St. Louis Globe-Democrat from St. Louis, Missouri on August 20, 1876 · 10
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St. Louis Globe-Democrat from St. Louis, Missouri · 10

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Sunday, August 20, 1876
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4 ikeNift161o.Emimilksia.i.- : 1 io , , 1 j 1. i St. rmils tjuf. A NEGRO CAMP 21:1ELPTING Ernm. , Ilrout a. Chicago 'hihnitel I Iiihy don't you do se Peter did., A-walking on-the sea? Re throwed both arms above his bead, 1 Crying, "Good Lord, remember me." Then remember the rich and remember the poor, , And remember the bound and the tree, And when you sre done rememberiug around. Then. good Lord. remember me. 1 ' If I could stand where Moses stood. And view the landscape o'er, I'd throw these legs as last I could And I'd go for the milk white shore. rhea remember the rich and remember the poor, And remember the bound and the free. , And when you are done remembering around, Then. good Lora. remember me. t EXPOSURE OF SPIRITUALISM. , ' Inuit Laura Ellis Did, and Dow She Did - ItThe Fay Performances its Deacribed by a PerformerA Detailed Account at Wholesale Jugglery. (Frets the New York Orsoh10:1 r saw Intim Graphic. a few weeks ago, a Tully illustrated exposition of the imposture ' practiced by the profeseed medium, Annie t Eva lay. who, nevertheless, continues to op- . H emir in her assumed eapacitv, just as if no strart had been made to familiarize the public mind with the real method of her operations.- She bas for a chart-4)ton at least one member of , the "Spiritualists' Protestive Association," ' who, though be has denounced many pre" - tended mediums as tricksters,is still beguiled by the little blonde. t The number of the Graphic above referred t to very forcibly impresses me with the value 1 el pictorial illustrations of the tricks of pre,. tended mediums. A mere description, bow. .1 ever full in detail, can not be readily COMO'Sbended by the general reader. t In the eerirpart of 1870 I rude an 'epistletion, quite minute In detail, of the "mani- t gestations" which for sometime previously '', bad been exhibited in ditierent parts of the country by Laura V. Ellis. the same "mani1 " in fact, so well illustrated in the . tivaphic, that Annie Eva lay has of late been' exhibiliug in Europe ad America. I , I will here give au outline of the perform! - once. of Miss Ellis. Laura exhibited uuder ': the management of her father, who attended to the "conditions" and ditithe "pattering." A cabinet was provided, with a door in the t trout, and a curtained aperture in the door. , Inside of that cabinet, secured to the back of that structure, was a seat; and about eight , Inches above that a staple, with ring,-wag firmly fixed. The ring was wound with twine to prevent its being meted by the perspiration of the medium's bands, Lille said, but really to keep it from rat-thug against the eye of the staple while the medium was at work.i there was another staple in the back of the cabinet at the ...height of Laura's neck,when she was seated. By request of the manager:a commktee was appointed by the audience to investigate the ! - arraneements for the "manifestations," the ; , ' conditions under which they were given, and to report upon them as presented. Strips of Stout cottou cloth, about in inch and a half - wide and a yard long, were shown to the au, , dience, and then with one of these strips Laura's wrists were tied togetheniehind her, - the tying been done by Ellis, or under his di- .rection. Another strip of. cloth was passed , around the one secured to 'her wrists and be: tween them, and tied with tt number of knots to the ring in the lower staple. A: strip of cloth was also put around her neck and tied . , to the upper staple. Sometimes, in addition, 7 her feet were bound together and fastened to ' the floor of the cabinet. Ellis offered t to use needle and thread, if desired. to 4 make the knots more immure. Thus situated it was. to the novice in such matters, seem- , ingly impossible for Laura to produce any of ' -, the "manifestations" which followed, and ' ' some of which I will now describe. Putting a strip of cloth around Laura's neck, with the ends crossed over her breast, Ellis then closed the .cabinet door and requested "the , spirits" to tie a kliot in Vie cloth. Almost ' - immediately thereafter a "spirit voice." half; way between that of a woman and man, something like a ben trying-to crow, cried out from the cabinet, "Come in!" On the door , - being opened it was found that a number of knots had been firmly tied in the cloth. A , tambourine and bell were put in the girl's ' - lap, and as soon as the doer was closed, the one was beaten upon and the other loudly rung, at the same time. 'dCome in!" said the , volt, and the door was opened simultaneous, ly, almost, with the cessation of the sounds of the instruments, and on examination by ' the committee Laura was found to be still se-, cured, as at tint. A -finger-ring put in her lap was transferred to the orifice of her ear, the end of her mime, her mouth, or one of her angers in as short a kime as it would take to say "Jack Robinson,i" the door during that instant, however,being closed. A tambourine , frame was iusututly taken from ber lap and ' a put over her head. A glue nearly full of Stater put in the tambourine on her lap was con- , veyed to her mouth and she drank most of the 1 contents, none being spilled upon her clothes or the floor. A stick, about three feet long, was laid on her lap- aud the door closed. Shortly one end of the stick was thrust under the curtain mad through the aperture in the itoor, and one of the committee, by request, - took bold of that end and made an effort to : , pull the stick away from "the spirit." A , vigorous tug by the committeeman and a sucl, den relaxation of the hold inside resulted in - his drawing out the stick and tumbling over on his back, a demonstration that brought! down the house in ' a figurative sense at least.' With these and several other "manifeatations,' 0- not necessary here to describe, , the i "Ellis girl" filled out an evening's entertainment, very much to the mystification of her audience. That she could withdraw her bands ' from the fastenings and get them back again ; in so brief a time did not seem probable to thou who were present at her performances, slut few were likely -to suspect the fact that without ' withdrawing them she could, by ' slipping the cloth a little towards her elbow, and by means of slightly stretching the knotted part of the cloth and the play of the two- ' Inch ring. reach to her lap or head with either hand. To tie the knots In the strip of cloth that was loosely put around her neck, she took one end between her teeth and put the other end through with her band, being ' , thus enabled not only to form the knots but ' to draw them tight. When asked why the in- suannents to be played upon or the articles to - be handled were placed in her -lap instead of on the floor of the cabinet, Ellis replied that d'tbe spirits" could operate only within a certain dimance of the mediums vital or- gum, ' - During part of every year since 1858 I have ' made it a business to investigate and publicly expue the deceptive practice. of professed spiritual mediums, and by particularly no. tieing all the conditions under which the op. -erations of that class aro performed, I am - - tuabled, by persistent experiment under the same conditious, to produce the-same results. When "secured," as I have described in the ' case of Laura N. Ellis, I can play a tune on a ' bartnonicon, beat a tambourine, ring a bell, - and sound a triangle, all at the tame time and - In time with each other. - Being In Cincinnati, O., In July, MI, I learned that H. Melville Fay was then bolding "spiritual seances" in that city. I had been quite familiar with the operation. of Mr. Fay for everal years previous ,to that ' time. To ascertain if he bad anything new ' In the "spiritual" line, I availed myself of , the opportunity to attend another of hi. - seances. I found that be had a me mistress for a confederate. I had seen several of his old ones. This was a pretty, petite blonde, with a highly interesting way of pouting out and pur;ing up her lips when un tier the influence of a little excitement. Fay introdueed her to the assemblage as his wile, .sonie E. Fay. Ills performances on that occasion were the same that I had witnessed at previous exhibitions of his in sari-Qua placeet but Annie introduced a trick - that was - new to me. ' In fact, I was puzzled by it. Fay, her spokesman. announced it as the "ring teat," and it too,isted in takings solid Iron ring, about six Indies in diameter. (rom a table' (in the d;irk) and putting it on' he arm of a skeptic hi:e her hi,nds, as he 'believed, were in con. tact "ill, - - Fay did not recognize me till greetea him at i he eonclusion of the seance. 31en drawing me aside, he asked if I was still exposing spiritualism ' and remarking that if I was in the city for that purpose, be might as well . gyt nut. I totd tom I was not thee doing anyt toincpa'tlielv on accouut of the warm wealth' or, anti that 1 would no interfere with hint ' in flirt place if be would promise not to claim that -ipirits bad anything to do with his further operations there. Ile made ins such - a prcniise. Next day I called to see Er. Fay at his boarding place, when be introduced me to his female partner. They both labored with me for "going in on the i expose," as they phrased it, and expressed the opinion that I eouhl make more money and have a better time as a medium. We talked over the performances of Foster, Slade, the Davenports, 'Ellis girl," and other professed mediums. length I F tivosect &cult tlacui the tzicla t). - - 11 a. ' - of the .11:1111 girl," 1 the "ballot fest" of Fdster, the slate-writing mystery of Slade, and other "wonderful demonstrations," if they would join me in giving, under my management, a number of ' drawing-room entertainmenta in Cincinnati, allowing me one-half the net procoeds, and would pledge not to communiesta to other parties the information I should impart to them. , I also stipulated that Annie should show me bow she performed the "ring test;" They agreed to DiY proposition. I then drew up an agreement in writing to which therappended their names, and in which they further engaged not to impart to any other personis the secret of sueh performances without my consent. procured at a hardware store -two large pleture-frame screws, and employed a blacksmith to insert in he eye of one of them a Iwo-inch ring. To these, I after screwing I them into the door-casing, fastened Annie, and instructed her how to go through with the programme of the Ellis girl. In a short time bile became quite proficient. As the mystery of these performances depended entirely upon the operator being so secured as seemingly to preclude the possibility of her making use of her hands ' bead or feet, I did not consider it necessary to present any parpeular series of manifestations in the halftiosen entertainments that Annie gave under management. I told her to exercise her Ingenuity, and suggest any change front night tonight that would be agreeable to her and Interesting to the audience. Instead of using a cabinet, we stretched a curtain across the room and turned the lights low. She was particularly fond of throwing the bell and other instruments over the l'curtain; reckless as to whose head was bit. As she was immediately , disclosed to view by a lowering of the curtain, it could be seen that she was still firmly fastened, and of mourn Dot personally responsible for any Injury that might have been done. She did not carry her recklessness to the extent of frightening people away. She simply kept up a mental excitement on the part of those present that was unfavorable to close investigation. After Annie's performances each evening Fay and myself held a dark-room seance, and,notwithstanding we were "pecurely bound," we made a stunning noise With various musical instruments as we whirled them around the room. lye also gave the "holding WV and other mystification.. In giving those entertainments in connection with k'sy and his companion I made no mention of jugglery or spiritual influence. I insi4ted upon my assomates being non-committal, while I was with them. It ; was my purpose to give, later in the season in that city, some lectures against spiritualism, and I hoped by means of Fay and Annie to work ins an interest that would lead a considerable number to attend my expositions. , Then, too, there were certain "points" that I wished to get hold of as a medium detective. But so strong was the force of habit with Fay, that he began to gabble about- spirits and his mediumship at our entertainments, and not wishing to be involved in such a way, I die. solved my brief connection with him and exposed his tricker. Melville and Annie suddenly left the city. I i A considerable number of the inrpostors tTIONVII as professional mediums, whose trade It is to practise on human credulity, and who make mortal bereavement the means of money-getting, are congregating in Philadelphia to secure as victims visitors to the Centennial Exposition. I wish that some bold and fraud-hating American equal to the task would meet them there, and so thoroughly expose their false pretentionn as to put them to,utter rout. W. F 110ht VI.acg. - ILake City, Minn., August 4. r -I Diseases of Animals. At the annuli' meeting of the Devon Chem-her of Agriculture, Dr. Blyth, the county analyst, read a paper on foot-and-mouth disease. lie said that study showed the great predominance among animals of parasitic d iseseeslife feeding upon life. 1 Whilst in hull:1Sn disease this class was subordinate ' in animal plagues -the parasitic. clatis held the field place. Sheep died from flukes ' horses from worms floating In tbe blood itself, fowls were suffocated by living red threads in the windpipe, and the strongest and moet robust animals were constantly falling a prey to despicable creatures immeasurably below them in the scale of creation, but which were enabled in, some mysterious way to prey on the very miters of life. This predominance of parasitic diseases was due ahnost to the common neglect to provide a fairly pure supply of water. He did not mean an absolute chewiest purity, but water, free from weeds and mud, and protected from the pollution of the cattle thealsebies.i Many ,people seemed to imagine : that any , filthy shallow pool was quite good enough for , cattle, and Would use as an argument the fact that horses frequently turned from a 'clean running stream and drank out of a turbid pond. The etplanation of this was mainly the tempera. ttire of the two, horses ?referring water of a -moderate temperatureo however polluted, to water that was extremely cold.- Liver-rot in sheep was parasitic disease, and its origin was the opaline, a little .animel which could only live in impure water, but when drank up by sheep it, by a series of marvelous transformations, devetoped into the fluke, which infected the liver of sheet) and caused death. Another thing due to cattle drinking Impure water was the existence of little cyeta, the existence of which necessitated in India le 18E8 ad 1869, the destruction of 17,0oti pounds of ration beef, for these cysts, if swallowed by man. ,developed into tapeworms. The almost, unchecked disastrous diseases which swept the face of the country from time to time showed the utter neglect of veterinary hygiene. J Let them look, too, at the dark, humid, Unventilated stables at Melted to , nine-tenths of the inns in Devonshire. Then again look at the farms. There were two methods of farmingin one the farmyard was neat and clean, and there was found nothing in any way offensive or re- pulsive whilst in another kind of farm might be found an immense cess-pit in which pigs and cattle, ducks and does wallowed, a pit into which every drain emptied, and which, In short, was full of filth unmentionable. One or the other of these systems must be wrongwhich? It would hardly be suggested that this was a 1 good condition of things for thee health of man, and there was abundance of fact to show -that conditions which operated unfavorably on men had a similar operation on animals, and that Judicious sanitary improvements which prolonged the life of the i former also prolonged the life of the latter. The same effect that was seen in the eyelids of children kept in a crowded and unventilated school-room was developed in the eyelids of pigs kept in close, Maly styes; and when they came to kill the animal they found, ea - the effect of such keeping, that the flesh of the pig was more watery, it was flabby, and less nutritious than that of pigs kept under healthier conditions. Mice were affected in a most intense manner by skin disease caused by fungus; this was caught by the cat feeding on its prey, and from the tat was propagated to children, becoming in them that loathsome disease, the honeycomb ring-worm. To complete the outline of the bearings which veterinary sanitation had upon the human race, it only remained losOilm to allude to the well-known serious influence which diseased meat bad upon the health of mentapeworm from eating meat affected with cyst. and trichinosis from eating that sleeted withlrichine a little worm which multiplied In the muscles of the human body, and not untrequently caused death. A Men in si, Hear Trap. (from the ilentor (Me.) Whig. Newell Alexander, a Micmac Indian, aged about sixty-nine, who was on his way from Quebec to Ifoulton and Woodstock, and who vaseed through Winn last week, Wita caught la a bear trap hit Friday night, A hich was set by Alexamier IlicMain ' of Mattawanikesg, Its the woods about forty rods from the sunken bridge, two and a half miles from Mattawamkeag, on the old military road. He had lain there until 4 o'clock Monday afternoon, when Edward Hamel and John &yard found him, having been attracted to him by his hoarse and faint cries for help. He bad 'heard the carriage passing up and down the road, and had cried for help,but the sound of tile wheels probably drowned his voi:e. Some persons beard, but were afraid. He had plenty to eat with him, but could not eat, as he was nearly choked for want of water. He bad In his possession a dipper, wit h which he dug down three feet into the earth, and was dipping up the mud and sucking the water from it. He bad an at with him, with which be made a wedge, driving it behind his leg, thereby easing the pressure somewhat. He was caught lust above the ankle of the right feet; but, fortunately, no teeth entered hie leg. He is now at S. B. Gates', with his wound properly dressed by a physician, and it is expected he will recover. ..k I 601.1) in New Hampilbire,gold in Vermont, gold in North Carolina, and new mines opening up all over the Rocky and Sierra ranges in the West. Verily,gold will soon be so plenty that its seflection will make us all look as yet-low as inamen. i ' ' It t I I I TO rEKIN. t , , , , 1 i 1 , f Curious Experience of a Traveler 1 , on the Peiho. Pozoramie View of Climes' SeineryTiettain Progress by Cart and StAamerCliaracter, lath) Scenes on the load. TIENTSIN. went to bed before we were half-wav to - Tientsin, but they told me It was just the same style of going all the way, and as it was too clerk to see anything anyhow, I was very glad of the chance to "turn In" for a good night'; sleep. I was waked before daylight by the ! stopping of the machinery, but I only staid awake long enough to find out that it was very cold, and that Tientsin Wag at last reached, and then, giving a gentle sigh of contentment, 1 I drew my knees up, and, hanging thew over my ears (a way I bate of keeping, warm), went to sleep again, not waking till breakfaet wmt ready. - After breakfastit wu a good breakfast, and made me feel so happv and peaceful that a child gould, have, played with , walked. to the door of the cabin with a placid smile on my face and,- openiug it (the door ' of course) poked my head out, said, 4AhI,P and drew my head In again, putting off prospecting until I had pugoit some over-; coats and hats, for it was very cold. Getting' Inside of an ulster, which oovered me from head to foot, and putting on a cap that gave' me a chance to eee and breathe only, I didn't' look very pretty, but I felt warm and yentured out on deck. Then I ventured whore and began to look around me for items to. write to my eager friends at home. The first thing that claimed my attention was a performing bear in charge of a wretched-looking native. The bear stood on 'his head, turned somersaults, balanced a pole by the middle on the end of his nose and , then whirled it around as if on a pivot; but with all his accomplishments be didn't seem happy, and , when I gave the man ten Cents to speed him on his way, the bear walked off with an air' that seemed to ask: "Is there no balm in Gilead?" i, THE FOREIGN SETTLEMENT stretches along the river beak for a mile or so, and makes a very poor show indeed: in fact, it isn't worth wasting time over. The massacre of MO, when the French Catholic missionary establishment was destroyed, and the sistera, priests and converts were ribly tortured, then barbarously murdered, ! gives to Tientsin a tragic Sort of interest; though all a visitor can do is to go to the place where the Cathedral stood,and ask questions, to which be will get very unsatisfactory answers. Let me warn you, if you be an Amer-' can, do not when in China inveigh too loudly against the danger a foreigner incurs in living In China. If you do, the chances are that one of those confounded Englishmen, who always know of all the wrong that is being done in thou United States, will thrust a handful of California papers in your face, and ask: "How about the way you treat China- men in your country?" One of the moat striking differences between the native of the North and of the South is the superior size of the former, he averaging quite as large as the European. The dialect, too, is harsh and gutteral instead of the high note and sing-. song of the Southern provinces. Ills food is a surprise, being meat and millet, while- the Southern Chinamen woull not know how to exist without his traditional rice and salt-fish. I tried to find out from some of the officers, of the steamer how I should set about getting to Pekin. They thought the Captain would ktinw, be thougbt the consul would know. ,r,,,, consul did know, gave me all necessary' dir?etions, got me a passport and a boy who knew all the ropes both of Pekin and the country beyond as far as the Great Wall, and who, moreover, could speak Ebglish fairly well. On going back to the steamer ' I found one of the passengers was also going to Pekin, and was anxious we should travel together.. There are two ways of goingone by water to within a few miles of the capital and the other by land all the way. By water they said It took longer, but was more comfortable; while by land, though it took more than half a day less time, it bad to be done in a cart without springs, and over a rough road; and each person, as he told of the cart ride,would try to outdo the other in his description of the agonies to be endured. Bless them that they persuaded me to sacrifice time te comfort, even such as it wile, though only comparative,, for I was once afterward allowed the oppor-' tunity to teat for myself the truth of their stories, and I found to my sorrow that they bad not even approached the real facts. My;. companion was a Hungarian with an outrageous name, and as moreover, be was very dirty, I consulted both my convenience and, the general fitnese of things by calling him "Baron"for short. We were to start early the next morning, so daylight the next day found us shivering and slaking through the t DIRTY CHINESE CITY, , on our way to the boats which we had not yet seen, having left it to our boys to have every, thing ready torus. We each had a boat about twenty feet long, six feet wide, and drawing two and a half inches of water; from about. six feet from the bow to within four feet of the stern it was housed over, and looking at it from the outside It didn't seem possible it could be large euough to more than lie down In, but en looking inside I found that part of the deck had been taken up, so that one-half of the cabin gave a height of nearly five feet;- the floor of the other half was raised a little above the deck. and served as a bed for the passenger.. The kitchen was in the after part of the cabin, robbing it of about two feet.i It didn't seem large enough to keep a deoent dog in, but nevertheless iu there, and with, out any utensils that I mad see, the Baron's boy cooked us . kiMe very good meals in the , daytime and slept there at night. For about I three Miles the ;WA wens burly LW'S t with , Mow the an Francisco rest., 1 To appreciate the Peiho River you must: Cross the Gulf of Pe-chitin. To come upon it overland would doom it to your everlasting-, contempt, tor there is no doubt that, taken as a river, and standing on its own merit., it is , failure, being neither grand nor picturesque, but simply a dirty, common, narrow, till& creek; at least the navigable portion of it may : justly be called so. Why It depends upon the gulf, into which it pretends to empty, but from which it really getti all the water to float!' Its shipping on, for its relative good qualitlea, Is that, u I know from sad experience, the gulf hi the favorite home of seasickness, and very few are the happy wighta who can cross It without paying tribute. So when after crossing the barfor eves the Pettit, has a bar you come crawling on deck and look on the smooth water, it seems to you, in spite of ell t its dirt and mean eurrolindings, a perfect little gem of a river. After you have had something to eat, it loses much of its beauty: but you must always think of it with the happy feeling of a man who has crossed the gulf to get to it. But what are you on the Peiho for? You certainly didn't leave the luxuries of Shanghai only to see , Tul PittriO? No, von are a globe-trotter, and having cnme to China ' must visit Pekin; Intl to Fe, to Pe- kin must t o up the Peiho about sixty miles to Tientsin, and from there it is another sort of journey to your destination. I have let you go to Taint which is a small village at the mouth of the riveri by yourself, for I vowed that I would never cross that gulf again; but you mutt take my word for the rest of the journey, or if you want to go yourself, you may at least wait and hear how it is done. It was nearly March, but it had been a cold winter, and the river had been so full of ice that ours was almost the first steamer up from; Shanghai since the preceding November. Even yet the junks which had made the Peale their winter quarters were not gone, but laid along the banks of the river, making navigation anything but tams, , and causing our Cap- tam n to indulge in vatious cursory remarks by the way. I can't begin to give you any idea of the trip up the river. ,I can only till you that we bumped first on one bank. then on the other.then we run our nose Into the bank, and then backed off; then the river made a sharp turn and tried to get to sea, then it changed Its mind add went back to look what ! was the matter,but before it got there changed its mind twice, and finall y started once more for the ocean. By this time the steamer was tired of such nonsencei and tried to turn around and get out of such au uncertain stream; but it was of no use, the river was ! too narrow, and tat with bow elx feet in the mud on one side and the screw digging out a big hole in the other bank in its frantic efforts ' to help us along, there we stuck till we got1 the hawsers out, and,fastening them to some piles placed for that purpose, hauled awayi till her head pointed seaward, that seeming to be the only way of reaching TIENTSIN. -I went to bed before we were half-wav to - Tientsin, but they told me it was just the same style of going all the way, and as it was too dark to see anything anyhow, I was very glad of the chance to "turn In" fora good night's; sleep. I was waked before daylight by the ! stopping of the machinery, but I only staid awake long enough to find out that It was very cold, and that Tientsin was at last reached, I and then, giving a gentle sigh of contentment, I drew my knees up, and, hanging them over my ears (a way I have of keeping, warm), went to sleep again, not waking till breakfast was ready. After breakfastit wu a good breakfast, and made me feel so happy and peaceful that a child eould have, played with walked to the door of the cabin with a placid smile on my face and,- opening it (the door ' of course) poked my head out, said, AhI" and drew my head in again, putting off prospecting until I had purott some overcoats and hats, for it was very cold. Getting' Inside of an ulster, which oovered me from, head to foot, and putting on a cap that gave' me a chance to see and breathe only, I didn't' look very pretty, but I felt warm and yentured out on deck. Then I ventured ashore and began to look around me for items to. , write to my eager friends at home. The first thing that claimed my attention was a performing bear in charge of a wretched-looking native. The bear stood on his head, turned somersaults, balanced a pole by the middle, on the end of his nose and , then whirled it around as if on a pivot; but with all his ac-: complishments be didn't seem happy, and when I gave the man ten Cents to speed, him on his way, the bear walked off with an air' that seemed to ask: "Is there no balm in Gilead?" i, THE FOREIGN SETTLEMENT stretches along the river batik for a mile or so, and makes a very poor show indeed: in fact, it isn't worth wasting time over. The massacre of MO, when the :French Catholic missionary establishment was destroyed, and the ',littera, priests and converts were ribly tortured, then barbarously murdered, gives to Tientsin a tragic sort of interest; though all a visitor can do is to go to the place where the Cathedral stoodoind ask questions, to which he will get very unsatisfactory answers. Let me warn you, if you be an Amer-' can, do not when in China inveigh too loudly against the danger a foreigner incurs in living In China. If you do, the chances are- that one of those confounded Englishmen, who always know of all the wrong that is being done in these United States, will thrust a handful of California papers in your face, and ask: "How about the way you treat China-' men in your country?" One of the most striking differences between the native of the North and of the South is the superior size of the former, he averaging quite as large as the European.' The dialect, too, Is harsh and gutteral instead of the high note and sing-. song of the Southern provinces. Ills food is a surprise, being meat and millet, while- the Southern Chinamen woull not know how to exist without his traditional rice and salt-fish. I tried to find out from some of the officers, of the steamer how I should set about getting to Pekin. They thought the Captain would ktiow, be thought the consul would know. ,r,,,, consul did know, gave me all necessary' dir?etions, got me a passport and a boy who knew all the ropes both of Pekin and the country beyond as far as the Great Wall, and who, moreover, could speak Eeglish fairly well. On going back to the steamer ' I found one of the passengers was also going to Pekin, end was anxious we should travel together.. There are two ways of goingone by water to within a few miles of the capital and the other by land all the way. By water they said It took longer, but was more comfortable; while by land, though it took more than half a day less time, it had to be done in a cart without springs, and over a rough road; and each person, as he told of the cart ride,would try to outdo the other in his description of the agonies to be endured. Bless them that they persuaded me to sacrifice time to comfort, even such as it was, though only comparative,, for I was once afterward allowed the oppor-! tunity to test for myself the truth of their stories, and I found to my sorrow that they, bad not even approached the real facts. My;. companion was a Hungarian with an outrageous name, and as moreover, he was very dirty, I consulted both my convenience and, the general fitness of things by calling hint "Baron"for short. We were to start early the next morning, so daylight the next day found us shivering and slaking through the t DIRTY CHINESE CITY, on our way to the boats which we had not yet seen, having left it to our boys to have every, thing ready torus. We each had a boat about twenty feet long, six feet wide, and drawing two and a half inches of water; from about six feet from the bow to within four feet of the stern it was housed over, and looking at 1 It from the outside it didn't seem possible it ovA,t1let hm wevaa mwttmp,a in ot.hsmyws !, ,.' junta and PlInfdler bnato, making it a matter of considerable diftieulty to get along. Had we been in the south of China we shopld have slammed right and left with a boat book, and cleared the way for our boats; but se we passed along we saw faces of such a villainous and piratical cast as would have done credit to any rogues' gallery; and taking that with the absence of the hurryiug and skurrving we bad been need to see in the native of the Southern provinces to get out of a fpreigner's way, we concluded not to force our attentions on thane Junkmen but rather i wait until we were once again n Shanghai, where we could kick and cuff to our heart's content. Alter we had passed the sablpping and got through the CELEBRATED BPIDGE OE BOATS-- though why celebrated I do not know, for It is only a pontoon bridgewe at last had a clear river before us, and the boats could go along as fast as theboatmen's skill could send them. After we had breakfasted we crawled outside to see how it happened we were going so easily through the water, when as well as we could judge the wind was not favorable to sailing; and judge, they bad yulobedas sculling with an immeuse oar or yuloh is called the boat would have rocked from side to aide. Just aft the cabin was a tough-looking little mast about twenty feet in height. At the to of the mast wam a ring; fastened to the deck and passing through this ring, ran a tow line, about a hundred feet long. at the and of which were three loom in each of which was a man, the loop running over one shoulder, across the breast and under the arm. The men leaning their weight on the rope until their bodies made an acute angle with the earth, swayed from side to side as they step- ped along, the bead man singing a solo- and the others coming in at the chorus. We were surprised to find so much melody in a Chinese tune, and still more surprised to hear the natural voice Instead of the falsetto of the cultivated Chinese singer. We were three days gettieg to Tung Chau, the - days being cold and the nights colder. There was nab--lug to bee on the way except a few Voituonat LOOKING VILLAGES where the children came out, threw mud at us and called us yang kwei-tze (foreign devils), and a dreary waste of level country on either side of the river. The only excitement was the grounding of the boat onee in a while, and the giving out of our atock of bread,when we bought a few loaves of Chinese bread made of millet-flour and sandthe millet for the stomach and the sand for the teeth probably. The Baron spoke very little English but was fluent in French; I epoke very little French but was fluent in English; but hi spite of these dimadvantages we managed to detect each other very cordially before we reached Pekin. We reached Tung Chau at night; and as we could not leave till morning went to sleep in our boats for the last time, I wee not at all sorry it was for the last time. for what with the extreme cold and the hoatmen sleeping under. 'teeth Inc. I had not enjosed my nights very' much. How the four men got into that email held and lived until morning I do not know; but they did it, and smoked there, too, the smoke coming up through the hoards and almost euttocating me. We were to have breakfasted at aeven and started at eight; but the Baron had to wash first, not having done so since leaving Tientein. and that took some time. so that we didn't start until It o'clock, the Baron on a donkey and I walkingour bagirome going in carte. Tung Chau is a MUM walled city some thirteen miles from. Pekin, - and being so near the capital is naturally of small importance either se a commercial center or a eight for glebe-trotters. There is a well-paved road thence to Pekin, but as it waa rough for opringless carts, or what troubled us most was Mugh for our trunks in such carts. we went by a longer and softer road for most of the distance. taking the paved road for the last mile only. The temperature by the way had bomme mtieb milder and grew more so as we approached Pekin. Leaving TtNG ("Tarr, it was to me like entering a new enuntry,ench ao I bad never read or heard of before. Nothing was Chinese except the cue, sod even it was of a different style, being much heavier and longer than that worn In the &Attn. All the way to Pekin it was one living ,etream of carts; wheelbarrows, camel., donkeys and people. Such agonizing things as those carts, to look at, I never eaw--stnall unresisting wheels, no springe, and with an air gleefully fiendish as they bumped into a hole and then bumped out again. They were all covered over so I couldn't see the sufferings of those inside but It wee easy tonimagine them. The wheelbarrow was, aftSr all, the greatest novelty; very large, and carrying an immense load, a man pushing, a tunic pulling. and a sail hoisted, pressing the wind into service. Droves of great camels, with their stolid look and ag, gravatingly slow-and measured gait going in Indian tile, midc a strong contrast to the little docke)s am they hobbled min, ingly along, watching slyly with their great iniowent eyes for a good chance to upset their riders. Then there were the peoplecome walking, some riding in carts, some on donkeys, ethers on ,anules, and others again on scraggy-looking potties. And such ridinga curious high saddle, and there sat the rider, perched up way above the animal's back, the stirrup so bort as tobring the knees almost to the chin, the women riding the some as the men. It looked as if they must fall off at the least movement, but they did not; they sat there as securely as if screwed on. All along the road were stands of donkeys for hire, and when we came in sight the boys would mount and. charge for us, hammering those poor beasts till it seemed their ribs must break. When we struck the paved road and they told us we were only a mile from Pekin I was glad, for I was tired; hungry and dirty. Still I was doubtful about the nournees of the city, for there was nothing in sight looking the least like's great town, nor even like a small one. In fact, we were almost tinder the city walls before we saw themhuge as goy really werethere not being any spires or high buildings to overtop them makes the approach to Pekin very tame. Our passports were not examined at the gate, and so without loss of time we went to our tespective abiding places. 'Thoorder of, business with Inc was first a bath, next clean clothe, and next come good chow-chow; theee obtained and 1 was ready to have a look at Pekin. Funeral of the Khedive's Sow-in-Law. The Alexsodria correspondent of the Lon-, don News writes as follows: The death of Toussoum Pasha, at the early awe of twenty-one, is a severe affliction to the Khedivial family, for whew Freai ayinpathy is felt by all classes. 1 his young Prince, only eon of the late Snit' Pasha, was married in 1875 to the Princess Feting, daugh4 ter of the Khedive, and it was an exceptional Instance of marriage for affection. He wits a Museir (Mersbal) and Minister of the Marine, an& a member of the Privy Council, but, having been a great sufferer for MOT montba, hac been unable to take an active part in the details of his department for some time. The funeral of the deceasied Prince took place on Saturday, the 8th of July. From daylight crowd. of natives made their way to tbe Mooque of Netsi-daniel, near the faintly palace, by the Mahmoudie Canal. At 11 a. in., a guard of cavalry escorted a large number of butlaloes to the place of burial, and these, according to the Ilussulman custom, were sacriticed, and the flesh given to the poor. Next came thirty camels laden with bread, dates and small money, all of which was distributed to the crowd. Afew minutes later came a procession of the municipal guard,followed by a squadron of lancers with their lances in the belts, and two regiments of infantry with their arms reversed. The rear of the procession was brought up by boys from the naval and military establishments. His Highness Tuetik Pasha, eldest son of the Khedive, was present as chief mourner. accompanied by Cherif Pasha, Miototer of Foreign Affairs, the Governor of Alexandria, and numerous ofilcialo, by the consular body, and by an immense number of bankers, merchants and inhabitants of Alexandria and Cairo. A detachment of marines mounted guard, and their band, having no duties to perform, carried silver trays tilled with perfume. Servants and officers of the Prince's household bore the decorations of the Prince on cushions of velvet and gold. The cotlin, of the simplest possible kind, covered with a priceless white and gold cashmere, was carried by soldiere and marines and deposited in the tomb where the Prince's father, Said Paslia, was burfed. About 80,000 people were present in the neighborhood of the grave. The city of Alexandria was quite deserted, all the native and many European establishments being closed.- Never has there been seen here such a spontaneous and sincere manifestation of respect and sympathy. a Killed with a Cherry Pit. ; Fronk liartford Courant. I Milford lady named Evitts died of Rh unaccountable malady few days ago. A post abortaus showed that the trouble was caused by a cherry plt, which became obstructd an its downward passage from the stomach, aud bad, In some manner, worked its way Lltrough one of the 'mailer intestine. A SEWING WOMAN'S WORK. '- How She is Employed and raid in Shops and at Homed , s i Tbe Waking of Apparel Ibri Nen and Winos De. scribedCompetition with Charitable:Usti. tationsTbs Ways of Employe. A !' . 1; ...; , , v ; I . trrom the New Tork Sun. 1 i The number of women in this city - ho earn I living by sewing would be difficult o- eer ' tofu. The business street show m ! s y hundreds of establishments in which nelidlework is done, or given out to be done. f "How much are you paid for ma ng those gsrments?" was the ; questfoli pu to two, young girls who were briskly wa fog up is done, or given out to be done. f , "How much are you paid for ma ng those garments?" was the ; question pu to two young girls who were briskly wa fpg up Broadway, between City Hall Park &lid White . street. , li ' Each carried ibulky bundle, comOsting of four boys' jackets, warm, thick outside gar. ments, to be worn next winter by latis of ten or twelve years. The girls had deo , .bright faces that told, without speaking, of. work gladly finished. . . 'We get' twenty-five cents apiece,!' sru the answer.: , 4., 1 I f: . . : "Do you make them out and tit for a quarter of a dollar for each coat?" t s'yes.'s 1 "And how long does it take von?' t; e"I do very well indeed ii I makel four in one day," said one. ' "It takes more than ten hours & make four," said the other. i "You take Your work home fro IS great establishment?'" V i ; "Yes," and they tantlingly hurried en. The jackets were of thick. gray wool material, and were wadded. lined with alpata,and had the finished appearanee of - a garment made by an adept, or struck ih a mold, sit exsetly a1titt4 They were made mostly by machine-sewing, yet the button-holes,ibe inside bindings, and other parts were done by:band. They -were pressed on the seams,the cods fastened. thread's pieked oil, neatly folded, and were ready for the counter. i Wages for the making of underwear, and, Indeed, for gentlemen's entire apparel, except the "tailor made" articles,have dropped far down within the lain, three years 4 The pay of the girls and women who make up the many articles worttby nien, from gloves' and chest protectors to shirts, does not average more than 5 a week.. Many make leap, and Ift is considered good pay nowadays in most of the great establishinenta. Most of the work is done by the piece, the swifter and skilled woman making more than the ordinary ones or the beginner. "One can not make extra exertion., sew evenings at home, and in the morning i early again in the shop, to LAlow it long," said an experienced sewer. "Some young i girls work hard beraisee thev like to dress nicely. As tong as we could make 7 or 7 60 a week we Were content." She mentioned a firm which manufaettires almost every article worn, by the man of sashIonhis uudergarmente, dress shirt s,i sus- penders, neck-ties, gloves and chest protectorsand which produces every grade of goods, from overalls' to tho best Broadway wear. She said: "Three years ago 1.gouldessily make $ ; 4 week there, but now I could not earn $4. 60. I gave up after I had tried it a week."' ,-- ' 1 , ROW CLOTHES ARE MADE. 1 Garments of all sorts, inner and outer, are made usually by parts. One woman makes bands and nothing else, another the trimminga, another the body of the garment, anot her bemusing', or facings; and another finishes it. The cutters are men. They might be termed cloth choppers, for they tiee chopping knives. They take many folds of Cloth and chop through the whole of Et at one stroke. This- mode secures unitortnity. Then the forewoman, and in 110 mammoth manufactory the four or 60 forewomen give out thework; and moil" Of the labor is done out of the establishment than in it. bien's drawers are made complete for SO cents a dozen pairs. The "hickory tbirts" that laboring men wear, of stout striped blue are made complete a dozen for 45 centsi All overalls are made for 50 cents a dozen pairs. Striped calico and white shirts are made complete for 65 cents a dozen. The forewoman fixes the prices and sees that thwtwork is aatisfactorily done. If it is not good 4t is not paid for. "And rightly enough," said one of the sewing women. Certain forewousen.even paying theme light prices, are exeeediugly popular. t 1! "There is not abetter lady who 4al to do with, workwomen in the city of l'rew York than she," said a woman of long es-perience In the shops and factories, referring la a fore-' woman; 'she has ninety girls. amLishe will not have one who can not make 7 60 aweek." Forewomen's wages range from 15 to VO a week. A buttoti-couuter got $9 a week during the busy season, which was silt months long, and dropped to 0 when slack times came. When the new shirts come from the laundry she counts the buttons to see that none are missing, folds the Shirts, end puta them in the boxes. - -; ,. , --- Tilt cus-roms oy THE TRADE. It Is'a general rule of the manufactories that the Who work in the shop at a fixed price hy the week are tined for a tardiness' of five minutes, 6 cents if they get 3 a week, ; and 10 cents if they getft0 a week. - s- 1 t "I don't really blame them," said one of the sewing women', "for these young girls would so many of them have excuses; and when you are employed by a firm your time is their money. I like the manufacturing proprietors geuerally. It Is the eabordisistea who grind.'' i She mentioned two or three proprietors who each provided work for 500 women, and said lhat they were kindly, pleasant men. The pat' for shirt making ranges from fifty cents a dozen to 2 W. according to their fashion and materials. Best Broadway shirts are made now at U -a dozen, out and out, button-holes and all. Allowing 2 60 e dozen for the making of the first-class shirts, which are sold for $.16 a dozen ' all that is paid for the making and material la not more than 10 or $12. At these rates of ' pay there are more applicants for work than the manufacturers can employ. Hundreds of women are turned away who apply. Many of them Gould do only poor work. , A young woman who sewed nine years for the same concern in Leonard street was thus spoken of by her employer: "Often' when I came here at 7 o'clock in the morning I have found her at the door. She supported herself, a brother eight years old, and her moth. er, who was a chronic invalid. We never had a better operator, and only parted with her on going out of that line of bustiness.;She still lives in Harlem, and sews in White street." A woman recently left a firm for whom she, bad sewed fifteen years because i having been paid for the complete making of men's plaid flannel traveling shirts, 4 a dozen, i She was cut down to 2. One of the firin,to whom she remonstrated, replid: ' k "The Sisters will make them for that, and I don't care who does my work, so it ie done well." 4 1 , The various orders of Roman Catholics Sis-' ters are supplied by the manufacturers with a great amount of work. The Sisters, who have on their boucle institutions full of helpless girls and ' women,, are glad to get work for them, however small the reustuseras. lion. The self-supporting sewing women deplore this competition, but the Sisters urge the claim of wicked or orphan girls, who, without this supply, would be without shelter; SCENES IN THE SHOPS. I, sli "We can not have a dining room.' said a foreman; "space is too dear in these great houses down town." , 4 ''1' , So, when the lunch time comes: and the sewing-machine clatter is stopped for a hall , hour, the women eat .in the midst of their work. , "It is no play," said the foreman, as the writer looked at a congregation of workers. This was a sight to be found again and again, up two and three bug nights of stairs, in great rooms.. In this one the cutter was chopping out felt skirts for next .winter's wear. The folds of. felt were a pile several 'lichee in thickness, aud he chopped through it with a huge knife. He occupied the front of the room with his ids, At several tables, Ironing women-were pressing the felt skirts after theg had received the last stitch of adornment, the plaited frill with a notched edge of blue or scarlet. It takes cleverness event() do that. Not every bungling washerwoman could give -the neat, uniform finish that is required. The ironer. fold the finished skirts in pilea; and their earning, the foreman said, doesn't materially differ from that of the neediewomeu. On the floor below were the fall cloaks and the warm wraps. ,The season begins In Jusei and all through the hot weather of July the elegant Styles of next, wiuter were being shaped.. NA , , , trimmed with fur or looped and graceful de-; signs., The women thus employed earn more than the makers of underwear. MORE 41300T PAY. "The pay for making and putting on the trimming of a dozen felt skirts varies, according to the simplicity or elaboratenesg,,P said the foreman, "from 75 cents to $3 a 'dozen; for -seaming, binding around the bottom, banding and putting in the drawing string, 50 cents a dozen. This is all rapid machine work. From 5 to 2.5 cents dozen, sav an average of 10 cents a dozen, is paid for the finishing of alelt akirt--that is, the fastening of the ends, taking off the threads, seeing that nothing is missing, and , that the garment is completely ready for the smoothing touch of the pressers. In the making of the cloaks from 15 cents to $1 is paid for the machine work of each cloak; and for the finishing, 50c to $3 50 each,this being done by baud. The cloak hands working in the shop make about $10 a week, and the masculine operators from $7 60 to $10. Competent cloak hands are few in comparison. Two nelons are required to make an adept. Many a woman who comes here to sew wonld not become a skillful, tasteful adept in twenty-live seasons. ,There is no svatem of apprenticeship. We have little girls, whose businese is to band things from one to another and tegenerally useful, Who begin with sevv.i lug plain seams and gradually work in. Beginners are paid 2 50ra week up. The season of making summer wear begins in January, and generally lasts until June, but is longer or shorter wording to the orders that come There wee but a week's interim this season between thlmaking of the summer and winter garments." - This foreman. had tinter him nearly 600 women, in or out of the manufactory.. The work done outside is not all applied for and caeried away by the women who do the sewing. Often one woman or man gets work for five to forty women. There are men who sell new and old sewing-nfachines, providing the purchasers with ' the work to pay for them. Much swindling is dope by several of these operator. A very expert operator can make a dozen fine shirts entire, except the button- holes in a day and a half. For every two who could do this, there are 250 Who would require two days, which is the usual time. Twenty-five Cellia a dozen was taken off, the parOy-made shirts last fall. Young operators are given the simple 'Work of making the shirt cuffs. They get 10 cents for making a dozen pairs all but the buttonholes. i The work consists in stitching them around agaidon the Outside. A smart operator can make eight dozen pairs, 192 cuffs, in a day, between 8 a., m. and 6 p. m., with half an hour for lunch. - No operator could potibly make more than ten or twelve dozen, pairs in a day, and could not maintain that rate. Women's white is kirta are made entire for SI Z15 a dozen. The least profit is made by the manufacturers on iiicitory shirts' and "slope work,' because it is disposed of to elope-buying jobbers. - ! LETTER FROM MRS. OLE BULL. --- Visit to Lyshorn on St. John's EYe-- Fourth of July Celebrated at Lysoen. in Ole Bull's Music Hail. . . , . ' 1 Mein the Madison (Wls.).Journal.1 ' 7- LYSOEN, BERGEN, NORWAY, July' .5. Friend --: I am actually in Norway again, and have . bad a very pleasant voyage. For the first time, life was not a ,burden aboard: ship. husband found my husand well, and Norway more beautiful Amu ever before. For three weeks after my arrival; the weather was bright and sunny,and vegetation and wild towers seemed to spring forth almoet miraculously. - On St. John's Eve (June 24), or Balder's Day, as it - should be called, we had a most delightful trip. to Lyshorn, the . hichest peak above Lysekloster. Our party, fifteen In all,includhie the minket composer, Edw. Orieg and his wife, started from Lysoen at 10 o'clock and reached the top of the mountain before midnight. This peak is only 1,400 feet high, but so ottuated that one gets frenb it eine of the moot beautiful nd extensive views inthis tel ; i region - - ' . . ' t , il As we nested the tole though it was not quite midnight, the snow-clad mountains in LAardauger Fjord were already touched with a bright light, and when we reached the top the clouds along the horizon were colored . with brilliant tints. , The niost of the peasants and , servants from Lysekloster had gotten there before us and had btu mentioned into line by one of the men, who. besides filling the office of Marshal, Showed great talent as a drummer. Whet' we finally stood upen the grimy plateau or knoll of the mountain top, a boat that had been brought up there for the purpose, wee set ere to amid cheers and drum-taps, that w-,,..te answered by sonic rockets from Lysekloster. below. We .wero all very merry cud not at all fatigued. from climbing the- mountain for the air was fresh and bracing. ti The day lil been unusually warm, aud hence the evening was delightfully mild. ' , Our first preparations for coffee, and breakfast were made with dispatch, and we soon found oureelves sitting in a circle and etiting all morts of good things. The remains -of the bonfire have given us excellent coffee. Hay. ing appeased our appetite, we were In better condition to enjoy the mystic scene whieh lay before .us-,-so real, yet so unreal. On three sides we could count seven rangee of mountains, shading and toning so mervelousty in the distance, while in the east the Foige ,Fond glistened with that . peculiar silvery i gleam. from the early morning light, so that one could scarcely detineite outlines, and readily confused it with the fleecy -clouds above. On the north side the Segue iMounteine loomed up distinctly, and on the west. the wonderfui coast, with. its numerous indentations, fjords and couutleas islands. with the open sea beyond, in contrast with fourteen lakes, at our feet and nestled among the rich dark lit trees around us, presenting a charming sightall forming a scene, a panonime.so rich In beauty, so varied in form and color. that word' 'fail to give expression to the effect produced upon our minds. ; , , As we ettSod entranced and almost overwhelmed with the supreme maguideence of the scene the tones of the violin fell upon the' ear. seeming In reality the voice of mountain sprites interpreting to us the grandeur and Inspiration of the moment. The nuttier bad Indeed given us a cordial welcome I Every tone was as clear as a bell, and when a beautiful mountain air was improvised, it truly seemed like a midsummer night's dream. Just as the tones died away the sun rose gice, cloudy over the mountains, tinging the sea with a rosy pink, and gilding the-small sails, that were winging their way upon the water, one In Samnanger Fjord, one lu Kan Fjord, and one in rue Fjord. The yachts seemed like fairies resting for a moment on the calm . surfeit, of the sea, which rellected in it. ,be-item every mountain and peak around it. The morning was soon fairly- upon us, and the peasants beean their hailing. and spring dances: We dici not mart fur home again until 5 o'clock in the morning. An old num told us that he bad many times been on the top of Lyshorn,but had never before witnessed such a night. It generally blew so, said he, that one could scarcely light a pipe. , About 6 o'clock -we were descending the het little bill near Lysekloster, and the troops of boys and girls running down the path, with here and there a red jacket or bodiee glaring through the green foliage, added much to the gavety and picturesqueness of the scene. With drum taps And loud cheers we apprised those who remained at home of our return; and as our whole party numbered about DO, you can imagine what, a noise we made in the quiet, peaceful morning. I have CO often beard my husband speak of the Inspiration he had received when a boy front these mountains, that I was eager to see them, and I must confess that, although I have seen many placee before that , seemed wonderfully beautiful, Lyaborn and its surroundings will always, I am sure, remain in my memory as a sight too beautiful to r-be compared with any other. - , 1 i Yesterday (the etti of July) we had a procession in our music hall; the American flag took the lead, marching to the tune of the "Stet...Spangled Banner," by the violin and organ,' lu honor of the Centennial Fourththe Norse flag flying from the staff outside. - Thoughwe were. few in number. tee were mighty in enthusiasm, and I think you would have been pleased to witness our patiotism. I devote part of my time to my translation of "DeulFreinsynte,'"e anti a part . to reading Egil's Saga. The introduction of the latter is intensely iutereeting.1: Tour friend,- . , . 1 1 . y SAILIL C B cll.. ' Fight the Devil With Fire.. I atom the Virginia (Nev.) News. An old Indian fighter, who believes in Tom Fitch's theory vtith regard to good redskins, proposes that volunteers of Indian companies to fight the Sioux be received by the Government. Ms idea is to take anything in that line.--Fiutes, Apaches, Witshoes, or whatever tribes are willing to fight. Then it would not make much difterence which whipped, for the expenses of the Indian Department woukt reduaed lii ma event. 1 1 ,, , . : ' 1 WORMS. if I '11 ' . - - 1 L.I In lustrious Animals That TAY 856 Eggs in Twenty-eight 'lours, and Then, - ,-, Very Natutally,Die--Brazit's lAdvau. tages Over China in the Silk Business. , -, ,; !From the Philadelphia Times.,Ii: 1 1. t 3 Sericulture in all its branches, and e pro- eess f spinning silk from the cocoon, is thoroughly illustrated in the Brazilian section - of Machinery Hall.- ;Although Brazilt makes 1 1 no specialty of the manufacture of silk, the - .1 I exhibit is the only. practical illustration of the, kind in the Exhibition. -Silk worms, from ; birth to extreme -old age, are there greedily devouring mulberry leaves from trees growing on the grounds. They seek this food as soon ss as they are born, 'although they are then only about one-seventh of an inch long. Their -- appearance at this stage is , that of meat "skippers" blackened. For the first three 1 - days of their life they are fed with the ten- I derest leaves,- the quantity being Increased with their growth. When twenty-two days old their length is about 'one and a half Inches, and their appearance that of a cater-. pillar made of white lead. Instead of a mut- , berry tree, the worms are kept in an upright ' wooden etructure, with openings very. closely , resembling, holes in miniature pigeont-boxes. Each of these openings isintended to Ireceive a cocoon. On the htvetity-fifth day the worm, or larva, le about two inches long, and of e yellowish white color. At the end, of the I , twenty-sixth its gormandizing of mulberry leaves hi over forever and it begins to build. , ! I coffin around itself. T,be substance forming 4, , 1 - TUE emelt I. , , - ) Is supplied from a gland of the Insect; just as . , 1 the material for a spider's web -is furnished. - , At first the worm fastens the fibers from top - to bottom and from side to aide of , its little pigeon-hole at - perceptible distances, but J., gradually the web grows denser, until the , worm occupies &Cavity only a little larger than itself lathe middle of the mass. 1 It then he- r gins to weave around itself the cocoon proper. - which resembles a groundnut -shell in both , .1 form and size, varying In color according to - , - the species of worm, and being as firM as if ,compoeed of ' half a dozen- thicknesses ! of - newspaper, pasted together. The cocoon is generally white, or of a yellowish shade. I It - is finished at the end of twelve days after the worm begins to weave. During the next , twelve days the larva undergoes a metamor- , pima's, and becomes a chrysalis, remaining , torpid until the endof this period, wheait ' becomes a moth, and, with its antenna!, breaks through to a tuAlight in the form of a "mil- ! . ler" butterfly. Male and female mate, eggs are laid, and after a life of twenty-eight hours the "miller" dies. These eggs are of the size of cabbage seeds.' and each female "mills er" lays about 330 of them. In color they , are at first yellowish, becoming in turn, ' brown, black and white. during their hatch- lug, which is effected by the sun, or a mod- : - crate artiti,hial beat. - . I I 1 , , r- TIM HATCHING 1 , ) requires front ten to twelve days,, at the end 1' of which time the little black worm men-., tioned at the beginning of this description appears and sets at once to devouring mul- berry leaves. - A cocoon broken; open by the "miller" is worthless. The moth is not al- - , lowed to see daylight utiless it is needed for re- production of the race. The cocoons destined , for silk-making are submitted to a steam bath , soon after:thee are formed, ' This kills the - worm without harming the silk.. The cocoons - are then .reedy to be spun Into hankie of , raw ailk- Each cocoon -contains from three- . 1! - fourthil of a utile- to a mile of libre.- The spins - ning operation exhibited is a Brazilian inven- - tion, very ingenioue, and attracts throngs of .1 epectators every day, Chinese and Frenchmen , seeming to -be particularly interested, a eircuinsiance accounted for by tbe fact that 1 ' ' China and France lead in the production and --e manufacture of silk. They do- not seem to L.- relish the fact that the silk worm in Brazil yields from six to eight times a year, while in andEurope it yields only once or twice in the same time. - : ! . ' , s SEN. natetereo etscO0NS. The c000ns, Containing the dead chrysal- " 11 , Ises,, are put, into a metal-lined :twin, sup- . plied withcold water, which 18 heated by ' 1 . steam to a degree sufficient to soften the gum., my substance, causing the fibers of the co- , , coon to ad nere to one another.- The cocoon is ', " . - then readily unraveled. The outer ends. of , the fibers are gathered by gently beating the - floating mass with a 'stiff brush.' Two sets, each composed of' ten fibers, 1 ire passed , ' - - through two small porcelain disks, or buttons, used as guides. , Passine upward the sets "ruse each -other and thelr ends are passed ' ' throught two loops in a little reel which revolves by clock- work, and then through ' ', two hichte in two beart-shaped glass ' plates. fitted Into loops at the tici.1 or - , spiral springs. Passing from ' these loops the sets agaiu creep,- sun through two wire , loops several inches aleirt, cross a third time - an..I are wound on a reel connected by belting - with the shafting of the Corliss engiue. The machine being set in , operation the fibres, each of which is less readily ' broken than a fibre of wool,. are unwound from the bob- bing cocoonts. broughtIogether at - the disks, 1 . intimately twisted by the little elock-work : reel, and, in two threads wound ou the large reel, from which the silk Lk slipped of , in hanks - . ' ' , - I 1. 1 ! ' - RAPID DeCREASE. 'With one ounce of eggs 40,000- silk-worms , t. can be raised In 45 days.- Allowing a loss ce - lb per cent, there would remain 34.000 co- 1,; - coons. These wofild weigh about-85 pounds, ' ,,- - which, at 50 cents a pound, would be worth ' ' 1 ! 42 oo. As the yield is made 6 or 8 times a 1 - year in Bra:sil, a woman or child In that coun- L',"st try ma- start with an ounce of eg,g,s,,aua make -' about $300 by the end of a year. , I - 1 I - - A curiosity in connection with this exhibit.. - is the brat cocoon importedlo Brazil. It was - ' taken there from Lyons,- France, in 1626. , , is , ' Precautions Against the Plague,, s ' ,! frrom Nature I I Various lanitaly measures (according to Dr. Tholozan) have recently been adopted by 3 - the Turkish and Persian Governments with - ! refesence to the outbreak of plague, which : commenced in Mesopotamia in the early 1. I part of the year., , Since the - be- - r ginning of March a sanitary cordon I has been established on the north of the , 1 invaded territory, on the '', most frequented e route of - Kurdistan - and , Syria, 1 between - - , Tecrit and Kifri. On the south a quarantine 1, of fifteen days la obligatory since April 1 - on all vessels sailing, on the Tigris and the Euphrates. It is at Kournii, at the confluence of them rivers. The ports of the Per-- - I I sian Unit are protected by a quarantine, which 1 !vessels from infected localities have to under. 1 go, at the island of Kezzer, formed by junction of the Chotel Aratand the Karoun. Since April 10 all communications by land between ! Persia and l'ilesopotatnia are subject to a guar-. 11, antine of fifteen days. For three years, it i may be added, all pilgrimages into the infect- ad country by Persian subjects have been in. -, terdieted. To fully comprehend this system ' of protection It should be remembered that on the west and northwest, for an extent of ' 1 three degrees of latitud no artificial barrier h ' has been or can be est:iblisbed against the j ' plague: but there are; happily,' natural ohs I 1 ' stades which prove Much more efficacious, I the infected region being there bounded by the deserts of Syria and Slesopotamia. The 4 , greater rarity of communauttions there renders restrictive measures on the arriving car- , &vans easier. Judging from past outbreaks ' of plague, it was anticipated that the present 1 , would decline in June (after reaching its , ' 44s acme in the end of May) , and disappear front . ' ' it Idesopotainia in July. But it may send off-1, , shoots to Bu B ssora, ouchere and Arabi stan, I and a still greater danger is thh intrpduction , of germs of the plague into the high plateaus ' of Anatolia, Kurdistan and Persia. 1 011tkre Meg were stIpttuttell to Lilo Gag- , , , . I - I. -Mullet I - , 'rbe red mullet, which generally conflnes its habitat to the south and west toasts of En- ' 1 gland. and there grout, to the largest sire, bits recently eppeared in considerable numbers in ! the water of Otilton Broad, above Lowestoft, aud may be seen early in the morning switn- 4 ming in shoals close to the surface of the lake. Anglers itave been trying, but with little success, to catch them with the book and line; but this Is not surprising, as the mullet will - for mr a er, re ,1 tywr ot ahmekne rta they bait i on ant entirdl h the pier. rdr 5. e c and i ,ni, eh are troref pee. - ence, therefore ' so far inland! is somewhat, - remarkable, but it may be that, baying vend tured through the gateusstwbheiclhartertromitunaateectuhse , : estuary, with an unusually high tide and ta- vorable wind, they are now made prisoners - In a situation -they m tomekto. One of these fish, of about one , I pound weight, was secured by an angler while - fishing for perch, and shown at Mutford , s Bridge, Oulton. The surmullet is Mill, as of' , old, a luxury of tbe table, and it was once a proverb that those whoeaught it never knew ' the taste of it; but to obtain-it in perfection ought to be in the hands of the took,within a- few hours after it has been taken Out of the water. 1 The ancients, therefore-, used to as- sure their guests of their freshness by bring-I in them on to the table alive in glass vessels, , I I 4 Psi cire Wu were submitted to tile adt l I - I i -I - - - - i I. 1, - - .-- . , , J 4i. ' , . 1 I. 1 , i , ..... I . A I -'- 4 , Why d4 , ,,, f .. , A-wa t - ,- I s ' j Ve thn - t '" . 4 Cryin Then r 1,, ,t 1-- Andl f '-;', i . I t q Then d wi i 1- ! it 1 Cot - . '' l'Inig; ' ', And , I, ,,,. rhea r :, - And 1 , And IC Then , i E t ',. I - S , . t -', it . icbat . . - I.-? ! by , ,4 . 4 Dt V , Tea. j Tully 1 ' It '' ' . ' r',,, ,., . , , , 1.. . ... ,. , erupil i! 1. ; emletncit - . . She ba . : the -- I who, t --:' 4 - inn dAd . . . 1 ,, , , 1 1 , --,7---,: r,T--7-2' -,',''''''"-7.--r-',;7' 7-- 7, r,, -'r: -7- -71-,:; --; -,-z 7- - '' ' '' --,...--; ,'-' ,----r; '-"'".- - v't , 4, -..., -'' - ,....t- -27: - - , - , , 1 t.-- ---- - - -- -' t - ,---- --- , --. --- :- ; .--,r .--1- -, .. .4 , , - --.. ,.,-, - 1 - - - 7 7------,-. I-- -7.- 1--7 ----a-.------.-, 14---4.----.- ---, ---; 2 t -I- -,..-.,,,r"----,.!--,-T- --, .-----,--7,----2,-,7-------,-,-,-7-7-7:7----7--..-------,- , - --- -4-,,------ , ,-, , , , :- 4-'7 . . .,, . ,, : ,, , , , r 7, , ,:: i . ,, ,.: . 1 : r , r r,,,r1,,,, ,,, ; ,, 1 , , , i ,, , .,, , , , , - ,. - , , ,,:: , , , ... . , . :. , , ! . , ,, , , -,,I... ., ,. 1, i, , , , , . . , r .. ,. , i, , . , ... . .. . i . , , r , . . , , , ,, ... ., , ,..,. 7 1 -- ' ' ' -" f !" ' i ... . - . . , , - . . I , i - . - . , , , , - t . , ,.. . , .t . , , , ,, F , ' . . , i . , , , , , .--,, - ; .. , I , . 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