The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on November 8, 1939 · Page 10
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 10

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, November 8, 1939
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Page 10
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TEN Mechanical Pickers Grad, uallj; Replacing Husky ', Com Huskers 'I WASHINGTON (UP)-Coin I buskers'•• who harvest the'nation's 'vast corn crop ami pi Mod themselves on lliolr skill arc being-supplanted by machines. Agrlcultuie Department es- tliiU a oonsklemble po'l THK/U FOR BOURBON DRINKERS f BLYTHEVILLE (ARK,)' COURIER NEWS of ihts year's l,S<W,OOfl-lwishel corn crop would be liitivftfetf bv th? 70,000-mechinlcn I coin pickets on farms, la 1920 llicic iveje only 10,000 siicli pickers, Last yea) nbout 43 per cent of (he corn ncrengc In Illinois was Imrve.sted by mcchnnlcnl lilc smil nboul 35 per cent li) Iowa nnd Minnesota. Tills year the percentage In these principal producing stales will lie larger. The Department's ' estimate for other corn slates showed mechanical pickers harvested- 22 per cent of (he crop in Indiana. 18 per cent, In South Dakota, 12 per cent in South Dakota, 12 per cent • in :o\va, and about 5 per cent, in Michigan, North Dakota and Wisconsin. fircal Labor Raving Adoption of (lie power take-off, the. wnt'on liltcli and (ho, mounted j picker are Improvements which led farmer!,- to purchase 28,000 mechanical pickers during • the part two years, the Department said. Used mainly on the most pro- ilurllve corn aereage, Ihc, picker.'! lust year covered about 13 )>IT renl of corn acreage in ihe nation, bill gathered about 20 per cent of the crop, Ihe Department s«w: The Deparmonl- estimated Ihut the one-row picker results iii, a saving of one-third in labor cost:> and Ural Ihc two-row picker saves half on labor costs. A one-row I picker will bine t HO fo 100 ncicv of coin Exclusive NEA Portrait, of Rarely Photographed Family * ' !$&?? ^f^'^^lj'" y i . ,%. *y**^* v* v ™ «*. .... ... . . You'll see it everywhere ~ open-minded men who formerly called for "bourbon" now cail for Catvertl Why? Because Calvert is master blended. It is smoother . . . milder, more mellow . ; : i it tastes better I CLEAR HEADS (CLEAR-HEADED BUYERS] CALL FOR Calvert Flush Are -lih Graders KENT, O. (UP)—College /I'fSli- meii are fourlli graders in English and punctuation. Dr. W. I, Gnr- nell, profe.«or of English at Kent Slate University, announced nfter a survey of tlirce 'mid-western teachers' colleges. AMERICA'S FIRST CHOICE WHISKEY ''. ?j,F Ij n Blended JT/i.'jAey—Cafrcrt "Reserie" uiEWFv ywjAW— 90 . froof — 65%'Crain Kailral Spirits. Califri "Special" BtfADfD irmswr — ?t> Pmaf— 72} i% Gram Kculral t Spiiiti. Capr, K39 fahcrl T> ' Corp., NauYorkCit). ' ' Mobile Cotton Decline. 1 ; .MOBILE. Ala. (UP)—Herbert, Atkins, counts 1 AAA administrative assistant, leyioitcd that ,only 717 Imles of cotton hart been elmuxl to Oct, 1. compnred with 2,845 bales'-during the snnie period ; of 1938. Tile (loiir in the wedding cake of gypsies is mixed with blood taken from the wrists ot the bride nnd bridegroom. Wed. &Thur. INTERMEZZO will] Leslie Hmrard vt IngriU IJergrriaii Xcu'S-Coincdy ROXY WED.' - allnpcs— lOc 10 Iivervl)0(lj' N5«lii— 106-.* 20o lax inclurleil .GANG BULLETS . Ann Nagcl & ICohcrt Kent ' Alsn selected, shnrls LISTEN TO KI.CN 11.00 am —12:45 i».m.' —4:30. p.m. FOR A BETTER TRIP and, CONNECTING SERVICE TO KANSAS CITY • Miitouri PatiSc \Vlblsh J-v.rSf. Louit . .. 4:10prn 4-05pm u ^ Ar. Kinus City 9.30pn 930pm SERVICE JO CHICAGO ., . , «'<><> W.V, -L». St. Utiis .... 4:30pm Al -,Coicjgo 9:25pm 9;35p m Next time go Frisco—lake "Tl.ic Sunnylaiid" .miring St. Louis 3:55 pm connecting with fast trains to Kansas City and Chicago. . , . Low round trip fares make the trip «onomic.i! as well as comfonaWe — free pillows, ice water nnd drinking cups; wasli-room and toilet facilities always available, .ill tile w.iy , . . Meals with budget appeal' served in thc'Ftisco Snack Car. ... No other form of transportation offers so much for so little! Get your /r« copy of tfit new "Coach Booklet" telling cj the many "plus rallies" oj a Frisco ticket — jail call ll>c FRISCO TICKET AGENT Most, rnrcly. photographed, perhaps, of nny highly '•iiromliient Amei-lcan family arc —Now York .District, Attorney . Thoirms E. Dewey, "is sons Thomas Edmond, 7, an ' Mrs. Deivoy.; Tills new niiti exclusive portrait- was made ot thoni 'at " their -Mortn, NBA Service StalT Photographer. the four shown Jiera and John Martin, 4, nhtl New York home bv Finns Girl; WJio Was 'Too Beautiful' For ,]VIovies, Now Comes Into Her Own . By PAUL .iiAnmsoK NEA Service .Staff Correspondent HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 6. — Miss Anita Ixjuise, the gal who has lost many tv role'by being considered "too beautiful," is now In the process" of squelching sonic-ether contradictory hindrances to her career. Not llvat she's complaining, exactly. ; She realizes Hint no other actress: .of her -generation ; lias worked steadily in pictures since childhood.. And .betcre movies, beUyeeu the nges of 3 nnrl 0,. Miss Loiiisc did very wcll.ns a profes-I deed; Miss Louise is nenrly 25. slonnl'model. Mostly she dlsplnyed I SHE GETS A "PAST" genues. Because she looked the same, and perhaps because she hadn't'been married two or'three times, Movletown seemed to linve forgotten' that Anita Louise )iat! grown up. Besides, quite. a feu fading players and directors anxious to overlook the', passage of "so much time—like the •actor who _cxclnimed .with feigned sur? prise,- "My dc ah!—you're a ;big girl now. And only a few yeans ngo I held/you on my knee and told -you stories!" Feiv years, in- panty-wnisls nud things like that, nnd she hasn't been seen iii-bcanties since: £i<- .,-: ;•;;;..• - ., . \ •-•: But for more than. 10 years, • on the .screen, 'the ._ classic-featured blond has had .few chances to net her age. She began playing in- genues nt-14, partly because there were no- good roles for adolescents in those days, nnd partly because she, had been around so long that Hollywood Ihonghl of her ns liehiK older. .-..,' Pretty soon, though, H:llywood began to consider 1 her 1 ageless, slie kept rlElit IN-LATEST PICTURE ,-,.flut now, thanks.-to a flicker fcrilted "Rei'io," i she 'emerges as .1 sleek: soiJhisilcate-coinplele with a past;, and wearing a gold lame gcwn cut-.down lo here. She's almost .a hussy.' Anyway, sex marks Ihe spot where Anitn Louise left the ranks of 'tlic' sweet young tilings. .-: .',"Curled oil a coiich'Mn her apart; inent, aiid alternntely .sucking nt clgnret and a tall glass flavored with g-n, the actress set nt rest (for this reporter, at least) s:me mistaken opinions about herself, "Whenever playing in- She.said, for-example Trma parmanli I Owners of Genera! Mofors Trucks report fuel savings of 15% to 4Q%_ , CMCs also give'-you liccKcr performance that saves .time on tlio roadj top-iitc bodies that make loading easier, sturdy, truck-built construction to «avo on repairs and depreciation I i our own YMAC Plan at lawcsl ovoifoblo rattj LEE MOTOR SALES, Inc. 305 E. Main , . CMC TRUCKS 329 DIESELS f did one of those parts which were just simplicity and sweetness I was wondering whether audiences would be as bore'd seeing it as I was playing it. Why in the world do you suppose all pictures make all ingenue.? so dull? Girls of that age really aren't stupid and shallow and fluttery. "It's almost as bad on the stage, but I can understand the reason for It there. A Broadway producer told me ihat lie won't buy a play that has -a good ingenue part. He said that whenever he tried it, after finding and hiring- and training a girl, he always lest her lo fthe movies." . .: . * ..-A look at Miss Louise's apartment was almost ns enlightening to me ns what she said ami how she said it. In one corner stood her 'well- publicized harp, with four broken strings testifying that she really dcpsn't spend all her spare time .WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, IflStt the other end of the huge,'' white twanging it. At the room Was square piano, -which she actually doesn't know how .to play. The rest ot the furnishings were comfortable and not forbiddingly delicate; at least, I didn't feel like n horsefly in rm Easter lily. All over the place was a wriggling cocker spaniel with nn insatiable appetite for pencils. HEl,AXES AlTEIl FILM IN' SWEATER, SCACKS ' I had to make a confession. I said, ."I've always thought you ucrc sort of— well— prissy. T thought everything wculd be mirrors and white rugs nnd—" "I guess I know what you mean," she said. "Some people called me tip and said they had a place ileco- rated especially. for me, nnd I went to see it. Baroque stuff, 18th century gilt and everything. My.God, •.I'd have gone crazy! I lintC;' French furniture. But I do like Wiite." ; She nlso likes black • clothes to set ott her blondness, but for a week or so after finishing a picture she goes around in sweater and slacks to .rclnx from (he fussy requirements of -the screen. About twc- thirils of Miss Louise's roles in five years have been in period costumes, which she doesn't mind '.especially, except that from now. on 'she hopes ot be given seme sure-enough net- ing to do. • She won't talk about roinnnce, but Hollywood expects ,nn announcement any day, npyr, of her engagement to Maurice Adler, a writer at Metro. : 301,787 Visitors'to.-Rainier MOJJNT RANIEB NATIONAL PARK,. Wash.•: (UP) ..— Travelers from 22 fcrcion countries, five United Stales possession^" nnd the 48 slates and the District of Columbia were among the 361,187 visitors to the park this year. It was Ihc second largest nvimbcr of visitors in history. • . Sounds produced by the luimnn voice usually have n wave length ranging from one to eight feet. Some singers have produced sounds with a wave length ot 18 feel. "NOBODY'S HOME YET! "MOTOR WOULVNT START THEWS USING LOW-TEST CAS AGAIN" The kid's right! it's a safe bet chat tlie^asolinc in the rank is nor "hot" cnoiigli when any ea• gine—in good mechanical condition—begins giving starting ttouble as the weather gees colder. It's an even safer bet that Phillips 66 Poly Gas will give you extra fast s/artiitg even on coldest days . . . because this sensa. lional gasoline is extra high test! Besr of all, Phillips 66 Poly Gas costs nothing extra, since Phillips is the WORLD'S LARGEST PRODUCER of natural high test gasoline. Why nor get a demonstration in your own car of the difference this lively motor fuel will make? Check how it 'does .away with starting ttouble. Note the faster warm-up. The improvement in power and pick-up. The "gain in smoother running. Besides, mileage is increased by the sharp reduction in the need for wasteful choking. Find out fjotv to'riin your car Jar leu /fjis'iniiteriiy getting a Phillips 66 Poly Gas, at ariy Orange and Black 66 Shield. Phillup with; Phillips for OF COMFORT WITH A MOORE HEAT With a Moore's Oil Circulating and Radiating Heater your heating troubles and worries: are over. In addition to supply ing. volumes oi Circulating heal, Moore's Healers also furnish ah abundance of Radiant heal. When more Radiant heat is desired — other than thai supplied through ihe Grille front doors, and both perforated ends of the healer — simply open the two faont doors of the heater. When these aUractive bright meial lined doors are open, Moore's Heater literally pours out radiant heat. Com* in — select your Moore's OH and Radiating Heater now. MOORE'S EEAT MULTIPLIERS INCREASE HEATING AREA 43% Note the half round heat multipliers thai completely surround Ihe inner construction. The openings at the bottom, top and sides allow air, as indicated by the arrows, to be continually drawn into Ihe air passage openings, thus assuring a constant flow of Circulating heat passing out the top of the heater, even when the feonl doors are open, Moore's heat multipliers provide improved efficiency and direct savings — Ihis feature multiplies the flat heating area approximately 451%—resulting in' morejieat from a smaller and more compact unit. HUBBARD FURNITURE CO. BLYTHEVILLE-SUNDAY, 12th AMERICAN LEGION OLD CAR DERBY $150 In Purses-50 Mile Race--$50 Gash Prizes ADMISSION 25c~FREE PARKING-NO EXTRA CHARGE

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