman, St. John's, 59-834. 440-yard dash-1, Larry James. Man. va, 47.0 (meet record: previous record 47.8, Theron Lewis, Southern University, 1965). 2, Tom Randolph, Western Michigan 48.0. 3, Ross MacKenzie, Southern linois 48.1. 4, Hardee McAlhaney, Tennessee 48.3. 5, Julio Heade, Kansas 481 Invitational mile (non-scoring event) 1, Martin Liguori, Villanova Frosh, 4:05.0. 2, Neill Duggan, Southern California 4:05.1. 3, Conrad Nightingale, Kansas State 4:06.8. 4, Don Vandrey, Wisconsin Frosh 4:10.0, 5, Peter Romero, Texas-El Paso, 4:12. Shotput-1, John Van Reenen, Washington State, 62-1. 2, Mike Mercer, Utah State, 58-4. 3, Dick Benka, Harvard, 57- 1014. 4, Tom Colich, Southern California 57-434. 5, Jim Arbuckle, Indiana, 56-712. Long iump-1, Bob Beamon, Texas-El Paso, 27 feet, 234 inches (world Indoor record: previous record 27-1, Beaman, 1968; Meet Record: previous record 25-7, Rainer Stenius California State-Los An- gales, 1966). 2;Mike Gregory, Oklahoma, 24-812. 3, Ira Russell, Michigan, 24-534, 4, Paul Jones, Yale, 24-314. 5, Mike Harvey, Virginia, 24-212. 880-vard runI, Dave Patrick, Vi nanova, 1:52.0; 2, Frank Murphy, Villanova, 1:52.1; 3, Devone Smith, California, 1:53.6; 4, Carl Trentadue, Southern California, 1:53.9; Juris Luzins, William & Mary, 1:54.3. Two-mile run-1, Jim Ryun, Kansas, 8:38.9; 2, Gerry Lindgren, Washington State, 8:40.7i 3, Kerry Pearce, Texas-El Paso, 8:44,9: 4, Ole Oleson, Southern California, 8:47.7i 5, Sebsibe Memo, Colby, Triple lump-1, Bob Beamon, Texas-El Paso, 52-314; 2, Lennox Burgher, Nebraska, 52-1; 3, Kim Piersol, Furman, 49-534t, 4, Stan Whitley, Kansas, 49-514; Tim Barrett, Southern California, 49-412 , toi ft or by Southern California teammate Paul Wilson in the pole vault. Washington State's pole vault hope, Jim Precht, was injured when he dropped directly into the vaulting box, flat on his back, in an attempt at 15-6. The Omak senior, who has had an injury-filled career, lay motionless for several minutes and finally was carried from the arena on a stretcher, but preliminary examination indicated he suffered mainly a shoulder injury. Ryun and Wisconsin's Ray Arrington in the 1,000-yard run were the successful defending champions. Went Sprawling Flowers virtually dove across the finish line and landed sprawling on the boards after overtaking McCullouch in the final strides. McCullouch, who had tied his own meet mark of 7.0 twice in the preliminaries, got off to an excellent start but was awarded second in 7.1. NCAA INDOOR DETROIT (AP) - Summaries of the National Collegiate Athletic Association indoor Track and Field Championship Saturday; 60-yard high hurdles-1, Richmond Flowers, Tennessee, 7.0 (ties meet record of 7.0 by Earl McCullouch, Southern California, 1967-68, and Erv Hall, Villanova, 1968). 2, Earl McCullouch, Southern Cali- fornia, 7.1. 3, Erv Hall, Villanova, 7.1. 4, Charles Pollard, Michigan State, 7.2. 5, Larry Midiam, Michigan, 7.2. 60-YARD DASH-I, Jim Green, Kentucky, 6.0 (ties meet record by Charlie Greene, Nebraska, 1966-67). 2, Craig Wal- lace, Kentucky State, 6.1. 3, Lennox Miller, Southern California 6.1. 4, Glenn Long, Oklahoma, 6.2, 5, 0.).. Simpson, Southern California, 6.2. Distance medley relay (880-440-1320 mile)-1, Villanova (Charles Messenger, Bob Whitehead, Tom Donnelly, Frank Murphy) 9:49.5, 2, Notre Dame, 9:51.0. 3, Drake, 9'511 4, Souuthern California, 9:51.3. 5, Missouri, 9:51.6. 600-yard dash-1, Tom Albright, Colgate, 1:10.6. 2, Tommy Turner, Murray. 1:10.9. 3, James Hardwick, Oklahoma, 1:11.0. 4, Mike Mondane, Iowa, 1:11.1, 5, Larry Kelly, Tennessee, 1:11.2. Two-mile relay-I, Harvard (Trey Burns, Royce Shaw, Jim Baker, Dave McKelvey) 7:26.8 (Meet record: Previous record 7:27.9, Oklahoma State, 19651. 2, Villanova, 7:273 3, Michigan, 7:30.1 4, St. John's, N.Y., 7:30.7, 5, Nebraska, 7:37.5. 1,000-yard rum-1, Ray Arrington, Wisconsin, 2:09.3, 2, Bob lieminski, Georae- town, 2:09.5. 3, BYron Dyce, NYU, 2:10.0. 4, Adrian Dewindt, New Mexico, 2:10.3, 5, John Lilly, Oregon State, 2:11.6. Mile run-1, Jim Ryun, Kansas, 4:061. 2, sam Bair, Kent State, 4:07.2. 3, Jack Fath, Fordham, 4:09.0. 4, Terry Dont lelhe, William and Mary, 4:121 5, Allan Andr- eine, Princeton, 4:12.4. High iumo-1, Dick Fosbury, Oregon State, 7-0 (tied meet record by Oatis Barrel!, Nevada, 1966; Ted Downing, Miami of Ohio, and Steve Herndon, Missouri, 1967t. 2, Ron Tull, Oklahoma, 6-10. 3, Tie between Ted Downing, Miami of Ohio, and Lonnie Hance, Tennessee, 6-10, 5, Tie between Ed Broderick, Notre Dame, and Karl Kresner, Tennessee, 6-8. Mile relay-1, Vilianova (Hal Nichter, Hardoe Davis, Ken Prince, Larry James), 3:14.4 (Meet record: Previous record 3:15,5, Oklahoma, 1967). 2, Okiahoma, 3:16.0. 3, Michigan State, 3:17.1. 4, Yale, 3:18.4, 5, Drake, 3:18.5. Pole vault-1, Paul Wilson, Southern California, 16-8. 2, Peter Chen, American University, 16-4. 3, Roland Carter, Michinan State, 16-4. 4, Bob Seemren, Southern California, 16-4, 5, Tie among Vince Bizzeirro, Villanovat Steve Owens, Tennes- see, and Bob Steinhoff, Kansas, 15-6. Team scores-Vilianova 35 1-3, Southern California 25. Oklahoma 17, Kansas 15 1-3, Texas-El Paso 15, Tennessee 12 1-3, Harvard 11, Washington State 10, Michigan State 8, Nebraska 8, Michigan 7, Oregon State 7, Colgate 6, Kentucky 6, Rhode Island 6, Wisconsin 6, Notre Dame 412. American University 4, Boston Co Ilene 4, Drake 4, Georgetown 4, Kentucky State 4, Kent State 4, Murray State 4, Utah State 4, Wrstern Michiaan 4, Yale 4, Army 3, California 3, Furman 3, Fordham 3, NYU 3, Southern Iiiinois 3, St. John's 3, William and Mary 3, Miami of Ohio 214,, Iowa 2. New Mexico 2. Co IN , Indiana 1. Missouri 1, Princeton 1, Virginia 1. re Titan Howard's Tip-In Wins BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) Great Falls Public narrowly remained alive and Missoula Sentinel won the right to oppose Public during afternoon Class A consolation play at the State Basketball Tournament Saturday. Big Ray Howaard made a tip-in with one second remaining to carry Great Falls Public to a 56-55 victory over Laurel in the morning consolation action. Laurel came from a 27-21 deficit at halftime on the shooting of Tom Perrigo to take the lead 45-44 at the end of the third period. The lead then changed hands three times in the final two minutes of play, setting the stage for Howard's winning basket. Chuck Lucero paced Great Falls scoring with 19 points.' Perrigo scored 18 to lead Laurel. Score 29 at Line Missoula Sentinel capitalized on 29 free throws to defeat Butte Central 78-64 in gaining the consolation game slot Saturday night. Sentinel took a lead early in the first quarter and steadily increased it, holding quarter margins of 18-12, 37-27 and 56-49. Missoula's pressing attack and tight defense kept Butte Central outside the key throughout the game. Jeff Nord, 5-foot-8 Missoula guard, paced Sentinel scoring with 20 points. Butte Central was led by Pat Foley with 22. Lest in Overtime Sentinel had beaten Anaconda 62-58 Friday to reach Saturday morning's game, but Great Falls was somewhat less happy to be there after falling 82-79 in double overtime to Wolf Point in Friday night's semifinals. Wolf Point met Kalspell, a 57-55 victor over Butte Central, Friday, in Saturday night's semifinals. Laurel had reached the consolation semifinals with a 70-47 romp over Billings West on Friday. Wolf Point got two :crucial free throws from Harvey Lan-gager with 25 seconds left to beat favored Gret Falls Friday. Sullivan Hits 22 , Dave Cassan led Kalispell to its semifinal victory with 14 points. Steve Sullivan paced Butte Central with 22 points. It was the first state tournament for the two title hopefuls since the Big 32 Conference was formed in 1963. Kalispell's victory margin was provided by Greg Dornfeld, who hit free throws in the final 45 seconds. Butte Central had come from 11 points behind in the last five minutes and missed stopping Kalispell by two points. Kalispell won the regular season Big 32 title and was ranked first in the Associated Press Class A prep poll. Plentywood, Choteau Win SHELBY, Mont. (AP)--Plentywood beat Circle and Choteau overcame Poison in Saturday's morning consolation semi-finals of the Class B State Basketball Tournament, setting up a Plentywood Choteau match in the night's consolation bracket. Jim Pederson scored on a short jumper from under the basket with 13 seconds left to give Plentywood its 64-62 victory over Circle during the morning. Pederson led scoring with 31 points. Larry Wilhelm scored 28 for Circle. Circle jumped into a 15-13 quarter lead but Plentywood moved ahead 30-29 at the half and led 49-48 at the end of three quarters. Wilhelm Ties It Plentywood held the edge 60- 52 with 4:58 left but Wilhelm tied the score at 62-62 with 27 seconds left. Then Pederson hit his jump shot. Northern Division Choteau made its way to the consolation game by eliminating Poison 83-72 in the morning. Choteau, defeated Friday night, charted out to a 50-39 halftime lead before Poison tied the score 57-57 and 59-59 late in the third period. Choteau, however, had the 61-59 edge at the end of the quarter, then pulled steadily ahead in the final period. Choteau center Ray Smith hit 34 points. Poison's Larry Busch collected 22 before fouling out. Missoula Loyola met Chinook in Saturday night's championship game, after the Plentywood-Choteau battle for consolation honors. Loyola had beaten Choteau 43-42 and Chinook nipped Plenty. wood 70-67 in Friday night's semifinals. Poison had stayed alive with a 78-65 victory over Roundup while Circle eliminated Malta 69-67. -RoundupwhileCircleeliminated Miles Injured Malta 69-67. DETROIT (AP) The De. Loyola's Bob Banaugh and,troit Pistons reported Saturday Sam Richter combined for 201that Eddie Miles who has aver. points 10 apiece in the aged better than 28 points in his Rams' semifinal victory. Loyola last eight games, suffered a managed to hit on only 21 per bone chip in his right ankle Fri. cent of its field goal attempts, day ni,ght and will miss at least barely under Choteau's 25 perithe next two National Basket. cent clip. lball Association games. - LIU, Irish Win First NIT Tests Small School Champs Roll NEW YORK (AP) Luther Green's three points in the final 19 seconds climaxed a startling Long Island University comeback and lifted the Blackbirds to an 80-77 victory over Bradley in the National Invitation Basketball tournament Saturday. Notre Dame shook off Army and its Bill Schutsky in the final minutes and paraded to a 62-58 victory in the opening game of a first round doubleheader at the new Madison Square Garden. Notre Dame and LW will meet in one of Tuesday night's quarter-final games. Green Hits Green hit a jump shot from the key with 19 seconds left for a 79-77 lead and then added a free throw with seven seconds remaining after Bradley's Joe Allen missed the Braves' last chance. The points gave Green, a 6-foot-6 junior, a total of 32 as he teamed with small college All-American Larry Newbold to bring underdog LIU from behind late in the game. LIU, the nation's No. 1 small college team, making its first NIT appearance in 18 years, spent three quarters of the game behind as Bradley hit 62 per cent from the field and Al Smith scored 16 points for a 41- 36 lead. But then Green and Newbold, the Blackbirds' 1-2 punch, took over and LIU finally caught the Braves at 65-all. Although the baskets were coming fast and furious in the final minutes, LIU refused to buckle and never trailed again. Smith's basket gave Bradley its last tie at 77 with 40 seconds left. Newbold finished with 22 points, the same as Smith. Allen had 21. LIU finished with a 61 per cent shootin; percentage and Bradley shot 55 per cent. Arnzen's 'Luck' Bob Arnzen, a good share of the luck of the Irish this St. Patrick's Day eve, sent Notre Dame to victory with a basket that shattered the last tie for a 56-54 lead. Dwight Murphy then took over with three points, increasing the margin to 59-56 with a little more than three minutes remaining.. Jim Derrig added three more points in the last minute, wiping out Army's final hopes. Notre Dame, making its first NIT appearance, had its hands full with Schutsky in the first half as the 6-foot-3 forward scored 22 points behind Army's ipattern play and paced the Cadets to a 38-37 lead at the break in the nationally televised contest. But Schutsky, who finished with 31 points, was one of the few Cadets not plagued by personal foul trouble that kept a number of the Army starters on the bench for lengthy periods. ARMY NOTRE DAME OF T OFT Sutsky 9 9-11 31 Murphy 1 1-2 3 Noonan 2 0-0 4 Amin 6 3-3 15 Hunt 3 3-3 9 Whtmre 3 5-6 11 Kzwkl 2 2-3 6 O'Cnel 2 4-5 8 Oxley 2 0-1 4 Demo 5 6-7 16 Gyoval 0 2-2 2 Mkiry 0 6-7 6 Urban 1 0-0 2 Rtvich 1 1-2 3 Simons 0 0-0 0 Fenty 0 0-0 0 Totals 2116-20 58 21 16-20 58 Totals 18 26-32 62 Army , 38 20-58 Notre Dame . .. . ... 37 25-62 Fouled outnone Total foulsArmy, 23. Notre Dame, 15. BRADLEY G F T LONG ISLAND O F T Berry 1 1-2 3 Culuko 7 0-1 14 Bowen 8 3-4 19 Lhnsky 5 0-0 10 Allen 8 5-6 21 Green 15 2-3 32 Swiarls 4 0-0 8 Newbold 10 2-3 22 Smith 10 2-4 22 Smalls 1 0-0 2 Rapo 2 0-0 4 Singer 0 0-0 0 Ludstm 0 0-0 0 Reeves 0 0-0 0 Totals 3311-16 77 Totals 38 4-7 ao Bradley 41 36-77 Long Island 36 44-80 Fouled outNone. Total foulsBradley 7, LIU 13. Attendance 14,789. Legion Loop Playoff Set in Montana BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) Dates for the American Legion baseball state tournament were set Saturday at the annual spring meeting of the directors of the state program. The tournament will be in Helena Aug. 9-11. Helena had the Region 7 tournament in 1967. The Class A alignment remains the same this year with two divisions. The Western Division is composed of Libby, Kalispell, Whitefish, Great Falls, Missoula and Anaconda. The Eastern Division is Miles City, Billings, Laurel, Bozeman, Livingston and Helena. At the meeting, a new national rule was discussed which permits 18 players per team instead of 16. The directors approved the bid of Billings to try for the Region 7 tournament in 1969 and the national tournament in 1970. aged better than 28 points in his last eight games, suffered a bone chip in his right ankle Fri. day night and will miss at least I 0, . " L, 14414' oet ,

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