The Spokesman-Review from Spokane, Washington on July 12, 1925 · 51
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The Spokesman-Review from Spokane, Washington · 51

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Spokane, Washington
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Sunday, July 12, 1925
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51
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I ; , a t - ii' A t 4 f z i 4 kv , e "The Hobe of Cards," by F. H. Drouais, one of the famous paintings bequeathed Lady Carnarvon by Alfred de Rothschild which she put on the auction block 4;,. - - gff LONDON. WHY is the Dowager ) Countess of Carrier- von selling her art treasures? ;, ' That is the question that in- terests English and European fashionable society more than any other topic just now. Of course, it may be said crudely ' that she is selling them because she needs the money, but there are more complicated reasons involved. Nobody who is informed about the matter doubts that her action is part of the extraordinary series of events that began with the discovery of Pharaoh Tut-ankhAmen's tomb by the late Lord Cartier-von and included the recent scandalous suit by Mrs. Dennistoun against her former husband, Colonel Dennistoun, now Lady Carnarvon's husband. Is Lady Carnarvon, once one of the . ' richest women in English society, so impoverished by the fascinating Colonel Dennistoun's requirements and the costs of the law suit that she is obliged to give up her trees- ' tires? r- ' ' Has she decrded to abandon English society on account of 1 the criticisms which the scan- 4 ' 4 dalous Dennistoun case has , I drawn upon her? The Countess was the heiress .! d of the late Alfred de Rothschild, ,,,ie a prominent member of the : .17 most famous banking family in ' I the world. Her mother, who ,. was a beautiful French girl, , Mlle. Boyer, by birth, married ' ..i i Frederick Wombwell, member A C, of a very old English family. ' ' t 1 The pair did not agree very ' k- ., well and the late Mr. Wombwell spent many year ti traveling s,', abroad. k. Alfred de Rothschild took a great interest in the little girl, Almina WombwellLady Car- narvon's maiden nameand , acted as her godfather. At his , death he left her his beautiful V house in Seymour Place, Lon- ', .1 don, with all its art treasures .!....N and a fortune of $2,500,000. - - This art collection, before Pierpont Morgan and several other great American collectors took , the lead in this field, was con- , sidered one of the finest in the ,',',1-: world. The late Lord Carnarvon was also extremely wealthy, as he ' must have been to finance the excavations at Tut-ankh-Amen's Lady tomb. In his youth while traveling he bought for a song a large men - Is It Because Her Expensive New. Husband Has Exhausted Her Great Fortune, or Has the Ugly Scandal of Mrs. Dennistoun's Recent L., Suit Made Fashionable ( , Society Life Too Unpleasant to, 5..'t for Her to Endure Any Longer? tract of vacant land outside Melbourne, ' Australia. The city spread out over this tract and it grew to be worth millions. The bulk of Lord Carnarvon's wealth went to his oldest son, the present Lord Carnarvon, who married Miss Catherine Wendell, of New York. But a large allowance was left to his widow. What are we to think of Colonel Dennistoun if the expense of maintaining him and paying his legal entanglements has dissipated such a great fortune? We have always heard of fascinating women, like Madame Dubarry and others, who have wasted the substance of kings and milliohaires. But here is a fascinating middle-aged man who Beems to rank with some of the greatest female charmers of history in expensiveness. This state of affairs is particularly ludicrous when you re I. 1,. mama; Lady Camarvon's daughter a large member the Colonel's abject poverty be fore his marriage. The sale Of the Countess' art treasures has thus far brought a total of $900,000. The interest in the sale was so great that the proceedings were broadcast by radio for the benefit of English listeners. The gem of the collection, a portrait of ,Anne, Countess of Chesterfield, by Gainsborough, sold for $90,000. There were five other Gainsboroughs. A Dresden china scent bottle sold for $10,000. Five other antique scent bottles sold or prices ranging from $5,000 to $7,000. The number of scent bottles in the collection called for a humorous remark that the Countess ought to have kept a few for her own use. , Five Dresden snuff boxes sold at prices ranging from $12,000 down to $5,000. A Louis XIV marqueterie table, thirty-one inches wide brought the high TIP 4t ,v , P W4 ,rv 4v " 1) M st 4c v". ittS Beautiful Mrs. Dorothy Dennistoun, whose suit against her former husband, now Lady Carnarvon's, brought such amaz-, ing revelations price of $40,000. This was the record price for an article of furniture at the sale. All the prices paid were high. The articles were of great beauty and unquestioned authenticity and attracted more attention on account of the strange social events that preceded them than they would otherwise have done. Nearly all the articles were bought by dealers, but it was believed that in many cases they represented the Rothschilds, who seized the occasion to recover articles which they felt .should belong to their family. During the sale it was announced that the Dowager Countess of Carnarvon and her husband, Colonel Dennistoun, were taking a secret motor trip , abroad. Doubtless they were not anxious to hear the comments or questions aroused by the great auction. At the same time it was announced that Colonel Dennistoun had resigned his commission in the reserve of officers of the Grenadier Guards, of which he was formerly an active and dashing member. It is understood that the British army authorities do not believe the army will benefit from the services of an officer who won large sums of money from his first wife, while condoning her affairs with various men. English society has been very frank and shameless in its affairs since the war, but men and women of influence are now, declaring that there must be a return to more decorous standards or there will be a social revolution. The King and Queen are particularly shocked by the revelations in such cases as the Dennistoun suit and have asked Stanley' Baldwin, the Prime Minister, and other public men to use their influence in favor of purer ideals of social life. The results of their action may be seen in the severe comments of the judges after recent revelations of loose conduct in high society. Is it possible that Lady Carnarvon's great fortune has been so dissipated by her affair with colonel Dennistoun that Copyright. ISM. Carnary. on Tne son of Lady and his American bride she is actually being forced to part with her art collection and her house? Society is divided between those who assert that she is really poverty-stricken, pointing to her successive great outlays, and those who assert that there are other reasons for her action. The latter declare that the Countess is sick and terrified by the misfortunes that have fallen upon her in London and wishes to live quietly in some out of the way part of the world with her fascinating Colonel. The known expenses that have fallen on the Countess since she made the acquaintance of Colonel Dennistoun are enormous and it is reasonable to believe that the unknown ones are equally large. It is estimated that the legal expenses of defending Mrs. Dorothy Muriel Dennistoun's suit against her husband cost Lady Carnarvon $750,000. An army of the best known lawyers in England was kept at work for thirty days, many of them receiving as much as $500 a day. Mrs. Dennistoun brought suit against her husband for' $150,000, of which $25,000 was for sums she said she advanced him, while $100,000 was money which she said he had promised to pay her for her services to him when he was able to do so. Her services to him consisted mainly of her intimacy with General Sir John Cowans, Quartermaster Gbneral of the British Army, through whom she obtained two governinent appointments for her husband who was penniless. Colonel Dennistoun, it was shown, had also acquiesced in her affairs with other men. Mrs. Dennistoun said of herself that one man's love could not satisfy her, while the Colonel said her will power was so great that he was obliged to consent to whatever she did. The jury gave Mrs. Dennistoun a ver. 1 ApeA77,A;IIIN The Dowager Countess of Carlictilt-Ork, widow of the finder of King Tut's tomb, and married again so surprisingly soon to Colonel Dennistoun diet for the sums of money which she proved she advanced her husband. The verdict did not benefit Mrs. Dennistoun very much, for the judge ordered that both sides should pay their own legal costs, which were enormous. Mrs. Dennistoun's costs, it is estimated, were $100,000. Those which fell on Lady Carnarvon were naturally larger, as she was a rich woman, with more at stake. Apart from the revelations in the. Dennistoun case, it is learned that Lady Carnarvon has suffered a long series of financial losses since her strange infatuation for Colonel Dennistoun began. It will be recalled that Lady Carnarvon married Colonel Dennistoun in 1923, only six months after Lord Camarvon died, as a result of a strange infection incurred at the opening of the tomb of Tut-ankh-Amen. The suddenness of the marriage surprised persons with ordinary ideas of propriety. The surprise was only increased by subsequent events. Lady Carnarvon was a middle-aged woman with three grown children of her own. Her marriage to Lord Carnarvon was apparently very happy. She had shown 'a great interest in his 'remarkable undertaking at Tut-ankhAmen's tomb and it was understood she had contributed largely to its expense. Lady Carnarvon first met Colonel Dennistoun in Paris, when his wife, whom she knew first, asked her to call on him and give him a parcel. At that meeting Lady Carnarvon asked him to lunch. "When he came he was in a lamentable state; he looked like death, a thin, emaciated poor creature," Lady Camarvon has said. "His clothes were shiny and he looked as though he had not had food enough to keep body and soul together. "When I was at the Hotel Ritz, in Paris, I contracted influenza. I became unconscious and during, that time Colonel Dennistoun called in a doctor and communicated with my family. "Our friendship began. He came to see me constantly before I returned to London. He came every day, but ,the day before I left he sent a message say- ing he was ill. . I then went to his hotel to see him. "I found him in an attic that not one of my servants would possibly be seen in. There was no fireplace, no hot or 4 ,1,.,,, ' . Colonel Dennistoun cold water, only a very small window overlooking a courtyard. I had a feeling of intense sympathy toward him. I wanted to do something for himI longed to. "It has been said that I bought him, that I gave him large sums of money out of Lord Carmarvon's account. This fact Is I got him to sell some valuable jewels for me so that I could help him, and I gave him a commission on the sales. "The money I paid to Colonel Dennistoun was the proceeds of things left to me by my late guardian and my mother. "Two sums of money amounting to a little over $600,000 were paid to Colonel Dennistoun's account, and this Burn was the proceeds of three Gainsboroughs which had been hanging in my home. "I sold the pictures and I arranged that the proceeds should be put in the name of Colonel Dennistoun. I asked the Colonel if he minded my using his bank account and he consented. "Whatever has been said about Colonel Dennistoun, I love him with all my heart, soul and body. ' "My friendship with Colonel Dennistoun developed when I returned from Egypt after Lord Carnarvon's death, and let me confess candidly that I contemplated marriage with the Colonel almost from the first time I saw him." Lady Carnarvon has also explained that when she raised the $600,000 she was already "very hard up," This wag explained partly by the fact that she had spent $625,000 of her own money in maintaining a war hospital in Paris. Lady Carnarvon's misfortunes naturally strengthen the convictions of those who believe that a curse was really let loose upon the world bithe opening of Tut-ankh-Amen's tomb. 6 ::: , , ": :, ::: ::. I.. : .. : . ?' t'4,,,':, , Hi , k ,,: ,, ,, ., , i.'; . ": " 1. .,,,a'et-:::: '., , t ,..., L,:.., t,i ...,..!1, ;..,..1, ,..,,",.:t,.,,...,, i: ., 8 , :. , ik , - ' ,. ' N ,:,.,, . : $ , , ,L,:, : : , . , ... , . :,0,,i , , s't ,V1 . , ,.! U ,o .1119 l'' 'k4:''' ''' ' 4'- ', ' t'" ' 1 7 41 't r 1 t .';' I ' , C4 ,, , , ,, ,, i ,, , ,t,,,4 n kk rs, ,k4, s', l r .6' ,,,,1,,,,I, - , ( ,I ,et At tf &',N 1,-v 4 -. & 4' -10'" I f le!'',', 'r.' '.1'',, ,',1 k- 4' A ,'oz t$ A,?4v.4,.'4, 4, :1, '.,..i ,, kIs.' 4 , w- , :,,,, i, ,,z,,, i A ., o,0 e,,1,'! ,,,. ,, ? s,,,f a ,,. , :4, .i:.,, , N, A4 N, g , xl, k ,,, 4 i , , ,4, , ko 6,,,, op,,,,N ,, 447 ,to i iv 4,,, A ,,,,,, Ai, ; I '1 ,...4. i,' ''', 1. S'''' ef ' 4 k ''. q t ; k, ,.,4 ' ' (i ' ' P k tt ''A ,o) 4,0 P ss'o isAp ',,.,,4' L. .;,;)te ;,. k,;.4. a k,v.,,i,,, 4,0 ifr,,, vo, ,,i io k'k., ,,,, k',- A'' ',. a,4' lio''W ,'''' ,.-k-, ,',,,,,,t,-4.,',, ' N,,,,4,,,, , on, ' C,,:.', . it,. , , . . ., , , . , , ., T . ' ,,,, , , ,, i Is It Because Her Expensive New, , , I, . ,- , , - , ,,,, ,,,,,,, - ' ,------h, Husband Has Exhausted Her Great :4;,,,,.. -. ,,, ,,,, , Iri ,' ', : . , . , ... A,, v , A v ' 5, : . ,.., : , ,4 , ,. : ',',.,,t ,,, i, ,.,- e.,,s,;' ,, , ' ,,,-''''' ..,1041q0 --,, . - ,,e' y . .,,,,,, ' 4,,, ,,,,,,, ,, .,,,,- , . , t..e.1-,,,k, itl .: Fortune) or Has the Ugly Scandal ,,., , .. , -3-,.07 . . ,, . ,,,,, ,, ..,,,,... , ,:,,, o'-.,,1, " ' ' '''' . . . ,,, f '''. ''.$1 .44 1 of Mrs. Dennistoun's Recent ,, ,..,,.,, . :., .,,, , - , ,; , " , . , ,,, t) t ' ' s , , ' f', . , 1 . . , '1 ' '' s ' '''t .. ' .. Suit Made Fashionable ., ,,;,, ,...s., ,, te'c: - - ,.......,,,,,,,t,,,. 1 , ,, , ,.., , .,- , ,,,,, 1,,,,,,...:,, ,;,., .. i , ,i ,,,-,:re),,,..., Le , i, . t 'k 4-i: ; 11 . - . Society Life Too Unpleasant ---,- r.ts : --N g,1 , ,,, ,,., . , , : p 4 P ' ' '',.k , 3 ,,e,-. - -I ,,,,,,---.iZ,1 . ,3,itt, , "alr'h 1 1.4 , 44 i. .. , 1 , ............ 4..., , ; , .0 t. : ::'''..:... ',''' ' ..5'. ''' ;':'.'7464r4:4 A: ' '11.4""C"."141".11).'' ' 1,' ' 1 for Her to Endure Any , ..,,..4,1c4,..,...,, -,..ft ,.,,k4 , ,,,A, ,111'l ,'.,c,,- ' , ,,,,,,,eq,,,,,,,z,,,,Noweitforar, ..,r,,.111, , '. ;, ,....poe ' .N.. ,,,,-,..: ..s' .00,74.1,-, .', ' '''."-",.....-,:' :'-' ,' '', ''::.;:ett 3-.. ' '-, , ,1,..4' ,,, ';,, ,L,,,F A , .-',',....r.,' s.' - i . . , '.4,s - Longer? ,,,,. 4 -,, -4,,:e2;r5t 7r-7-- i. 7. - ,, :---,-t. v,....,,,,...,, : , ,,,,,.,,,,,, ' ,,, . -.-4,,-.-, , . -t, , , , ie; ':-.4.;..",..t, l . , . . ,,, The Hobse ,,4.444, 4,- ,,, . of Cards," by , : , . , , , , , F. H. Drouais, one of e --2s . ,''')-,,, 'd .-ase- ''', :' ' -' ' , :. -NA the famous paintings he- i 4.i, ,. ...s..,. , , 7 f queathed Lady Carnarvon .,.- ,,,Itt;t: ,,-,7:,.,,,, ,,,i.. by Alfred de Rothschild 4t, t ,,,...4., :,,,,,,,:ri.,,,m ,-7' , ' t,o. , , ,, which she put on the auc- it et '',, tion block es .,o s't . , 1,' ,..';', , ,, . ., , , 4' 4). LONDON. c: 0. W HY is the Dowager 111' , wt,,,.et ' ' ''''"'''''''!:44'kkv,-, , , , .,4 4 t- Countess of Carrier- ' PI1 --kOnt.,,, svlk 1 ,.. von selling her art 0. , -, t.: 1. 1 t ) 41 treutzres? .. . ,I,A.P,:r '''' . ,;gite,..;.. ,k ,. ;07' . ''''''' - '" , , . ' , 3k, ' That is the question that in ..,i; if", 4 '..,:. terests English and European ts,t;:: , fashionable society more than t ,, - .-. ' 1 , As 'N rt ' V4It 4 ,iA, , ;!''..;!' l' f I ,4' '4, ,, , any other topic just now. Of "tNe.tr..1 ' eiki, ' : ' : '2 .' t , course, it may be said crudely ' '' ':''.14 '41 0 4 . ,. t that she is selling them because she .. - , . . , :, ,,.., .s.: : , k 4 t 4 1li 45' ..., , . , . , ,. needs the money, but there are more .. . ' , 9 ,-:,s, i.- ' Olt , , . A , , - , '4 "1. A, Ne , 4,....., ,,,,, ,.. 4 complicated reasons involved. Nobody '''', i 1.,--,. , t 11"16104Ctilkt. .'S'.', ' .. ,..',', .,' 41' - ''' . who is informed about the matter doubts , , ., .,or , . i ew ' s , ':'..-- ,.1, i , ..,, ., that her action is part of the extraordi- , , , ,,, ,-, - , ; ' ,,t., ' . - ' nary series of events that began with , , ... ,, ' ' . 4 i , , , , - ' ' , 46'4 ' ,..,..,4 , . ,;t, the discovery of Pharaoh Tut ankh :- '''',.: - ,..; .r - ? :s. , 0 . '.' ,., .. .Z.,, ,,.', . '',' '- ',' 4.' :'-, ;,' ' -: : ..' t 4 ,,. -!.. ,4.00."1 ' .4e 1 Amen's tomb by the late Lord Cartier- ,2, . 1 ,-, " ,',',.:': '-',-,:'",' -414,.",., .'s- ..,, ,',;' -- ' ti ''''''''''11'..7.- .. 'd,,, von and included the recent scandalous ,,,?..,, .; ":' ' . ' -:'..,, ,...-'. ' ' 4" :i , -: '- ,,,k . , R ''' : 771A,01 , , suit by Mrs. Dennistoun against her for s 'N. , PAILA. mer husband, Colonel Dennistoun, now ,e!.,::. .' :,' ' -vi ,,z,:,-, re. .-, ', , , A. - . , Lady Carnarvon's husband. , ''' .', ; ' .'- ',..',.,,s tir' i ,: ,..,,.? -..' . 4,, . .N4 , , . , sh society, so im- ,..,,,,, i:;,$.40'1 IS Lady Carnarvon once one of the 1, richest women in Engli 4':' '''''''.;.:1.:'. ..-' ':' ..':1-'44"'I''' ' ':' It ' i ' ''';''' ',: ''''.... '.. ''.. '1 TCohuentDesoswoafgeCrar- .' .24 . poverished by the fascinating Colonel Dallt-Ork, widow of 0 i Dennistoun's requirements and the costs 4... ,:. ,,,z ' ,-,.-,.... : . , . ,. , -., ., ,..,tc,,,,,,, ... ..,:, . : ,.. ',:' the finder of King ' of the law suit that she is ,...i.,...,,..,,,:i . , , , ,,.. ,,,, , . -.. ... .,. ..;, .,, . ...- ', ':', , . . : . ' 1,,,.',:k;k...:. Taguat'isntsoomsbu,rpanridsimnealr;iesodon to ,,,,ZiteiCtkIL.1-., ( obliged to give up her trees- ..... , wee? r- ' '-' '' : ' "'''' ''''- '' : :: ''- :; i Beautiful Mrs. , . . 4 , :. Colonel Dermistoun , . ,, .,, '.. :000''. N. :,, ,, Dorothy Den- ,,: .,,,, , - ; , ;Esf , , , i ... .: ;....s ...:::. , oor ' - nistoun, whose , :-,,,,- , . "'S ,1,,, l' , - ',-. diet for the sums of money which she ., , ,, , . ': k . -...., -.' proved she advanced her husband. The '- I . ) ,,, k her former : ' ,,,,.,00 ,...., ,. verdict did not benefit Mrs. Dennistoun , 4, J---'''''"...,. , '''. husband, now ,-- too- h for the judge ordered that ,, ,,' . - very much, oe uge orerea ill" , ,e4,. - , ( d T- 4,; ... L a d y Carnarvon's, ,,,. ', ,,-s., ' , - A : k, ,' both sides should pay their own legal t, ,-- 4 :' -:, : " brought such amaz-, , , : , o , ..e...4 - costs, which were enormous. Mrs. Den- , , ing revelations ' -, nistoun's costs, it is estimated, were ' I' - , . ,..,.,:.,;: ),:,. . '''!' '6,.. $100,000 Those which fell on Lady fi . t'''.;:414. ''' . , 1C1r:" '. price of $40,000. This was the ,, ,- s - , r no son was were naturally larger, as she t. record price for an article of fur aAs pa,rrtichfrwomomtahne, wrietyhelmatoiroensatinstatkht; were high The articles were of great e 1 i, ' - ' 4 niture at the sale. All the prices paid . . . of Lady Carnarvon and. his American Denrustoun case, it is learned that Lady ' 'Irfl. : 4.'''d , bride ' Colonet k 0 ,s - 1 4 - '' . beauty and unquestioned authenticity Carnarvon has suffered a long series of i - ). .,' Dennistoun ''''' and attracted more attention on account financial losses since her strange infatu 4464L. q'' . -le ; of the strange social events that pre- she ois actually being forced to part ation for Colonel Dennistoun began a i: . ' ' ..-o , - , ' 421411.. . '4''''' ' ceded them than they would otherwise with her art collection and her house? It will be recalled that Lady Carnar- cold water, only a very small window fait,. (op It(4 IA Vst(171111 I ap)e) PA 41K-4 to, ea,; P fat A --rore j ) sak.Rid, - I, 1' '4 N t . , 1

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