St. Louis Globe-Democrat from St. Louis, Missouri on October 15, 1899 · 36
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St. Louis Globe-Democrat from St. Louis, Missouri · 36

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Sunday, October 15, 1899
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-; Ilan did any of you fellows ever eat dog?" : ' The question fell like a bombshell from ' the lips of an old Elondiker into a group of dusty travelers In the smoking compartA ment of a Southern Pecan Pullman sleeper. They had been trying their best to pass time telling stories while the train slowly plowed a dusty track .-over the hot Nevada desert. The dining car conductor f bad just passed through the car with his , 4 fatntlige cry: "Dinner now ready in the dining earl" - The announcement bad caused the gold bunter's mind to turn to Alaskan dinners enjoyed or endured before he had made Ms "pile" and returned to Ole states to , enjoy It ' Four noses 'went up- In disgust and four faces expressed supreme horror as the Klondiker repeated the question: "Did any of you fellows ever eat,dog? "Well. now, there's no' cause for you par- - Ocular chaps to take on like that," he , resumed, after a searching look around the ' compartment admit that ' there is many a thing a darn sight better than dog - - ' steak. Fli even agree that a big juicy - porterhouse, with rich blood kind of hanging through It and plenty of seasoning such as civilized folks use, Is about as , tasty ft thing as a man can set down to. I've seen the time, though, when Malamoot steak was much more appetizing than the , tenderest porterhouse In the land will ever be to you fellows. - "You don't believe It? Well', let me go to 11--- If I can't tell a story that II prove It - You see, it was this way. In, the winter of , . - '90 about twenty of VS wintered at Forty- Mile Camp. That was long before the , Klondike was heard of ,Diggin's at Forty-Mile and Circle were goodbetter than any other on the , -Yukon Valley. Even then 7 we were all on the bust for the bonanza campft something to be found somewhere that vroulct startle the worldjust what Indian George Carmack found years later 'j In the now famous Klondike. We were not particularly short of grub that winter. I can remember years when the Supply was much smaller. We had bacon, beans and,flour a-plenty. and what more could you ask? Along about ary , we began to get restless and think about plans for the approaching summer. "One night or maybe dayIt doesn't make much difference, as it was dark 'most all the time, anywayFred Kurtz, Harry Kelly and Theo. Marsden were In my cabin talkie things over. Kelly, who afterward 000000000000000000000000000 OOOOOCOOOOOO .c. Alt. NE 01 i.,, QN 1.'. '1..0irT::T9 .. GET lo. c!1..-..: -r. ! : ,1 The Retired Steel King Furnishes Some Sound :Advice :, - . - 'Young Men. . , , XrOOCOCC0000900000000000000000000éb0000000000000C I - BrICTAL COMUSPONDiaiall or Tax ax.oes-DxaocxAT , LONDON. October 2.--Irifty years ago & ', 1 ytranit Scotch lad was working 1111 a t'bob.- t i , bin bole in a cotton factory in this count : try.' He was earning' somewhat less than $1.25 & week. That boy was Andrew Car-' I 4,- nee& who is vow one of the richest men 1, .. In the world. At the age of 62 be has retired from business with a fortune that is 1 , estimated at $100,000.000, or an annual in' come of 0,000,000. Mr. Carnegie pondered 1 over the problem how best to distribute this huge sum during this lifetime so as to ' produce the maximum amotint of good and , the minimum of evil. Mr. Carnegie , finds that a man who attends to the distribu, tion of his own fortune is not to be rated ' an Idler. This, however, Is a difficulty few ' S ' men are called upon to face. Most of us - ' are concerned In laboriously accumulating - an infinitesimal fraction of the millions ' which Mr. Carnegie has won in his pros; perous career. How to make millions, not ' how to spend them, is the pressing prob' , who has made millions can best explain . lent with the majority of men. The man ' s' - 1 bilasow kimilndilicmsr consarseumtedadoioagnidveMtrieCreaarndeegirse . ''- 4 of the GWEX-Dsitocitar his practical ad1 t ' vice, the outcome of his own personal ex perience, on how to succeed in business. , t "If a man has an ambition to make nill4 lions, Mr. Carnegie what are the gifts with . . , which a fairy godmother should endow hint 4 at hi birth?" , . l'Ilie greatest of all advantages with 1 which he can begin life is that 6t being , poor. The man who wishes to make millions must not be born with a silver spoon r f- . In his mouth THe must feel that it is sink 1 or swim with him. He must start his life Ir ., . career with no bladders, no life-preservers . t i , no support. If. in addition to being poor I himself, he -has 'witnessed his parents' struggle with adversity and resolves to -I drive the wolf from the door of the tam- incoomenptiavredes rally:ref:7e itrasersotnalhe snatrotungerestcanof ablie i' thlettL tRoesinipomens5lbs.ilitNy7thalnrobwnitio'nuspoonf ..aa youzur, poor man. that le the thing to bring - wiwhithch ad , out what is In him. such Is the raw mate- rial out of which great captains of industry i are made' ,' "He has placed his foot on the fret rung of the ladder of success?". got rich runnte a garoblire den in Dawson. got his eyes On an Old map tacked on the wall. It was a small one of North America. which I'd torn from lily kid'. , geography before leavin home, and ' didn't seem to lose It In the three years I'd been stampedin! up and down the Yu. kon Valley before settlin' In Forty Mile. I'd fasten the map on the wall Just to sort of remind me that there was a part of the world that was not all snow and Ice. "Kelly took the candle off the pine box that stood for table, and went over the map. He studied It closely, made a few marks with pencil and finally came back to his stool. He lit his pipe and puffed It ai few moments before he broke out In this manner of talk: " 'Did any of- you's ever see any one who had mined on the Mackenzie River? No tenclerfoot; mind you, but a. man who knows diggin's when be sees them.' "'The silence was heavy. None of vs knew what be was drivin' at. ,, " 'Do any- of you know that there Is no gold there?" was the next question which Kelly apruhg. It remained unanswered. How did he know? " 'Well, what's the matter with our goin' there. There's no use in stayin' around here. We make enough durin' the summer to live on through the winter, but that's all. I,- for one want to get out of this country some day, and before I go I've got to have a sack of the yellow. When I left Ohio thred- years ago I said ''Good-by" to as sweet a lithe girl as ever lived,' and told her I'd be back with a fortune sooneen this She Is -Wattire for me, an' bow far have I got along? Enough grub in my cabin to last until the thaw comes: then It's scratch for more so's not to starve next winter i: say, let's go north, even to the shores of the Arctio Ocean.' i t , - "The speech was a mighty long one for Kelly. He didn't talk much as a rule. 1 At first we thought he was Jokin', but when he- mentioned the little gal and Ohio we knew, he -was ,in earnest, for those are things a man don't joke about when halt In the land of Ice and snow. I" 'There must be gold somewhere around, and God, knows It's time our luck was changing,' was Marsden's comment. The German simply shook his head kind of' doubtin like. He didn't speak much English. The- discussion soon became general. Unrest won out, however, against better Judgment in the end. Within two hours we had decided to adopt the plan that was as wild and visionary as any miner evier eon RICH. , ,, tnd Advice to - D00000000000G "yes. and be goes ahead. for be knows no such -word as IWhat about . his personal character? "I think if a young man has ambition he has the ,necesssry Qualities behind it. Tbe desire to succeed develop e them. The secret of success chiefly lies in the determination to succeed and the -resolve that every Ira-- prise. over' knock-down he receives in the battle will only nerve him the more., "Are there any other essentials to elm- cess?" . ' 1 "Yes, ha should make his employer's interest 12Is ovrn. He should take personar pride in the concern with which be is connected. He should consider the property as his vat already, and expend all his efforts and energy upon IL This attracts the attention of , his employers and the rest is easY.", . . , "If he follows this advice, will he eventually come to he top? -:"Well.. you can ,find 100 men who will make good Brigadier Generals, ten, perhaps, who can command a corps, and only one who can combine all the forces and wield them as one solid mass. The tame analogy holds good in business. The ..lan ologists 1.4 have discovered no bump of an nature, thongh they should have done . so., The must delicate and the most essential piece of mechanism that a man has to deal with is the human machine. Unless a man knows how to wattage those above him as well as those below him be will never achieve supreme success. Knowledge of human nature is the chief element in the composition of the successful business man. The test of any man's ability is not what he does himself.1 but what he can get others to do in co-operation with him." "Then you believe in a close connection between employer and employed?" ' "No matter how close It is," said Mr. Carnegie, emphatically. "It can not be close erough. L A successful business firm should be like a band of brothers. Of course they can not be this unless real co-operation exists. The head must share with the others and the , others with him, so that all are working fqx the common Interest.", ' "That is v-ia Ar you gave your employes a Practical interelask your business?" "Yes, that is one I'Dkson. The other was etikz... that by doing so busin becomes a pleas- 'ire. We were as one. wt aye united. I would not give much for any E an who was st. gratis palig Gkdn-Ptmaral, Sitntrn Morning, Orinker IL 1E81 -: AYA1:2N :: :; Or THE'Li , :KLONDIKE COUNTrtt : sidered., We made up our minds to start as soon as the data got longer. In the meantime we worked on our outfit. I "Our route was to be up the Porcupine River to its headwaters. Thence across the foothills to one of the low passes through the Rockies and down one of the westerly branches of the Mackenzie ,until the main stream was reached. t t"We could not carry with us sufficient grub to last us into the nearest Hudson Bay post. We decided that enough game could :be killed on the trall, to piece out the supplies we could carry. There were deere caribou, and moose usually to be found in plenty along the Porcupine. As tha summer broke. the grizzly and glacier bears could be flgured on as resources of the larder. Then there were several kinds of 1 arctio birds that eould be counted on. We had 'all made long tripe before when game was necessary to Musts-in life, and it had never been found wanting-. How could we tell that the caribou and moose intended two Huskies, doge looldng almost like Mal-moots, but etronger and dercer, They come from the Arctio ocean,' and hid been driven down by Indians. There was a Ruselan bound and a Mongrel ,,dog from the states. The latter wait leader, and la be was not eaten is worth telling about. "He was one of the few clvtllzeddogw than on the Yukon. He had followed the German - from Dyea,, and bad no sooner landed at Forty Mlle than be distinguished himself to such a degree that the miners named him 'Hell. As much as a dozen different kinds of blood must have run through the dog's veins. He had a streak of bull carefully hidden under his shepherd coat, and was a match for any three Malamoots. on the river. - He stood on four squatty legs one of which was always lame. He took to sledding like a native, and 'Kurtz had never been eeparatod frotg the animal. - '-, ;. ' A , "Malamoots never get en well with dogs from the outside untU they lave thoroughly Initiated the newcomer. When Kurtz' seow grounded on the send, beech hi front of Forty-Mile the dog was first on shore and his right wee denied In to, minute by a big Malamootwhoee many scars told why he was leader of the Forty-Mile pack, The libialarnoot struck a urer! party, - grabbed low, bulldog feehion and got the Yukon dog where he woe WrOnitin the leg. The fight.was moon twee an4 the Male.- moot limped off Up the trell. !' ' 47n ten minutes he .wee beck again at the head of tweniV The peek fairly loped down the their Anxiety to get at the -newcomer, 'Heil' pew them coming, and did not shrink, lie went into the bunch( like a miner goeaoa t Pope do0 and sue-, ceeded In causing ,e, general 'mix up.' Realizing that numbers' ware against hint, tiut resolved to 'die game, be fastened to the old,leader and bold on to the death. The other Malamoota, unehle to get a,' bold on the stranger,'; began lighting each other, and at the end of the eereb POO worth, of dead sled :dogs :lay on the grotied 'Hell' was - found, covered with blood, but mostly' that of tail enemies. Ire etlit held on to the old "THE ARGUMENT WAS GROWING VERY BITTER." coming up the other side of the Yukon for some unknown reason of nature, and that bears and birds would not be in evidence? Each man of the party contributed a dog or two, and the team was composed of all kinds. There were two Malamoob3, or native Indian dogs, with flne heads and heavy coats of gray and black. There were willing to devote his life working for others. The i valuable man is he Who has proper spirit, and determines to be master himself . equal in rank to any one." r , "Do yOu think, Mr. Carnegie, that the manager of a great business concern should have a practical acquaintance with all the details of the business." I I "Well, I am not one who could say that because I am nothing of a scientien or a mechanical enan. What' is important is that the manager should know the clever men who are scientists and mechanicians. He Ishould always keep his eyes open for a genius in any branch of the business, and .. when he finds him take him into the concern an a partner. The great manager is titer man who knows how to surround himself with men much abler than himself. He must love his work, and this will make his associates love It 1 He must trust and - respect' his associates, took and that will make them trust and respect him. The latent reserve power in men waiting to be called into action has never been accurately estimated. I have always found that a manager of one of our great works has been able to make excellent managers out of 'material which before his enagle touch was quite mediocre. I He inspires his subordinates to almost superhuman effort." "To summarize; I take it that the quailtiee which should distinguish the ideal captain of industry are 1 . An intuitive knowledge of human nature; 2. A genius for otgardzation, and S. The capacity of inspiring his subordinates." ','. I'es; when you have all these combined you have an extraordinary character. Such a man can work miracles- even if the material at his command is not much above the average. The great manager who will succeed in making millions is not a specialist, excepting so far as it is his special function to understand thetuman machine. You may find men who will become famous as specialists in many branches of life, especially in xtrofessions. Great talents in one line will atone for the lack. of many other qualities. But in the business career there meet, t think. be an all-roundness to secure success. The decisions a business man is called upon to make every day, sometimes every hour, are momentous, and involve many Interests. His judgment needs to be sure upon a wide range of subjects." 1 "Ttne do not share the belief that society is about to be delivered over to the tender mercies of the man who has made a special study of one subject, and is ignorant of all others?" . i :No; i do not. There must be division of labor, of course. It is said it takes nineteen inert to make a pin. It is quite true that he mechanic! and workingman may only( have one thing to do. but when it ioom to directing the operations of 30,- 000 40,000 people, providing them with wor 'deciding all questions as to markets, inve ticma. supply and demand, I think that leader. although the life had gone some time before. Then it was that the miners gave him his original name and he never made it seem inappropriate. I "But to come back to the story, we finely got started ! about the middle of Marcb with light hearts- and heavy packs. '707e made -good, time up the Porcupine. al tt Is too Wide a field to be controlled by the - specialist. As I said before, the great Dan-ages needs an all-round knowledge of a!-fairs and especially of men." 1"Is the most successful business one In which one directs and may serve?" "No, I should not put it that way. I think 1 the successful concerns are those w'hich interest the largest .number, making them all of one rank, partners.; No one really serves; that is not the right way of looking at it Every one contributes some Weenie' quality to the general whole. They naturally serve each other. I do not believe any one man can make a great success of a business- nowadays I am sure I never could have dime so Without my partners of Whom I had thirty-two., the brightest and cleverest -young fellows in the world. i I have, often said that if I, bad to lose, all the 'capital I had lin the works or lose my partners I should let all ray capital go and start again without a dcllar, but with the organization intact No not, it is absurd to think that Power IS going into the hands of a few. The great concerns require many first-class men. All are equal to -each other. Tile chief must only be first among equals. I know 'that every one of my partners would smile at the idea of, me, being their superior, although the principal stockholder. The way they differed from me many a time was delightful to behold. : 1 I never enjoyed anything more than to get a sound thrashing in an argument at the hands of these young geniuses. No man will make a great business who wants tot' do it all tdmeelf, or to get all the credit of doing it. That spirit Is fatal, and the sure proof of a' email mind." , , .; , When the poor lad without a penny has become the great captain of industry, with millions at his command, what are his duties to the community at larger' "As long 418 he reraains captain, of Industry his business must be conducted on business lines. But the wisest policy that an employer can pursue toward his men Is to show by his actions that he has a heart. In, cases of accident, distress or any trouble., the firm Should show that Its heart has been touched, and that it can be generous and benevolent. , The crux that has a reputation for taking the best. care of its men , has the beet ehaztce Of success, because the best men, whie.4 is the earns l thing as the wisest, men,' Who again are the ablest' will gravitate to that arm and stay with it- Nothing pays so well in business as generous treatment. Indeed the firm which sees that its men make the highest, earnings is certain to be the most Successful." , "What edutation would YOU advise a boy to have who wished to go into business?" It depends wholly upon hie bent. Had I been able to have chosen my own education f ahould have preferred a classical, for I have no great taste for scientific subjects. Business is neither classics nor 1."THAT WAS TH la PLEASANTEST SIGHT I THINK I EVER LOOKED UPON.'t fhough the snow was heavy itred the weath I intended as food fet,civilized man. It may er bitter cold. Some days wa covered twenty miles. Other days. wheni the snow was soft. our 'camps :svould be put three or four miles apart Orrreachin tile head of the Porcine we- ratt Into a series of terrible blizzards that at first made, life a burden, and then made the keepint of the vital 'park a serious matter. Wecould make no progress. It took' alt. Air energyto keep from freezing. Whattwas worse,- our, provisions were going very fast. ' "Up to this time we had tilled no game, although part of even', day i was anent in hunting the side hills by different members of the party. and, we were always on the lookout for tracks. We had been in the deer het for days, and a, single deer trail was all that bad rewarded pareful watch-in Marsden followed, that :deer for miles and stumbled back into cemp two days later with as bad It case of now blindness as ever happened., He had seen nothing of the deer, but his eyes bad even out under the glare of the sun on the snowy desert He had. 'tied le thont around 'Heil's' neck and the dog led him back toicamp or Marsden would have been ;a dead one "For two weeks we had been traveling on short rationstwo lsour dough' biscuits, a slice of bacon and a small. portion of rice every twenty-four hours., pur dog food was all gone and the poor 'critters had been livin' , On snow for seVerak days. Hardship was beginning to tell, on every member of the party. Our faces Were drawn and haggard." Our stomachs Iburne4 with hunger. "As leader of the party and ,manager of the supplies I bad greet trouble staving off a raid on the balance of rations by both men and, dogs. Somelpf the;boYs were for znakin'l one good Meal over hat was left and then givin up the ilght4 "We still pushed on; although every step through the snow' was tortute. Our faces were turned toward the !nighty river of the great, j unknown !Northeast Bitterly we cursed the thirst, for gold that drew us further into the mountain wilds. : There was but one slim hope beyond. We might run into a Hudson's Bay Company's trading station. There as no hope at all be- hind. was out o 7 4 4 e onestiow to start It back over the trackless aste of snow and ice Our provisions would not have lastei a tenth of the wayi to Fnrty-Mile. Be. the middle m bidardldel3r oftr April, p mrtliiles weapart go t sides, , not a man, in the party could have made so long a trip ..11ur en. about ts ' w down to rice and;rice alone Rice may be all right for Chinamen, but it never was vb.0 science. The study ,of lin:Man nature, I think, Is the best education for any busi! ness man. But ). whether youngc,man chooses a scientific or a classical education, if be wishes to pursue a. bustnesa career be should not remain long &V college and vniersity." , ' At what are should hal go Into business?' : W.U. all my brilliant partners have begun hard practical Work In their teens I think & course at :a modern unlversitY from 19 to 24 will not teach a young fellow to be as sueiessful business man as if be had been- sent into business in & subor dictate! capacity. This is tiOt disnaraging university, education. for I limit the observation to the business career." "You would place men in responsible post. tons in early lifers be all right in puddin's, with plenty of ref-sins to give it flavor, but if you want to get to the bottom of the rice question, try it alone for a week. I never did like rice, anyway. , , "At the end of dye days, we were ten miles nearer the Mackenzie and our rice was gone. The dogs had been turned loose several days before. They were not able to haul the camp outfit, and we had no provisions left Even the tent and stove was abandoned with ithe sled. The pack still followed at 'our heels, keeping up a dismal and continued howl for something to eat. It was not encouraging, as we 'mushed' slowly over a heavy trall.1, The Rusin hound died one night of exhaustion and next morning we found his bones picked ciean.I Hardly trace of hair remained. The rest of the pack were livelier than they had beenc, in weeks. The fact that they were cannibals did not seem to bother them. "Three times a. day I dealt out six :raisins apiece from the small supply that I had carved for just such an emergency. It was poor food, but it kept life together, and ,enabled us to 'mush on with the determination of despair, It could not be for long, however. The raisins were numbered. $o we thought were our days. Nights were almost sleepless from hunger'. All were half insane. ' Marsden was still troubled with his eyes and at times 'clear out of his 'head. His mania took a cannibalistic, turn at times and he WI to be watched,' We kept on traveling beeause we knew nothing else to do. As our sack of raisins got lighter our hope dwindled away. " If we don't strike game to-morrow I'm a dead one,' said Kelly one stormy night as 'we settled down at a cheerless camp in a steal hunch of trees. 'We're better dead any-way than starving in a land like this. I3on't blame me too severely, boys. for startin' . you en this race for gold that's going to end in death. God knows I meant to do the right thing.' He ended by writhe the address of his relatives on, & card and putting it tato his torn wallet. He bad prepared for death. The rest of us were not quite ready.. , , , 2 ' "I remember fallin' off Into a troubled sleep, and I remember wakenin' with a start at the smell of, meat frying before the l(re. I thought I'd dreamed it until I looked around and found Kelly over a small dro with four sticks in front. On these sticks were four thick steake rapidly browning as he slowly broiled them. That was the pleasantest sight 'I think I ever looked upon. With a. yell at the other boys I In 41, f olr I the nre on the run and grabbed the biggest ' piece. ,, X did, not even watt 1 for It to Pool. and burned my mouth while eating It It r 1 went down in gulps. and I hardly tasted It .. Thee other fellows made wily with their steaks in much, the same moaner. Kelly 2a4 already gersaken, ansl ate his slowly ' when be had It browned to suit hint. VP ' to this time we hail not thought where lee' bad secured tbe meat It was enough for . us that be had at ; , ' ,,,, ' V '," 'Where did you klU the bear. Kelly? asked Marsden. Is there much of It leftl It was certalnly the best bear, meat I ever -, . tested, and I've eaten 'eome prettft,, tine grizzly steak on, the Forty-Ulla ' . '' , ', -' "Kelly's answer struck us dumb. ' ., " 'That's not b'ar." he sold. It's dorgr . -,.1, "We all took the news quietly. if any one had told us 'that we would have eaten ' dorg steak ;and enjoyed it we would have certainly told them they lied. The fa,ct re- r matned. however that we had eaten. 'the - meat and had enjoyed it more than any. , other we ever remembered partaking of. ' 1 7 0"How did' you dare th give us dog meat , - without telling us?' said Marsden, who took the matter most to heart . - ' , . " 'If l,ou . ve killed Hell there'll certainly " '. be a shooting.' remarked the German.- and he began to call the dogs. It developed that ..,. Kelly had got up early and killed one of the Malamoota skinned and dreased him.' giv- , ing.the dogs the hide and en rails.- There' was enough of the meat 'eft t ) last for sev- oral trubstantial meals and litter we beceune -' reconciled to the idea It was not so ,bad. Hope come back like It shining light, r and we made snore progress, that day than we 1- had since the flour ran out I, ' ' ! 1 ' ' 1r , -4; ' ' "We drew lots to see who would kill:the I ., next dog. and it fell to me. 'II decided that ' , , one, of the M Ul Mahlon shod replenish theY: larder, and , the execution ,was soon oven , le came to Me readily enough when tempt- al with ,a bit of beef.' A Arm vitt ore, his collar and a sharp slash with a keen 'Mg knife across the threat , completed the job. : i i ' , -, ; i . -.1 - ,' . i-, . ir , - -- "We pushed along rapidly.- now that there .1 was something g to eat. The dogs averaged - , . probalOy TA pounds in their shrunken con. , -- dition, and one killing gave sufficient meat ! for four days. There liwere four dogs. be-,' sidel the . German's, cdr.' who seemed too - ' ' much-like one of us to be killed. This gave us sixteen days' traveling and brought us on the other side of the mountain:, I The l' , I weather was getting warmer.. and If we , could hold ,out a few days we would car- ,'. :, tainly reach the Mackenzie. -,; 1 1 , I: ..'. ,- At last the dog meat was ,a-11, gone and .,,, 4.' the river was atilt out of sight We pushed, on for a day without food, and at last could' ' go no further. Kelly said that it had come , Ileirs'' time to die. The German replied , that he would - never . consent. Marsden. ! aided with i the German. for the dog had 1 saved his life.' I was still holding back an .: opinion. I but. -as hunger got the better .of :- me, would have probably decided against the dog. The argument -was growing very . bitter . andeven threatened to lead to blood. ,.... shed. when the most unexpected happened. - "OVer, a low elope came a, well-clothed Agura following behind a long team of ,,' Iluskies., His red woolens proclaimed . him a Hudson Bay man. even before he. was , within yellin distance. and such he proved to be. The fort to which he belonged was r - near at band, Land wee were soon in :safe. r quarters.' '" ' , ,. ,, 1 ', , ' ' 1' ( .1 ' "A week later scurry broke out among us, ' i and for weeks We suffered with the dread : r 'disease. 'Kurt bad a terrible ' case, 1 and r: ' after long suffering gave Up the fight. , They , .,,, buried him,on the banks of the, river. He made me promise to take good care of his -. dog at the only thing on earth that he cared for. The, rest Ole finally recovered, '. Mined that fall on the bara i f the ,and several. other, tributaries ,.0s, tee ... . kenzle.,We put In the winter trappins,h; the next summer roamed the divide e;,.,0 ,. and drifted back into Forty, Mlle. We v,:stelet adbeated dead. No s uon, one e e elpictiws,..7 received 'al though we had risen, from ri.,, ithhooubigihzztAxtdhwatAwreeschuegr.0 :aver . L ...:: .. had round out sled and, tent where we Alai! . . abandoned' them.. Our bodies. of course, were not to,be located. 1 but that did not , prevent them from sending out flews of our , . , death. We did not take the trouble to coy. , r "met it' What was the -use? We were not . coming back to the states without a "take.- . and that seemed a. far out of reach as ever. - - Wei did, not know of Klondike. : ! H. ' . ' "I've just left Kelly In San Francisco. . Ms gal in Ohio married another chap, and he's all broken 'up. There'll be an old worn- an up In New York that'll be mightily our- . prised 'to see me walk in with a sack. ru have to tell her the dorg meat story, for Its , - to those dogs that I owe my life." : :-', 1. . , The men, left the sleeping car for the diner, and with one accord ate chicken tro.,' ,,.. 1 stead of beef. .T. FRENCH DORRANCE. - -- oCODOC30000LXDOC1 CARNE( :, The Retired E. .' - "res. earlier than is customary in any part of the wor,id. I believe firmly in'youth as executive &genii. Older beads should be reserve& for counsel. Xt is astonishina what a young man can do if he is onlv trusted." ; , "But does not tills encouragement of the young . cut the ground from under the feet of the middle-aged? What about the men who are too old at 40T " 1 , 1 "A man at 40 who is in search of something to do has a prima facie case against him. Long before be is 40 be should have shown himself to be indispensable and received either a very Idgh salary or an interest in the business. Of course, there are exceptional cases where & worthy man is , suddenly deprived ot work at 40. Ills is & 'Sall case Indeed. I am satisfied that sue caas in business is tq be achieved bjr bering to' a etrict civil service cistern.' There should be no promotion of outsiders Over the heads of expiring young men. The , employer who has not made the material around bun lit for promotion will not be found to be much of a captain of industry. If the employer is indispensable to the young matt the young man can soon make himself indispensable to 'his employer." "How long, Mr. Carnegie, do'you think a man should remain in business? At wbat age should he cease to accumulate I millions?", 1 - 4 - . ' 0er7 naturally. I think I retired just at the right age. At or out 030. In pro- fessions, perhaps, they can remain longer. but business requires all the faculties to be alert and at their highest development Bo. sides, aa a rule, businese is so exacting art occupation that a business man. at 60 is probably as old as a man, who bad followed.' ft profeesion is at 65." , "And when your man of million' bas tired from active business, in what way. do you 'think he can best spend his tittle and enerr3rr ' , "If ha la a wise man, be will immedlate17 try to interest himself in public duties. This of course, embraces good work In his immediate neighborhotut- :When be Places his!" accumulated experience and ability at the disposal of his fellow-num be serves himself at the same time.", - 1. W. T. firIOAD. lit. Money Pound la the Mail sags. 'It seems almost 'incredible that in the neighborhood of $40.000 in actual cash should have been confided to letters during; the last yea r. and harder still to credit that the most exhaustive efforts failed to end the owners of one-fourth of that agnount." writes Patti Lyle Collins in the lAalee Home Journal. "The envelopes- which are eddressed are kept on tile for four years, blank ones not so long. but in either caa a liberal margin of time is allowed for claimants to appear before the money is finally turned into the treasury to the credit of the Post ince Department. In addition to the money contained in letters during the Immo period, something like $10,000 was totmd loose in the mails. It is officially stYlell 'loose money.' " 4 A Perverted lestortointst. , ?rocs the Washington Star. I "How does the anti-trust plank In -no platform strike your Well." answered lifamer Corntoseel. it purty good. But it doestet Aro tur enbuthIt Jett' says 'down with the trusts. instsad o' proyldlni to hsitto 'Om turnini over to ua agriculturs-Usta. SO We kin drew the dlyto dands." - 1 ) Sentiment. . ) irrom the Washington Star. ) - 'Whet crooked streets this town hitsri exclaimed the stranger) In the islands. "Yee." rumored the Filipino Clenorst. "We're mighty proud ot this taws, It Ing.koll WI L24 r14 OZ IEJOItooe' - ----- ', . 1 - 0 0 0 0 0 lb . 4 oe C I . , r ' f - t . 1 1 , - ,. , 006000000000000000000000000 04,0 willing to devote his life working for others. tt Is too wide a field to be controlled by the - r 1 - . . ; -- :: , . . , j ' , : : i - - - : : . .. - .- :- , - : - : The valuable man is he Who . has proper specialist As r said before, the great Dan- ' I , - - - niurnir , ,. spirit. and . determines to be master himself. eget needs an all-round knowledge of af- I ual In rank to any one." r 'i , ,: - - fairs, and especially of men." : : i- : :' ',.: : i ' CAlinEum ON 110W TO GET. R eq I - "'Do YOu think, Mr.;' Carnegie, that the !"Is the znost successful business one In, I , . i - : : - I - , f :- - : manager of a great business concern should which one directs and may server' :. ' --'' ) r . . ! 1 have a' practical acquaintance with all the "No, I should not put it that way. I think r ' de - -r. I . ; , 1 ' ' ! - 1 ; , . 1 ' tails of the business." I ' - ' . the successful concerns are those , w'hich - : The Retired Steel King Furnishes Some Sound ..Advice to . ...cy 11. t : ' - . . . . . . ... 1 '' ' : beeauese I -am nothing am - .1 , , Young . , . . nnooton who could say ticat. interest the largest ,number, making them - ioung Men. 1 1 1 of a, scientific or a all, of one ' rank, partners. No one really tr.echanical map. i What' Is important is serves; that is not the right way of look- .1 ! 000000000000000000000000000 that the manager should know the-clever ing at It -Every one contrtbutes some BP.- , . I , A , 1 - men who are scientists and mechanicians. cial quality i to the general whole. They ' - ' ' it h ' - sbead.'',-fOr be knows He Ishould always keep his eyes open for naturally serve each other. I do not be- - , 1 ' k . t - Ersotar Cosasevosnautas or vas tax.oss-DsmocaAn , 'yes, an e goes , a genius in any branch of the business, and - 1 ,. . , ' lieve any one man can make a great 1 - no such word as lail. .!! sue- - ,, L! ' I f ' LoNDOLN. Octob-er 2.--Ll'Irifty years' ago' a . . 00 I What about. his personal character? . when he ends him take him into the con.. case of a businesn.nowadays. , I am sure . . LI - ! young Scotch lad was working as a , bob- I never could have dbne so without. my ti , ti. a a partner. The great manager is , ' - ', ,4 . , ' -! bin bcry" in a cotton factory in this COU11. "I think It a young man has ambition be cer thel man who knows how to surround him- partnersi of Whom I had thirty-two.: the ' ' I II ' 1' .i Virib4t.1.....,:s has the necessary qualities behind it. Tbe , P, ' , i trl. He was earning' somewhat less than desire t ' succeed develop them. The secret Ise0 with i men much ' abler than himself. es re o s brightest and cleverest -young fellows in , , , 1 ''''11 ..64,0&44.. '''.661Ns ' ., L ,7 . $1.25 & week. That boy was Andrew Car- , H l b the world ' I have often said that it I, ' ' ! 6 ,-;..--,,,-.5'wr 1 ,- . . . , ,,, .4,).., Tn., of success chiefly lies in the determination He love is work, and this will make . ., 1 . a.,.. .,,. .. . A 1.. ,,. L : . ' , , t f ',-,:,,..,:,,,,,5-,:;,2--- , , NN4, , . , . :- - ' '! '. ,.. N't-V ,, -' oia1, L. . . . .: 7 : ! .' 1 ...;:,!,,,r,,,,,-,-,,,,i-7...,,,--77,-.1-:-,, .:.,-. v .. .8 ,.:. . ,, : ,, .,...,.....,,,, ..,-,. .. !: , ' t:,,-.;;;.,'''':-.----,z;e "' , ., ), . i ' . ilt ' ,1:1: r:412t4V3';;,s2f,"'4....';';',.4...' ' ... A, : ' ' ' '' ' la ' . ' . ' i.;',-!' ,,';'-'5:-;,''''''.."17,..-a- 146 a V;' ' tl , '''.- .. ... 1 , -.;:. ,. '. i; ' . ' . Lt . . il f-i' . , 4' ..! i ,,,:,t-1,,-,:, .',',' ' - , ',H.-',., r.,.' )N ' ' iV4) :. e 1 i,. k . , . II; . i, 1,. , , . 111,.. .4, is i, . ,,. ,,,,,,, It ' . , ' ,,,,,,,,,,,; .;,;,-.,,-,,tx:t.:1''.:.,.--' ,' 4 t4 i "C:0 . ' ' ' e,, - - 1 .', ,l' :1 , . .: .411T !f,:iAi V' , . ' 7, Lt - i , 1 . f'-' :'' ' . '4 ';u90,1,1',;,ON,, ' '''''.''. st'',1 . : fo ' -,, , . A , . , Lt ! . 4' - ; -r,;,;&', 7 0,' .7! r',,i1.;',!:,,S 4'. - , t,;..1'4.1 iil. ': I''''' :' ,':-',' ' I- , . . Y' . 0i,- z, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,:12,0:.,,,,44-,,,;,,,$, ..,,,. t N,11,- 11 fIl ,. VI t, J , i ''-Z,41,',;,!::!-.1:','''';t4 1;410A li' ''1' 'é:- ' , , !! , , 0...,,,,, - 4,,,e , ..'?,1,:t14 - ., 41 1,,,, . Ally ,' ,, rot', iv.,,,. ,I,vi.:I: y , ,:,, ,1 , g , i : , , , -' ' 4 ' ' A . Ltil,e: ' t'' ' tt.,4 .1:t t4.--; ' ' 1' ' - 41'1.! : fir H g ; ; 1 .. ,. I- : , . i , ,kov f,,;11 . ,,, ,,, .N ,1,1 ,ii, ill, , t,;:ci .,. ,t ., .$:7?, . , . ., c .. .. ! I. : ,,,, ,,, 1. ,k, i.. 4 , . ; . It ,,,, ,, , : ,L'p 1 v lock. t!, 1 lp ' , ':-,,,,,,,t.,- l-,,',-.. , , ., i -:, 1(7 , ' A,:;-,1'--.1,11, , 7 - , 11 . 71 . l':,0,,,:i 10,' -0 of --11:k9-11I : , : 1 . ,. , : . . . . . . . . ' I ' ' 0 i f a t ; i , 1: APPio. , , . : . ' 1- 11.1,4, -?-----,,,In..0-4-: h neve, -twilit, Z.SU guLawx wak, of 62 be has re- a,,,aswww to succeed and the:Tesolve that every im- hislass!)ciates love It! He must trust and nao to lose; au toe capita' 4 uaLu Au tired from bustness with a fortune that s Liam - in the world. At 'the age, Prise. evert knock-down he 'receives in the respect' his associates; toe sztd that 'will :works or lose my partners I should let all . i estimeted at $100 ',battle will only nerve him the more "; make them trust and respect him. ' The nil! capital go and. start ' again without 'a , ,000.000, or an annual in- - - f. A 1., rt h nr, aecanti gala ta arta- latent restartA netlatetr Itt Than walling,. fa ha dtliar, butWith the organization intact No, vice; the outcome of his own personal ex- ------ -- - . aaas,.Act 12 gl.ptl.LAALL st netts. must delicate and the most' essential piece tst, excepting so tar as it Is his special tune- I I - millions at : his comraand, what are his i , perience, en how to succeed bu ; at menhnnigrn thstt R. h tn Ann 1 mrtth ie.,. es msams,at or A Ildh U., duties to the coraraunity at larger , , --ww. wawa. waft 0Aa ,ta MAU .L LIU Ss long as , 0 "If a man has an ambition to taxa mu- 1 I - I As , he remains captain . of in- I is the human machine. trnless a man knows may End men who will become famous s 01'..' ' Jer' ' ' lions, Ntr. Carnegie. what are the gifts with . dustr3r his business must be conducted on 4 A" 0.4.1N-Y V I" 14.41. am asintuati.uniug ui maxi orancnes or r which a fair,' godmother should endow hint 1 1 Y 11 eisPe- I business lines. But the wisest policy that I ! ,,, 1 th et., .1 I vn Al vs,111 ',warm.. "ItavEr I "i11. . a. A. - ..,. v I 4a. w&voltt w -71-ckt. valenta In On I IrrtIVA I i ,0"; - ' ' " - , lila 'hirth ?" ' r : , . - 4 -- : , : , I smnrsvrno deruwszba Trrt t'svcrle,l cr. etf I 1 I , SA ,VA,I,J,SW I me ...Jo,. "S.1.2.., WM S. ...A amme AA.... 11.... . I.., ME .11- vv. 11 V. 0. ,11.Wk - A -AZ : - "The greatest of all 'advantages with Lure is the chief element in the composition -busin;;;;;;Zr ...t1;;;; 44, Is to show by his actions mat ne naa , : - heart In , cases of accident, distress -or , ' 4ri- - , , , 't which he - can begin life is that of being of the successful business man. The test mtt I think. be an all-roundness to secure any trouble . the florin ihould show that Its , poor. The men who wishes to make mu- V l- of any mae ability Is- not what be does success. The decisions a business man le - ,e' Ilona must not be born with a sliver spoon himself. but what he can get others to do called upon to make every day rni , sometimes heart ha been touched, and that It can be generous and benevolent- , The c l'eV ne ,62V r In his mouth. He must feel that it is sink in co-operation with him." - , every hour, are momentous, and Involve that ha a reputation for taking the best , itet ' - '" ,-,-0004,0,1!"-, ' Ar-OlY".4001 1 - or swim with. him. H. must start his life "Then you believe In a close connection many Interests. -- His ludrment neAsta tgt s . r A career witn lay ind.uum-10, ity utw-in own vcrm. I petween employer and employedr ' I sure upon a wide rance of sublectioi ."-" ,.77,7. 7. i : ;i: idordr:ir-le'''',,7-kdrd,-.,-;drdl..elledforde-elordir-drlo'r',Itry drde-dr-At ' I no unnort. If. In addition to being Poor I "Nn rtinftar hivor AnRA It t.L" snail Itrv (soy- I Ar-,- dIft. ia.a n-- 1 - I g""Ce;38. DeCall" tn.) De went wuw41 ul .1 Air : -if,:vrf2.,7-11dLOtellee1;1;AFP.:.56 Or"' -00E-41.-AISk.o..LP - I s, aa LIV14 144-154 ociety himself. ha 7- hai 'witnessed his ' parents' Th-rt--; --do-vrt- 1.7ta t-1-":11m. a- -ha...-. - ----A I the same ! thing as the wisest, men,: Who I ! 14r -,r ! - - - I -....,te..,-,-..-, - Los Et UUUI. IAD ttts um& vtu-eu over to TIM tentlAr. I 4-4 I ?Air r ,ifir Ale Afir- Arr ono- Ail' ..ord, VT . , Ah 10 - ---- . drdr,or AP.' IdO'r Afr 4 t ' ;,,, J JEKrug-ipg. INLI,. WU, ...,-.7 ,.., .V.C. V CO LAP erougn. .a. auccessrat Dusineas arm should niercies of the man who ha s made & special . 1 .,, 0 ,...- firm and stay with it Nothing pays so , ,. I drive the wolf from the door of the tam- be like a band of brothers. Of course they study of one subject and is ignorant of all well in business as generous treatment. ' 1 - , , I ' 9 I tly. be has the strongest of all Incentives can not be this unless real co-operation es- others?" . Indee d. the firm which sees tba,t Its on 1 I ANDREW t I which lead to Success. No ambitions of a 1st& The head must share with the others i "No, I do not. There must be division of make the highest, earnings le certain, te be .-----.-------,..-----4----------- ' merely personal nature can be compared and the others 'with him, so that all are labor, of course. It. is said it takes nine-- the most successful. from 19 to 24 will not teach s. Young fellow with this. Responsibility thrown 'upon ,a workingeqr ttte common Interest." ' teen Men to make 11 pin. It is Quite true what education would you advise a boy to be as successful a. busiriess man as if , l'res. i ed, , ,young, poor man. that is the thing to bring "That is V-ia.y. you gave your employes a that he mechanie and workingman may to have who wished to go Into business?" , be had been -sent Into business in a "mbar is . out what Is In him. such the raw mate-- Praotical interelisk your business?' . only have one thing to do. but when It -it depends wholly upon big bent Had I dinate , capacity'. This is not disnaraging rial out of which great captains of industrY that is one -iktson. The other lints cm to directing the operations of 30,- been able to have chosen my own educe.- university ucation for I limit the ()laser- are ma t da," ' ' that by doing so bustn becomes a pleas- 000 40.000 people Providing thorn wits tion, i should have preferred a classical, for 'ration to the business career." E f we has placed his foot on the fret fling Ur& We were as one aya united. wor deciding all Questions as to markets, have no great taste for scientific' sub- "You would place ztten in responsible post. , .. .vf the ladder of sucreser . . would not give much for any 11131 who was 'nye ticma supply and demand,, I think that jenta. Business Is neither classics nor ,e, tons In early lifers . : :., w 7 : 1 .,-sb- oir' Ar IIP:00,00 49741 . '. . 1 1 ' 0 , ' ' '" 1 . ' '' 1 -' ' ' . I '9 . . , , . . I . i 1 ANDItEW CARNEGIE. . ''. . '. , ' ' e ,:c,, Ji.,,,,,, r, a:0,,,,., 1,0"--41"177., .... j, ifrieta. , ,' , ,..,. .!J:', . :','. cot' :rtat' ' : - ' .1 ' . ' . , ' . , , - , : , . , .. ' . , , , , , , ' . r tehtzlunP , ,v, t , . Si. ginfts palig Gkdn-gentztral,:Suntran Morning ettaker 115 I.S.09. . . 'With' a ye' II at- the ot he'r boys I ze ' for ' --, , , - - - ' 4 - - ' . , .- tt , , 1- 1 pi.ec.The.0- rothdider n:autoewve:mawdatetwarall Itoyryiwttasitittot'elloottrut r ... ' I e ' , - i'. ' - , . , , . - , . t)rr ' ' , .---- ---- . , ; - ' e two huskies, doge looklosn.ceangTh' almecesonewdt alh:ak; Ember: , .... . ,, .. moots, but etronger and fiercer, Thel ; ' '' . ' ''' i00,:. , ' ' '' ", ...4,?,17teitt. k. leee .,? ii . . - , the fire on the run and grabbed the ',sagest ; .. : . . - - . . i , , : ',, 1 '4',,...t ,'tilre,;'. e eet -; r! i, i, . . '' ' ,,,;c.k.',;! , .i, , ' - 1 yyti flit 4- ,L-i,11,' , . . , ,, ' ', tend burned rny ,mouth while eating It It ,; . ' 0 : Ai 1 0 0. ' . . . . d ele. rent 70MW ati ter AI rned It la ZIG ; s ., , 6. . I. i . 4e.,,, ,,,. ,,,,,, ,. . . . , ' .. . . . ' 70". ;'.7i . . . ; ,,,L . ' . , ' , , . . 15T A' .T;.,. ,..... elan hound and a mongrel:dog from the state& The latter was leader, and la be , ft.' ',..e i,,-i ! ' '' ; "-Ili)! 1 -i --'" . ' " ' ' ' 1, i - - I -;-... ee- ' : : 0. .' ' : bail alma-dr Partaken end ate his slowly : ' ll AI, .,.. J: ,,,, ,.4 . ," '. , ' .'-i ' auserhteaksenthalitb.hmatdati:Ittt anrbthroee...sw:Ineellindeallotod.qmm,u:tell.tvrety,rier.bd.t,:rlir'flt:,:ranlivl:nnieri this time we had noet thousgeht where kr) ' . was not eaten Is wcirth telling about. ' : . 11 e : 11' i le :': secureaduktdooethotn.ntebh, ,theroloielaidirttsobretirelytt.mwasmwitiaeleitoutto.ult.gtiefft, or,t,-, . . . : . lk , 1 I , "He was one of the few'. civilized , dors ' 1 ' 4 n . , , . . , , z ,, , ... , .. , . .., , , .. , then on the Yukon. He had followed the 051 e - - 1 1 ! !, , ifii I"; '",, ' .,e, 111 German - from Dyea,' and bad no sooner I : ay. , . I '''.111;11 If a . t i., .,, , landed at Forty Mlle than he distinguished . : il , , e , . 0 11, , himself to such a degree that the miners ' , ; ' ' ; , '- - 417,all dal 7-- , e s.'' ;' Z: ' ' . - tt120051.4110 named him 'Hell.' As much as a dozen - . I .......-4,,,eeeee;,-- ,4,-'4. , , , , - efter .1 -e, ,eeeeeeee-eeeee e 1 en ked M . Kenr? ' ' ' , : ' different kinds of blood must have run . ,,,,,,,-Avtileele, e, .., ,,,,-, as , , . , -.. - . . f e.,,petVL.e',e.--e.eee,,X.,-- e'en , . . through the dog's veins. Ho had a streak of ' :.' Ill tle ,. ''' I' '''''' ' , ; -4;- -:-'-71?' t--:4'...4.1:1---":17"- . .-' '''( - -:- 1,1' '-: ' ;:at'll:Kted'aeallyeae':rtaladnelliwYerthsetrub:Itc bu elus ;lett' . etee ,-,-e,...0,e-, e',.e.--e,..-! e etee, . , le --e t -:-, er '-',5-1, -- ,f ''''''',;,,----'7::---4, . 1 - - ' , 1 . . - --- . :4 4, t-i,11'- 45) ',1 , '--?r,;-- - ,. 1 - 1 , I . - - , : 1 . ' - L - bull carefully hidden under his shepherd I !' . " - - e : , - - toe fete efe,:xe-iiToe tpee..0,--, - ,...0,0?-0 . - .., ; squatty legs - . eameao tsan. donweethee rimveer- tjetre IknstoTOthd roe: Mtosau; , 1417.71: ' i - e - :i ,.,"., , ',t' ve.,:'''-, . -:',4: ,-...'-4-.-m, ,,,w71:',.'":4:,''''''''A'''4,1:1",L -'f'-:;,,,,i'llj,-.,',,-,',, .04,1, ...', e..,, ,.,'...1...., ' t 1 1 , , t, ' 1 ' ' g r i SI' ew alcr. nro:a I netacloWunol. That ,..:: beaky told them they lie& The fact re- ' ' - - - ' --lie-- 4-.-eli;"-.e7' - . , , ee-- el - - .0, -- A ' ,.,' V , -. . .. ' 1 ' . one of which was always . ...,a --,," - . dorg' steak ;end enjoyed ed . . . , ,,, - lame. He took t,,o sledding, like a native, ,, - , , ee, . -------es -,' d17 . ; . , . e ,A- .e0...eoe, . . : - - AYAQN I : , and 'Kurtz hall never been imps-rated front ; , 1 ' ' 6.4"1"14' , -- 1 - - ,.. - ...,:.. , . , . . i : . animal. . L 4 - , - ee - - 'te . . "...es, ' , - "Malamoots never got on well with doge .: ' .. f ' - - ' ; - Ore.,', 4' .'-'1; or nt eh: rHt,,, owav la: dedvi had eo t:m enjnja ar Go ! , , . , ! - , from the cnitside Until they have theroughlY ' . ..if e ' "-t; ' :Li; ' '. , .1 . ,. ,I4.1,,,,,,,,,dr.,- e:, , , , :, me. ", , , ' .r- 4 c .(00:', ,,,aL,,, , , ,A.t, 1 - ' ' 1 . OF THE : ..- meat , . ,. . initiated the newcomer When Martell - ' p ' - - , . 51,4 --',-P.,'-'---, ,-:-. ' LO E, ..,,c,:thcrioain.talbotks, - . - . . - - -: .? !,--------: i- 04 K HDIK scow grounded on th end, beach front COUNTITt , e s in , . 1 ; , . .: - ..-- - I - - 10 ',e 0,,' ' . ' - Illkiefee Z.t '1 ' : " ;..' '., t, , - -- .,- -:, - - , ., , of Forty-Mile the dog Was first on shore ! . a : , I rigi-,..44.1' r.:,I,L..., -.,;,,,,,,,..fc- ,... ,.,..,, ,,',--,,,::.,,,.,,,,, . . ', : ', i, vtioth7of7toeullyineg,kuusiredsanidel)1 Lathrsedree.nr; : , .,-e'; , e, - e, 0.), , -,,,,,.-' ;-.:-;'): - , A" ,,,,,,lz-,..;,,e, ,, ,.,,,,,,,,..,.., ..? , . - 4-.)1--, '-e e --- .:el.'; and his right wait denied in to, minute by a ' ,7,,,,,,e9 - , '" - - - '); ,' . ' 4 e ;'ee';,ifeeeee .'...elet".e,,,elef,:,-;- , , - , siderede We made up our minds to start Mal bi t h sea t Id wh - : it, I ' S' 0 i '' ., .., A , ' amoo --w olio many et o I e e. , , :La .., , , , ,e,. . - ''''',4a,-;,e2 e , I -. . the matter most to heart - , ' - ' ' . : e - . ,---- . 000- -- . 'kee ,4 retie' '... '-- 4- ',eete-: --, ";-- - '-- ..., as soon as the days got longer. In the he g leader of , ; . -..,-, -,.. --,. i e ,.,,itot.. ,, , , illow., , .,, j wits the Iforty Mile Park, The , . , . . . - ee .,z, , er-i-eee, " ' : - ' - ',-',-,,t-; --4-' '''-',,e ' ' Ce-,.',-:.'" - " ! meantime we worked on our outfit -. , C. - -',AA ''''''' ,,cte e -' ,,,.r,, ,..,..:,,,,..H' 4- ,, J.)'47.x.. .) , '-:, . '.- , , .1 , : bletaltrbegaectonottao.:11::eldaogna.d, tltrtelodeevdelohpitra.olor, that ', .' --t ' ' I- ' - - - . . -,. - re- , ewe ...,',,..ae,,-,-, - , ) J, I "Our route was to be up the Porcupine' littalarnoot struck a etteprise party, Hell , ' ., , , e . re.", ."-- -1 '---74--e" .- grabbed low, bulldog feehion and get the ' oagastialthemleialdi a: ::: otelerralwlae,beTchaerrnee . ..,. a' '-' - ' ' l'e, -:,,e:, :' 4'9 '' River to its headwaters. Thence across the ce 4, , , - ' - '-', : , ' ' ,: , - - : z Tukon dog where he we wrong-In the - is I, - '.',. , ..,, , , , y.. , - , , .C,'N -4 - ' - - ' , -- - -.- --.". - - ; ee -. . . : foothills to one of the low, passes through , e -a - ---; . - 7,3:, - --,i.;-,---,-g- 7 leg. The fight.wate moon ever and the Meese 1 ' sot..ie,,',.(,T. --. i: ''4-:7,J..4.....v.: . ';.'''..- , ..--e, - - 7,,,,.0 , ,,,,4 . , , . f ': ---. ' - : . 1 ' - - : ' :'..-' -.4-'3.4K(.----- t a':-' -: ', thrane RI:PettelikleaQf atlid Mdeacwake .44,i ..e onzniee7ufnatilethweesmtearlf; moot limped off UP the 'refl. ! ' e ve , -...-, , t , . , ' . , , , . .- ---;', -e ),,i, -- -eiei,eee , : '' -. ,,,,,.. : . stream was reached. i ! : " ' . - ' ' th4e7nietoedn or; itnwuote"telle4e-aWieelirbhgerkeee. gageflatla rtt . ' IfIlli, ..-,,e -.'-' , . ' l, Eet,,,, , , rf.y:. ........00, , . ., , ope came back rerlirgkanreeseolcustthhieln,indgeyli, light, than we 4...i,',,.. . ,,,":e "-e,-ee -e , , 1 e.,-, t re . - , el, II': , , I, ',"We could not carry :with -us sufficient 6?' .. it-e----P1- ) .. ' b to last Its into the nearest Hudson loped down the hill In thole Anxiety to get , ; ., - . t, - , -: ' - ete- e - .4 -re-,: --c-r07--feet, a ,-ar, r .',: ' -..,'.- 1 . P- , - , i - e 110 so bed et the -newcomer. 'Hell' pew them coming ' e ' ' i?,-,-41,:-eree-.-1,''' le,.-i-T t. ,e. ;-7-77 ,,, , Bay' p. - that enou g g ..., ;:-. 11 ea ' e - ' sea -Itle. - . H ''''- .: ' - -::''', ''''''' ' ,,r, ki ''' --,", : '',' ', , . Zs made "IthoerefloPu , - , : - 1 f ost We decided enough -Ar. , .-- e , . -- -., , ., 4 , : - ,,,-,,. ' , --- t. r , ' , .S..t r d,11-, ' ' could be killed on the trail, to piece out end did not shrink, lie went Into the bunch the supplies we could carry There were ; like & miner goee ore A pip:vadat and sue-, , iiit 02.- ' e?- "- 144AA'' .,,P, -,"" Z,..,;;- - - ,... ' ;: i '. - , .' ' "We drew lots to see who! would kill ,the I ., , i : 4.4 .- . i.,., i .' . '. ,t . ., Icatiortleielamr, omfaetndittoet,:fte' houarskrpeadiessillasyshottld' re'plenis'h th'ee:.'i ' ,a er-716. ' -Pv'' ' - V-1' ' , . . deer, - caribou , and moose -- usually to be iczetendgedthlanteahuullminhgera4. gw'VottrirstrotUhIP'anufletis'ult- 1 ,;,,,,-....., ..1 .: ,---- ,,o, , 4. .01.7 I , r ' I. '4. '1.:" 7 -''''' ; : '. y'l, 6, A ' found In plenty &long' the ;Porcuptue. As , resolved to 'die gam& be Le-atoned to the: , -e-- .' el-NN)e1'''''"' , rt'- : . ; ,0,,,, - w. 1 , next dog, and it fell to me. 'II decided that ' , re4 ... ..,.e-,:. theesumrner broke, the grizzly and glacier f , ',k : he7w1ligt: 11;itit keen .. Aer ' ; '''t, - old,leader and hold on to tho death. The eae. larder, and the ex ' . 900". ........ . . , 41 ' . r : . '''..71!" 7. 1 bears could be figured on as resources of . 1,", - e 0 - , , ecution was soon over. t , ' , , ; i the larder.- Then there werteseveral kinds oth,er Malan:oats, tinehle to, get a,' hold n 1 et .; . Of ! &retie birds that ' eould be counted on. the strangerebegitn fighting each other, and 1 . . ,-' , - worth, of dead, 1 : -i . - .,-'e'r , , . , 1 1 . . 1 ' , e4., 4 ,. el with a bit of beef.' A firm gip ore e-e : ! , - . . , we had all made long !tripe before when at the end of the aorith S300 7,.. , - ,,.. .!-;-,,,:, -: 4- : 'Heir was kesp...Le '',' ,', -2 ,, - . , !, 1 ' . : . .; ; game was necessary to eustain life, and it slede dogs ,lay on tho (ironed. ' ' ' ' I eal . ..,;!: " -...---1't ,:' --- . . had never been found 'wanting. How could foundcoyered with blood, tut most'? that, , . .. the . : ,, ----It"n'-,; ' e- i ' '' ef,,.' - - .. . ! ' "tell that the caribou and moose intended of his enemies. Ito etill held on to the old . l' . ,,.. ; we: t c t ; . .,.., . . ' - ; Ing knife across the threat completed job : i . . - . , ,- . t . . eel, , -- ' 21,,,,,,,- ..,--,...; i ' Se- : I i . . . I I:: i';,, , . , , , , ', . .4 . - 311. ', .,-.', if, ',- ::, y ----- , k , . we . . , Iwo pushed along rapidly,- new that there I ' ,' - . . , - - - I ' ' . ! ,-, ! ' '1. Iii ' - . ' . ', was something to eat The doge averaged ' -,, , .. -4r ,eefet71 ., , : : : , , . . .. :.- ' . . . r. - ', 11 1 fr .., ,, ,' ., :: . :, . -.::.... . . ,,..L ...,. . .., 1. . .,:,,. p ,..., ,c.---0 I . . . 1.. , probalOy 75 pounds in their shrunke e -. re oort , ;. ' ! i . ! -d Oen, and ,one killing gave sufficient Meat -, ; , 1 - -- ; AT WAS THE) P.LEASSA-NTEST SIgHT THINK EVER thoKED trPowt for four days. Th ' ero iwere four slogs. bee' : I - - 1 1 , i. , . ; 1 . . . . . , . , . - Wei the German's ter. who seemed too ' ' 11 , I ll, , 1 r.. . . ,,- . . . i ,,, , , , . 1 though the snow was heavy end the weath I intended as food e'er, civilized man. It may muchlike one of us to be killed. This gave' , , : - - er bitter cold. Some deys wer, covered twen- be an right in puddle's, with plenty of red- us sixteen days' traveling and brought us : : e ' "Say, did any of you fellows ever eat got rich rennin' a garablire den In raw-- . i i , , , ' . , . . t-- dog?" , - - - : ,,, ' . ', - Eton. got his eyes on an old map tacked on I. I . , , . ' ' ,, , : . . ty mile -, Other day whenithe snow was sins to; give it flavor, but if you went -to on the other side of the mountain:- I The e , - , , i .. , soft, our camps 'meld be put three or four get to the bottorn of the rice question, try weather - was ,getting warmer,' and if 'w ' , e ."-: - The question fell like a bombshell from the wall. It was a small one of ' North , ' ,,.. , II . . .1 - -, : t . 4 - "a. s , - ' ' ; , miles apart One-reaChin the head of the It alone for a week. never . did like rice, , could hold out a few days we would car- ,, ' "-- the lips of an old Klondiker into a group America, . which rd torn from My kid's 1 ' e ',AL -' 1 , i , , Porcine we ran Into a series of terrible anyway. , ' . ; ! , - , ' , :, : .tainly reach the Mackenzie,' :, 1 ! , l ,..: .- . of dust3 travelers In the smoking compart- ; geography before leavin' home, -' and I . - . '..; ' --- - rct - , . . ,' . , ' buzzards that at first made', life a burden. :,"At the end, ef five days, we were ten ' , "At last the dog meat was all gone and ! '' meet of a Southern Pecan Pullman sleep- didn't seem to lose It In the three years . . ..,-- ..:, -,-. , , , ; 11,, tal miles nearer the- s - ,,,-- zee- , ' : and then made the keeping of the 'vi ;Mackenzie and our rice the river was tent out of sight We will d ' - .er. They had been- trying their, best to I'd been stampedin up and down the Yue 1 i , . . 1 le i: ; ' - , . pushed , 7 ' ,e' ' -- --Ate AO- leet . ' - ' - ark a serious matter. Viee!eould make - et .1r, ,) .- no was gone. The dogs had been turned loose on for a day without food, and at last could' ;- '' - -pass time telling -stories- while the train kon Valley before setelin In Forty Mile.' e , . 's, . : - , N r. 6., ,3,, , I . . spark , , , slowly plowed a dusty track -over the hot I'd fasten- the map on the wall just to ' 1 --; , ' -s, . - , , e ee. 3 , , , , . . w - - t -- A 0,,, - i7 I 1:' ' - - progress. .It took ' alti Air -energyto keep several o further. Kelly said that it had tome days ' before. They were not , able g o n . : --- ,te. st-e , ,y, e - - i ,,,- - , ,.,,,. . from, freezinize , What was worse,' our pro- , to haul the camp outfit, and we had no Heirs' ' time to die. The German replied ' , ,- --- - Nevada desert. - The dining cat conductor sort of remind me that there was s part of ., . ,,.. ,-- - - e ,,, et ! - f i , , k -.2, --;- ' r ' 7 , ,, - fl : , . - visions were going very fast.; . ' ,' provisions left ': Even the tent and stove that he would - never consent. Marsden - ' - bad just passed through the car with his the world that was not all snow and Ice. ; i ' ..... - ,- , 4. e i . , - -' A ,:.- - - tanititstr cry: - 'e ' : "'Kelly took the candle off the pine box . . .e.e , . . 0 APi , , , ' "Up to this time we had illed no game. was abandonedwith the sled. the German. for the dog had 1 The pack sided with 11 ' k: , ; ' e , Vete ---, , 2,e, e , , ,,,-, oto ,, el If :: : e, although Dare of every, day t was anent in still followed at our heels, :keeping up a saved his life I was still holding back an ' - ' "Dinner now ready In the dieing cart" . that stood for table, and went over the iolleet,- :. ';-114 ;---- ,9,- --',;..', Ill ' - ., hunting the side hills by different members dismal and continued howl for something opinion I but as hunger got the bettereof ,- - The announcement had caused the gold reap. He studied It closely, made a few - . ,,,,- -,e e ,,,, ,t ,e ,- - - , et-, .. ,,,,, ,' -r,,, 0 ,,..a,,; 44,, , , ; of the party.' aed, we. were always on the to eat . It was , riot encouraging. as we me, would have probably decided against ..- bunter's mind to turn to Alaskan. dinners marks with pencil, and finally, came back I-. - .,e-- 10 54'. .,-, ' i , p ,:,..,,; .:---' Z 7- We had been in the for tracks meshed lookout -' ,,,e- ,- : 1 , slowly over a heavy trail The the dog ; The argument was growing very i enjoyed or endured before he: had made to his stool. He lit his pipe and puffed it - I et ee. . e . - 27, A f . . ' ' I . . i , ' ; ' -- y'l1 . - -.' ) ! , . ' - .' . ' . ' e h . : e 7 , '1 ''''J', -;,,, f, 1 ., -, , ... , , deer belt for days, and a- single deer: trail West hound died one night of ezhaus- bitter . and even threatened to lead to blood.. e his "pile" and returned to Ole, states to al few moments before he broke out In this , ,,-.,,,, ... ,,A,,,: -,,,,e. of ;jai :,,,4, - 1 ,. ,e, i r ---,,,, P) . 4- .' , was all that bad rewarded pareful watch- tion and next morning we found his bones shed when the most unexpected happened enjoy It Manner of talk: e Te; .e ii ,- '' l' - - -.' ' : . , . ' - : ' .. ': - - kSee. e-ifP ;:- ' ' 1 I ''A) , - - - - et, i ., , ee - ,i A - . 4, T ,,, I, . , he Marsden followed. that deer for mtles picked clean. Hardly . trace of hair re-, ''OVer, a low slope came a, wen-cloteed . ! - Four noses went up- in disgust and four 'Did any of- you's erver see any one who , , e' - .,-: eel : ...,,, - , e-- , ,, 4 ' ..' ' and stumbled back Into clime two days maned. - The rest of the pack were livelier figure following behind a Ion team of ," faces expressed supreme horror as the had mined on the Mackenzie River? No ten- , el-el ei! ,"Flifir 't e ' .., p- 4!, fil; 4 i i V - --", , ,:, z . ; . , , , .,P -,-, h' s e b d" as of now blindness than they d bee in Weeks . not Th facto hl ic; His ' g '' Kiondiker repeated the -question: ' . eerfoot,' mind you, but a. man who knows - . -10. te'eeNettetiN e, , . t,- t, ' eelea, re,,e,,,,,.4e , 0,. . , : : . - 4 , lateervewri thaepeneed He he e had seen nothing of that they were c nibals did el.et seeemeteo aeHe udisee.oe B sayremd man pbe rofolaore eimh WWI ed him fellows t dog? b them.' -.. . ' - e."- r A -r , - ee le 1-i- ir, : ,, . . the deer - . ' but his eyes had given out under bother them Did any of you e owe ever ea , og : digger: s when e- pees ern. ,. ,. . :-., I e - eee , ; e. . eak: ,,- ! ' - , : ' , , I . :, , . ; : ,:- . 're : - I, within yellin distance and such be proved ' . "well, now . there's nticause for you par-' ' -"The silence was heavy. None of us , - ee 1, ..,, 1 , ,, 1 - ,,,,, -. el,- e ee i . , .. . , .. , . tor e,..,,.-ea.,,, , . 1- : . :' r, the glare of the sun on the snowy, desert .. Three times a day I dealt out six raisins to be. The fort to which he belonged Wall . ', ''' - Ocular chaps , to take on like that," he knew' what be was drivin at. ' ;, . - - ,e t. eetc-le. -, :,, ltio7 ,,e r,, thonc d e around Heil's' neck apiece from 'te ti d a e small h e H , . . , , , , , , , , ; ' le ;., '- , , , In , , resumed, after a searching look around the : " 'Do 'any of you know that there Is no e ,-,,,i, tesq,c- le - 47I ' . - ' ' . . supply that I had near at hand and we . . , were soon sate, ' , , ,-, i 41 4r- , ad Sti 1 T - . and the dog led him beck toi,camp or Mars- served for just such an emergency. : It was quarters.; - ' ' , - . : . 1 : . : compartment "111 admit that ' there is gold theree" was the next question which , ,g, . ,,, -., esib... S....A :, ,,,-: -.0...,,,- e-, --et , , ' . . : ' den weuld have been la dead one - , poor food, but. it, kept life together, and ''' , ' ' many a thing a darn sight better than dog Kelly treeing,: ' It remained unanswered. . ' ! e., ,- . :,4,--y - , e, - ' ,,..e e ---e-e- ,.. ' . .61 a , "A week later sent broke out amens Us ' ' ' ' . ' I steak. 111: even agree that a big juicy How did he know? - " " ! - e - e. - -e-A - ,.1 re., . - - .. ' : , . : . .-,-. i "For two weeks we had lbeen. traveling case and ling ' ienabled us to ,"taush .on with the deter- and for weeks we suffered with the dread, . -.."' 1 , Porte:It-onset with rich blood kind of hang- : " 'Well, what's the matter with our gain' - . ' . "1 i ' i! ' dpe On short rations-two !!'sour dough' biscuits, mination of despair. It could , not be for ' diseese. 'Kurt bad a terrible ' i ,: ' ing through it, and plenty of seasoning , there :There's no use in stayin' :around - t,V l I, - ' c a ell e of bacon and & antall portion of rice 4 . : ''' every twenty-four heurse :Our dog food long, however.' The raisins were numbered. So we thought were 'our day& . Nights were after long suff I er ng gave up the fight , They : .: - - : .. . . . ; . ' i - . , buried him on the banks ' '' ' such as civilized folks use, le ,about as here. We make enough durin the summer & ; of the river., He s : :, ; ' . tasty a thing as a man, can set down to. to live on through the winter, but that all. . i e : . ." , :: ' . was all gone and the poorcretters had been almost s :: leepless-: from hunger'. , All were made me promise to take good ca ' re of his : ..1. . - : ere "" NI , - . . livin': on snow for- , . seeeral, days., ,Hardship half , insane. : Marsden ; was still dog , : I've seen the time, though, when .Malamoot I,- for, one, want to get out of this country , .0- . O f 6, , S ( At. ' t . ' was beginning to tenon ev withhis eyes, aed at times clear out of his for ery member of og as'the only thing on earth that he cared -' -; ', ' ' ' A - , - steak was much more -appetizing than the some day, and before I go Tye got to have - , '1-, . ,..,th ,- . - : . . - . The, rest of , ea finally recovered s ' ' arty. Our faces were drawn and hag- 'head. ,i His mania took a cannibalistic' turn -tenderest porterhouse In the land will ever a sack of the yellow.. When I left Ohio . " . - , , ete. , ,,,,',-, , Fee ,-, , ,1 . ; . the p 4 Mined that fall on the bane if the i ,e-' .- - O., A -07 ' - i ! , ' ' ' ' I : gard.," Our stomachs iburne wit h one hunger. at 'times and ' he ha?. to be watchede' We . A sevral. other tributerie ,et t to . , - . . . - , - , be to you fellows. , i thred--years ago I said Good-by" to as , , . e- s , tee ' . I: "As leader of the 'parte aed manager of kept on traveling beeiuse w 0 knew nothing ,kenzle. ,We put in the winter trapping, -'' - ' "'You don't believe it? Well, let me go to sweet, a little girl, as ever lived,' and told -,,to - . e e; '' 4 - the supplies I . . . , ' --- 't '' , , 7 b t trouble le l k he ad grea ou e s taving off e se to d co. '. As our sae o f raisins ns go t , - tk the next summer crottsed the divide t - le-- If I can't tell 'a story that'll prove It her rd be back with a fortune: sooneten --', A ! ' i ' - ' : -, ' a raid on the balance of rations by both lighter our hope dwindled away. , and drifted back into Forty. Mile. .'We ve," - - You see, it was this way. In .the winter of - this.... She le evaltire for m& an bow far . .0. . . . , , . . ..,; . .. men arid dogs. Somelof theeboYs were for ' " If we doe strike game to-morrow rm received' though d n trom al tho h we had rise armotoetf' ' - ' . '90 about twenty of us wintered at Forty- have I got along? Enough grub In my cab- 4 1 . ! .. , ';. ., : ! ' i , ,... c . maldnI one good meal over hat was left a dead one,' said Kelly one stormy night as ho dead. No one thought that w - , - I, - - N ! ; ' - ' Mile Camp was long before the in to last until the thaw comes: That! , ' ' ' ,e 4 h''' . : : -. :: : then It . . - ! . ' - . -'' . . : , : - ' ' 7 - V ' ' ' ' t. . t and then givin up the fight4 , , - , , we settled . , doyen 'at 'a cheerless camp in a able to survive the blizzerda A rescueTparty. - Klondike was heard of Diggin s at Forty- scratch for more so s not to starve next , . , . . .t We pain' pushed wit although gvery step mean burich of , trees. : We re better dead had found out sled and tent where we had ' ' Mlle and Circle were good-better than any winter.: I say, let a go north, even to the . , e e 7 , e ,, y y . - , '. f'.4, -' N I ' ' ! ,- . through the snow,' wae tortnee. Our feces anyway' than starving in a land like this. .abandoned' theme Our bodies. of course - . s- other on - the !Yukon Valley.- Even then shores -of the Arctic Ocean.. ! : . . . . " were turned toward 'the !nighty river of Doret : blame ;I me ; too severely, :.boy& for were not .to,he located.; but that did not , we were all on the bust for the bonanza - "The speech. was a mighty. long one for , , . . - . . . . . t IA .- i -- the great : unknown ! Northeast Bitterly stertin" f you en this race for gold that's prevent them from sending out pews of our , , - ' : cam something to be found somewhere Kelly. : He didn At ' V t talk much as a rule.. . . - le t, 1 -- ! . . we cursed the thirst! , for g1 d that drew going to end le death. God knows I meant death. We did not take the trouble to COn ." - , ' - - that would startle the world-just what first we--thought he was Jokine but when . . . - . - ' e ' - US further Into the mountain wilds., i- There to do the rightthing.', He ended by writire eect Ite W-hat was the -use? We were not ',. . 9 1 Indian George Carmack' found years later he- mentioned the little gal and Ohio we , ! . . 1 : . .: : p 7 .. . , . ,, , , , was but one slim hope beyoed. Wo might the address of his relatives on a card and coming back to the states without a stake.- ' In the now famous Klondike., . ' knew, he wasein earnest, for, those are ; . . . 1 ' , . : : .f. , : I ' , ' run Into a Hudson's Bay Cernpany's trade putting it leto his 'torn wallet, He had and that seemed as far out of reach as ever. - , "We were not particularly short of grub things a ' man don't joke about when he s . , . . . ! i. .. , , . : ; - Ing station , There as no hope at all be- prepated for death. The rest of us were We did no know of Klondike. l that winter. -I can remember years when In the land of ice and snow. : ; : . , ,- ! . . .; . ! ., - , ' hind. It was out o ready. a qUestiow to start not quite ; . . ., . : 2 4a I ve just left Kelly In San Francisco. 0 ae- e , - the itupply, was much smaller. We had !" 'There Must be gold somewhere around, ! . "THE ARGUMENT WAS GROWING VERY BIrrER." - . 1 ' back over the tracideits este of snow and - " remember . fallin' off Into a troubled ITte crol in nee, --- ...A a.....,..... , ; 2' ' S..... ... V..,..e ms,A flee.. evvtictInt, aintl virillat atnA 17,-nel Itytemalm It' la Sim" MI? Plink . was oys I 21--If-or Pbed the biggest '.1.for It to cool. I. eating ill It I 1ard1y tasted It . wily with their manner. Killy ate his slowly, 30 uligUbltt whir:relit: was enough for. . . ,' ' i .e bear. Kelly? !"4 much of it leftt . ear meat t ever me pretty , fine oille.. ' ' ' ' ' i dumb. L t's dorgr . 1, quietly. If any ould have eaten we 'would have 'd. The fact rotted eaten the more than partaking of . - 7 ! ive us dog meat ,raden, who took - :1, here'll certainly " he German.'and :t developed that - killed one of the rensed him giv- t elralla. There t t last for sevkilter we became. was not so bad. lining light, and kat day than We I o would kill the I . II decided that d replenish the;;,I was soon over.: igh when tempt-firm grip on his Ith a keen hunt', t completed the . I ' I, ; ,,; 11, ' ;-' now that there e dogs averaged I, r shrunken eon. !J sufficient meat ! s four dogs., be- ' , vho seemed too flied. This gavel' and brought us mountain.; I The 1 mero- and if we ' I I we would car- ,' . 1 . . '. , 1 ' I - 14 riti all gone and ..4 4: ght. We pushed, ind at last could' :hat it had come German replied nsent. Marsden or the dog had holding back an )t the better 4A - decided against le growing very to lead to blood-. Lected happened. I well-clothed L long team of proclaimed him before he was such he proved . le belonged was re soon In 'safe. , I , 1 1 Le out among us, i with the dread '''' 1, rible case, 1 and ! .1 ' the fight. , They . .1,,,, ,f the river.,, He rood care of his th that he cared ..1 r recovered e re-', et the litt :es 0 s ebbe .., er trapping he he divide 11: ; Iffila ua found :- Ur styled ; ' k $n-otur . ofool..lre r ottouirh 1. triotood ye? to us , , I U. , it i it- L. , r ea L. k .ho

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