St. Louis Globe-Democrat from St. Louis, Missouri on January 15, 1899 · 1
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St. Louis Globe-Democrat from St. Louis, Missouri · 1

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Sunday, January 15, 1899
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, . , - . , , , . . . . .. .. .... . ., . , . . , - , . . -, - , . , . . -- . , ' ,- . .. , . - . . , - . . . . . , . N .....i ,......7 0 . .. . ,.. . . , . ,, .. , .., 11 ., .... . . , ,... M t ocri,t. . t , .,.......,........:::.. , . . 4 . . . .. .. .. .... .. .. , ,,,,,1 , , .4. . . . . . ,. . . . . ...,, . . , . , ,.,,,..., , 7 ' . , .. . , 41 . .. . , , .. . . . .. . ,. . .. . . , . . . . .. . . . . . . . . VOL. 21.--. NO.-, 211. : ;:-.. ; -- :'- - - - - '-- v.... ...,- .' .. ' .' - ''''..- ":-...- -- . . . .... . - - - . .. , ST..-LOUIS -SUNDAY- MORNING ''.1AINIVARY 15 1899-.--FORTI4OUR.'PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS. . . , . . . ,T14 T. LOUIS, SUNDAY MORNING, JANUARY-15,4L1899-FORTY-FOUR. PAGES. 2 VOL. 21.--SO-. 211. PRICE FIVE CENTS . -. S -J :CONTENTS Of TO-0111'8 PAPER - 'WEATHER INDICATIONS. WASHINGTON. I.P. C.. January 14.Forecast - tor Sunday: , MissouriFair . aoutherly winds, becoming variable. IllinoisFair. fresh, southwesterly wind.. - - ' ArkansasGenerally lair, light, variable winds. Kansaslalr, southerly wind., becoming variable. , PART FIRST. Pates. 1 Army Scandal to Be Probed. - Hawaiian Decision Against Chinese. Senator Gray on the Paris Treaty. 2. Our Relations with Germany. Cecil Rhodes in England. Havana City Government Changed. 45. Proceedings of Arkansas Legislature. Proceedings In Consress. - 7 . The Bonapartist Conspiracy. Troops Get Ready to Leave Pant. London Literary Gossip. S. Editorial.- America's New Obligations. S. British and Continental Events. 10. St. Louis Lexow Developments. Lindell Railway Company's Reply. - Cherokee Treaty Signed. ' -- 11. General News of the Railroads. 12. Currency Legislation Improbable. 13..Prof. M. S. Snow at the Round Table. , The Good Government Club. , - Civil Court News. ' ' War Upon the Court House Janitors. 14. Handsel Won Another Stake. 15. Pleasure Party from St. Louis Missing. le. The World's Fair Enthusiasm. Missouri Botanical Garden report. Strike at the New Armory. Grand Jury Report Returned. "- PART SECOND. 17. Temperance in Kentucky. 3Ius1ca1 Comment. 24. In Real Estate Circles. New Public Library Books. East St. Louis News. 25. Rod and Gun. -- Secret Society News. 28. Pulpit and Pew. Poetry of the Day. 27. Sports and Pastimes. 28. Markets and River News. 29. Figure Skating. European Notabilities. A Big Fish Trust80. Society News and Gossip. Women's Clubs. - PART THIRD. jt, Gen. Wood a Modern Hercules. Horoscopes of the Nation. Success as an Artist. A4."Merrimac" in Islew 'fork Bay. 82. Long Political Careers. A Lesson from Webster. Princes Under Orders. ' Poetry. L'116. Book Chat. - Schein that afl. ' , Humors of Speech and Pen. Sleep. 84. The Northern Ice Harvest. Making Money In the Argentine. 85. Organ Building In St. Louis. Bob ' Stewart, Missouri's Last Bellum Governor. 66. Fashions Whims. Paris Gossip. Housekeepees Corner. Antel 3 . i 1 1 - y i 87. Ts be Baby Did It. Rainy Day Dresses. Novelties in Neckties. A Bit of Holland in Kansas. Care of Kid Gloves. Carnival Queen and King to Marry. 8R. With January Birds. In Tamerlane's Capital. Tomb of Esther and Nordicai 80. The Millionaire's Bishop. Treasure Trove in the West Indies. How Railroad Men Catch Quail. 40. The Trocha Telegraph (Limited). In the Caverns of the Winds. 41. The Cuban Situation. In Havana January 1. Big Nut Business of Si. Louis. 42. The Brownies' Poi Hunt. Ancient Tune of Yankee Doodle. Weisahke and the Giant. How Polly Papered Her Room. A Bubble Game. 43. With the Wits. -New Things in the Air. 44. Theatrical News and Gossip. Gossip from Gotham. ESTERIIAZT TELLS HIS sTonl, Outlines the Evidence Ile Would Ha Given in the Dreyfus Case. PARIS, January 14.Maj. Count Est bazy has sent to M. Mazeau. of the Coi of Cassation, a synopsis of the evider , which he says would have been given at revision inquiry if a safe conduct had be granted him. He admits his relations d in 1894-9.3, at the request of Col. Sand chief of the information bureaus with a eign agent. by which the Count claims - supplied the Colonel with important formation, "enabling him to combat t , intrigues of an individual well known . t whose position made it unsafe to act opet against him." Esterhazy adds that he w warned a month ahead of Matthew Dre311 Intention. and denounced it at the insti tion of Col. Picquart. Subsequent to he had the closest relations with his periors and acted throughout on their structions until January 7, 1898, when claims, the war Ministry suddenly assu a hostile attitude toward him. Fresh proceedings, the Count asse were instituted at the Instigation of cousin. with the view of getting him ou the way and keep him from testifying. In conclusion. Esterhazy says: "Alone, lied, abandoned by those who should h defended me, I have resisted the tempting offers and bave refused to say write a word against my chiefs. I hope pain will be spared me of having to app to the tribunal of public opinion from decision of the Court of Caseation." To rrt lee , be ien Irhe Ole 'tut rdy as c'is dta, rhho led his t. of :ex-lye lost or he eal he ON A SECRET MISSION TO JApA.x, 'William M. Rice. a 'Kansan. Sent to t Orient by Thin Governinent. FORT SCOTT. KAN.. January 14.W M. Rice, former editor of the Fort Scot Monitor, and well known in state politics for two years past Commissioner of Imml ration at Vancouver. B. C. has been aen by the government on a secret mission to Japan. Its is now at Yokohama Fad will be absent a year or mom 1. nr' .st Indies. ; -5-- 1- ids. 1- ouls. )oodie. town. p. ci w5 1-0T11 gSeill ,L,LI S a , manna, tnat mar- going steam ETE SRIIAZY TELLS HIS STORY army, the President decided that the ut- neated 1 d c a istinct improvement in the ould be broken e situa- treate of peace. In the last event the truce sion, and Brig Gen. Charles B. Whittier, of to be -sold a terances should be passed over. He de- w, and a state of active New York. recently on duty at Manila. Ad- - vised the war investigation commission as corn- mire! tion there. The General's dispatch satisfy the - war would have been resumed. We would re! Dewey will be president of the corn- outlines the Evidence. pie would pi a ve pletely negatives the absurd story- from wages. - Given in the Dreyfus Case. the means by which such criticisms as have no cession of the sovereignty of the mission. , Manila s at Mana ' It Is PARIS , January 14.Mat. Count Est ' e-- Gen. Miles had given might be sifted and Madrid that the American troop Philippines, and none of Porto Rico, and It Is now only a question as to whether or claim ' p tt ry hazy has sent to M. Mazeau have mutinied And refused to ee . of the Co ".rt proven true or unfounded. to no relinquisbment of the sovereignty of not the gentlemen named will consent to are corni wherever- he has planted his foot , Un . of Cessation, a synopsis of the evide . Ice Gen. Mlles has continued to talk and to Iloilo necessitating serve, and th as to e date when the commis- til Miller's force from that the port. Gen. withdrawal of GOtis en. Cuba is and the Congro re cm , which he says would have been given at , be widen the breach between himself and the ion will start for the Phil! s. " ppine master . ' . , It Is true that In the protocol of Au- 8 there Is leg! - revision inquiry if a safe conduct had b. en rest of the War Department. The other gust 21 Spain had deffnitely promised that . and undoubtedly is able to carry, out to the treatment of the nati any The Chino granted him. He admits his relations d ur- Generals who participated In the active she would cede Porto Rico and relinquish , COLUMBUS RELICS LOST. policy as- ves The colony ing 1894-9.3, at the request of Col. Sand ir, campaigning went before the commis h sion Cuba. but without a treaty of peace that t inistration is likel y to dictat e. - chief of the information bureau. with a 1r- e en and, with a single exception, failed to sus- dication that promise would not be performed. What Missed When the H Caaket Was Th is encoura. eign agent. by which the Count claims he tam n the complaints of Gen. Miles. The ex- ere are n ge the -officials here to believe was that the conciliatory would then have been the exigence of the Opened at Madrid FAVORS J supplied the Colonel with important : polley owar recentl y d alth h it n- ception wore Inspector General Breckineidge, situation? Undoubtedly we would have Special cablegram to the Globe-Democrat. td the natives that , formation, "enabling him to combat - he who sided with Gen. Miles at the very be- been compelled to go on and seize with the HAVANA.. January 14.A sensation bas II w w . d ll , Intrigues of an individual well knon adopte wi succee bug can not be . :ut ginning of the controversy and has been strong hand and by military power both been created in Havana by the report re- "Cants it4 tly Identifi expected th at ce the ,Filipinos of tbe absolute will fabe i th con in - whose position made it unsafe to act ope ' ed with him ever since. the Philippine Archipelago and the Greater ceived there from Madrid stating that when LONDON vince a o . - d t n against him." Esterhazy adds that he as WAR DEPARTMENT FACTIONS and Lesser Antilles, taking by ruthless con- the casket containing the supposed remains waiter, of 01 of Christopher Columbus ' was opened In published in which Geri. Otis is acting towards them - warned a month ahead of Matthew est what it was far better that we w Dreyf, is The trouble has been growing steadily. . i Intention . and denounced it at the insti ,a- Not so much as evident to the general TORNADO IN TEXAS. tohould take by the voluntary cession. of a Madrid it was discovered that the !Spanish "'related Frei tion of Cot Plequart. Subsequent to is Public as could be seen by those familiar treaty of peace coins of gold and silver, the gold cross, and returning to be had the closest relations with his se- with the workings of the War Department A Woman other valuable relics which were interred tention of ou periors and acted throughout on their in There. on the one hand. were Miles and e Children Hanger.; But now that we have them. it does not nly Injured. follow that we are come to a colonial pot- with his remains were found to be m .t issing. structions until January 7, 1898, When he Breckinridge. They were against the secre- LONGVIEW TEX. January 14 A tor- The remains, it will be remembered. were ilylrtebetamwo notrhki claims, the war Ministry suddenly assu led tarY. the Adjutant General and all of the n ado passed through 'this county yesterday icy or to a violation of those great prim! pies of liberty and self-government which . f taken from the -cathedral in Havana and alliance wit) a hostile attitude toward him. bureaus. "Strained" is a word not strong from ore. T oK t the I Isoautahh d Fwesitv, four miles northwest must always remain American Ideals, if shipped to Spain after the agreement made am. tie say Fresh resh proeeedings . the count asse Ie . enough to represent the deplorable eondi- by the Spaniards to.' surrender Cuba. It Is try have stro of .' evere Instituted at the instigation of his tion. It is fortunate that this personal war demolished Kilgore e tornado swept down and our own free institutions are to endure a tenement house on the Moore asserted that the record of the articles and adds u : cousin. with the view of getting him o ,. of at home did not break out until the hostill- place, in which n4re a woman named Mrs. ' PRAISES THE PRESIDENT "'. a placed in the casket containing the body "The Inter the way and keep him from testifying ties with Spain were ended. No country. and this country least of all. McCuen and live children, dangerously in- has been kept among the archives of the England are In conclusion. Esterhazy says: "Alone, ex- The crisis came when Gen. Miles publicly can afford to trample on Its Ideals I have . cathedral. In charge of the Archbishop af juring all, and perhaps fatally injuring Mrs. attempt to f iled, abandoned by those who should h tee declared that ''under the pretense of an ex-ill do o ithout assure-Havana.. s. Wre- Havana, and that they show that the casket McCuen. The husband was away from no fear that it w movement a defended me, I have resisted the lost periment" beef treated with chemicals, - Ing for a moment any right to speak for contained some of ail the gold and silver It has not ca n . tempting offers and have refused to say or which caused sickness, had been fed to the home the President. I think can assure you with Acres of forest trees are uprooted and , coins of Spain then existing, as well as a and is mere write a word against my chiefs. I hope . some knowledge whereof 4 speak . that he the army. He cordemned in unqualified terms everything' was swept before the wind s I cross of solid gold and a number of other aims: (1) 7 will ill be spared me of having to aPP eat the dressed beef and the canned beet l'o fu Th rain was the heaviest ever wit- fully appreciates the duties and respons - relies clf great value. . . from et:inflict to the tribunal of public opinion from the quote a member of the Cabinet Gen- Miles ry Where they have disappeared to is now a sphere: (2) t nessed an e d the creeks are so swollen that bilities of . the situation . and that be is e e ey b decision of the Court of Caseation." In this sweeping charge about "embelmed this hour communication is impossible committed to no polic3t calculated to die- mystery as so far as can be -discovered. Britain's eat t beef' struck a blow at the integrity of the f b much less strike do up to , courage the as- there is no evidence that , the casket us the East - " southern part o te county. AU ' ' s ON sovernment From the day t h with the A SECRET MISSION TO JAPA at Gen, " wires went down and trees were bl wn ptrations of liberty-loving people all over disturbed e yet on the other hand it is air - " to the Unite able st o e g l; ewit ---- y. , ,ies put forth that statement the feeling the world I belong to a different political an traces In som j man of the ei h gued that they could not have been eXtract 1 e de xacuedp tt then removing u over tu g the p e William M. Bice. a Kansan. Sent to t ,e has been strong in the administration that across the International and Great Northern party. but I should be lab,. to rev lomat, .,, as been Russia than - 'What Ament Orient LOY This Government. Railroad in several Places. he must prove it or answer for It-The mat- - of justice and to that pride which I feet as u e r -Iremains obbe FORT SC ter has been up several OTT. KAN.. January 14.W times in meetings IORE CRUISERS I did not declare my eon- work. t is charged that t. M. Rice, former editor of the Fort Scot 1- , 1 FOR JAPA ears past ItNgr give the t of the Cabinet The President has received . lottcisKmaeny H , Apue s ritl n yo: committed and as the robbery has in latter Monitor, and well knowmin in state politics 0 , elapsed if friendly from his advisers some strong opinions that Large Construction Order to Be Pl.siee ' d charge of the priests th ey are held responst- w for two y Comssi g oner of Imml . pannuareponAemmtaertioncfantwhiettllipaamtr McKinley - the fullest possible investigation ought to in England. usurper' of power. no stranger to American ble but as nearly 400 years have e . gration at Vancouver. B. C has , been aen be made and that if Gen. Miles was shown Special Cablegram to the Globe-Democrat Institutions but one of the American peo- since the interment of the body It i 1 by the government on a secret mission t - -s mPoe- land and An to have spoken without warrant he should LONDON, January 14.--The Globe says pie. called to his high office by their suf- sible to accuse any one of the theft. How- via Into core Japan. He on is now at Yokohama d f Will be made to suffer. that Japan will shortly place a large order frages. and It would be strange. Indeed; if ever. there is much disa int be absent a year or more. ,IJoot raent over the of the wort - - - - - , - : . ' The sto th rY of embalmed beet was put out for e construction of cruiser In England. he 414 not share to the fullest extent In fact that the vai ukhl. .. I . : , , ., , . , ; . A Ano ovary uL cmultwatna my via. w ma Nub rub wi laa. v.v...., m avm wa . m a, t ma a Sag WU. lau ' gr"'"... . . ,.., 4""v111' V7'112111 111 o racttlat the valuable relics ha I ve been loft, lore t ) - , , .. , , , ' 4 . - . . , , : , . r , , , , ...,ak , AFTER MILES. Whole War Department Scandal to Be Probed. COURT OF INQUIRY PROBABLE. If Ordered, More Than One Court-Martial Will Follow. HEAD OF THE ARMY MAY BE ONE. President Has About Decided to Go to the Bottom of All the Scandals and Make' the -Guilty Ones Suffer for Their Actions. Special Dispatch to the Glohe-Democrat WASHINGTON. D. C.. .Tanuary 14.The President still has the situation in-the -War Department under eonsideration. No word ' of his intention has escaped him.- 'That he Is deeply impressed his manner at the Cabinet meeting yesterday showed. The President acts slowly and with great deliberation when a very serious question is pre: sented to him. The more grave the action I to be taken the less precipitate he is. That policy is apparent now. No order of court-martial has been issued against Gen.Eagan. That officer began the revision of his statement against Miles yesterday. He contine ued it to-day. He had the advtce and assistance of two trusted friends. The statement is about ready for transmission to the war investigation commission. It will be presented probably on Monday. The coarseness and the vituperation have been eliminated. But as a denial of Gen. Miles' charges and as an answer to them It is stronger In its new tone than it was with epithets included. Gen. Eagan abates not one jot of his declaration that Gen. Miles has falsified, but he puts Win parliamentary form. The President is said to feel that the situation in the War Department- calls for something more serious than the court-martial of Gen. Eagan. "Eagan," said a high officer of the department, "would be disposed of without any real investigation of the controversy if a court-martial should be ordered as the first step. He would be charged with con.. duct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman. The specification would recite the language of the statement about Gen. Miles. Eagan would have to admit the truth of the specification. The court-martial would stop right there with a verdict of guilty. The verdict of guilty on that charge carries with it the penalty. The offending officer is then and there cashiered That ends It" WRY PROBA.Zasro.- His manner indicates that Sa.--the mind of the -President this ,controversy in the War Department calls for action, 'which will go deeper than a single court-martial and one example. A court of Inquiry offers the only remedy commensurate with the existing evils. In that direction it is believed the President's course will be , taken. A court of inquiry can go to the very bottom of all of this scandalous talk which has been furnishing a series of War Department sensations for weeks. It can find out the origin and the basis for the story of "embalmed beef." alleged by Gen. Miles to have been fed to the soldiers and to have sickened them. The court of inquiry would not.convict anybody. It would report findings, and upon those findings could be based the orders for court-martials. There is no authority as, yet for a definite statement of the course which the President will take, but the indications begin to point to a court of inquiry with .possible courts-martial in sequence. The trouble in the War Department began when Gen. Miles in Porto Rico, on the eve of his departure for the United States, made his strictures on the war management. At that time the - statements credited to the General commanding caused much astonishment at the White House and in the War Department. The expectation was that Gen. Miles would disavow them. He did not. On his arrival here be was even more outspoken. At the time a proposition to court-martial Gen. Miles was seriously discussed. There was an element in the Cabinet which thought such a step was called for in the interest of discipline. The President was not willing to proceed to extreme measures. He did not approve of what Gen. Miles had said he keenly regretted It The country was rejoicing over the fruits of the war . and rather than have the discordant note of a court-martial of the highest officer of the army, the President decided that the utterances should be passed over. He devised the war investigation commission as the means by which such criticisms as Gen. Miles had given might be sifted and proven true or unfounded. Gen. Mlles has continued to talk and to widen the breach between himself and the rest of the War Department. The other Generals who participated in the active campaigning went before the commission and, with a single exception, failed to sustain the complaints of Gen. Miles. The exception was Inspector General Breckinridge, who sided with Gen. Miles at the very beginning of the controversy and has been Identified with him ever since. WAR DEPARTMENT FACTIONS. The trouble has been growing steadily. Not so much ss'as evident to the general public as could be seen by those familiar with the workings of the War Department. There on the one hand. were Miles and Breckinridge. They were against the secretary, the Adjutant General and all of the bureaus. "Strained" is a word not strong enough to represent the deplorable eondition. It is fortunate that this personal war at home did not break out until the hostilities with Spain were ended. The crisis came when Gen. Miles publicly declared that "under the pretense of an experiment" beef treated with chemicals. which caused sickness, had been fed to the army. He condemned In unqualified terms the dressed beef and the canned beef. Ii To quote a member of the Cabinet, Oren. Miles In this sweeping charge about "embajmed beef' struck "a blow at the Integrity of the sovernment" From the day that Gen, Skt.,Les put forth that statement the feeling has been strong in the administration that he must prove it or answer for ItThe matter has been up several times in meetings of the Cabinet The President has received from his advisers some strong opinione that the fullest possible investigation ought to be made. and that if Gen. Mlles was shown to have spoken without warrant he should be made to suffer. .The story of embalmed beef waa put out by Gen. Miles three weeks ago. At the time the investigation commission was about to complete its hearings and report. Immediately the ccmmission voted.,at the suggestion of the Presidentit is .,understood to probe the beef story! Since then Gen. Miles has been called upon for his authority. Ile furnished a list of officers, about ' fifteen names. When these officers were examined It appeared thatthey had not been in Santiago or Porto Rice. - MILES' CHARGES NOT SUSTAINED. The commission has been examining witnesses almost daily regarding the beef furnished the army. The evidence fails to sustain in any sense the charges of Gen. Miles. And now the General, in an interview, coolly criticizes.' the commission, .alleging that it has failed to call any witnesses other than the beef contractors and the commissary officers, who could not be expected to stultify themselves. The course of Gen. Miles has been most remarkable. He tentinues to talk, as if he courted open rupture with the administration. ' - And finally comes this astonishing statement of Gen. Eagan. t Nobody justifies the language of the Comrhissary General. But the intemperate abuse'of Gen. Miles is important as evidence of the intensity of the feeling which prevails in the War Depart. ment Gen. Eagan, with a degree et bad judgment almost inexplicable, gave vent to the pent-up feeling. ' He will In all probability suffer severely for it But that there is also a day of reckoning close at hand seems certain. The President was in consultation over the War Department troubles to-day. When Secretary Alger came from the White House his lips were sealed. It is not probable that the action which must comb will be taken for several days. ThelPresident mat wait until the report of the war investigation commission is placed in his bands. That will be in about ten days. Then, if 'not sooner, it is intimated he will order the military court of inquiry to do its work, preparatory to possible courts-martial. And then the rigor of military investigation will be applied to the most scandalous condition the War Department has known in this generation. Mdre than one court-martial may follow. W. B. S. CUBANS WANT Ttl DISBAND. Army Anxious to Fluter Into the Pursuits of Peace. Special Dispatch to the Globe-Demoerat. , WASHINGTON, D. C., January 14.--Gen. Alberto R. de' Betantourt, of the Cuban army and a nephew of the Marquis de Santa Lucia, a wealthy Cuban, who gave the major portion of his fortune to aid in securing Cuban independence, arrived in Washington yesterday. Gen. Betancourt came directly from Havana, and shortly before his departure for Washington he visited the camp of Gen. Gomez to confer with the Cuban commander-in-chief regarding certain provisions for the army. Gen. Batancourt declares that the soldiers of the Cuban army are now, almost without exception, anxious to disband and return tewtheir homes, seeing that there is practically no longer need -for 'their services. They realize that independence and freedom from Spain hate been gained, and that absolute independence and the formation of a strictly home government is not to be had by force of arms, but rather by methods of peace,, and aiding in the establishment cf aLairm and table government The Cubans,. slid specialty the-leaders of -tho--army, are 'extremely a, alouti to render their assistance in this respeet.'- They' have fought for their independence, and now they are anxious to enjoy it. -Gradually, but nevertheless surely, Gen. Betancourt declares, the masses of the Cubans are becoming reconciled to American intervention. and 'welcome the interest which the United States has taken in their affairs to lend the army toward the reconstruction of the government of Cuba. The Cuban army, he declares, has hardly', since the beginning of the war been in better condition than at the present time. That Is. the soldiers have not wanted so much for food. They have no very great variety. but it is enough, such as it is. Then, too, he says the people are getting on better with their crops, so that with the aid which the United States is supplying it will not be long before the great suffering which Cuba has experiencekduring the past four years will be greatly relieved, and the real work og upbuilding can be commenced. Regierding compensation to the soldiers, Gen. Betancourt asserts that it is his belief that the commission will be able to secure some hatisfaction in this matter, and that a certain amount will be advanced by the United States with which to pay off the soldiers, and the repayment pledged with the revenues from the custom houses of Cuba. This done, there would be absolute contentment with American intervention in Cuban affairs, and realizing the generosity of the American Government the Cubans would be more willing to have it longer coal Untied. REASSURING MANILA NEWS. Gen. Otis Master of the Situation in the Philippinem. WASHINGTON, D. C., January 14.The War Department officials were very much 'encouraged to-day upon the receipt of news from Gen. Otis, at Manila, that indicated a distinct improvement in the situation there. The General's dispatch completely negatives the absurd story- from Madrid that the American troops at. Manila have mutinied and refused to' proceed to Iloilo, necessitating the withdrawal of Gen. Miller's force from that port Gen. Otis is master wherever- he has planted his foot and undoubtedly is able to carry, out any policy as- to the treatment of the natives the administration is likely to dictate. There are indications that encourage the .officials here to believe that the conciliatory policy toward the natives that was recently adopted will succeed, althbugh it can not be expected that the Filipinos will be convinced at once of the absolute faith which Gen. Otis is acting towards them. - TORNADO IN TEXAS. A Woman and rive Children liangerl ously Injured. LONGVIEW, TEX., January 141.--A tornado passed through this county yesterday from the southwest, four, miles northwest of Kilgore. IThe tornado swept down and demolished a tenement house on the Moore place, in which wre a woman named Mrs. McCuen and five children, dangerously injuring all, and perhaps fatally injuring Mrs. McCuen. The husband was away , from home. - Acres of forest trees are uprooted and everything was swept before the wind's fury. The rain. was the heaviest ever witnessed and the creeks are so swollen that up to this hour communication is impossible with the southern part of the county. All wires went down and trees were blown across the International and, Great Northern Railroad in several places. ' MORE CRUISERS FOR 'JAPAN. Large Construction Order to Be Placed In England. Special Cablegram to the Olobt-Democrat. LONDON, January it The Globe says that Japan w111 shortly place a large order for the construction of cruiser In England. fiRAIS VIEWS 'Says iire Could Not Avoid Takitithe., WENT TO PARIS OPPOSED TO IT But Becam- e Convincid It Was Arnerica's Duty. A TRIBUTE TO THE , , , PRESIDENT. The Democratic Member of the Peace Commission Says Zito Kialey's , Policy at First Was Opposed. to Claiming the Atiehipelago wiLmiNoToN, 1.. .. ,Jatwary IC It United States Senat George Gray was tendered a cOmplim tary dinner in this city to-night Preside t McKinley. his Cab- I Met and all the Mem rs of the peace corn- mission, with the ex eption of John Bassett Moore, sent lettetS of regret. Mr, Moore was the only member of the commission present. There were I. guesis in attendance. Senator Gray, was the chief speaker of the evcning and, responding to the toast, !Our Guest of Honor," he said in part: "We am now in a Crisis of our national history, anti your hearts and mind, as patriotic citizens of this great, country, are full of anxiety as to the proper settlement of the momentous issues which have resulted from the war with Spain. While your country was at war with Spain we were ready. to make, I hope,' every sacrifice t8 insure the success of American arms and bring victory and honor to the American flag. And trhert the war -was over I believe the patriotic, instinct of American citizenship demanded, as your President enjoined Up011 us, that we would exhibit magnanimity to a prostrate foe and moderation in the hour of victory, as we had faced the war with steadfastness and courage. In the first place, I want to say to Toll that it was my pleasure, as -well as what I ,conceived my duty, to endeavor to carry out this instruction' so credible to us as a nation and so worthy of the high civgization of which we profess to be leaders. - - - -,- "The acquisition of territory by the United States was not onq of -the objects of the War. and we solemnly declared in the resolutions of Congresa'that our only object in demanding the relinquishment of the sovereignty over Cuba by Spain was not to hold it - ourselves, 'except that we might pacify it and fit it for self-government by Its own people. , ; - : ,- THE PHILIPPINE QUESTION. 'But in this as fit all else 'Man proposes and Gothat dispeses,NihtteVt I ,t s -.ono of he 'things makeslhoughtful men desire to avoid war where it ean be avetded. for no one can tell what its 'consequences may be. I ardently desired that we might escape the necessity of taking' the Philippine Islands, and assuming the burden that their taking will Impose upon us. and I know that the President of the United States was equally anxious to the same end. But It became apparent that without c;ur seeIng unexpected conditions had been created, and out of these conditions unquestionable duties had sprung which could not be avoided or evaded by the United States. - "It was argued that the performance of duty is sometimes not only unpleasant, but has dangers attendant upon it; nevertheless a brave man and a brave nation will not shrink from it on that account. On the other hand. if American sentiment did not justify the return of these islands to Spain, no more could it justify leaving them derelict in the Eastern ocean, the prey of the first occupant of European rapacity. The powers of Europe would acquiesce in our-, taking them, but they would not stand by and see them In their helpless condition of anarchy and disorder, withot seizing the opportunity to aggrandize themselves, and so it was thought best by the President and his .advisers to to take the cession of their sovereignty from Spain and hold it in trust to be administered in conformity with those high ideals and liberty-loving traditions which animate and glorify the history of our country. Duty can not honorably be avoided. because it may bring pain or danger, nor can responsibility always be evaded because of its brrdens. BEST COURSE WAS TAKEN. "That I sought in Paris by all honorable means to escape this responsibility does not matter now. It came ta..4t point at last that we must either leave the islands to Spain, take them as we did, or break oft negotiations, and come home without a, ticaty of peace. In the last event the truce would be broken, and a state of active war would have been resumed. We would have no cession of the sovereignty of the Philippines, and none of Porto Rico, and no relinquishment of the sovereignty of Cuba. ' "It is true that in the protocol of August 21 Spain had deffnitely promised that she would cede Porto Rico and relinquish Cuba, but without a treaty of peace that promise would not be performed. What would then have been the exigence of the situation? Undoubtedly we would have been compelled to go on and seize with the strong hand and by military power both the Philippine Archipelago and the Greater, and Lesser Antilles, taking by ruthless conquest what it was far better that we ehould take by the voluntary cession of a treaty of peace "But now that we have them, it does not. follow that we are come to a colonial policy or to a violation of those great principles of liberty and self-government which must always remain American Ideals, if our own free institutions are to endure.' PRAISES THE PRESIDENT. "No country. and this country- least of all. can afford to trample on its ideals. have no fear that it will do so. Without assuming for a moment any right to speak for the President. I think I can assure you with some knowledge whereof I speak, that he fully appreciates the duties and responsibilities - of the situation. and that be is committed to no polic3t calculated to discourage. much less strike down, the aspirations of liberty-loving people all over the world. belong to a different political party. but I should be fat.e to my pense of justice and to that pride which I feet as an American If I did not declare my eonfidence in the patriotism and purity -of purposq of William McKinley. He is no usurper' of power no stranger to American institutions. but one of the American people. called to his high office by their suffrages. and it would be strange. indeed; if he 414 not share to the fullest extent in . . : - the the 7tpetago the love of our 'constitution and the principles that" lie under it" But the solution of the problems which confront us is not with the President. When the treaty is ratified no policy can be adopted without the sanction of Congress. And the whole American people will determine. through their representatives, what relations we shall sustain to the Philippines. Shall we hold the sovereignty in trust for their people, as we will do in Cuba. or shall we with ,their consent, establish a protectorate Over them or govern them its we will the Island of Porto Rico: All the questions wilitproperly come up for determination after the ratification of the treaty. I will.not entertain the fear that the American people will not stand by the principles of the constitution.' and the declaration that they will not curb the ambition of territorial aggrandizement and exhibit to the world an example of moderftioii, jus&e and self-restraint that will be worth tOrus in moral strength more tit-ail all the islands of the seas.'" ' ' ' , AGUINALDO'S EMISSARIES. Three Memberi of Hiss Cabinet En Route to Vilashinnton. Special Dispatch to the globe-Democrat. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. January It -- Among the passengers on the new Japanese steamer Nippon Maru, which arrived to-day from Hong Kong and Yokohama, after a stormy passage, were three -members of Aguinaldo's Cabinet, who will go to Washington to prenent the claims of the Insurgents. They are men who would pass anywhere as citizens of the world, for all speak.English and are gentlemanly In address. The leader and spokesman is Capt. M. Marti Burgess. of Aguinaido's staff, who has been In nearly all the firliting against the Spanish. The others are Dr. Jose Lasada, Congressman in the Filipino Parliament and professor of medicine in the University of Manila, and Juan Luna, a well-known Manila artist, whose pictures have been honored in the Paris salon. and the correspondent of La Independencia, of Manila. These delegates say they will make no demand to see President McKinley . though they would be gratified if he would receive them. What they count- on doing is to get some influential Congressman to present their. case to Congress and to the American people. They are confident. they say, that if this is done there will ,be a strong revulsion of feeling in regard to making the Philippines a colonial possession of the United States. When asked whether Aguinaido would agree to a colonial government without citizenship, Capt. Burgess said: - "The feeling of the insurgents is very strong against, the- acceptance of any government which would not place the Filipinos on the same level with the people. in your territories. That is, they must be given a vote and be treated is Americani. No other course will be accepted. The Insurgents have been fighting for years for their freedom and now, when it is within their grasp. they will not consent to be cheated out of Its fruits and made merely members of a colony of an alien nation." AGUINALDO MASSING TROOPS. Gathering Hie 'Forret" Around hittailiem, Miller Waiting' for Orders. Special Cablegram to the Globe-Democrat. MANILA, January 14.Aguinaldo is masaInf his troops around Manila. It is stimated that they number 40.000. It seems difficult to avoid hostilities. Aguinaldo -will not listen to a reasonable solution of the question. Twelve thousand natives have left Manila. Seven extra traino carried many out of the city yesterday, and thousands are leaving by the roadp. The American troops will remain at Iloilo. The Indiana will take down 200 tons of provisions and a full cargo of coal. Gen. Miller is awaiting orders as to landing. Tho natives are still hostile to the Americans. Owing to the attitude at Iloilo Gen. Aguinaldo's party deride the result of this expedition. Last night two natives attacked and wounded a sentry of the South Dakota Regiment, who bayoneted one and shot the other. THE HELENA LEAVES PORT SAID. Special Cablegram to the Globe-Democrat. PORT SAID. aanuary it The United States gunboat Helena has sailed for Manila. A PHILIPPINE COMMISSION. President Asks Dewey. Otis. Selturtnan. Denby and Whittier to Serve. Special Dirpatch to the Globe-Democrat. WASHINGTON, D. C.. January 14.President McKinley has decided to send a commission to the Philippines to make a thorough study of the situation and advise him' as to what the policy of the 'United States should be regarding those islands. He has asked these gentlemen to serve on the commission: Rear Admiral George Dewey, commander-in-chief of the Asiatic squadron; Maj. Gen. E S. Otis, miltary governor of the Philippines; Prof. J. G. Sehurman,president of .Cornell Eniversity; Col. Charles Denby, former Minister to China, and now a member of -the war Investigation commis. sion, and Brig. Gen. Charles B. Whittier, of New 'York, recently on duty at Manila. Admiral Dewey will be president of the commission. - It is now only a question as to,whether or not the gentlemen named will consent to serve, andas to the date when the commission will start for the Philippines. COLUMBUS RELICS LOST. - --- Missed When tbe H Caaket Was - Opened at Madrid. , - Special Cablegram to the Globe-Democrat. HAVANA.. January 14.A sensation has been created in Havana by the report received there from Madrid stating that when the casket containing the supposed remains of Christopher Columbus was opened In Madrid it was discovered that the Spanish coins of gold and silver, the gold cross, and other 'valuable relics which were Interred with his remains were found to be missing. The remains, It win be remembered. were taken from the -cathedral in Havana and shipped to Spain after the agreement made by the Spaniards te- surrender Cuba. It Is asserted- that the record of the articles placed In the casket containing the body has been kept among the archives of the cathedral in charge of the Archbishop ,3 Havana, and that they show that the casket contained soind of ail the gold and silver coins of Spain then existing, as well as a cross of solid gold and a number of other relics tif great value.-- Where they have disappeared to Is now a mystery. as so far as can be -discovered. there is no evidence that the casket was disturbed, yet on the other hand it Is argued that they could not have been eitracted except by removing the lid in som4 manner and then covering up an traces of the work. '.1t is charged that robbery has been committed,- and as , the remains were in charge of the priests they'are held responsible, but as nearly 400 years have elapsed since the Interment of the body it is Impossible to accuse any one of the theft. However. there is much disappointment over the fact that the Valuable relics hays ben loet, RULED OUT. Chinese Can Not Even Return to Hawaii. UNITED STATES OFFICER MELD Decision by. Supreme Court of the Islands. NO JURISDICTION IN SHIP CASES. Contracts with the Kaneko, Republie Are Vitiated Th. Court Holds It Can Not Fame ort the Powers of a Federal Oft leer. prom a Oloba-temocrat Staff Correspondent. HONOLULU. IL I., January 7. via Sen Francisco, Cal.. January It The most irn. portant and far-reaching decision ever arrived at by a. legal tribunal' In these Islands was handed down by the Supre.ne Court yesterday morning. It leaves the government here "in the air" in relation to all add miralty and maritime controversies or questions. The Newland' resolution annexing these islands as part of the United States provided that local or municipal laws Should continue in force where they did not conflict with the constitution of the United States. Another 'section etipulated that no more Chinese should enter the islands. D. K. Brown was sent here by the Treasury Department at Washington to see that the Chinese exclusion act of the United States was enforced. Ile refused landing to Chinese returning from visits to their own country and with permits to make the trip teemed by the Republic of Hawaii. Habeas' corpus proceedings were had. The Chief Justice. Mr. Judd. decided that the Newiands resolution did not contemplate that agieetnents made with Chinese recently by the Republic of Hawaii should be vitiated without due notice, and ordered that Chinese qualified under the Hawaiian laws to enter the country he allowed to come la.. ANOTHER DECISION. Mr. Brown and the Collector General et the Port. Mr. MeStocker, took another case to the full Supreme beech. Atistoelates Whiting and Perry (decision by Perry), milting in place of Freer. ailment. reversed the Chit f Justice. who gave a minority ruling. It is held by Perry and Whiting. as follows: The joint resolution passed by the Congress at the United States on July 6. MI, relating to the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands, provided. inter alit, that there shall be no further immigration of Chinese into the Hawaiian Islands, except upon sueh conditions as are now or may hereafter be allowed by the laws of the United States..- "Held that; by virtue of this provision, the United States laws relating to the immigration and exclusion of Chinese were extended to and put in.force in this country: and. further, that Chinese . whether residing in this country or not, prior to July T. 1898, to whom permits to enter the Hawaiian Islands were lettered pclor to said date by the Hawaiian Government. are not excepted by the resolution from the operation of said United States laws, but are also subject to the provisions thereof. "This court is not a court of the United States, and has no jurisdiction in habeas corpus proceedings. or otherwise, to pans upon the validity of the appointment of a federal officer. or the extent of his powers under the federal laws. or the legality of the detention by him under such laws of persons who claim to be illegally in such custody. 'This statement of the law is clear and to the point. If, in thin case. there be any defect in the power of a United Staten officer. or in his mode of proceeding, it is for the tribunals of the United States to revise and correct it. and not for this court. That no United States court bee been established here yet, and that great inconvenience may result from this courts holding that It has no jurisdiction can not of Itself confer jurisdiction upon the court. NO JURISDICTION. The Hawaiian Government had not, and has not, the power to confer upon title court jurisdiction to construe or judicially enforce United States laws. and the United States Government, though possessing tho power to confer such jurisdiction, has not yet done so. For such failure. and the inconvenience resulting therefrom. Congress is alone responsible." A valuable schooner, confiscated for having brought opium Into the country, is about to be sold by order of court. The steamship City of Columbia, a big oceangoing steamer from Seattle. is advertised to be sold at auction on the 17th Inst., to satisfy the claim of sailors for ;14,000 wages. It is claimed that while Whiting and Perry are correct In their ruling. the prospect Until Congress acts is something appalling. and there can be no adjudication here until there Is legislation at Washington. The Chinese are sullen and indignant. The colony Is old and Wealthy. EDWARD TOWSE. FAVORS ALLIANCE WITH RCSSIA. John W. Bookwolter Pay Illnsrlod Wants to Lae to st Her Catalpa wr. LONDON. January ItJohn W. Book-Walter. of Ohio. whose views on Rusala Were published in a dispatch from here to the Asscciated Press under date of December 22. le returning to the United States with the Intention of writing a book describing his three months travels In Siberia. Incidental. ly this work will be a plea for an American alliance with Russia Instead of Great Britain. Be Says his observations in this country have strengthened his pro-Ruselan views and adds: The Interests of the United States ani England are radically antagonistle and the attempt to foster an alliance is an artificial movement so far sts England Is toncerned. It has not captured the hearts of t e people. and is tootoly a political device wo aims: - (I) To divert Ameriefi front conflicting interests in 11( sphere: (2) to make the Unite(' Britain's eatspaw In her diplot the East. She thinks that if to the United States as an able to extort better ter 1 What America wants In and she will do more b Russia than by ante latter already pract will give the Unit( if friendly. It lk land and Americ via Into conces of the worir nor. than The most they could do would be to home bard a few coast towns. whits Russia's rail. rciade could pour so many soldiers Into China that any the United States and Omit Britain could send would be a handful im comparison. BLANCOCERTERA QUARREL. Moro Tenable. Espeeted Over Oast lase Campaign& aperients's lose. Spotlit! esbleitram to the Glotle-Donteerst. MADRID. January it --Madrid has a sou. sation in the Quarrel which has arisen between Ger. Blanco and Admiral Corson". The troublo Si over the conflicting report regarding the responsibility for the destruction of the fleet at Santiago de Cuba. When Anmital Cersera was held in Multi. ago harnor1 through the Instrumentality of Gen. Blanco. beyond the time that he de. sired to rtmain for the safety of hie ships, and when he discovered that be was entrapped. he cast the responsibility upon Gen. Blanco . and so reported to his horn government. Ever since that time the two Spaniards have not only been hated cal enemies. but have been personal enter mien as well. Each one has his personal followtng and his atrang supporters. Upon several ocea. along Gen. Blanco has In public stw'rchcc verely attacked the Spanish Admiral and declared that but for his stupidity Spans might not have lost the pride of her navy . but that on the other hand, had the Cape Verde flee: been In charge of a competent commander it might have annihilated Des. eral of the beet ships of the American fleet and the reitult of the war might have boort entirely different. Admiral Cervera bee taken but little no. tice of Write attacks. but his follower. and friends have taken the matter up and replied to tba statement.e made by Oen. Blanco. Recently Gen. Blanco published a 'tatement over hits eignature In a newspaper calling Admiral Cervora vile names. pro. nouncing him diehoneat. a traitor and a hi. littler. For the first time. then the Admiral took reeognition of Gen. Blanco and replied. As a result further trouble is looked for. Already several serious tights hey token place between the followers of the two men, 'and Senor Sagasta has been asked to arrange a settlement between them for the beet intereets of the country. IRELAND OFF FQR ROM& dE OokiimOnanftwookiimel. The Arch)) Jabots Plaited trona New Torte en be Tease. Special Diapatch to The Olobe-Demoerat. NNW YORK, January Me-Archbishop Ireland. Of St. Paul. palled to-day for Napies, en route to Home, on the North Ger. man Lloyd steamer Trave. Ilia name did not appear on the patisenger list. Ile litre rived at the floboken pier shortly before the tessl PliiiPti, having taken a carriage front tho Witidort-Atitoria. The Archblahop re fused to discuss matters pertaining to hie isit to Home. Bishop NICOOnnell, of Brooklyn, going tta Italy for hie health, was also a pasisenger on the Trave. The prelates did not know they were to be fellow-passiengerc It wail ettid. until after they boarded the steams rhip. CAUSIC OF1 litkILAND'S VOYAGE. Special eablogroun to the) 0 lobo. I Hunorrat. ROME. January Me-Archbianop Ireland hoe been summoned to Itome to explain hie action in undertitkitur to guide the Vatic on what appears to have been ineuMelent groundi tur succeao in the tirompt to prevent war between the 'United States and Archblahop Ireland, it in meld, ba4 at different times made known to the Pore that he wan on very friendly term., with Premident McKinley and had considerable influence with him, The Pope, wiatiing to preserve peace as far as he poasibly could, and to du everything in his power to avoid the Spanish-American war, siaturally was murh impreesed. The Pope. matte &rest efforts at Intel-yam. tion. but they signally failed. The Vaticen Its much diepleemed at having made over. tures whith only invited a refusal on part of the President to accent them.ttlforesslit--"'s question of church curliest also has to dal with Archbishop trelatiira visit. FAVORABLE TO DREYFUS. An Outtle ell the Probable tried lett el Ike 4 vol.. PARIS. January 11.The Stalin and thos Gun lois Ode mornintr asiby they understand! that the inquiry of the Court of Caseation Into the Dreyfue came le on tho point of terminating and that the court will probe,. bly report that acts of treatton actually oe.. curred. but that sulncient proof of the guilt of Dreyfue does not exist. &lid that his Den. tence. therefore. Is enutehed. The papers add that there will be a fresh court-martial. Dreyfue. It appears. was Informed of the revision proeeedings some, time ago. but be la under the Impreeelon, that they are due to the Initiative of the general staff. and in his letter the prinone thanks Oen. lioisdeffre, the former chief of the general otaff, and his comrades of the army for the action taken. M. Do Ileaurepaire, writing to the Vette d Parte. xpreeses the opinion that .Thurs. days debate In the Chamber of Deouties renders It Impoesiblo for the Court of Cats. Dation to proclaim Dreyfus Innocent. LEO MIL'S DISARMAMENT PLAN. 11111 woOPINIP Scheme Reported eubmItted ,itet the Cater by tilt. Pepe. Opelal rahlegrarn ta the otobe-Democrat. LONDON. January itOn Monday the Czar received a. special meseenger from the Vatican who presented an autograph letter, from the Pope relative to the disarmament conference. It Is reported that the Pope ad. vined the Czar to place before the powers a clear and simple scheme for the eat0)1114h. ment of International arbitration with an arbitral tribunal compoeed of the chief min., inters of the European states; that this trt., bunal should meet whenever there was dans ger of an International conflict, and that the aggrieved parties appear by apecial envoys.' Apparently his Holiness believes that the contending powers would quietly accept me' solution the arbitral tribunal might decide!' upon. for he makes ro provittion for the en.! forcement of awards. The report cornea frOnit a very good eouree. but the Neheme le ao crude that It la difficult to believe that le was really submitted by the Pope. COUNT THUS WANTED WAR:. , MEIEMMEM.IiMMEli.. IndleatIon that Anatele Preget. toologist a Unerrel wII Cierseany. BERLIN. January 14.Iracta have come to the knowledge of the government. allow. Ing that the Auntrian Premier. Count ThunItohenstein, for a number of months pre. ceding bla attack on the German Govern.; ment in the Reichrath, eystematically me, 'qki.c- ' very shred of evidence tending that Germany had a. vet& in extwiliue Austrian frontier Meows tto .-ft,....... .e0 so oorly so to collootol rtiotically. i .1ctio Ms 1 tohonA I Auso : hat i -rtis-t-I-c-a-il-Y: i Ion Ms 1 tohenA I Ausd i hat 1 rt., c

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